35 Burst results for "Sorenson"

Chiefs keep AFC West lead with 22-9 victory over Broncos

AP News Radio

00:29 sec | Last month

Chiefs keep AFC West lead with 22-9 victory over Broncos

"The the Kansas Kansas City City Chiefs Chiefs never never trailed trailed in in their their twenty twenty two two to to nine nine win win over over the the Denver Denver Broncos Broncos chiefs chiefs quarterback quarterback Patrick Patrick Mahomes Mahomes scored scored on on a a ten ten yard yard run run to to open open with with the the TV TV on on their their first first possession possession but but that that was was Kansas Kansas city's city's only only offense offense of of touchdown touchdown G. G. safety safety Dan Dan Sorenson Sorenson returned returned an an interception interception for for seventy seventy five five yards yards in in the the fourth fourth quarter quarter to to cap cap the the chiefs chiefs scoring scoring that that was was one one of of two two interceptions interceptions thrown thrown by by Broncos Broncos quarterback quarterback teddy teddy Bridgewater Bridgewater Greg Greg Echlin Echlin Kansas Kansas city city

Kansas Kansas City City Chiefs Denver Denver Broncos Broncos Chiefs Patrick Patrick Mahomes Mahome Chiefs Dan Dan Sorenson Sorenson Kansas City Kansas Broncos Teddy Teddy Bridgewater Bridge
"sorenson" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

03:12 min | 8 months ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"Of not just a regular consumer product but also so much of how people see themselves in the world and how they see america. it's like when we had motor vehicle crashes in public health. We started to look how to reduce those well. We didn't say okay. If we can reduce the speed limit that's going solve everything We also had design issues And so we sit in cars now. They're designed very very differently than the ones that a generation or two people grew up in. we have all sorts of laws and particular interventions around specific things. For example the graduated driver's license has substantially reduced motor vehicle crashes and deaths among young people and we used to think driver's ed going to be very effective We have a strong belief in education. If we educate people then they'll do the right thing and we found instead. Drivers had little to no effect and sometimes the opposite effect of what we wanted because it was getting younger people behind the wheel sooner with less experience but more confidence. Because hey had had driver's ed. We can pass laws around gun training. We can pass laws around Registration of firearms. We can pass laws that have to do with keeping guns out of the hands of people who we all agree should not have them. We could pass laws around assault weapons which has a value statement as a society that we don't think this type of firearm belongs in the hands of civilians. But it's that panoply. It's that multifaceted approach but it gives us a chance of doing something which gives us a chance of accomplishing something. But looking at one thing or even a handful of things won't do it. We have to have a comprehensive approach. Well thank you for joining us today. Dr sorenson this has been very interesting and educational. I do hope that we get the data that you need in order to Propose solutions that will perhaps make us a little bit less lethal as a society you. You're most welcome. And i am optimistic. Because there's so many people who are coming into this field right now because they do realize that it is a very very pressing problem We will have changes data. Do have a place. The policy making table thank you. You can read more about new funding for research on gun. Violence prevention in the april-may issue of a p as magazine monitor on psychology. Just go to. Www dot apa dot org slash monitor and you can find previous episodes of speaking of psychology at speaking of psychology dot. Org.

sorenson two people psychology dot. Org today america april one thing Www dot apa dot org may
"sorenson" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

Speaking of Psychology

04:21 min | 8 months ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Speaking of Psychology

"And policy. Thank you for joining us today. Dr sorenson thank you. I appreciate your interest in this issue and appreciate your invitation to joining today. great what. Let's start by talking about mass shootings that have been in the news quite a bit in the past couple of months but they're responsible for only a small percentage of gun deaths in this country. What are the main drivers of gun. Deaths in the united states the most common type of gun. Death in the united states is a suicide as you noted there about two suicides for every homicide but we tend to focus on the criminal uses of guns and we tend when somebody talks about gun. Violence they tend to think of homicides in two thousand nineteen the most recent year for which we have national data. They're about fourteen thousand homicides the next most common type of gun death were shootings by police in their five hundred twenty that works marked and then the accidents are what public health. People call unintentional. z- They're about four hundred and eighty six nine those that they couldn't really determine what the nature of the the death was. What the intent was where about three hundred and forty six so overwhelmingly. It's an issue of suicide. Well let's let's move to the Gun violence as a public health issue. What exactly does that mean. And why is it important for how we think about prevention looking at guns as a public health issue is really important for a couple of reasons. One is it. Takes a consumer product approach. How do we prevent this. Let's look at the gun itself. Let's look at its design. Let's look at its manufacturer. Let's look to advertise. Let's look at how it's distributed how it sold and then finally let's look at the purchaser user and almost all of our policies focus on that user component. We spend very little effort and energy looking at what we would call more upstream sorts of issues. And that's in no small part because guns were specifically exempted from the consumer product safety commission act of nineteen seventy six. they're the only consumer product retreated like that And so we don't have any safety regulations on guns to continue this just a bit more when we talk about a public health approach. We're talking about population we're talking about policy and we're also talking about prevention as to a more criminal justice or after the fact approach that focuses on the individuals and on how to treat in intervene after the fact. Do you think that the increasing visibility of mass shootings has changed the way people fear gun violence in their everyday life. Yes definitely Going about our basic activities really important to feel safe and we've had mass shootings at school. Movie theaters concerts. Supermarkets work nightclubs places of worship. These are things that we do every day. Just as a regular routine in as a regular matter and yes that fear of. We're not safe just doing our lives has has crept in and i think it does change people's behavior we don't have lots of solid research on it but if it mean this is even cocktail party conversation of what it does People in the past. I think would try to avoid or certain neighborhoods that they thought were risky or certain circumstances they would think are risky but this feels different. Mass shootings make it feel random or that it could happen to anyone so that lack of control of that lack of ability to protect oneself knicks. Next people very very uneasy.

