35 Burst results for "Souci"

"souci" Discussed on My true Self – Podcast für Deine emotionale Freiheit

My true Self – Podcast für Deine emotionale Freiheit

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"souci" Discussed on My true Self – Podcast für Deine emotionale Freiheit

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souci alzheimer giancana Remodel Allston hamas Heinsohn Zohar Brady moss utah Van nuys
More Than 700 Civilians Killed By Myanmar Junta Since Coup

WBUR Programming

01:48 min | 1 year ago

More Than 700 Civilians Killed By Myanmar Junta Since Coup

"Civilian leader on San Souci was hit with another criminal charge by the military this time for allegedly breaching covert 19 restrictions under the country's natural disaster management law. Souci, who has been detained since the February 1st coup now faces six criminal charges altogether, as well as lengthy prison sentences. Meanwhile, more than 80 people were killed by security forces on Friday. It's the largest single death toll in weeks, Yet protesters are still trying to reverse the military coup. Some say it has left me and more on the brink of collapse. Reporter Michael Sullivan spoke with a woman who has lived through several crackdowns in Myanmar and a warning this story contains graphic descriptions of violence. University of Washington professor Mary Callahan has had a front row seat watching me and Mar descend into chaos. Her neighborhood in the commercial capital Yangon. Ah, hot spot for protests and the crackdowns that follow seeing from my condo balcony. People fleeing Into the spider web of streets in the neighborhood and soldiers chasing them in then random shootings and the terrorizing Of the people on the streets every night. Her routine the past few months has included a nightly walk around the neighborhood just before sundown and nightly chats with some of the young people. They all know me and they all know I speak for my knees. And it's like they wait for me to show me Grisly pictures and videos of things. They took or they pulled off Somehow, social media even though they no longer have no bio data. Mobile data was cut

San Souci Souci Mary Callahan Michael Sullivan Myanmar University Of Washington Yangon
Myanmar's Ambassador to the U.K. Locked Out of London Embassy

Fresh Air

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar's Ambassador to the U.K. Locked Out of London Embassy

"Myanmar's ambassador to London says he's been locked out of the country's embassy His deputy reportedly has been taken has taken over the embassy in behalf of Myanmar's ruling military junta. NPR's Frank Langfitt has the story from London Quads are men stood outside the embassy in London's wealthy Mayfair section, unable to access the building amid a small crowd of protesters and Bridget police officers. I've been locked out, he told Reuters. It's kind of a coup in the middle of London. You can see that they occupy my building since the military staged a coup in February. The ambassador has broken with the ruling junta, who called for the release of detained civilian leader on Sans Souci. On this day, troops in Myanmar opened fire on pro democracy protesters, local media reports They killed at least 15 people and wounded dozens. Activists say that about 600 civilians have died at the hands of security forces

Myanmar London Frank Langfitt Bridget Police NPR Mayfair Reuters Sans Souci
Several More Coup Protesters Killed in Myanmar

Morning Edition

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Several More Coup Protesters Killed in Myanmar

"In Myanmar. The military junta has declared martial law in parts of Yangon, the country's largest city. Now the move follows one of the most lethal crackdowns by security forces against protesters since February, 1st when the military seized control of the government. Local media say nearly 40 people were killed Sunday. Now, despite this protesters were out on the streets again Today reporter Michael Sullivan joins us now from neighboring Thailand. Michael the government seems very motivated on putting an end to these demonstrations. What's the latest? They are motivated. But there were more demonstrations again today as you mentioned in Yangon in Myanmar, second city, Mandalay and elsewhere, and there are reports of more protesters killed by security forces again today as well This after yesterday's violence, the younguns suburb of linked our yard where security forces used live ammunition against protesters, killing dozens. And where several Chinese owned or managed factories were set on fire. It's not clear by whom, though state run media claims protesters prevented firefighters from reaching some of those factories, the Chinese Embassy said. Several of its citizens were injured in those fires and ask the military to protect Chinese property and its citizens, and the Hunter has responded by declaring martial law in length Dario and five other townships. Do we know why those factories were set on fire? No, there is this perception shared by many in Myanmar. I think that China has been largely supportive of the coup makers and hasn't really called out the military for seizing power is the U. S. And Great Britain and others have done And that's really frustrating. Too many Indian mark trying to get this cool overturned and this anti Chinese feeling is real enough that after these fires, according to Reuters, Hi. One advised Taiwanese companies Indian mark to fly the island's flag outside their businesses to avoid being mistaken for mainland China owned businesses. Still no word, though, from depose civilian leader on son Souci since her arrest of February 1st up it's Saturday, a high ranking official member of her party, the National League for Democracy, urged protesters You continue to resist, Michael, is this having any effect? It doesn't seem to be. I mean, the party's acting vice president has been in hiding along with many other NLD leaders, and he surfaced on video on Saturday, calling this the darkest moment for the nation and urged the NLD supporters and Myanmar's ethnic minority groups, some of whom have armed wings who've been fighting against the military for decades. Come together and continue what he called this revolution. But the speech doesn't seem to have gotten much traction among the protesters or the ethnic minority groups and the demonstrators don't need any more encouragement there Disobedience movement and a general strike. Have already brought much of the economy to a halt.

Myanmar Yangon Chinese Embassy Michael Sullivan Mandalay Michael Thailand Dario China Hunter NLD Souci U. National League For Democracy Britain Reuters
Myanmar using martial law to 'legitimize' tactics

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar using martial law to 'legitimize' tactics

"District's of the main city. Young gone as they try to stamp out continuing protests against last month. Military coup Steve Jackson has the latest form or townships have been placed under tight military control today, in addition to two, where martial law was imposed on Sunday on the violence has continued. Eyewitnesses say several protesters were killed by an explosion in the northern town of me Union on another is said to have died after being hit by a rubber bullet. New court proceedings have begun against mere Mars elected leader Aung San Souci, who was ousted in the coup, she's accused of accepting gifts of gold in large quantities of cash illegally. Supporters say the claims of fabricated and intended to undermine the widespread public support. She still has Tens of thousands of women are marching in 40

Steve Jackson Aung San Souci
Escalating violence ups pressure for Myanmar sanctions

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Escalating violence ups pressure for Myanmar sanctions

"Have again used force to disperse anti coup protesters. It comes a day off to the U. N special envoy coach the Security Council to take action to quell gentle violence that has left around 50 peaceful protesters dead and scores injured this week. Large protests have occurred daily across many cities and towns. Security forces are responding with a great use of lethal force and mass arrests. Theo escalation of violence has put pressure on the World Community Toe Act to restrain the gentle which seized power on February 1st by ousting the elected government of unsung Souci. I'm Sarah passes

Security Council U. Theo Government Of Unsung Souci Sarah
Myanmar faces more protests after U.N. envoy urges action

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:08 min | 1 year ago

Myanmar faces more protests after U.N. envoy urges action

"Protests continue across Myanmar more than a month after the military took control there. The military has responded to those protests with tear gas, rubber bullets, stun grenades and live bullets more than 50 people have died. Reuters reports that protesters have begun to string up women's clothing on lines across the streets to try to slow down police and soldiers. Security forces have arrested more than 1000 people. Including man Marsh, civilian leader on some sushi she has had to trial appearances. Both have been closed to the public and Attorney has not been able to meet with her since her arrest. That attorney is Ken Mang Jaw. He joins us now from Myanmar. Thanks so much for being with us. Yes, Yes. Thanks. How do you represent a client that you haven't been able to meet with? It's a must that I have to meet with her because we're doing that client and the lawyer. There must be a private meeting to give constructions like this. If the intensity my clan doesn't have that chance, there will be injustice. What do you make of the charges? Because I read them through. And they seem to boil down to the fact that she had six walkie talkies. Yes, we'll lose six walkie doggies found in our residents when the police raided there she was charged for illegally in boarding those six countries. And this again charge is for breaching the instructions on the communications concerning with those six walkie talkies. Why is it against the law to use the walkie talkie in Myanmar? This new specific regulations about rocky doggies? But if someone use and Elektronik applies is that bus and must apply for that instrument? As I'm sure I don't have to tell you on some sushi has been under a lot of criticism, of course in the West and at home because of her silence on the massacre of the Rohingya people. How is she viewed in Myanmar today? At this moment, she is the victim off the middle. She use a vision off power. That's why I have to stand for her. And moved off the people in a country stand for her. I understand. You served nine years in prison under the previous military regime. Yes. May I ask, sir? Do you feel safe now? I don't feel safe. But it's my duty to stand for dogs and city and also for the students and demonstrators that has bean put on trial representing for them. Yeah. Do you believe that Anson Souci can receive a fair trial? On Santa Jesus. No chance Fed fire. He cannot get legal assistance hey, is now kept in communicator. He can not get open trial. But as a lawyer I have to trust that judicially so I am hoping for the best, but I prepare for the worst. And the worst would be more violence. Maybe maybe Do you think the trial will bring more people out in public to protest in the military will crack down again. There's a possibility for this. What would you like people in the United States to know. Today the United States is in the full friend off liberty and democracy. Then government of the United States, together with its people help and assist in always, it means to regain our democratic ways and it was elected the government. In Monk's are is the attorney representing Myanmar civilian leader Ahn sang sushi or trial is scheduled to resume March 15 Qinglong, Joe. Thanks very much for being with us.

Myanmar Ken Mang Jaw Reuters Marsh Anson Souci Santa Jesus United States Ahn Sang Monk Qinglong JOE
Myanmar police fire tear gas, rubber bullets at protesters

Morning Edition

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar police fire tear gas, rubber bullets at protesters

"There are more protests today on the streets of Myanmar Police in the capital fired tear gas and rubber bullets at demonstrators who were continuing to denounce the country's military for seizing power a month ago. The U. N says at least 18 people were killed in clashes with security forces on Sunday. Me and Mars ousted leader Aung San Souci remains held on multiple charges.

Myanmar Aung San Souci
Myanmar police fire at demonstrators, killing 2

WBZ Afternoon News

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar police fire at demonstrators, killing 2

"In me and mar after police opened fire on protesters injuring 20 others. This is the worst violence in two weeks of protests since the military coup. CBS is Rami Inocencio reports, The generals and power are still holding civilian leader Aung Sung Sochi. Generals are vowing to hold free and fair elections and are now targeted by US, British and Canadian sanctions supporting people fighting for a return to democracy on Myanmar. Human rights watchers expect these protests to go on for a very long time, Tom Andrews, saying it could be in for a siege. As for Aung San Souci. Her next hearing is March 1st. But the hoods there really could detain her indefinitely. Remy Inocencio

Rami Inocencio Aung Sung Sochi CBS Tom Andrews Myanmar Aung San Souci United States Remy Inocencio
Myanmar police fire at demonstrators, killing two

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar police fire at demonstrators, killing two

"To have you with US. People took to the streets around me and Mara Day after security forces shot and killed two people at a demonstration in the country's second biggest city. Many of the protests is like those who killed our workers from the railway or truckers and civil servants who've been taking part in a civil disobedience campaign against the Genter. The funeral was also helped for a young woman who was killed by police in the capital Nappy towel on February the ninth two days before her 20th birthday. Her death was the first confirmed death amongst thousands of protesters who've rallied against the February 1st cute that toppled the elected government of unsound Souci when her body was released along motorized procession began a drive to the cemetery. In Yangon, Myanmar's biggest city, about 1000 demonstrators on it the woman under an

Genter Mara United States Yangon Myanmar
Anti-coup Myanmar protesters die after being shot by police

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Anti-coup Myanmar protesters die after being shot by police

"35 to anti coup protesters have been shot dead by police riot police in Myanmar, local media have reported. The shootings had occurred in Myanmar's second largest city, Mandalay, where tear gas water cannons and rubber bullets had been used on protesters earlier in the day, and he crew protesters in Myanmar's two largest cities also paid tribute to the young woman who died a day earlier after being shot by police during a rally against the military takeover. About. U S. State Department spokesperson Ned Price offered his government's condolences on reiterated calls on the military to refrain from violence against peaceful protesters. The military seized power earlier this month after detaining Nobel laureate Aung Sung Souci, saying elections in November were tainted by voting irregularities. I'm