sorenson today One consumer product safety commis about three hundred and forty united states five hundred twenty about fourteen thousand homici about four hundred and eighty past couple of months two thousand nineteen two suicides every couple of reasons
"sorenson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"sorenson" Discussed on KOMO

"Some cases. Houston was down to 12 degrees this morning. All of this cold weather and the resulting storms and tornadoes have killed more than a dozen people in the last day. Claims of widespread voter fraud from the 2020 election. We're desperate attempt to overturn the results of the election. But even as elections, officials of all political stripes said, as much millions of dollars floating from donors who wanted an investigation into fraud Reporting on this in The Washington Post is Shawn Barber, who joins us on the coma News line shot Good afternoon. Thanks for having me in your piece. You feature a guy named Fred Eshelman. He donated $2.5 million in hopes of uncovering fraud. Where did all that money go? Well, Fred Excrement donated $2.5 million to a nonprofit group in Texas that he hadn't heard much about previously but was recommended to him buying a political adviser. Um, and he was very enthusiastic about giving this money based on What he thought would be a robust investigation that would uncover massive voter fraud and potentially overturned the election results over the course of 12 days or so he became disillusioned with that nonprofits efforts and came to conclude that what they were promising was falling short. And she now wants his money back. Is Fred the exception to the rule here, or how much money do we believe may have flowed into either the Trump campaign. The Republican Party or these nonprofit groups like True the Vote. How much money you was flowing in? Well, we're talking about hundreds of millions of dollars in the weeks and months after the election that went to the Trump campaign. The RNC congressional members who were largely advertising and soliciting donations, based on assurances that both legal efforts And investigations. Like true the votes would reveal enough fraud to overcome the election results. You know it, Zraly. Remarkable Even when you look at President or President Trump's fundraising During this time period. He had just lost the election based on unofficial results, and yet he managed to raise Uh, an incredible amount with almost daily fundraising appeals that said, this money is going to be used to reverse this election and exposed widespread voter fraud. Of course, none of that came to fruition and will never know the full tally. Uh, because you have to get into the intent of specific donor so why they were donating in these amounts, but it's safe to say that it was hundreds of millions of dollars that went into this. Now Fred Eshelman wants is $2.5 million back and read all about the story online at Washington Post from investigator reporter Sean Bo Berg. Shawn, Thanks so much for spending time with us today. Thank you. Come on news time 12 50 times for a propel insurance business updates for our own fortunes less than $2.5 million mark likely. Here's Jim Chess Co word today that Marriott's boss has died. The company, says CEO Arne Sorenson, who had been fighting pancreatic cancer since May of 2019 passed away on Monday at the age of 62. Sorenson had been Marriotts chief executive since 2012 several energy stocks are doing well in the wake of frigid cold across much of the country. Marathon oil of 5.5% Occidental Pete up for in a quarter percent. Coming soon was selected retailer near you of vegan version of the iconic KitKat candy Bar. Switzerland's Nestle says it will soon have a delicious plant based option that delivers the perfect balance between crispy wafer and smooth chocolate that people know in love. Nestle says the candy bar It will be in several countries across the globe. That's your money now in the markets today are looking to end the day mixed. The Dow is still up by 64 points. But the NASDAQ is down by 47 essentially a flat market for the S and P 500 down by just a single point. Money news A 2050 past the hour. We have a traffic update next Enjoy. Thanks. He ordered breakfast at the McDonald's drive through. Tell yourself you'll wait to eat it at work, but it's most way too good. So you eat it right there in the McDonald's parking lot, Neil.

Fred Eshelman Sean Bo Berg Neil Texas Shawn Barber 12 degrees Marriott Monday $2.5 million 64 points Marriotts Jim Chess Co Sorenson Nestle 5.5% Arne Sorenson May of 2019 Trump Houston 2012
Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson Dies

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Marriott CEO Arne Sorenson Dies

"Today that Marriott's boss has died. The company, says CEO Arne Sorenson, who had been fighting pancreatic cancer since May of 2019 passed away on Monday at the age of 62. Sorenson had been Marriotts chief executive since 2012

Ceo Arne Sorenson Marriott Pancreatic Cancer Marriotts Sorenson
"sorenson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"That's Sorenson's personal finance speaker, author producer and, of course, says she was that Rose about securities from 2017 to 2018 as well. The first Woman trader, equity trader on the floor and the second black woman to hold the equity traders bought in history off the New York Stock Exchange. Now we want to get down to Washington, D. C to get the latest on those stimulus talks that do not seem to be happening, at least at the moment. Let's get there to Nathan Hager. It certainly appears to be the case. Vanni House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is sounding increasingly skeptical that a deal can be reached with White House, she says Democrats remain far apart with Republicans not just on dollars, but on values. Hairs at the Republican sneaked in alleged piece of legislation that gave $150 billion The wealthiest people in our country. $150 billion and Heroes Act. We take that out at the White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany says Pelosi is the one not being serious on stimulus talks, she says the White House would look a clean bill to help airline workers. Speaker Pelosi joins us for an exclusive interview on Bloomberg Radio and television that's coming up at noon on Wall Street time just about 20 minutes from now. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden says his campaign is seeing Mohr former Democrats returned to the party Bloomberg's Amy Morris report, Sidon has maintained a persistent lead in both national polling and key states and tells reporters in Pennsylvania. He's also seeing gains in support among white working class voters. Those who had been Democrats but backed President Trump in 2016. Biden says they're polling shows Those voters are quote coming back home, and he says he hopes he can win back. Even Mohr. President Trump's numbers continue to slide because of the pandemic and racial unrest in Washington. I'm Amy Morris Bloomberg Radio. The single largest driver of misinformation about the Corona virus is President Trump is, according to a new study from Cornell researchers who analyzed 38 million English language articles around the world about the pandemic. I found mentions of the president made up 38% of the overall misinformation conversation. The New York Times reports. The study is the first comprehensive look at the info Dem Accord Falsehoods About Cove Inn. Global news 24 hours a.

President Trump Speaker Nancy Pelosi Joe Biden equity trader White House Amy Morris Mohr Bloomberg Radio president Vanni House New York Nathan Hager Sorenson Bloomberg Washington Sidon Cove Inn Rose
"sorenson" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

"I don't know if I'm saying it right but they will it's the lawyer and I might classmates of mine who I love and respect have worked for them. Right just like, you know, cuz I mean it's an important point, right? That's how pervasive it is. Go ahead. Yes. No, no, that's and that's great too. That's great to point out because you know, as we as we touched upon, you know, if you're just doing it in the nitty-gritty on a day-to-day and you're focusing on your task, you really don't believe that you're part of the problem in a lot of these things, you know, if you're just get you know, you're making ends meet and you're just, you know, you know a contractor for one of these one of these firms so long You say was Delhi Odell. What was it? Deloitte is a lawyer think it's a lighter. Yeah, so that's a lot but I'm pretty sure so you'll have something like, uh any of these under secretary and Deputy undersecretary in and and assistant Deputy under secretary positions love this stuff. So, you know that Corporation will be you know, 17 Jun 2020 advisory and assist services to support the deputy assistant Secretary of the Air Force office of business transformation and deputy chief management officer in managing and improving strategic transformation initiatives at the Enterprise level. It's it's it's nonsense, you know, if if the generals and Admirals cannot do their own paperwork, if they cannot make these calls if they cannot do analysis. What are you doing? What are you doing? What what purpose you are? You are a you know a barnacle on the on keister of the you know, what should be a functioning, you know, military Boston Consulting Group out of birth. Which contracts out of pathetic Maryland on Twenty One November 2019 cost transparency to facilitate the design of an optimized maintenance program to include design of governing governance processes of the reliability control board, you know, it's just like, you know, same Corporation thirteen April 2020 support. Chief managing office assessing at least 90% of annual spending implementing and training to increase departments efficiency speed. I mean, it's nonsense. It's absolute nonsense. This is stuff that should not be not only should not be, you know, given to the corporate sector. This is stuff that you as a competent flag officer should either be doing as part of your daily work or you know, I don't do it like some of the stuff is just, you know, creative categories that Corporate America comes up to and then just then just pitches. Yeah, it's really It's very frustrating to see on the daily, but it's also frustrating to see the you know on the macro when you're looking at it over the course of you know, an entire fiscal year. And this is money again. I cannot stress this enough. This is money that they're only X dollars that go around as you guys know, and as you have pointed out very well on this podcast before they're only X dollars that go around and everything that is going into not just these the consultative class not just you know, the local Beltway Bandits, but the broader War Industry could be it should be going elsewhere to actual National Security actual National Security wage, you know Healthcare homelessness hunger. These are actual National Security issues not whether you know, some clown entrepreneur, you know, I don't know consultant, you know can get, you know, get his cookies doing I don't know analysis and advisory assistance. So that was a great question. Thank you for that. I really do that.

Deloitte deputy assistant Secretary officer deputy chief under secretary Delhi Odell assistant Deputy Deputy undersecretary Maryland military Boston Consulting Gro consultant Air Force same Corporation Corporate America
"sorenson" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

05:54 min | 1 year ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Fortress On A Hill (FOH) Podcast