Myanmar Mandalay S. State Department Ned Price Aung Sung Souci
Woman dies after being shot in head by police while protesting Myanmar coup

Hugh Hewitt

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Woman dies after being shot in head by police while protesting Myanmar coup

"Woman who was shot in the head by police last week during a protest against the military coup and Myanmar has died. A young woman was the first protester to be killed since me and Mars army seized power on February the first on detained the country's elected leader on San Souci. The demonstration turned violent when the security forces try to disperse protesters using water cannon, rubber bullets and live rounds. At least two other people were reported to have been critically wounded. The young woman who turned 20, while in a coma has become a symbol of resistance for protesters who wielded massive banners portraying her likeness during

Mars Army San Souci Myanmar Coma
Big protests across Myanmar as UN expert fears violence

BBC World Service

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

Big protests across Myanmar as UN expert fears violence

"Many thousands of people have gathered again in Myanmar's commercial capital, Yangon in some of the biggest protests yet against the military coup at the start of the month. Many protesters were carrying the picture of the deposed leader and Sans Souci, Our Southeast Asia correspondent Jonathan Head reports. The numbers are much larger than in recent days. Loosely organized civil disobedience campaign is hoping for a massive turnout to protest against the trial of Miss Souci. She's being prosecuted on two bizarre and trivial charges. In the process widely condemned as a sham aimed at disqualifying her from political office. The army has been deployed in force in many parts of the country. Soldiers have been conducting raids during the nightly Internet blackout to try to disrupt the opposition movement and arrest its leaders. Today's march will be a test of the military hunters promise to be patient with the

Jonathan Head Yangon Miss Souci Sans Souci Myanmar Army
Protests Persist In Myanmar Even As The Military Tightens Its Grip On Power

The World

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Protests Persist In Myanmar Even As The Military Tightens Its Grip On Power

"Saying they'll hand over authority to whomever wins. What they're not saying, though, is when that election will happen. Huge protests are still happening across me and marred by day and by night when police come to neighborhood searching for protesters to arrest Residents turn out banging pots and pans. Many people just want their democracy back. But Myanmar's ethnic minorities say this uprising needs to go much further as the world's Patrick win reports When Stella Naw was a little girl going to school in the hilly northern part of Myanmar, she learned all about the greatness of the Burmese, the country's dominant ethnic group. She learned about their ancient kings, how they built Golden temples and had mighty armies. That was fine. But what about her ethnic group, the kitchen with more than a million people, mostly living in the mountains? Well, the textbooks didn't say much about them at all about the kitchen people with about two lines. We were just learning as we were learning about some people who were extinct, already not totally extinct, the school, said. The kitchen where farmers who like to do this neat dance Stella says that was about it. We were nothing more than some cute people with not much history. This is how the country's military rulers who are all ethnically Burmese tend to see minorities as people who should just assimilate. Get out of the way. But in Myanmar more than a third of all people are minorities groups such as the Sean Kitchen Corin kn mon, wiry, kind Chen Rohingya. It is a very diverse place yet the army has been trying to colonize their indigenous lands for decades. Often brutally even blasting villages with fighter jets. I asked Elena, who is now a political writer and activist how her people the kitchen tend to feel about the army. Disgust, fear they feel disgust set off the military for all the human rights abuses that they have committed against the community members. Two weeks ago, when the general sees total power in a coup rolling tanks through major cities, including the Heartland where most Burmese people live, Stella gnaw and other minorities were like Yeah, looks familiar. I even have someone asking me how do you feel to lose their freedom? All of us sudden, like I never felt like we had the freedom to begin where, right? Myanmar is now in the throes of a huge uprising at people's uprising, with doctors and students and factory work per person. Strike everyday people standing up the tanks and riot cops and rarely has the whole country. All the racial groups been united United in anger at the military. For Stella. Naw, it feels pivotal, like okay, now, maybe we're all on the same page. This is an opportunity, maybe to help them understand a bit, but also, we can really hope and expect too much because they are so focused on releasing freeing often Sergi Aung San Suu cheat the most popular political leader in the country ever. Especially among the Burmese majority. She's backed by the US and for the past five years on sense, UCI has shared power with the Army until the coup That was the status quo. What many minorities are now telling their Burmese brothers and sisters is let's fight for a real democracy because that status quo For many, it was miserable. It's a village on fire the village once home to Rohingya Muslims following an army purge about three years ago. The army has violently driven more than one million Rohingya out of the country. Years. Nay Sandlin, a Rohingya activist, You know military is the one who committed the genocide against the Rohingya. So we have no reason to support this military coup. But he does say that for his people. The coup doesn't change much. Many already live under an apartheid like system. For example, most Rohingya can't vote. And, yes, he says, some Rohingya refugees did enjoy seeing on Sans Souci get ousted after all on San Souci did go to The Hague in 2019 to defend the army against charges of genocide. Niece. Unwin says that celebrating was just a knee jerk reaction. We informed them. This is not the right way to enjoy detention off society. We have to support the public movement, even if we don't want to support heart or the whole party. They take the long view. He says that the army will never change its ways. But maybe in the future elected officials might begin to stick up for the Romanian. So now in refugee camps, you can hear this growing in survivors of genocide, beating pots and pans in solidarity with Burmese protesters. Nation. Lin is even seeing Burmese people who never stood up for the Rohingya saying Sorry we should have done something they realized their cruelty off this military. And they have the sympathy for us. But like Stella, non, he knows racism won't just go away overnight. This racism is deeply rooted in the country, so it will take a lot of time to change. Only they don't have time. This mass resistance is happening now. And Stellan Aw says it needs to become a more inclusive fight, not just for democracy, but to get the army off. Minorities backs once and for all. That's what brings kitchen people out on the streets in her hometown machina. You see fewer protest signs about Aung San Souci, and more that say, Abolish the Constitution basically overhaul the entire system. But this is how security forces responded to that. Over the weekend, Paul getting a boat, a barrage of rubber bullet, Maybe some real bullets seemingly fired in the air. No confirmed casualties That's from a Facebook live stream. But the army keeps blocking the Internet nationwide, in part to keep the world from seeing these crackdowns. What's clear is that resistance is becoming very dangerous for everyone. That's why Stella Naw says the only solution is to stick together, so we need to work together for this country to work and not become a failed nation, which is already on the way Myanmar's minority groups know quite well, she says that this army will not back down easily. For the world. I'm Patrick Win. Francis Cyber Security Agency says several French entities have been breached in a hacking campaign. They say the G R U

Myanmar Army Stella Naw Chen Rohingya Stella Stella Gnaw United United Sergi Aung San Suu Nay Sandlin San Souci Patrick Elena UCI Sans Souci Unwin Stellan Aw Aung San Souci LIN United States
Over The Dystopia

Sidewalk Ghosts

06:05 min | 1 year ago

Over The Dystopia

"More big fan of science fiction right and who's happened and science fiction has is not about the future. It's about the now through different lens. And i get very frustrated with a lot of distance stories. You know the stories that are bout was miserable. The end times it's going to be this So when i look at the world. I see a lot of problems. You see a lot of harshness. Souci lot of this union and and disorder in distress. And and i thought often about the fact we don't have community places to have real exchanges and i've insert myself into those into those conversations. You know where. I don't agree with what they're saying. But i try to find ways sometimes to to sort of say. Hey i here. You're saying book. Let's actually have a dialogue about. Let's let's find some commonality and so far. I've walked away generally unscathed you know. There's there's usually resistance what are you doing. Why bother me but if you approach it the right way you actually find. Maybe not agreement at the dinner. You haven't swayed somebody else over but you've actually found a place to have a conversation and maybe you're nodding your head a little bit about what they're saying and maybe they're actually nodding in return which we don't get otherwise we've lost so many of these and replace them with memes and news feeds and mistakenly think that those actually activate that commonality at first impression of his resume it can be assumed. He's a man driven by list of temporal accomplishments. Yet as he shares of who he is and as we take the chapters of his introduction. It's easy to see the humility that resides within him with the mind that but what's to come thinker. He not only ponders of the world in which we're living but imagines the world where walking into he recalls. Simple moment years ago when i work more directly and in comic books and and i would get invited to stores signings autograph sessions instead of things and i got invited to this one in west texas think it was west texas this texas definitely somewhere texas big place and and you know was all full of myself and went to the store and nobody showed. Nobody like nobody cared. That i was there so i sat there for hours. Stacks of whatever it was assigned except for this one. Kit showed up and young. He had a couple of stories and maybe illustrations he had done. And i had nothing else to do so i just talked to the kid. Most of the day gave him pointers joked with them. This that and the other thing didn't think twice about it. And i had a driver that day because it was so far away west texas. The driver was sitting there that whole time. And we got back in the car at the end of the day and the driver turned to me. And i wasn't thinking about any of this and he said that kid will never forget this day for the rest of his life and as a pretty talking about you know he was making the point the fact i had given that kid attention and encouraged his doing but i had an intended. It wasn't like i was leaning into it but sometimes it's those at those things that maybe are just small gestures. You don't even think about but they they can make a hopefully they do make an impotent and they add up over time as opposed to well. I'm gonna do this big thing and speak programs big. Whenever baby steps and commonality he suggests speaks of how small or large the wakes of even our smallest gestures can radiate asks us to not get so caught up in our own accomplishments disappointments that we don't take time to truly see those around us. Perhaps he is gently challenging us giving us reason to look over the walls of a plausible dystopia future and as he does he releases. Each of us sincerely consider the links that bind us. I think that there's an inherent need for connection. And you owe it to yourself to discover that and if you can do that on your own through introspection or finding a philosophy finding a faith some type of therapy. If that's what's necessary cracked the code on yourself at no matter what point or stage you on your life. Well i'm fifty. whatever. I'm i'm past the point of doing that or i'm twenty. I'll still figure it out on my own home. Take the time to figure it out. You owe it to yourself and it's okay to be selfish in that way being separate is not worth it. Yes he has achieved a degree of success yet. When he speaks of his priorities he mentions no quest for wealth even admits his work is secondary to what he feels most important simply. His role was a loving father as a caring husband as a good friend and as a contributing citizen to this world in which we share so it is as we take a pause to absorb the voice of today's stranger. Now friend dan. My we open our hearts minds and actions pass any barriers. That just might be of our own making back to dan. I would say ask the person next to you. What matters to the most because when you understand that about somebody else you see yourself more clearly and then you. You understand them better. I think if we understand that and the answer is honest if we listen we truly listen. Go beyond the go beyond. I can't understand that now. There are all these factors these burdens that we carry. And it's hard to think about the other and not just within yourself. And i think every one of us can find something relatable and that's what we should aspire to

West Texas Texas DAN
Myanmar's Coup Leaders Level More Charges Against Ousted Leader Suu Kyi

Doug Stephan

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Myanmar's Coup Leaders Level More Charges Against Ousted Leader Suu Kyi

"More charges in Myanmar for ousted leader Aung Sung Souci, Her lawyer now says she is facing charges connected to a law that has been used to prosecute people who violated coronavirus restrictions that she was removed from office in a military coup more than two weeks ago, and protests have gone on in the

Aung Sung Souci Myanmar
Myanmar's Military Coup: How We Got Here

Morning Edition

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Myanmar's Military Coup: How We Got Here