"Old Rocket program post World War Two where a lot of the old Nazi scientists went and so hospital every major war Corporation has a has a an office in home so multiple offices actually and they work they work in and out of hospital and they work on Redstone Arsenal down there. So then you got like you mentioned sort of North East Virginia through Thursday see and up in the Baltimore. That's a huge one, Maryland anything in and around Fort Meade. You have the Dallas-Fort Worth region of Texas Southern California. And then there are a lot of up-and-coming locations like Tampa. Florida is huge these days 6 to Special Operations Command and Central Command down at down at the Airforce Base down there. So you you also Silicon Valley you have Greater, Boston, Massachusetts, you know, Dayton, Ohio. So yeah, they're a lot of black spots. So I jotted down a few notes about my experiences of contractors when I was in before we got started and aside from the kind of standard deployed Soldier, you know, go to the chow hall. See you guys at the gates checking IDs those kind of things overseas, right the ones that were very much in my face was that the service department of the army made a huge transition from having active duty MPS do their patrol work to d a civilian cops? Yeah, so they slowly and slowly have to take over more and more of that and I'm assuming that for most major installations now, it's just d a cops, you know, actual MPS who you know, that's their home on the base versus contractors that were off post by Design because they can't live on a post from come in and take over those jobs. Yeah. Yeah, so they Security based security is sold off. As a distinct, you know good or service but it's also sold as part of what they call Base operations support services or boss and so boss is just everything that you know, it takes to run an installation from taking out the trash to you know snow plow to mowing the lawn and and that stuff back in the day that the soldier of the Sailor the Airman Marine, you know did and there was nothing there's nothing wrong with that system. You know, it worked really really well, you know, there's always somebody on base who doesn't have enough to do you test them you get it done and that's you know, that's how we did it but as you know the corporate office of the US government in general, but the Pentagon is specific now have boss as as one of the many profitable business sectors of War essentially and you see this at see the state side, you'll see all these so you see boss contracts for us presence in the occupation in Iraq occupation in Afghanistan bases in Turkey basis throughout Europe. You'll see in the phone number. East you'll see it in Japan you'll see it in Guam as a huge bus place but there's a you know, there are many profitable sectors of War there's propaganda that's public relations with Recruitment and Retention anytime. You know, I never knew this but anytime you see, you know, a slick.

Airforce Base war Corporation North East Virginia Baltimore Recruitment and Retention Maryland chow hall Fort Meade Florida Airman Marine Tampa Texas Dayton Silicon Valley Boston Massachusetts Ohio Guam Japan
Major hotels to require guests wear masks nationwide

WBZ Afternoon News

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Major hotels to require guests wear masks nationwide

"Soon be mandatory at the world's biggest hotel hotel chain. At least outside your rooms we hear from ABC is Alex Stone Face coverings have already been mandatory for workers at Marriott Hotels. Now CEO Arne Sorenson, making the announcement that customers laugh to wear masks went outside of their hotel rooms. Even the recent spikes across the U. S. And with guidance from health officials. We are now extending the requirement to wear face masks in all indoor public spaces of hotels to our guests, he says. The rule applies it all Marriott hotels even in counties and states that don't have mask requirements like Stone ABC News, however, in

Marriott Hotels Ceo Arne Sorenson Stone Abc News Alex Stone ABC
A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

Environment: NPR

05:19 min | 1 year ago

A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

"An international collective of electronic deejays and composers is taking their beats out of the dance club, and into jungles and forests. It's all to help save nature's greatest singers. Birds Catalina Maria. Johnson has the story of a guide to the Birdsong Project Robin. Perkins is a thirty three road DJ composer producer originally from glass of England. He goes by the name A. Spanish for the. Perkins produced his first project in Twenty fifteen a guy to the Birdsong of South America. The whole project was born of this idea of taking the songs of endangered birds and challenging musicians to make a piece of music from and so trying to marry these worlds of activism, all conservation Goodson and joining us. Perkins invited artists from each of the endangered or threatened birds homelands to build their own solves around the Birdsong. The beautiful thing about electronic music is that it opens up this whole toolbox of things that you can vies do right so you can take a sample of a bird song and do five million things to it. You can turn into an instrument itself. You can reverse it. You can have effects. You can sample. Ed Perkins has just finished the second project. A guy to the Birdsong of Mexico Central, America and the Caribbean. One of the musicians who responded to his call is Nicaraguan Sonic artist that on behavioral. She chose the Turquoise Proud Maat Maat or Guatemala. rankle to me was a very clear choice as a child I would see this bird freely flying around and meeting his partner, the travel in pairs most of the time in my backyard for sunsets. Beautiful mystical moment every day. What about wrangle is threatened by loss of habitat primarily due to deforestation, it's also Nicaragua's national bird. This bird represents a lot of symbolic in my area of the world's, because it represents freedom and these Central American countries have been striving for political social economic freedom for a long time. The idea of freedom was also part of the impetus for Al Ovando choice. Ovando is a member of the renowned Gutty for collective, that also includes musicians from what the my love on us and Nicaragua for the collective's contribution to the album Ovando chose the endangered black cat. Like the guava uncle, the black cat birds freedom is threatened by loss of habitat. Obando feels his people have a special kinship with the catbird and struggle for survival, like you've just imagining US coming all the way from the coast of West Africa into the Caribbean, ending up in believes that still continuing the struggle and trying to be part of what the world is today. Ovando also happens to be a devoted burger. He even convinced the. The band to add a technical writer to its contracts when the musicians perform at festivals, so we know what we should just add it on and just put just for fun. You know some of us in the collective avid burgers, and if it here's anybody at the festival. Who'd like to burning? We would love to go birding with them married. They would know some places some hot spots. In Oh, we could check out some birds. As with the first scalpels, all of the profits from the new release will support organizations in each region. One of them is birds, Caribbean. It's executive director Lisa. Sorenson explains how the recording not only help her efforts, but may also yield extended benefits helping to develop sites in the Caribbean that need infrastructure for example, there might be a beautiful place to go see birds, but there's no trail. There's no interpretive sign edge there to tell you about what you're seeing. So we're envisioning funding from this project will help us advance building the supply and building the demand for sustainable burden nature tourism. That's project founder. Robin Perkins wish to yeah. Hopefully people will come away from the album. Feeling inspired and feeling the need to listen against the Birdsong around them to do something to protect the natural spaces that we need to survive proceeds from a guide to the Birdsong of Mexico Central America, and the Caribbean will also benefit nonprofits in Costa Rica and Mexico.