"The country's civilian leader, Ahn Sung Souci, will remain in custody for another two days. The military staged a coup on February. 1st and people have been protesting it, but the big questions right now are why did the coup happened when it did? And what happens next? Here's NPR's Julie McCarthy. By the hundreds of thousands citizens armed only with indignation March daily against the military takeover. the escalating dangers, teachers, engineers and doctors in their scrubs demand that civilian rule be reinstated the country's defacto leader Aung Songs, Hoochie was arrested February 1st thwarting the decisive re election of her National League for Democracy. The U. N Human Rights Office is tracking more than 350 political and state officials, along with activists, journalists, monks and students who have been detained. Young gon based commentator Kinzel Win, says the atmosphere Feels like the upheaval of 1988 when the whole country went out to protest on the streets of Yangon just by comparison, at time, it ended badly. Some people shot and kills and the army taking over again. When says it is a once in a generation event, especially inflaming the young voters who came of age under me and Mars fitful transition to democracy. They don't want to even hear the name of that. C zero Power takeoff power historian thought Manu, author of the Hidden History of Burma, says over the past decade the Army had relinquished day today governing to an elected parliament. Ah hybrid arrangement that left to the generals in charge of security and believing that after surviving years of Western sanctions They were in a position of strength. But chief parliamentarian Long songs who achieved sought to change that governing model and the constitutional change she wanted was to have the army under the control of an elected government. And under the control of her and this has led to tension meant who says Souci was alert to the possibility the army would probe for an opportunity to overthrow her November's election set the stage. Souci refused to discuss any alleged irregularities at the polls, which the army claimed had reduced its share of oats. Generals took the refusal as an affront on do that feeling of disrespect comes after many years where they've also felt not properly consulted where she's had the limelight where she seeking to undermine this kind of set up that they've had over the past 10 years meant juices from the Army's point of view, the hybrid model might have worked with lesser luminaries. The generals didn't count on the 75 year old on songs. Hooches sustained Star power or that this daughter of Burma's independence hero had a taste for power that might sideline them. But she broke the mold and in a way what's happened this past week? Has been the end of that experiment to see if that system could work with her as well, innit? Kinzel Win says it's entirely possible that the Army never intended Maura than one term for young songs hoochie and they had to find every Ruthie can think of You keep her away, and now it has succeeded but meant who says it's not clear whether the generals will only be satisfied if Souci is permanently removed. The situation, he says, is difficult to read. Myanmar's military rulers have seized power during a pandemic, which has made the messiness of governing even Messier. People are hungry and financially hurting, and now they stand on balconies, banging pots and pans furious over losing their democratic experiment. Julie McCarthy. NPR news

Ahn Sung Souci Julie Mccarthy Aung Songs U. N Human Rights Office Kinzel Win Army Souci National League For Democracy Hoochie Myanmar NPR Yangon Long Songs Manu Parliament Kinzel Maura Ruthie Messier
"souci" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"souci" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Souci Panda is the chief medical officer for Stanford Blood Center. She says Early results from clinical trials show that donated plasma from people who have battled Cove in 19 is beneficial for other sick patients. So far, I think the data is Promising, Pandey says the best time to donate plasma is soon after someone recovers from Cove in 19, because that's when they're antibody levels are the highest but that's not possible for gay men. During the AIDS crisis in the 19 eighties, the Food and Drug Administration determined it was too dangerous for men who were having sex with other men to donate blood. The lifetime ban was shortened to a year of celibacy in 2015. And then reduced to three months last April, which is still a problem, according to California state Senator Scott Weiner. The FDA is blood donation ban is 100%. Driven by fear, ignorance and outdated stereotypes about gay and bisexual men. The FDA argues that their position is based on the best available evidence. An agency spokesperson wrote in a statement that wall blood supplies screening is highly sensitive. Small risk of HIV transmission still exists. There is absolutely nothing a scientifically that justifies this ban. Dr. Monica Han is an HIV specialist at the University of California, San Francisco. She says. Back in the eighties, it took several months to know if you contracted HIV after a sexual encounter. That's no longer the case weaken, very accurately detects the presence of HIV in patients about 10. Days after HIV transmission occurs, she says, requiring anything longer than 10 days without sex isn't necessary. So back in Los Angeles potential blood donors, Samuel Guarente Pate says it's unfair that he and his boyfriend would have to wait Someone whose justice sexually active but not a man having sex with men. You walk into any blood bank in America and give blood. The FDA is considering swapping out the three month celibacy requirement for a risk questionnaire, donors would answer questions about their sexual activity. Anybody who is not monogamous, gay or straight would have to wait. Garrett paid would gladly fill this out. All any of us want to do in life is help other people. Whether it's donating blood donating plasma. We're holding them back from making an impact on the world, he says. Science to drive health Policy not Homophobia for NPR NEWS I'm Lesley McClurg in San Francisco. Hmm. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Fossils have provided a detailed record of early human skulls, but not the brains inside them. So researchers are using genetic material taken from those fossils to study how the human brain evolved. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports on an effort to grow human brain cells containing an ancient gene. The gene is called Nova one. It's among the genes that have changed significantly since Neanderthals roamed the Earth. Alison Watery of the University of California. San Diego, says no one plays an important role in brain development so that Jean would be perfect to start measuring if they can change the way the brain develops to find out more tree and his team turned to brain organize, who are many brains? They're tiny spheres of human brain tissue that grow in the lab and mimic early brain development. But what he says existing organize on Lee had the modern version of the Nova one gene, so we swap their cake version for the modern version and the team started growing. Organize carrying this archaic gene. Lottery says they were clearly different. The archaic version off the gene changes the way the shape off these organ oId are formed. The surface of each sphere was uneven instead of smooth. Also watch, he says. Individual cells behave differently. The archaic version off the bring organ. Why do we see an Acela oration off moderation? So the NEOS we start to get more active at very early stages Compared to modern humans? A brain amateurs quickly is more capable at birth. But it's less likely to continue developing during childhood. The period when modern humans acquire important social skills more tree says There's probably a reason why humans with the new variant of Nova one survived. Well, those with the old version died out. It might suggest that some time doing evolution we acquired that mutation. And it brings us tremendous advantage to be able to have this complex brain later in life. That idea is consistent with what some other scientists have learned from studying ancient genes in a different way. Dr Karen Berman of the National Institute of Mental Health is part of a team that's been studying the Neanderthal genes that are still present in many humans, especially those of European and East Asian ancestry. It's very exciting to be able to use our knowledge of archaic Edna. To really explore what makes us who and what we are. Berman's says People with more Neanderthal genetic material tend to have skulls more like those of Neanderthals. And she says, there are hints that Neanderthal genes emphasized brain networks devoted to visual and spatial abilities rather than social interactions. It may have been The lack of these social networks that led to the Neanderthal dying out. Berman's research partner, Dr Michael Gregory, says it's easy to imagine how Neanderthal brains could have become outdated. If they went foraging for food or hunting. They could find their way back and forth to different places better. But they couldn't form groups quite as well in theory to fight common predators or something like that, and group cooperation has been critical to the success of modern humans. But Gregory is psychiatrist says all this research on ancient brains is about more than human history. The thing that drives us is Not just how did things happen to develop over time and over evolution, But also, how did they go awry? Ng cause neural psychiatric diseases and why Gregory hopes that by answering those questions, scientists will be able to develop better treatments for problems like schizophrenia and autism. The new research appears in the journal Science. Jon Hamilton NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Many Afghans escaped war by crossing the border into Iran. Then Iran became a covert hot spot, and they had to flee again back to Afghanistan. A lot of people were simply worried about.

Jon Hamilton Lesley McClurg Los Angeles 2015 Samuel Guarente Pate America 100% Souci Panda National Institute of Mental H Alison Watery Karen Berman Food and Drug Administration Earth Stanford Blood Center Afghanistan Iran Gregory Monica Han Berman Pandey
Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

"Joe Biden is using one of the preferred tools of his predecessor to punish military leaders in Myanmar sanctions. The U. S will freeze about $1 billion worth of Myanmar government assets held in the United States. Military leaders took control of the country in a coup earlier this month. Yesterday, Biden called for a return to democracy. They're the military must relinquish power it seized and demonstrate respect for the world of the people of Burma. As expressed in their November 8th election. The party of the deposed civilian leader on Song Souci swept those elections. She was detained in the coup, and for the past six days, protesters have filled streets throughout the country.

Myanmar Joe Biden Biden Song Souci United States
Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

Morning Edition

03:57 min | 1 year ago

Biden announces sanctions on Myanmar coup leaders

"One of the preferred tools of his predecessor to punish military leaders and millet Myanmar sanctions. The U. S will freeze about $1 billion worth of Myanmar government assets held in the United States. Military leaders took control of the country in a coup earlier this month and yesterday, Biden called for a return to democracy there. Military must relinquish power it seized and demonstrate respect for the world of the people of Burma. As expressed in their November 8th election. The party of the deposed civilian leader on Song Souci swept those elections. She was detained in the coup, and for the past six days, protesters have filled streets throughout the country. Reporter Michael Sullivan has been following the events in Myanmar and joins us now from his base in neighboring Thailand. Good morning, Michael Good morning. Who exactly do these new sanctions target? We don't know for sure, the administration says details will come later this week, but I think it's pretty safe to say the coup leader, Senior General Men online is at the top of the list, along with a small circle of subordinates, basically the same bunch probably who are sanctioned by the U. S and 2019. For their role in the brutal crackdown against the Muslim minority Rohingya Amid allegations of genocide. President Biden also said the sanctions might not be limited to just the generals but include family members and business interests, too. It's not clear if that meant the family's business interests or the military's like the two very, very large military, one companies involved in all sorts of businesses that jade trade Helicon banks, etcetera, some of which have foreign investors or partners, who came after Western sanctions started being lifted in 2012 at the beginning of what look, then to be the start of me and March transition to Democratic rule Well, Michael, Me and Mara is closer to China and other Southeast Asian countries than it is to the U. S. So considering that how effective can these U. S sanctions be? Yeah, well, that's a good question. When President Biden says he wants to work with international partners toe urge other nations to join in these efforts, But it's going to be a slog not just with China but with other countries in the region and beyond Singapore. Japan, Thailand all jumped in after the opening in 2012 in some cases earlier and there's lots of money to be made in Myanmar and a lot to lose by turning against the generals. About China. It might not be happy with the coup, either. It got along just fine without some shoot on some sushi and their party, and there are some reports the military thought Souci and China were getting on far too well. Myanmar's generals don't really trust China don't like it, in part because of their own long fight against communist insurgents, and even today. China is said to provide weapons to some of the minority ethnic groups fighting Myanmar's military for more autonomy. China like things the way they were with him, some Souci, the military maybe not so much. Since Biden announced the sanctions on Wednesday have the military leaders in Myanmar said anything about that. Not yet, but they haven't been very concerned by sanctions in the past. I don't see them starting now. And of course, with all these people protesting, there's the concern about what might the Myanmar military do? Will anyone get hurt? How has the military responded so far? With restraint of the beginning, and then in the middle. It sort of got a little worse on Tuesday after it issued its veiled warning to prevent acts that violate what it called state's ability, state stability In the rule of law. Things did turn ugly and several places with water cannon and rubber bullets used by police and several different cities. But things to have calmed down since so they're happened. More rests of political figures. Nighttime curfews are in place in some areas. The protesters are still coming out every day in big numbers, and I don't see that changing unless the military shuts it down, forcibly definitively, And that's the big fear, because they've done it before reporter Michael

Myanmar President Biden Song Souci China Biden Michael Sullivan Thailand Michael United States Mara Souci Singapore Japan
"souci" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"souci" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Julie America Coming up, people take to the streets of Myanmar for a second day in a row to protest against the military coup once more, they poured in along the main road from the north of Yangon. Mainly younger men and women, many dressed in the red color of the National League for Democracy and many holding up pictures of unsound Souci. Donald Trump's impeachment trial in the US Senate kicks off tomorrow. His supporters are upbeat. I think he is incredibly serious about continuing his political involvement, and should he decide to run in 2024? I think you'd be almost impossible to beat and mission to Mars. Scientists gear up for three new missions to the Red Planet's orbit. It's all here on weekend after the latest World News Hello. This is Danielle yellow of yet scout with the BBC News. Tens of thousands of people in Myanmar have protested for a second day against the recent military coup and in support of the ousted leader, Aung San Souci. Many gathered in the main city of Yangon is Jonathan head reports. Once more, they poured in along the main road from the north of Yangon, mainly younger men and women. Then he dressed in the red color of the National League for Democracy, the party whose government was overthrown last Monday, and many holding up pictures of uncertain Souci, the party leader, who was still in military custody. So far, the military authorities are not stopping this show of mass defiance, but everyone assumes they will try before long Internet services have been blocked to the points that mama is now almost cut off from the rest of the digital world. Get people are still finding ways to get images and video of their protests out. In video taken in the southeastern city of morality Shots are heard as police broke up a demonstration. Early trials suggest the Oxford AstraZeneca.