Ed Perkins Caribbean Al Ovando Ovando Mexico Nicaragua Robin Perkins South America Maat Maat Catalina Maria Johnson United States Goodson Producer England Founder Obando Sorenson Writer Executive Director
Honoring George Floyd with Real Change, a Statement from Marriott

Squawk Pod

06:51 min | 1 year ago

Honoring George Floyd with Real Change, a Statement from Marriott

"CEO Arne Sorenson, and addressing the recent events surrounding race in this country, and in his company in a recent linked posts, saying for many years I've tried to use my purchased Marriott to advocate for opportunity for all regardless of race, gender, nationality, or any other point of human difference, each person deserves to be recognized for who we are and respected for common humanity, and the distinct qualities that make us unique joining us right now. Is Arne Sorenson? He is the CEO of Marriott international and Arnie. It's great to see you. Thanks for being with us today. Becky you to. Want to set this against the proper backdrop, obviously, the last several months have been incredibly difficult for everybody in the Travel and leisure industry. You are a global company. You've got more than seven thousand properties, one hundred and thirty one different countries, so you've been watching the arc of this as it all takes place, you've had to close properties. You've had to furlough employees. Where are we right now? How many of your properties are actually still shuttered? How many? Employees. Have you had to furlough? How many have you been able to bring back? Less aggression there, of course, the impact of Covid nineteen has been profound on our business. We've seen. By Revenue Sales, at army tells by ninety percent globally starting of course I in China then moving around the world as we got into March. And are low point. We had about two thousand, nine, hundred seventy five hundred hotels that were closed around the world. We've probably reopened three to four hundred of those I. Think when we look at even in the United States. We see the early signs of recovery, although we've gone from something like minus ninety percent revenue, something like minus eighty percent revenue so well in percentage terms. If you think about it from the bottom is up one hundred percent. is still a long long. Before and we suspect it's going to be. A slow climb beck. Levels we nineteen. So that sets the backdrop for what a difficult several months it's been already and how much you have on your plate. Employees are kind of watching this and not knowing what's happening on, either then you have the civil unrest and the riots that have taken place, and that adds to it so as A. What did this mean? Warning label to do. What are you hearing from your employees? This is obviously a just blew latest reminder, a frustratingly long Sharon criminal justice, particularly for for blacks and urban cities in the United States. where! There is unfairness that is profound, a and I suppose the only thing that are is what positive about this is the availability of cell. And the fact that we can see the outrageous behavior that obviously. Killed George Floyd in Minneapolis. Allows US I think to some sometimes. Put aside your search for him big. Unity Instead, say this is a profoundly unacceptable. And start to turn the corner in eight now. What is it that we can do about it? When I blog about this weekend, of course was was quite personal. I woke up Saturday morning and had this on my mind as everybody did. and. This is something we should communicate about. I'm obviously not black leader in a business community him United States. We have a very diverse work group and wanted to communicate with them like the more I think about it. It is not just a question about what we Mary Do, which is really the focus of blog, but recognize that what any individual company can do is simply not enough. We've gotTA. Find a way to. Make a dramatic more progress can. Is Space than any single company? Can You well what does that translate into in real terms? Arnie we, all the conversations are underway in a number of different organizations, so the VRT for Jampel is is talking about fitness a real time as we speak. I think many of us are are using our networks, folks both inside and outside our companies to. Talk about places we can make a difference I think I. Think and must each of us do what we can with our workforce and with our partnerships, unity's where we do business, but I think that we can band together also through outfits like the Bart recognized that we've got to work on criminal justice issues which. Company can't do probably ending together and advocating. Criminal Justice around educational opportunity around access to healthcare around access to financial resources. These are for big areas that. Collectively. We can push for not just. What can we do as companies, but what can we? Help implement in the policy space. To to put this outrageous behavior bindis. SAY THAT! These are real time conversations that are happening with you and your peers at the Business Roundtable How quickly do you think that this is something that can, it can translate into action. We had Randal Stevenson a former head of the business roundtable on earlier this week, and he said that look when any of these big companies kind of put their mind to it, they they can have a significant amount of say in policy in Washington and that we've seen it happen time and time again. For issues that are near, and dear to any of these individual companies, hearts or that make a real difference for business business doesn't work free markets don't work in an environment where a large class of our people are perceiving and experiencing injustice, so we have an imperative to begin to use our muscle and are influenced to begin to affect policy change to address this. That this is something where? This is a moment that all of these companies are going to stick with us and say that this A. An agenda that has to carry down I do I do it again. By suggesting for a second, Bart ought to band together and use its force together. I'm not crying. Excuse the conduct that any individual company will be we will continue to be very active in this space as myriad, but I think collectively would be that much louder and I think the Bart and other organizations will move very quickly and will not let up on this. I think our employees basis demand. I think society demands it. I think fundamental aspects of fairness and the importance of opportunity. demands it and I think as a consequence. Is this event I? Don't know whether you had a chance to see prisoner after noon. But one of the things that I found some

Ceo Arne Sorenson United States Arnie Marriott International CEO Becky Revenue Sales Bart Covid George Floyd Mary Do Minneapolis Sharon Randal Stevenson China United States. Jampel Washington
Violence in Resistance