Yangon National League for Democracy unsound Souci Donald Trump Aung San Souci Myanmar uncertain Souci Julie America Oxford AstraZeneca Danielle yellow Senate US Jonathan head BBC
"souci" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"souci" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Our elections. Cyber attacks Poisonous citizens are over. We will not hesitate to raise the cost on Russia and defend our vital interest in our people. And We will be more effective in dealing with Russia. When we work in coalition In coordination with other like minded partners. Political motivated jailing from Alexey Navalny. Russian efforts to suppress freedom of expression and peaceful assembly. Our matter of deep concern to us and the international community. Mr Navalny, like all Russian citizens is entitled to his rights under the Russian Constitution. He's been targeted. Targeted for exposing corruption. He should be released immediately and without condition. Biden's comments on Russia coming as you had asserted abroad reset of American foreign policy, including reversing Trump's order to withdraw U. S troops stationed in Germany. Ending support for Saudi Arabia is military offensive in Yemen and promising to support LGBT Q rights as a cornerstone of diplomacy. The U. N. Security Council strongly back to return to democracy in Myanmar and has called for the immediate release of Aung Sung Souci and all those arbitrarily detained in the coup and its first statement on the military's ouster of the government, The U. S most powerful body stressed the need to uphold democratic institutions. And, uh, democratic institutions and processes. The members of the Security.

Alexey Navalny Russia Aung Sung Souci U. N. Security Council Saudi Arabia Myanmar Yemen Biden Trump Germany
"souci" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"souci" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Ousted leader on San Souci have called for a campaign of civil disobedience against the military government, which seized power on Monday. Many doctors and medical workers say they won't cooperate with the authorities. Jonathan head has the latest. The military has started releasing politicians from the former ruling party, the National League for Democracy. But is not yet freed. Its leader on Sans Souci, an 11 member council has been formed to run the country headed by the armed Forces Commander General Men online. Many believe it was his ambition on fear over what would happen to him after retirement this year, which drove him to launch this coup. One of the Hunters First Act was to issue a warning to journalists and citizens not to post anything on social media, which might stir up unrest. Scientists from the World Health Organization who visited a virology institute in the Chinese city of Luke Han, which some U. S officials have said, may have been the source of the Corona virus pandemic. Of a chaotic scenes outside the building as the W H o motorcade arrived, and security officers pushed back journalists. The former head of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, is due to hold talks with Italy's president today with the expectation that he'll be invited to form a new government. Attempts to rebuild a coalition collapsed following the resignation of the prime minister, just epic contest last week mark Low in reports in the grip of the pandemic and the worst economic crisis in decades. Italy's president says the country needs ah high profile government, and so he summoned one of the highest profile Italians of all marry or drag E with the expectation that he will be asked to form it. If he accept Mr Draghi would try to put together a broad government to avoid early elections on stabilized the use third largest economy. It will, though, be a tough task to bridge divisions between political leaders that have only deepened since the conflict government collapsed. The Russian authorities have detained a further 1200 protesters in Moscow and ST Petersburg during demonstrations on Tuesday in support of the Russian opposition activist Alexi Navalny. He's been sentenced to 2.5 years in prison. Mr. Navalny's campaign team has called for the demonstrations to continue from Moscow. His Sarah Rainsford as the ruling against Aleksei Navalny was announced. Riot police were deployed in central Moscow in huge numbers long lines on all the main streets and squares close to the Kremlin. Protesters who marched shouting freedom for Navalny and Putin resign were vastly outnumbered. More than 1000 were detained in Moscow alone in court yesterday, the opposition needed they support her denounced the move to imprison him as purely political. Attempts to frighten other dissenters into silence. Well, these from the BBC. The BBC has obtained firsthand accounts which described women being raped and tortured in China's camps for weaker Muslims. The women said they were detained for months and electrocuted by masked guards. In a statement, the Chinese government said it was committed to protecting women's rights. Independent estimates suggest more than a million people are held in the camps. The government in the French Pacific island territory of New Caledonia has collapsed following violent protests against the proposed sale of a Brazilian owns nickel plant. Pro independence politicians in the coalition government have resigned. They said A local bid for the factory was unfairly rejected in favor off a foreign led consortium. Religious leaders in Haiti have demanded that President Jovan Elmo ease leave office on Sunday when they say his term ends. In a statement, the country's Roman Catholic Church said no one is above the law and the president should respect the constitution. Mr Murray's, insists he has a year left in his term and will not resign. The Mexican government has requested that the international auction house Christie's suspend the sale of more than 30 artifact that predates Spanish colonization in the Americas. I need you to be sold in Paris next week. Mexico says the treasures belong to the country's heritage. Daniel Wittenburg has the details. Mosques, plate sculptures and other figures from Aztec, Mayan, Toltec and mixed at cultures. The listings display Mexico's diverse national heritage. Some of the relics currently kept by French collectors are expected to fetch more than a million dollars in Paris next week. But the Mexican government described them a sacred and insisted that shouldn't be trade in national treasures. Its foreign Ministry is attempting to retrieve the objects through diplomatic channels. Thought French law will, however, prohibit any interference in the private transactions. ABC News Many thanks. Indeed. For the latest, this is Do you stay with Lawrence on declare on the way to big voices reflecting on the jailing of Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny and also in about 10 minutes time. Another major investigation by the BBC into the campus system imprisoning although China says they're re educating the Muslim minority, weaker people, horrific details, allegations of rape and torture in the camps for the weakest a latte on the way on the sport and the business. That's news Day. Let's starts in Russia because Boris Johnson has become the latest world leader to Cannes to demand that.

Aleksei Navalny Moscow BBC president Mexican government Mario Draghi Italy National League for Democracy San Souci Chinese government China Paris Jonathan head Sans Souci Mexico ABC President Jovan Elmo World Health Organization French Pacific island Haiti
"souci" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"souci" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Hong Kong, threatening to knock down doors to force people to get the mandatory covert test also has issued a statement saying it may take legal action, including approval to break into forcibly housing. Biden administration looking seriously adoptions of sanctions against me and Mar the U. S government officially labeling it a coup today and says that it is wrong. It is working with the Japan and India which have better contact than it does with me and Mar. Britain is demanding to be able to talk directly with Aung San Souci and threatens to cut assistance. President Joe Biden has signed a trio of executive orders today dealing with undoing Trump immigration policies. First executive order creates a task force chaired by the secretary of Homeland Security to reunify film in families. Which will work across government to find parents and Children separated by the prior administration. House spokeswoman Jen Psaki saying the pain of separation needs to stop the head of the U. S coronavirus task force that Jeff San says he is finding ways to get more doses of vaccine. A vials now contain the syringe required. To enable a 20% increase in the fives. Reduce S O that will increase the number of doses also says pharmacies will be getting vaccine directly from the administration and space X Deep Space Starship Test today, going up No problem coming down for a soft landing lets the vehicle vertical, then transition to one engine for the landing burn. Well that fireball. One of those engines appeared not to ignite went nose first at an angle into the ground. This one did have FAA approval. By the way, the first in December did not in San Francisco. I'm Ed Baxter. This is Bloomberg. Unmanned..

President Joe Biden Hong Kong Aung San Souci executive Jeff San Jen Psaki Ed Baxter San Francisco Bloomberg FAA Britain Japan India U. S
"souci" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:17 min | 1 year ago

"souci" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Military takes control of the country and its leader and sank. Souci is taken back into custody. Along with other political leaders. They declare a state of emergency for one year. So why a coup? And why now, Tens of thousands of Russians took to the streets in protest of the weekend. What started off as rallies in support of the jailed opposition leader, Alexia Navalny seems to have solidified into a a new movement against President Putin. The uses. AstraZeneca will not supply an additional nine million covert vaccine doses after days of criticism of the blocks Vaccination program will get to the bottom of vaccine nationalism in our business news, Aunt also sport as well. Alistair Ross will be here at the publishing house, putting great works by great British black authors back on the shelves. I am Neil Nunes with the BBC News. The armed forces in Myanmar have seized power after they detained the country's elected leader on San Souci and all the senior members off the governing party. Statement on the army's television station said All authority had been given to the top military commander general mean on Klein one year state of emergency has been declared. Is Jonathan head. Why are you getting information from the military? In Mainz City areas like Yang gone. Things are pretty calm. People are actually focusing on try to get food and money out of 80 machines, which seemed to stop working and We're hearing nothing at all from the political capital naked or where the core part of this coup took place in the early hours of the morning, and where we believe in San Souci and all of her leadership allies in the National League for Democracy are being held in detention by the military. Where power is now being in effect, transferred to the armed forces Command him in a line. You know that everyone's poised in Myanmar waiting to see what the military intends to do with this one year in power that is has given itself The United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres strongly condemned the detention of on Sans Souci and other civilian leaders in Myanmar. He called in the military to respect the will of the people. The United States said it was opposed to any attempt to alter the outcome off the recent elections and would take action against those responsible for impeding democracy. Australia's Prime minister Scott Morrison called for all civilian leaders who have been detained unlawfully to be released. I'm aware of those troubling reports in the foreign minister has been following the very closely knife. The details have gotta say a very limited communications that reportedly kept on it's still relatively early in Myanmar. We've been a longstanding supporter off man Mars Democratic transition. The authorities in Hungary are facing a major challenge with nearly 200 restaurants and bars, threatening to reopen today in protest at what they say are unfair coronavirus restrictions. The government has asked the hospitality industry to show patience, saying the current lockdown measures needs to remain in place on too far more Hungarians are vaccinated. Nick Thorpe is in the capital Budapest. There's growing frustration among restaurant and bar owners in Hungary about the coronavirus lockdown. Many have closed some of partially open for takeaways, but customers could be fined for drinking or eating just a few meters from the door. Yet primary schools, kindergartens and shopping malls remain open and shops a pact with consumers Before the 7 P.m. closing time, your band government has reduced certain taxes and said it will pay half the wage bill. Donors reply that they've received nothing and many a close to bankruptcy. BBC news Tighter border restrictions imposed by the French government. Because of concerns about new veterans of coronavirus have come into force spot. The authorities have again resisted a fresh nationwide lockdown. French Prime Minister John Kostecki said all but essential travel from outside the EU is now banned while testing requirements on travelers from within the EU has been tightened. The European Commission says the drug firm, AstraZeneca will now supply on additional nine million covert vaccine doses to the EU by March. But the $40 million is now expected are still only about half of what had been hoped amid continuing problems with supply. The announcement follows a public round between the commission and the pharmaceutical firm and days of criticism off the blocks Vaccination program. They arrested Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai has appeared in court in a bitch to win bail in the first major legal challenge to a sweeping national security law Beijing imposed on the city last year. Mr Lai is one of dozens of democracy supporters arrested under the new law since it was enacted in June. The world's first biofuel rocket has been launched by a company in the U. S. State of Maine, the first test flight by Blue Shift. Aerospace used a 6 M Long rocket, which was propelled a kilometer into the air. You get more details in this report from Terry Egan. Backed by grants from NASA. The main goal of the small company behind the rocket is to provide a cleaner way of sending up smaller payloads. So two satellites The aim is to reduce the environmental impact cost and turnaround times of launches, such as these and blue shift aerospace is working towards a rocket using bio fuel that can lift a payload of 30 kg to low earth orbit. That's the latest BBC World News. Makes sense, buddy. Thanks indeed. Welcome back to new state with Lawrence and Claire on the way, obviously the latest from Myanmar. We've got a range of voices for you Pretty. Our correspondent standing by also will be talking about Russia around 5000. Russians have woken up in jail this morning following mass protests and support of Alexei Navalny. It would seem that the protesters are not going away despite what's being unleashed on them. Will have the.