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

08:46 min | 1 year ago

Violence in Resistance

"Cities and towns across the country. Protests have broken out telling the police killings of George, Floyd. We honor Taylor Tony mcdade others while many of these protests were peaceful. Others have turned violent with buildings, being destroyed or looted in clashes, breaking out between the police and protesters. In light of these events, we wanted to bring you an episode from our archives to better understand some of the history behind the black lives matter protests why protests sometimes turned violent how governments often respond and what the role of social media is all of this? This episode was originally recorded with Avi Green in two thousand seventeen, and we're bringing it you a bit earlier this week. Our usual schedule given this weekend's offense. Hi I'm Miranda Kelly, and this is the scholars strategy network Snow Jargon. Each week. We discussed in American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon. In this archive episode Avi spoke with Professor Ashley Howard She's an assistant professor of African American history at the University of Iowa shears their conversation. Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it. Well. It's interesting to think about the more recent violent protests in the context of that long longer history of protests and the longer history of civil rights and racial relations in the in the states as a white person and also somebody who's gone through sort of the standard His. You know I'm not a student history just like history and high school and all that sort of thing. Boy. Is there a difference in the way that we hear about the non violent protests. Martin Luther King. Gandhi all that sort of thing, and and then the way that Events like watts are described and certainly the way that the media today traits events like Ferguson. And there's a difference between how they were portrayed in the moment, and how they're remembered so watts south central l., A. Nineteen, sixty five. This is one of the first when the earliest large uprisings, and so there is the infamous McCone commission that came out where Ronald Reagan is referring to these folks as mad dogs and lawbreakers, and so even though they're pathologising to actions of the people who are engaging in this type of protests they. They. Still understand that it's rooted in politics. The kerner commission, which came out in nineteen, sixty eight, which looked at that. What's been called the long hot summer of nineteen, sixty seven, and that and that was summer with a whole bunch of protests and uprising. Something about that's correct. That was the deadliest summer and the one with the most amount so in the aggregate, the most amount of in terms of scale and scope the largest. Amount of uprisings, this is when you're and Detroit. Both happened and the Kerner Commission looked at this, and said that this is actually rooted in the fundamental desire to have full inclusion American Society and that it's this notion that had as Robert, focus and a scholar who wrote about this in the contemporary moment, said it's not a attempt to overrun America but to alert America. That's something is very wrong and I think when we look at it today, you know it seems. A bit as an anomaly, I at the time Ferguson has time of Baltimore. There was a black president. I think many of us had kind of been lulled into this false sense of security of a a sort of colorblind society. That racism was over. No longer are people using the end where no longer is. The clan burning crosses on people, Yar People's yards. It's over, but in many ways is racism became more systematic or structural, more institutional and hidden, and so these issues still exists is that people don't realize that they're

Omaha Kerner Commission Professor Ashley Howard Ferguson Avi Green Miranda Kelly Taylor Tony A. Nineteen Safeway Grocery Professor George Martin Luther King Ronald Reagan City Councils United States America Assistant Professor
Violence in Resistance

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

04:59 min | 1 year ago

Violence in Resistance

"Professor Howard. Thanks for coming on new jargon. Thank you for having me. Why did these protests happen? Well there's no one easy answer, but if I were to give an umbrella term to why they happen is that people feel that they are not receiving equal treatment under the law or in society, and they feel that all of the established means getting equal treatment have failed them. You mean in a way. They're sort of fed up and sick and tired, absolutely fed up in sick and tired I think this is something that people often forget when we think about not only the uprisings or the violent protests that happened in the past two or three years, but also looking historically that there are lots of preceding events that occur beforehand there. There were marches there protester letters of indignation. There were speeches given fun of City Councils, and for whatever reason those cries. Those grievances were gone unheeded unheard, and because of that people take to the streets, and it gets attention, and it's a very loud cry for help and for acknowledged professor. How can you just tell me about one protests from beginning to end? I would love so I'd like to start with kind of the protests. That's been nearest and dearest to my heart. It's the one that I've been researching the longest, and it also takes place in my hometown of Omaha. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, six fourth of July weekend. There are a group of young people. In a parking lot of the Safeway Grocery store on North Twenty four straight. And this kind of an area where people congregate and it was. Evening. GOOP young people were setting off firefighters or firecrackers. A police officer comes. They begin to throw firecrackers at this police vehicle, the police kind of get scared and equipped takeoff they come back and forth, and this kind of sets it off people. See Police as indicative at this time of the state of unfair treatment, and oftentimes these police, public attractions are the catalysts for these uprisings, so over the course of three days young people go up and down North Twenty Fourth Street in the black enclave, and they set small fires. They break windows. They steal goods out of these stores, and the very much engaged in property, violence as protests, but meanwhile has this is going on. You have the mayor of the city Av Sorenson actually meeting with these youth activists listen to their grievances listening to what? What they feel is going on the community. And why love, starting off with Omaha is because Omaha had a long history, a civil rights activism prior to the nineteen sixty six engagement, and what was so notable is at the end double ACP, an urban league had been begging the state for years to open up an unemployment office on North, Twenty Fourth Street, and for years that desire for a building was met. You know was ignored, and by the end of the week of those three days of uprisings North Omaha got their unemployment office. While you know it's funny because I think the words are so charged when we think about uprisings or protests that end in violence that involves some aspect of violence on TV you hear about riots. Can you tell me a little bit about why you call them violent uprisings, and what you think of some of those other words? I mean in some ways. I think riot is pejorative, because it seems that when people use that term, it's divorced from the context in which people are participating at it seems as it's just want violence as a social and Beran, and not actually rooted in issues, and you don't violence approach as protests had along and storied history in the world, so if you think of Labor bread riots. In France in England. Through the green corn rebellion in the United States hey, mark an uprising working class people people without a lot of political capital engage in violent protests as a way to make their voices heard, and it seems that really in the nineteen sixties when blacks began to use this as a primary tactic in their. Repertoire of protest actions that really begins to be demonized in not lauded as you know the underclass kind of going up against those in power and so for me, I like to use rebellion or uprising, because I see these actions on a political. Continue up that you have protests, you have marches, you have demonstrations and at one end of that spectrum. Is this violent protests? It's not divorce from the other things that have come before, but it's the next step when those issues are continually ignore it.