Myanmar BBC San Souci Alexia Navalny AstraZeneca Souci Hungary Sans Souci EU Jimmy Lai Neil Nunes National League for Democracy President Putin government Alistair Ross Prime Minister John Kostecki United States Russia Jonathan head
"souci" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

Stories Philippines Podcast

04:53 min | 2 years ago

"souci" Discussed on Stories Philippines Podcast

"Began. Knee I hate threats Agai Mingo. The! Mobile being. Can you honey Eric Young SOUCI. Said throw raining bedside table. Not Sonya unluckily. Walk in closet door. But Boston Eighty. Megan sound. My Shallow Lobe to Jacome and on Mir on the oneida knuckle Ostlund in. Malaysia who sacked abandoned been a milestone..

Agai Mingo Eric Young SOUCI Jacome Sonya Mir Megan Malaysia Boston
"souci" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

10:36 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on KTOK

"Back to coast to coast, David Souci with us, David the other plane that crashed in October, a similar 737 max eight can you tell us a little bit more about that? That was a lion air airplane. It also is a newer airplane. It was the max eight, of course. And how it's it was determined that what caused the crash on that one was that. There was a angle of attack indicator. And what that does is tell you just what how the aircraft is approaching the wind. That's coming at it. In other words, it's not just whether the angles up or down. It's how it's upper down related to the wind. So what that tells you is a good indication of whether you're about ready to stall the airplane or not and a stall. Of course, would give you an abrupt drop in the aircraft. So. As a circling airplane was flying. It was a radical the angle of attack indicators giving all kinds of different readings back to this system that we referred to earlier as the m the maneuvering caracteristics augmentation system so bad data coming in. It's trying to respond to it. And it saying, hey, the aircraft is way up to high. I need to push the nose down. So it does. And then the pilot all Houston says that the nose is going down for no reason whatsoever. And so this continued to happen, and they fought and fought and fought the airplane. It would try to go down and they would push back Quebec. And then it would also correct itself. And so they'd be lifting the airplane. It had to push it down. So it went back and forth and looking at the data from the black box shows clearly that this angled attack indicated was giving bad or Rania signals. Ultimately, the aircraft was going nose up. The power was full forward on the airplane. They were still trying to keep the aircraft going, and then it ended up in what? We call a flat spin, which is a power on stall the powers on the airplane airplane still trying to fly, but there's not enough window or none of air over the top of the wing to create lift, and then it falls dramatically, and then ultimately crashed killing one hundred eighty nine people Neva. Why wasn't there an outcry by investigators to ground these planes at that point? Well, there what Boeing came back with his said, we we do know what this problem is in in in an unprecedented move, usually what happens on these aircraft accidents. They'll wait until they get a report back from the DSP or from the regulatory body. They don't want to admit guilt right away. Right then. And they'll say, hey, we're going to wait and see what they find. We will react to it appropriately. Well, Boeing didn't do that. In this case, they they saw what was happening. It was kind of odd. How quickly they knew what happened. And then they then they said we've got some software fixes we're gonna put those out they'll be done in a few months. Now, remember they've had not remember. But I wanna make sure everybody understands that this occurrence had happened before and pilots responded to it appropriately. In other words, the angle of attack indicator had failed aircraft previous flights and it recovered in this case at lion air, they did not get occurred in it and it crashed the airplane. I thought was at the time with which was back in November Tober November. And I think the thought at the time was that was an experienced or hadn't had the training that he needed. So a big outcry went out about that. And so they and came back and said, yeah, we should have given more training. We should have let people know what was going on with this airplane, which they didn't. And so now we're going to make up for that. We're going to train pilots gonna teach them what to do. And and there was a lot of training went on. They went out, and actually every aircraft that was out there that had the system on it. They looked at the angle of attack indicators, they tested the process. Yes that they use to test. These angles attack indicators many were replaced with newer models and make sure that this didn't occur again. So they felt that the the mitigation measures that they had taken were adequate enough to to ensure that it was still a safe airplane. There's still nothing wrong with this training and is tests that they did would wouldn't have fixed. So it was a level of confidence at the time that safety management system that they had in place adequate. So there wasn't outcry. They responded to it in what they felt was inappropriate way. But clearly if this turns out that Ethiopia had the same the same problem, and it seems that with adequate it seems that way I had to call my Bank today David because their app wasn't working. They changed it a couple of weeks ago. And this time, it's horrible. You you sign in and you get into your count. And then the next button you hit. It says there's an error and you have to take the software app. Off in reinstall it and then a works. But then it breaks down again on the second try all the time. So I ended up calling the IT department. I said have you gotten any other calls about this since like the pilots have complained and they said, yeah, we're getting a few. Now, why does it take us to tell them that? That's a really good really good process. And that is what happens it takes a long time for people to realize why the things are happening. And I believe I believe that this is a phenomenon that I've seen within the airlines within other industries as well. But in my business, what happens is people become overconfident. And in what they have. In other words, say in this case with these Ethiopia and with lion Air Boeing may become overconfident systems and said, look, we we know that we've got a good safety management system. We've assess the risk, and here's how we're going to mitigate it and you become overconfident. You think you think things are fixed? When you what you really need to do is a deeper self examination and say is it really fixed is this are we meeting the same level of safety that we initially intended to do when we built the airplane. Do you think the team at Boeing that created the software that now is? Desperately trying to fix it. In regard to the new software. They knew right away. Something was wrong. Yeah. Because they had the data available to them. In in developing safety systems, we design engineering, and and the probability of failure to tend to the minus nine safety factor. And what that means is that didn't in the mind as nice as a very very very very small tolerance for any kind of failure. And how they get to that number is with double and triple redundancy. They they make sure that if something fails there's a backup system for that. And if that fails backup system for that. And so, and then you calculate in probability of any kind of failure on top of that. Now, that's pretty simple to do. It's not that simple. It's still is rocket science, really. But it's you can do it. You can come up with those calculations now when you're talking about software. It's a little bit different. In software the probability or the opportunity for failure comes down to every bit. That's in that software program. So to design software to tend to the minus night safety factor is. Almost impossible to do. And so, and it really has not been held to that close scrutiny. When you're talking about an engine installation. You're talking about the engine spinning you're talking about hydraulic systems that go back in power the controls that move it move the airplane. Those are physical things that you can look at and you can say what's the probability of failure. Here. What's the probability that the hydraulic line is going to leak it rubs up against site? All those things are physical software is not that way. And so it's really difficult to come up with a way to measure the safety of software. So that's a long way of answering your question, but I can't believe that in any of their probably thousands and thousands of tests before they even built the planes that the software issues didn't crop up. I keep believing that will they had to they had to have. And I think it comes down to the probability that the two factors would happen. One is that there would be a failure of the angle of attack indicator. Now, remember that the? Mm caste system. Did exactly what it was supposed to what was programmed to do. If you have a guy who's programming the system, and you have a different guy who's programming and building and designing and engineering angle of attack indicator. Those are two different people. Do they talk together? Do you say? Safety factor. I'm angle of attack indicator. I'm really proud of it. It's amazing machine. And then you do the same thing with the well when you put those together you've just doubled the complexity you've doubled the vulnerability you've made it where now you've got a whole another level of complexity that can fail. So did they look at that? Yeah, they're supposed to and they probably did. But somehow they said, well, if it fails if that England attack indicator fails, you have a backup system. What's the backup system will that the pilot would turn it off? They can turn the trim system off. And this thing doesn't happen. Where broke down they said, well, they made assumptions with engineering to get this ten in the minus nine few make safety assumptions, and those that were made were that the pilots would know how to turn it off have we gotten to technological David where we have to rely on software to help fly these planes and jets now, I'll tell you what it's an automated plane is a safer airplane in my mind. I really until this happens. Well until it doesn't. Yeah. Until it's not, you know at the risk of sounding like a Luddite here. I wanna make. Technology can get in the way. It does get in the way. And in fact, it is it accelerates so quickly that the human the ability of the human mind to understand all of the systems that are going on. I think we've exceeded that. I think we've gotten to a place now where it takes more capacity, mentally, and we're not evolved enough mentally to actually fly the airplane and know about every single system. So when they do design these airplanes, they designed it now where the only systems that are critical to be thinking about are on your display as a pilot. So what you see is. When you start taking off you won't see indications of your hydraulic pressure. Because it you're you're pressure. Doesn't mean anything until it starts getting too low right until the quantities vote, and you know, you have a leak so when that happens the system comes and says, hey, your hydro systems failing. So it starts thinking for you..

David Souci IT department Boeing Ethiopia lion Air Boeing Quebec Houston Rania England
"souci" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

11:01 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on 600 WREC

"And welcome back to coast to coast, David Souci with us, David the other plane that crashed in October, a similar 737 max eight can you tell us a little bit more about that? Yeah. That was a lion air airplane. It also is a newer airplane was the max eight, of course. And how it's it was determined that what caused the crash on that one was that. There was a angle of attack indicator. And what that does is tell you just what how the aircraft is approaching the wind. That's coming at it. In other words, it's not just whether the angles up or down. It's how it's upper down related to the wind. So what that tells you is a good indication of whether you're about ready to stall the airplane or not a stall. Of course, would give you an abrupt drop in the aircraft. So. As a circling airplane was flying. It was radical the angle of attack indicators giving all kinds of different readings back to this system that we referred to earlier as the m. Maneuvering caracteristics augmentation system. So with bad data coming in. It's trying to respond to it. And it saying, hey, the aircraft is way up to high. I need to push the nose down. So it does. And then the pilot all Houston says that the nose is going down for no reason whatsoever. And so this continues to happen, and they fought and fought and fought the airplane. It would try to go down, and then they would push back Quebec. And then it would also correct itself. And so they'd be lifting the airplane had to push it down. So it went back and forth and looking at the data from the black box shows clearly that this angled attack indicated was giving bad or Rania signals. Ultimately, the aircraft was going nose up. The power was full forward on the airplane. They were still trying to keep the aircraft going, and then it ended up in what we call a flat spin, which is a power on stall the powers on the airplane airplane still trying to fall fly, but there's not enough window or none of air of the top of the wing. To create lift, and then it falls dramatically, and then ultimately crashed killing one hundred eighty nine people. Why wasn't there an outcry by investigators to ground these planes at that point? Well, there what Boeing came back with his said, we we do know what this problem is in in in an unprecedented move. Usually what happens on these aircraft accidents is they'll wait until they get a report back from the TSP or from the regulatory body. They don't want to admit guilt right away. Right then. And they'll say, hey, we're going to wait and see what they find. We will react to it appropriately. Well, Boeing didn't do that in this case, they they saw what was happening. It was kind of odd. How quickly they knew what happened. And then they then they said we've got some software fixes we're gonna put those out they'll be done in a few months. Now, remember they've had not remember. But I wanna make sure everybody understands that this occurrence had happened before and pilots responded to it appropriately. In other words, the. The angle of attack indicator had failed aircraft previous flights and it recovered in this case lion air, they did not it it occurred in it and it crashed the airplane. I think that the thought was at the time with which was back in November Tober November. And I think the thought at the time was that the pilot was inexperienced or hadn't had the training that he needed. So a big outcry went out about that. And so they so Boeing came back and said, yeah, we should have given more training. We should have let people know what was going on with this airplane, which they didn't. And so now we're going to make up for that. We're going to train pilots teach them what to do. And and there was a lot of training and went on they went out, and actually every aircraft that was out there that had the system on it. They looked at the angle of attack indicators they tested the process that they use to test. These angled attack indicators many were replaced with newer models and make sure that this didn't occur again. So they felt that the the mitigation. Measures taken where adequate enough to to ensure that it was still a safe airplane. There's still nothing wrong with it the training and is tests that they did would wouldn't have fixed. So it was a level of confidence at the time that safety management system that they had in place with adequate. So there wasn't outcry. They responded to it and what they felt was inappropriate way. But clearly if this turns out that Ethiopia had the same the same problem, and it seems that with adequate it seems that we had to call my Bank today David because their app wasn't working. They changed it a couple of weeks ago. And this time, it's horrible. You you sign in and you get into your count. And then the next button you hit it says there's an error, and you have to take the software app off in reinstall it and then a works. But then it breaks down again on the second try all the time. So I ended up calling the IT department. I said have you gotten any other calls about this since? Like the pilots have complained. And they said, yeah, we're getting a few now. Why does it take us to tell them that? That's a really good really good process. And that is what happens it takes a long time for people to realize why the things are happening. And I believe I believe that this is a phenomenon that I've seen within the airlines within other industries as well. But in my business, what happens is people become overconfident. And in what they have. In other words, say in this case with these Ethiopia and with leeann Air Boeing may have become overconfident. Uh-huh. And said, look, we we know that we've got a good safety management system. We've assess the risk, and here's how we're going to mitigate it. And you know, you become overconfident, you you think things are fixed. And you what you really need to do is a deeper self examination and say is it really fixed is this are we meeting the same level of safety that we initially intended to do when we built the airplane. Do you think the team at Boeing that created the software that now is desperately trying to fix it? And you know bre Ri get to the new software. They knew right away. Something was wrong. Yeah. Because they had the data available to them. In in developing sixty systems, we design engineering and the probability of failure to tend to the minus nights safety factor. And what that means is that didn't in the minds. Nice is a very very very very small tolerance for any kind of failure. And how they get to that number is with double and triple redundancy. They they make sure that if something fails there's a backup system for that. And if that fails as a backup system for that. And so, and then you calculate in the probability of any kind of failure on top of that. Now, that's pretty simple to do. It's not that simple. It's still is rocket science. Really? But but it's you can do it. You can come up with those calculations now when you're talking about software. It's a little bit different because in software the probability or the opportunity for failure comes down to every bit. That's in that software program. So to design software to tend to the minus nights safety factor is. Almost impossible to do. And so, and it really has not been held to that close scrutiny. When you're talking about an engine installation. You're talking about the engine spinning you're talking about hydraulic systems that go back and power the controls. They move it move the airplane, those are physical things that you can look at and you can say what's the probability of failure. Here. What's the probability that the hydraulic line is going to leak it rubs up against right? All those things are physical software is not that way. And so it's really difficult to come up with a way to measure the safety of software. So that's a long way of answering your question, but I can't believe that in any of their probably thousands and thousands of tests before they even built the planes that the software issues didn't crop up. I can't believe it will they had to they had to have. And I think it comes down to the probability that the two factors would happen. One is that there would be a failure of the angle of attack indicator. Now, remember that? Mcat system did exactly what it was supposed to what is programmed to do. If you have a guy who's programming the system, and you have a different guy who's programming and building and designing and engineering angle of attack indicator. Those are two different people. Do they talk together? Do you say safety factor on the angle of attack indicator? I'm really proud of it. It's amazing machine. And then you do the same thing with the when you put those together you've just doubled the complexity you've doubled the vulnerability you've made it where now you've got a whole another level of complexity that can fail. So did they look at that? Yeah, they're supposed to and they probably did. But somehow they said, well, if it fails if that England tech indicator fails, you have a backup system. What's the backup system will that the pilot would turn it off? They can turn the trim system off. And this thing doesn't happen. Where it broke down. They said, well, they made assumptions with engineering to get through this ten in the minus nine few make safety assumptions, those that were made were that the pilots would know how to turn it off have we gotten to technological David where we have to rely on software to help fly these planes and jets now, I'll tell you what it's an automated plane is a safer airplane in my mind. I really until this happens. Well until it doesn't. Yeah. Until it's not, you know at the risk of sounding like a Luddite here. I wanna. Technology can get in the way. It does get in the way. And in fact, it is it accelerates so quickly that the humans the ability of the human mind to understand all of the systems they're going on. I think we've exceeded that. I think we've gotten to a place now where it takes more capacity, mentally, and we're not evolved enough mentally to actually fly the airplane and know about every single system. So when they do design these airplanes, they designed it now where the only the systems that are critical to be thinking about are on your display as a pilot. So what you see is. When you start taking off you won't see indications of your hydraulic pressure. Because it you're you're relic pressure. Doesn't mean anything until it starts getting too low right until the quantities vote, and you know, you have a leak so when that happens the system comes and says, hey, your hydraulic systems failing. So it starts thinking for you. And the things that does to your mind is is unbelievable. What your mind does at that point is stop looking for nominees because it doesn't have to anymore. The system's gonna tell you, and you start thinking that way, and your brain starts becoming lulled into this false sense of safety where an anomaly can occur right in front of you like like a software problem with your Bank right in front.

Boeing David Souci IT department Ethiopia leeann Air Boeing Quebec Houston Rania England
"souci" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

10:59 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"To coast, David Souci with us, David the other plane that crashed in October, a similar 737 max eight can you tell us a little bit more about that? Yeah. That was a lion air airplane. It also is a newer airplane was the max eight of course, and how it was determined that what caused the crash on that one was that. There was a angle of attack indicator. And what that does is tell you just what how the aircraft is approaching the wind. That's coming at it. In other words, it's not just whether the angles up or down it's up or down related to the wind. So what that tells you is a good indication of whether you're about ready to stall the airplane or not a stall. Of course, would give you an abrupt drop in the aircraft. So as cling airplane was flying. It was erratic. The angle the tech indicator was giving all kinds of different readings that to the system that we referred to earlier as m cast. Maneuvering caracteristics augmentation system. So with bad data coming in. It's trying to respond to it. And it saying, hey, the aircraft is way up to high. I need to push the nose down. So it does. And then the pilot all Houston says the nose is going down for no reason whatsoever. And so this continued to happen, and they fought and fought and fought the airplane. It would try to go down, and then they would push back fullback, and then it would also correct itself. And so they'd be lifting the airplane they'd had to push it down. So it went back and forth and looking at the data from the black box shows clearly that this angled attack indicator was giving bad or signals. Ultimately, the aircraft was going nose up. The power was full forward on the airplane. They were still trying to keep the aircraft going, and then it ended up in what we call a flat spin, which is power on stall, the powers on the airplane airplane still trying to fall fly, but there's not enough window or none of air over the top of the wing. Create lift, and then it falls dramatically, and and then ultimately crashed killing one hundred and eighty nine people. Even why wasn't there an outcry by investigators to ground these planes at that point? Well, there what Boeing came back with his said, we we do know what this problem is in in in an unprecedented move. Usually what happens on these aircraft accidents is they'll wait until they get a report back from the DSP or from the regulatory body. They don't want to admit guilt right away. Right then. And they'll say, hey, we're going to wait and see what they find. We will react to it appropriately. Well, Boeing didn't do that in this case, they they saw what was happening. It was kind of odd. How quickly they knew what happened. And then they then they said we've got some software fixes we're gonna put those out. They'll be done in a few months now never Dave had not remembered, but I wanna make sure everybody understands that this occurrence had happened before and pilots responded to it appropriately. In other words, the. The angle of attack indicator had failed aircraft previous flights and it recovered in this case at lion air, they did not it it occurred in it and it crashed the airplane. I think that the thought was at the time with which was back in November October November. And I think the thought at the time was that the pilot was an experienced or hadn't had the training that he needed. So a big outcry went out about that. And so they so Boeing came back and said, yeah, we should have given more training. We should have let people know what was going on with this airplane, which they didn't. And so now we're going to make up for that. We're going to train pilots we teach them what to do. And and there was a lot of training went on. They went out, and actually every aircraft that was out there that had the system on it. They looked at the angle of attack indicators they tested the process that they used to test. These angled attack indicators many were replaced with newer models and make sure that this didn't occur again. So they felt that the the mitigation. Measures taken taken adequate enough to to ensure that it was still a safe airplane. They're still nothing wrong with it the training, and he's tests that they did would wouldn't have fixed. So it was a level of confidence at the time that safety management system that they had in place with adequate. So there was an outcry. They responded to it in what they felt was inappropriate way. But clearly if this turns out that Ethiopia had the same the same problem, and it seems that adequate it seems that way I have to call my Bank today. David because their app wasn't working. They changed it a couple of weeks ago. And this time, it's horrible. You you sign in and you get into your count. And then the next button you hit it says there's an error, and you have to take the software app off in reinstall it, and then it works. But then it breaks down again on the second try all the time. So I ended up calling the IT department. I said have you gotten any other calls about this since? Since like, the pilots have complained and they said, yeah, we're getting a few. Now, why does it take us to tell them that? That's a really good really good process. And that is what happens it takes a long time for people to realize why the things are happening. And I believe I believe that this is a phenomenon that I've seen within the airlines within other industries as well. But in my business, what happens is people become overconfident in in what they have. In other words, they in this case with Ethiopia and with lion Air Boeing may have become overconfident systems and said, look, we we know that we've got a good safety management system, we assess the risk, and here's how we're going to mitigate it. And you know, you become overconfident. You think you think things are fixed? When you what you really need to do is a deeper self examination and say is it really fixed is this are we meeting the same level of safety that we initially intended to do when we built the airplane. Do you think the team at Boeing that created the software that now is? Desperately trying to fix it. And you know, re get the new software. They knew right away. Something was wrong. Yeah. Because they have the data available to them. In in developing safety systems, we design engineering and the probability of failure to tend to the minus night safety factor. And what that means is that didn't in the minds. Nice as a very very very very small tolerance for any kind of failure. And how they get to that number is with double and triple redundancy. They they make sure that if something fails there's a backup system for that. And if that fails as a backup system for that. And so, and then you calculate in the probability of any kind of failure on top of that. Now, that's pretty simple to do. It's not that simple. It's still is rocket science, really. But it's you can do it. You can come up with those relations. Now when you're talking about software. It's a little bit different. In software the probability or the opportunity for failure comes down to every bit. That's in that software program. So to design software to tend to the minus nights safety factor is. Almost impossible to do. And so, and it really has not been held to that close scrutiny. When you're talking about an engine installation. You're talking about the engine spinning you're talking about hydraulic systems that go back and power the controls that move move the airplane. Those are physical things that you can look at and you can say what's the probability of failure. Here. What's the probability that the hydraulic line is going to leak it rubs up against site? All those things are physical software is not that way. And so it's really difficult to come up with a way to measure the safety of software. So that's a long way of answering your question, but I can't believe that in any of their probably thousands and thousands of tests before they even built the planes that the software issues didn't crop up. I can't believe that that will they had to they had to have. And I think it comes down to the probability that the two factors would happen. One is that there would be a failure of the angle of attack indicator. Remember that the system did exactly what it was supposed to what was programmed to do. If you have a guy who's programming the system, and you have a different guy who's programming and building and designing and engineering angle of attack indicator. Those are two different people. Do they talk together? Do you say? Safety factor on the angle of attack indicator. I'm really proud of it. It's amazing machine. And then you do the same thing with the well when you put those together you've just doubled the complexity you've doubled the vulnerability you've made it where now you've got a whole another level of complexity that can fail. So did they look at that? Yeah, they're supposed to and they probably did. But somehow they said, well, if it fails if that Anglo tech indicator fails, you have a backup system. What's the backup system will that the pilot would turn it off? They can turn the trim system off. And this thing doesn't happen where it broke down. They said, well, they made assumptions with engineering to get this, Tinder, minus knife, you make safety assumptions, and those that were made with that the pilots would know how to turn it off have we gotten to technological David where we have to rely on software to help fly these planes and jets now, I'll tell you what it's an automated plane is a safer airplane in my. My mind. I really until this happens. Well until it doesn't. Yeah. Until it's not, you know at the risk of sounding like a Luddite here. I wanna make. Technology can get in the way. It does get in the way. And in fact, it it accelerates so quickly that the human ability of a human mind to understand all of the systems that are going on. I think we've exceeded that. I think we've gotten to a place now where it takes more capacity, mentally, and we're not evolved enough mentally to actually fly the airplane and know about every single system. So when they do design these airplanes, they designed it now where the only the systems that are critical to be thinking about are on your display as a pilot. So what you see is. When you start taking off you won't see indications of your hydraulic pressure because your your dog pressure. Doesn't mean anything until it starts getting too low right until the quantities vote, and you know, you have a leak so when that happens the system comes and says, hey, your hydraulic systems failing. So it starts thinking for you. And the things that does to your mind is. Is unbelievable. What your mind does at that point is stop looking for normalise because it doesn't have to anymore. The system's gonna tell you, and you start thinking that way and your brain starts becoming load into this false sense of safety where an anomaly can occur right in front of you like like a software problem with your Bank..