Omaha Professor Howard Safeway Grocery City Councils United States Professor Officer Beran France England
"sorenson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"sorenson" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"P. E. one of the volunteers as Ian Sorenson an industrial engineer with in depth knowledge of three D. printing he's with us from Alameda in what exactly are you guys doing so our team is actually making a variety of P. P. here for our children writers and dive essential workers in the bay area so we've got a group that's dealing with face mask doing selling material distribution breaking up material out laser cutting we have a group that is dealing with that includes and processing of teaching your teaching children zero which is sort of bottom bottle material excuse me on that material then goes out to a variety of major groups unity die cut with laser cut over his head in some cases to be used for think shields PhD are which is a type of controlled mask system which is that's been used by nurses a number of other groups that are doing three D. printing and primarily those three printer groups are are making special components as well so let me thank you I think she'll crying then so be making whatever components you can handle a variety of efforts that are being done at the same time and then we're also distributing and working collaboratively collaboratively excusing with different groups around the San Francisco Bay Area make sure that all of our co providers are given the tools that they need it's amazing because there's so many different groups and none of you would like around the same or you know work for the same people right this is just a verbal for lack of better term like a disjointed group of volunteers coming together in turning out a final product the bids and actually it's a lighter bigger groups that kind of had the capability previously and they were using them to help for small small volume production or they were doing prototyping or at least people that we're doing you know site engineering work and we all kind of spool that spontaneously at the same time to tackle this problem together so we're all working separately but together to accomplish the same goals and I guess the best way to describe it now is we're acting is just distributed manufacturing centers to get to about more efficiently than maybe a large factory would be able to because it takes a lot of time to set up to ring me up large management structures and logistical structures whether being the small independent teams that we are that allowed us to be more flexible and work more collaboratively collaboratively with our local communities I saw that I think I was reading that some of the folks who are working here volunteering were recruited by social media you know how did how did you fall into this I I actually was I fell into it the same way as a matter of fact so funny story I was actually laid off awhile ago and I've been looking for work and when the shelter in place order occurred I was kind of looking away for a way to volunteer started getting on the my local Facebook groups and somebody found a group that was calling he was helpful engineering and it was a series of people on Facebook it we're just looking to solve how to make Steelman provides ventilators and how to get TPP out as quickly as possible so one thing led to another and I started three D. printing components at home and then I got connected with another group in my hometown of Alameda and I kind of threw up a message like Hey what can we do collaborative we as a community to get parts out and to make things quickly for our notions in front line people that need this equipment that it doesn't exist and through that messaging I just connected with one group and another group and then it led me to the all bay area PP weapon during printing and face shield you know distribution and it kind of spiraled from that point and actually most of the people I work with all that connected through social media to people but I wouldn't have known you know five or six weeks ago now you know I feel like I've been working with them for years and some of them might actually never even that we interact primarily through social media through slack boards you know it's it's just kind of spun up quickly and and you know what we're talking about it because it feels like it's been forever but it really happened is remarkable we speak with Ian Sorenson he's volunteering with the all bay area P. P. either making critical medical supplies for front line workers battling the pandemic he's located in Alameda California so when you started this what kind of demand was there how difficult was it to keep up it was actually kind of challenging we've had quite a bit of demand and most of our material that we received and donated you know we've gotten people on the Facebook channel saying Hey we need here we don't have here and then we kind of split up our own web page and we've done Google forms trying to gauge what people need and we'll get responses like Hey we need the people to balance these people across the country that we can't get here so we try to connect to as many people as we can around the country it's been quite a challenge thanks Ian Ian Sorenson a volunteer with the group all bay area P. P. E..

P. E. Ian Sorenson engineer Alameda
Logano, Byron win Daytona 500 qualifying races

AP News Radio

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Logano, Byron win Daytona 500 qualifying races

"Ricky Stenhouse junior Alex Bowman were already locked into the Daytona five hundred first and second respectively based on their qualifying speeds so Thursdays dual races at Daytona set the rest of the field would join the gonna taking the checkered flag in the first event and William Baron in the second lagana will start the Daytona five hundred in third based on his win and barrel roll off in port for barn it was his first ever win at the Cup series level reed Sorenson cried tears of joy after making it into the big race on Sunday but NASCAR's first Mexican born driver dangle swear S. failed to qualify after getting wrecked out Jerry Jordan Daytona beach Florida

Alex Bowman William Baron Nascar Ricky Stenhouse Reed Sorenson Jerry Jordan Daytona Beach Flo
Logano, Byron win Daytona 500 qualifying races