Boeing David Souci IT department Ethiopia Bank lion Air Boeing Houston Dave
"souci" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

10:01 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"In that very tragic crash of the Boeing company's 737, max eight, and of course, what's really got everybody concerned, of course, is because in October. There was an identical plane that crashed in the Java sea killing one hundred and eighty nine people in the crashes seemed similar I thought it's about time. We bring back David Souci back to the program. David, of course, is the author why planes crash he was born in Boulder, Colorado, then he has traveled the world in the interest of improving safety awareness. He worked in the cockpit on the hanger floor with an aviation boardrooms and inside the Washington DC beltway, he has seen death up close and personal David and you've been on CNN all week David good to have you back. Well, thank you, Georgia. I wish it was. For something more enlightening, but this is a tragedy. When when I saw the similarities between the two crashes, this is even before anybody had grounded the planes. I figured this is something weird. I I've been someone David. I don't believe in coincidences. I think things happen. And when they do you gotta look at the facts that are out there. They're way too similar. What do you think? Oh, most definitely Georgia as an accident investigator, which I was for sixteen years. The the worst fear that I have is basically going to the same accident scene twice. You know, you go to one accident scene. You figure out what happened to it? And you sixes in place to make sure it doesn't happen again. But then when it does it's it's doubly tragic has just horrible. And when I saw these two the the data where the angle of attack indicator now, this this data was streamed through the new system that we use the. DSP system. And so when I got the what they call the high definition report, which was within hours of the accident. I could see clearly that this angle of attack indicators giving so similar readings to lion air that it was frightening. I I knew we had to do something right away. Will you put this mix? Let let let's just assume for a moment that there's a software problem and Boeing is trying to update it as we speak. But there's a software problem in nixed that in with inexperienced pilots that don't have a lot of flying time. You gotta disaster on your hands. Yeah. George that's the case in in line air, but it, but then again in this aircraft in the opium aircraft. They had eight thousand hours. So, you know, in the accidents that I've investigated there's a thing that I refer to atrophy of vigilance in the brain. And what happens is the more confident. You are the more routine. You are as to how you do things your brain is not capable of understanding or becomes less capable of understanding anomalies. And when things don't go the way, you expect them to go. And so even in that case, even in someone who has that much experience. They're going to respond in the way that they you know, innately do and and and the way that their soccer is it's set them up for failure from the very beginning to for that kind of scenario to happen in January of two thousand nine a US air Airbus A three twenty tanked in the Hudson river all one hundred and fifty five. People aboard survived because of the incredible work of now. Retired captain sully sullen burger he went online today. David and said that we don't know the cause yet of the crash, but I'm concerned about the training of the pilots. What do you think? Well, the the training of the pilots. I think it goes further than that though. If the pilots had the information, they did did have extensive training. What was I think the mistake as case with almost every accident? I've done the the actual risk occurs way before the accident occurs. And I believe that the risk here started with the with the desire of Boeing and the FAA to Maine to come up with a new aircraft that has new capabilities that had bigger engines that had a very significantly different airplane. But what they wanted to do is make sure that the pilots that went from the old model seven thirty seven into the new model. Seven thirty seven didn't require a lot more training. They wanted to be able to save a lot of money, and they wanted to be able to make it more efficient transition to this new model airplane by saying, well, the cockpits are the same and you fly at the same way, and it feels the same way. And and we don't have to retry. Train you on a whole new type of aircraft. And that's what they certified it under the same type certificate, which is basically the approval to build that airplane. So they started by saying we wanna make the same type certificate, but we're gonna pack a lot more punch into this new seven thirty seven. So I believe that's where it really started. And when they came up with a system to make it fly that same way. So that they didn't have to retrain pilots and go through this. They didn't tell the pilots that there was something new about this airplane. And so the pilot training is good as it may have been didn't touch on this particular part of the aircraft which is the which is what is referred to as the maneuvering characteristics augmentation system. Big name for simple thing. It just make sure the airplane. Fly straight. Really, we've got some video simulation of the Ethiopian crash on the coast to coast AM dot com website in the highlight reel. But I want to warn everybody. It is kind of emotional towards the. End it's video simulation. It is not actually what happened during the crash. It is just a simulation on what the artists think happened. But it is still kind of emotional David in your opinion based on what you're hearing of the two crashes. What do you think happened in this Ethiopian crash in terms of it takes off people are strapped in the plane takes off what happens? Well at this point. It's interesting. I looked at the data from the same flight from the same airport at the day before the day before let's start with that flight. I they're strapped in a new coat of fly. And and three quarters of the way down the runway takeoff and their thousand feet above the runway going about two hundred and forty knots in this next day, they take off and the airplane stays on the ground for an extended period of time. It goes past that point three quarters of the way down the airport. The speed continues to increase in increasing increasing ended up to about two hundred. Sixty two hundred seventy nine on the ground before he takes off and the pilots had to be wondering why just things not lifting off at that point. But eventually they do get the aircraft liftoff they lift off with that aircraft's and it takes off within six minutes, then five and a half to six minutes. This flight will the first firstly within three minutes. The pilot starts calling back saying we need to come home. We need to come home. There's something wrong. We need to bring back home. Give me his actor. I need to be back. We need to go back and land. So they routed other airplanes around they tried to turn the airplane around or they were going to before they even had a chance to turn this airplane around. It had already gone down in the nose of the aircraft was pushed down by this M cast system and and fatally. And tragically the aircraft's continued down within five or six minutes aircraft crashed and no survivors. What angle was the plane coming down? I I don't know all the details at this point. I do know that the that it was an incredibly short period of time. So if I can just calculate what the angle would be it would have been close to about seventy five degrees. My almost straight down it is. So the people obviously aboard this plane. They knew this was at. Yes, they did. They did. This was not one of those instantaneous failures that happened in the sky when people are instantaneously killed. This is something that they had to have suffered that all the way down knowing that something obviously dramatic was going on. But before that the aircraft had host up and down. It was going up and down the air. Traffic controllers knew there was problems with this aircraft long before not long before. But minutes before the pilot actually called in for help because they could. See that it's varying altitude significantly up to one hundred feet up in a hundred feet down very rapidly. David I fly about four to six times a month. Mop primarily with south west. On these older versions of the seven thirty sevens. The over liable ones. But every time we hit a little turbulence, you know, you could tell people on the plane get a little skittish and jittery they make some sounds and things like that. I could only imagine what it was like on that plane for those poor people know it had to be tragic. I just. It would have panicked anyone. And unfortunately, you're there, and you have nothing you can do about it. David's book, of course, is called why planes crash and accident investigators fight for safety skies. David we're gonna hit the brake in about forty seconds. But how did you get interested in air travel? I as a kid I always had an airplane in my crib. I think. You make those balsa wooden planes to and have always wanted to be a pilot until I realized that there was a lot more to flying than that ended up being a mechanic because the the systems and how things work together and how things don't work together. We're always fascinating to me. Every toy got I tore apart just for the joy of figuring out how to put it back together. Again, we're gonna come back and talk more with David Souci about this plane tragedy, and then what's going to happen? When do they lift in his opinion, the restrictions on these planes? They've been grounded right now they've been grounded in many many countries. So they've been grounded now in Canada and.

David Souci Boeing Georgia Washington Boulder Colorado CNN captain sully soccer Hudson river FAA investigator opium US George Canada Maine
"souci" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on KTRH

"I could see that it was very altitude significantly up to one hundred feet up one hundred feet down very rapidly. David I fly about four to six times a month Ma primarily with south west. I'm on these older versions of the seven thirty sevens. The reliable ones. But every time we hit a little turbulence, you know, you could tell people on the plane get a little skittish and jittery they make some sounds and things like that. I could only imagine what it was like on that plane for those poor people know it had to be tragic it just it would have panicked anyone. And unfortunately, you're there, and you have nothing you can do about it. David spoke of courses called why planes crash in accident? Investigators fight for safety skies. David we're gonna hit the brake in about forty seconds. How did you get interested in air travel? I was as a kid I always had a airplane in my crib. I think. Did you make those balsa wooden planes to and you have always wanted to be a pilot until I realized that there was a lot more to flying than that ended up being a mechanic because the the systems and how things work together and how things don't work together. We're always fascinating to me. Every toy got I tore apart just for the joy of figuring out how to put it back together. Again, we're gonna come back and talk more with David Souci about this plane tragedy, and then what's going to happen? When did they left in his opinion, the restrictions on these planes? They've been grounded right now they've been grounded in many many countries. So they've been grounded now in Canada.

David Souci Ma Canada one hundred feet forty seconds
"souci" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"News talk five ninety K U N G, Springfield me emerald empire. Exiting Venezuela to fly or not to fly. I'm Michael Toscano. Secretary of state Mike Pompeo was pulling the last of the American staff still at our embassy in Venezuela out of the country citing the deteriorating situation. There. Menez Waila is struggling to restore electricity following four days of blackouts, and a deepening political crisis as we hear from correspondent Paula Newton in Caracas. This blackout has indeed even unnerved up president Medina. They have now shut down the country for another two days understanding that even the meagre power that they are able to distribute throughout this country is not enough to actually get people back on their feet that Australia to the list of countries. Grounding, fleets of new Boeing seven thirty-seven max, eight passenger jets, including China, Mexico, Indonesia, Singapore, South Korea, Ethiopia and others following that second crash Sunday EFI opium. But the US has not made that call and Steve Kastenbaum reports. That worry some experts Boeing monitoring the investigation David Souci was a top investigator with the FAA the airlines safe. The experts said this should give airlines reason for pause. I've never said that, hey, it's unsafe to fly particular model of aircraft. But in this case, I'm going to have to go there. I just looked at the flight data off of off of that aircraft its strikingly similar same issues that lion air had seven thirty seven is one of the most successful. Passenger jets ever built suceeds said this max eight version is a little different than its predecessors..

Venezuela Boeing Mike Pompeo Michael Toscano Paula Newton Springfield Caracas Menez Waila Medina David Souci FAA opium US Steve Kastenbaum president suceeds Australia Ethiopia
"souci" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

12:32 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The AllState skyline studio high above Wacker drive here on Michigan avenue are no longer on Michigan avenue off Columbus avenue. I guess in the new WGN radio studios on Columbus avenue. Thank you very much for being with us until five AM. David Souci has been a guest to the show many times. His website is why planes crash dot com. You can follow him on Twitter at David underscore Souci. SO? You see I e. For for lots of great air travel, and and any accident investigation involving transportation, David good morning. Thanks so much of being with us. I want to say the last time we chatted was there was an Amtrak crash a year or two ago wasn't there. Something was remember now in Canada. Yeah. That's right. No. It was a New Yorker. I think is where it was a New Yorker. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. It's so funny. How the time flies by and things run one into another. And then we talked a lot back when Malaysian Airlines flight three seventy went down, and you and you had your book about that a year or so later, but it's been a while. And I'm glad I'm glad you're able to jump on with us tonight. Thank you so much. It's interesting pleasure. Absolutely. When I reach out to your earlier today. There was what was it LaGuardia at first? And then I think was it. Liberty international had to start canceling flights had a bunch of problems. Because of of course, all of these air traffic controllers all the TSA security people have been working without paychecks for about a month. Now, and you wondered when eventually something was going to happen. I knew I had read a story that I want to say, and I apologize. If I getting this wrong spokesperson for for the I think the air traffic controllers was saying people are making mistakes. They haven't made in ten fifteen years because now we're being overworked. There's a lot of stress because of the paychecks and all sorts of problems going on. And then this came to a head and suddenly tonight. Late on Friday night or later in the Dan Friday, we have agreements real, but the government for three weeks how much they make you put a political hat on here. But how much of an effect? Do you think the issues we started having with the FAA played on the fact that the two sides suddenly came together to reopen the government for three weeks? Unfortunately, I think that's one of the main reasons is something did go down today because weights they wait until there's only lives at risk. And then that are really at risk and not not. You know, some kind of down the road thing. It's right now, it's happening. Now, there were seventy one hundred planes sitting there waiting to land the couldn't because there was so much backup today. Did you say seventy one hundred? Yes. Typically Omni given time it was maybe seven hundred but not seventy one hundred that many planes circling waiting to land, and that's just crazy. And that's not just a new war in those two airports that must be nationwide. Because of what happens when planes are late and things like that that the whole system gets mucked up. Exactly. Yes. That's that's crazy now. Now, I'm going to disagree with you a little bit. I know you're saying that it's not too lives are at risk that they take action. My guess is. And this is the cynic in me is that it wasn't lives at risk that made anybody take action. It was the economy at risk that made people take action because I think of air travel slows down to a crawl that truly will affect the economy because so much business is done by people traveling across the country to meetings and things like that that that, you know, politicians realized this is going to be our undoing if we if we shut down airline travel because of this, you know, that that's going to hurt us all or one side of the other whoever cave, but I think that the economy I mean, how dependent is our US economy and all of those flights happening every day. Incredibly dependent on that. But I do want to go back to the lives at risk saying because you don't for fifteen years. I was in charge of making sure that our budget RSA budget cuts through the congress and got past and we never had problems passing that budget. Because of the fact that there was never a congressman or Senator that wanted to be. The one that didn't pay for things that take us keep us safe. And so you'd end up. If someone said no gonna pay for the FAA to keep you a running. Then you've got a lot of safety things that are happening that if there was an accident didn't know congressman wanted to be the one that say we didn't have enough air. Traffic controllers are enough inspectors out there looking at safety for the airlines. So no one wanted to do that. So it's it's always been used as a tool USAA has always been used as tool because it scares people something you do every day and something that no one wants to be the one that puts it risk. So David and all that time that you were in charge of getting congress to approve that budget. I imagine at some point while you were doing that. There was a government shutdown. I know previous government shutdowns had been a very short amount of time. Never this is what this was about double the length of the previous longest one, right? When when you were part of that what I don't understand is how in the world because because essential employee's still get paid even during the shutdown. It's you know, there's these weird tiers of some people just get laid off, and you don't get paid. And you don't work until this is over some people are steamed so essential that they work, and they get paid. Right. But then there's a third group sandwiched in the middle. That's like, you know, you're kind of important. So you've got to keep working, but you're not so important that we're going to pay you, and somehow that is where TSA and air traffic controllers have fallen and I do not understand like you talk about the safety that's at risk here. How in the world are those workers not deemed essential enough that they keep getting paid a government shutdown? Yeah. There were a couple of thrillers while I was. Shutdowns in which we did not. We're not supposed to be paid. We're not supposed to be going to work, even but as essential employees. I was working out Washington DC, and we were essential. There's a tear between essential for safety for the safety of the country, and what's the central for the operation of the country, the two tiers? So when when the tear gets down to the operation of the company where country, which is TSA traffic controllers that that that's a tear that's been passed and it never in in my career. He's never gotten to the level of getting to that operational tier where they take those operationally essential personnel. Stop paying them. So this is really news to me today when I heard of it, and the only thing I can speculate as one swimming government shutdown before the Petco strike if you remember that many years ago at that time there was a different organization in charges air, traffic control. And now, the organization is in charge of it, evidently, isn't considered operationally essential. It doesn't make any sense especially in light of September eleventh. I know that's a while back now. But you would think that that is the safety of the country that if we don't have people watching things and don't have people in control of things and overseeing like TSA does like air traffic does that that's such a danger to the country. I would hope that after this. Hopefully, once they work everything else out that are senators and representatives come together to say, okay. Next time this happens because let's face it. Not like, it's never going to happen. Again. These people are deemed essential. They have to be paid. We have to keep the safety and the economy going we're going to have shut down. It's just it's just stunning to me. The aviation subcommittee. Is that is that entity that could do that they could pull that off? And they certainly need to look at it Oberstar was the last one that was really predominant. Subcommittee that was fifteen years ago. But at that time, he really stood pulled and said, look, this is something that's central to the country. We're never gonna shut it down. Let's keep it moving. But evidently, that's that is slipped into the current aviation subcommittee. David jumping around a little bit here. It's been a while. And I I don't. I don't want to be jinxed or anything. But but we've had we had an unprecedented run of overall airline safety here in the United States in the last ten to fifteen years. You're in the United States. That's true. It's been incredibly unprecedented. And I think it's do a lot to the change the change the PF AMD airlines themselves and started working together to more transparent about safety and understand how the whole system works. One of them was project that I worked on it was called oasis and another one was called the obsessed plate standards automation systems, and those are safety systems that were put in place in patterned after the Sandia laboratories safety systems, which is used in the nuclear industry. So that's really what's changed. A lot is just the way that we view safety and the cultural aspects of what kind of things what is safe what? What is the standards that? We're going to have to maintain to in order to be safe. And I think those are painting out now is some of it also related to a lot of Boeing and Airbus have sold a lot of airplanes in the last ten to fifteen years. And I think a lot of our airlines have modernized their fleets is that part of it as well. There's a project. This was back in the late nineties early two thousands that was the aging aircraft initiative and that started after all air Lasca crashed. When I don't know if you recall that one more the convertible airplane, the top of the airplane came off, and that started any credible in depth study of how how how long can airlines last how long can they sly without falling apart. And so the aging aircraft was really behind a lot of bad as to why these airplanes who the aircraft have been retired and put back into service and speaking of new aircraft so Boeing has this new seven thirty seven max jet, which I think is the one that has been kind of a viral video of its test flights where they take off like a ninety degree angle. And all this kind of fun stuff. You see him doing an test flight, but lion air had a crash with a Boeing seven thirty-seven max, they was back in October. The twenty ninth. I think just in the last week or so they finally got the blackbox and the voice recorders. I don't think we've got too much details yet. But what are you hearing about what happened there? With bowling. It's really has to do a lot with the thought that technology advances much more quickly than our systems in our even the human brain can conceive of all of the possibilities of what could happen there so complex so automated that we start relying on that. But in this case, what had happened was bowing felt that it wasn't necessary to tell the pilots about a particular failsafe system that they'd put into the aircraft. So when in automated mode, if you turn off your auto pilot, then it shouldn't really be doing anything to fly to control the airplane. Whereas because they had added the sector safety feature. The pilot didn't wasn't aware of that in the airplane continued to to reduce powered reduce stressed in certain areas where the pilot wasn't ready for it. So the details it gets really highly technical at that point is what happened in that particular incident. And like you said your reports not out yet. But. Bowling his really come back and said, look, we we messed up we should've told people what what happens here. It's it's there's a few lines in the manual that say this is what is going to happen. But they didn't make it part of their training program. It didn't say, hey, we have this new way of doing things, and that's only one of many things. But I think that looking forward that's going to be our biggest challenge in safety is how do we maintain the human aspect of of how they interface with these heavy technical advance, auto pilots and auto systems. Well, so a lot of it comes down to training making sure that the right training is getting to them. And then they have enough time to train when the technology is really changed on an aircraft. So is it really coming down to Boeing saying? Yeah, we change this. And we didn't tell the pilots. Yes. That's really where it is. They've already made some changes to go to the manuals into the train which I really applaud Boeing for doing..

Boeing David United States FAA TSA congressman congress David Souci WGN Malaysian Airlines Michigan David underscore Souci Twitter Canada Amtrak AllState skyline studio Liberty international
"souci" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"So maybe growers will Souci visions of better plums dancing in their heads. Gary Crawford for the US department of agriculture Washington. A lot of farmers are talking about the potential for him one popular conversation. Among farmers is the price that a certain hemp product can bring in it's called CBD oil. It has a wide variety of uses and it can bring in as much as ninety thousand dollars acre man, wiser of water deeply as researched the subject of hemp and has discovered that there's a lot of products that can be grown from hemp over twenty five thousand products made of hemp presumably down the road. We'll get to a point where the market for oil, and saturated and probably prices will come down by that point. These other Marcus for him, fiber and building products will emerge presumably and create new markets. We all know the back in the day a lot of ro and heavy cloth used to be made from him. But these days you can also use the fibers, basically, the waste material from harvesting other products. Using how can be turned into building material light, construction blocks or panels can be made to build houses and commercial buildings today. CBD oil is widely recognized as an effective therapeutic treatment for many health problems from basic muscle and joint strain to epilepsy and concussions nitrogen is an important input. When it comes to grain crops, and while there are research based recommendations, generally, there's about one point two pounds of nitrogen required. Bushel.

Gary Crawford Marcus CBD US department of agriculture W epilepsy ninety thousand dollars two pounds
"souci" Discussed on NWAP

NWAP

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"souci" Discussed on NWAP

"Don't wanna right. So I definitely want to build up that like like last couple of years like I've just kind of belie-. That's what I was saying before like I've been writing all these different places, but like I'm balancing school and like trying to find a job then like, balancing school and work. And like this is like the first year. Baby ever. Maybe that like I've only had to go to work and like not have to do anything else. Like, I'm not going to work and preparing to go to school or not work and going to school. I'm not working for the summer and then going back to school in the fall. You know tonight. Do something say you like, but not necessarily not an excuse me. I'm just saying like, usually like usually flecked the less. I don't know maybe like six seven eight however, many years like, I'm always inbetween some shit. Like, I'm always like, I'm always on my way to the next thing or in the thing and trying to put myself to get out like I'm either I'm either preparing to go to law school, and I'm doing in all my focus is there. I'm either in law school and on my focus is there, you know, I graduated but I'm trying to find a job. You know, says all my focus is there or graduating. And I got a job, but he don't pay. No. So get another job in another job, number two, three jobs and vibe. I'm always, I'm always survivable. And I'm always juggling like all these different things at the same time. This is the first time in I honestly, it really might be ever that. Like, the only thing that I have to do is good work. That's it. I go to work come home and out to do nothing else in my life. Like if I wanna ride. I can't right? If I don't wanna right. I don't have the right. If I want to play video games like as I go to work everything else is fine. This is like the first African that. I've had I've definitely been like enjoying it by Mike. They can about like what is kind of like what all wanna do in. You know, what's interesting. I'm getting back into reading like I started reading accountability group. I re read one fiction book one nonfiction book a month. You know what I'm saying? Like, we don't reading the same books not a book club. We just hey, did you read that they met you said that you're gonna read this month? Okay. Cool wasn't Nixon that you're gonna read. You know, what I'm saying just getting back into like living like what I call a regular ordinary life. I just go then I come home and do my hobbies shit. So definitely want to read more. And I wanna I wanna see. This BTV Souci marketing so and that's in my pocket teams to. To get something. Like, I have lots through this year. Of course, you did. I had tomorrow that I'm about to get all man, I'm gonna I'm gonna get one this year got damage. I don't have any. I say that every every year I say straying given on my chest. Just don't get blast are loyal. He doesn't get the you'll house joint. Not conceal a should be like. Unforgivable? For example. Misunderstood. Bye. This. This might be every year. I say I'm going to get its act too. But every at the every every seven sets from birthday, but every year around birthday on bro. So. Your phone. This year will be the year that I get a tattoo from my day is a good time to do it. I'll be thirty four this year. Will need to. To ease. Indeed. All right. Thank y'all everybody for joining us for the new knows episode sit together for y'all this law. We are we're so every year. But did as we really go there and tire both of releasing an episode. We haven't even been tweet on the counter, nothing nigga was just really Ave. We really Burnham Alamo..

Nixon BTV Souci Burnham Alamo Mike