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 years ago

Logano, Byron win Daytona 500 qualifying races

"Ricky Stenhouse junior Alex Bowman were already locked into the Daytona five hundred first and second respectively based on their qualifying speeds so Thursdays dual races at Daytona set the rest of the field would join the gonna taking the checkered flag in the first event and William Baron in the second lagana will start the Daytona five hundred in third based on his win winning anything in Daytona is a really big deal to me weather is the doles whether it's a tricycle race I don't really care I want to win it Byron will roll off in port for barn it was his first ever win at the Cup series level we're gonna use this momentum as it should be you know it's I feel like we didn't look into this reed Sorenson cried tears of joy after making it into the big race on Sunday but NASCAR's first Mexican born driver dangle swear S. failed to qualify after getting wrecked out Jerry Jordan Daytona beach Florida

Alex Bowman William Baron Daytona Byron Nascar Ricky Stenhouse Reed Sorenson Jerry Jordan Daytona Beach Flo
"sorenson" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

06:39 min | 2 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Go for a straight first in this game the Sorenson Baker answers for the badger's body minutes later to one one game badgers pretty good I don't remember even as quick as this is what we're seeing on these guys yeah well a lot of draft choices on this team Packers twenty six members schools by the NHL team for the gophers walls change course a couple of times towards a Minnesota net for Miller turns into the Wisconsin Badgers virgin taken the lead here was to go first to get under control it's a time of possession here's the first overshot awhile for so you know it's going to really take it off this first a hard time thirteen screens in front of the job of the middle and one the goal of the period watch out if they ever find their accuracy this full time dangling in the attacks on for the gold to the point what are the capital Wisconsin coming back out of the world's all from bold Caufield hold away from our first generation our we have to invite yes the is will talking with athletic director his take on this definitely yeah he thinks things are going one one I feel a certain rights on this team are older brother I should say as well the Minnesota song field a first round draft choice in last June's draft they have another first rounder on this team and and it's one that was drafted two years ago it was the goal tender we talked he made earlier in this this was even more spectacular have a safe what was he walked right out of the corner shop right at the hash marks another drive on for the gophers is on the ice here's this seven goals and you can go Jacksonville's so with two results scores Sorenson so far Johnson another for Daniel Lobato right Johnson just got rid of it in a hurry before anybody could break away from that faceoff circle these winding and shooting in the goal with a face off Jackson also so the pretty good first period at least early on one what most of the goals for a little bit here in the second half late last week St the missed the weekend before you to Michigan state twenty was the flu in the Minnesota is this constant go back to the room I see also trying to make plays the second half rather than react to situations trying to make things happen in a nice job the results on the top of I got to get back to sort passes are going to start to kill gophers connecting please to the cross to for and why Sean do back in a little point seven double wall now was it a cruise for looking for trying to break it up is he has been busier than the ten shots on goal will indicate the badgers are going to have a lot of the tips in this area and Jack all ahead on his way and he would had a particularly keen on that last sequence because first way up at the blue line trying to get to a loose puck what's guys go to summarize those in seconds left in the sold us all to tie game one to sort first pick it up this polls the one with the Wisconsin Badgers full for both teams during.

Sorenson Baker
Aromatic Dressing Featuring Paige Sorenson

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

07:45 min | 2 years ago

Aromatic Dressing Featuring Paige Sorenson

"Today we're excited to sit down with page Sorenson as she talks to us about the process and benefits of aromatic dressing page. Thank you so much for coming in and talking with us today. We're so so happy to have you so happy to be here so this is a topic that I think a lot of people may be a little no more unfamiliar with. So how would you describe. Aromatic dressing Oh. I'm so excited to share its superfund aromatic. Dressy while I have to say I didn't come up with this I didn't design it. I learned it from a woman. Name of Vanessa Ovens. She's actually a top leader Indo Tara in Australia and I saw her speaking one day on stage and I just got chills all over my body because I knew what she was saying. Just lined up perfectly with me and my message and my life and my career and so so really just over all aromatic dressing is a a quick practice that you would do in the morning or or in the evening whenever you jump out of the shower and I think it's bigger than the oils and the actions however the oils are so important in this. Yes and and then you just take it like one body part at a time and I always start from so okay. Let me back up. So you'RE GONNA make a small mixture Mr so When you jump out I usually do fractionally coconut oil and I do some oil some of my favorite oils and just a couple of drops here and there? So you've got this fun. John Little Mixture to rub rub all of your body and I usually start with my legs and I moved my way upward and but the secret about it is. You're saying positive gophers to yourself. Okay how loud. And so I feel like aromatic. Dressing is super powerful. It has a lot of ways to involve golf healing in your life and acceptance radical acceptance and infusing love and goodness and all of that is just wrapped up with awesome oils. And so I just love it. I've been doing it for a while and I teach it all the time and I think it has some power. So did that even answer your question that you asked me. What was the question? How would you describe? Yeah yeah so it's very it's the funny thing is is when I teach people when I teach the crowd sometimes I can just see body language. It's awkward it's uncomfortable. You know a lot of times. People need to hear that they are. They allowed not even talk nice to themselves like that. Random new concept for people I know within the culture. Everyone's a little bit more progressive in that area. We're very you know into self care and self love but overall it's really fun to watch people experience it and then move into like a comfort level level where they're like. Oh my gosh this can really helped me. And so that's fun to watch the transformation with people so I love that and I love the fact that you brought up that some people are very very uncomfortable with saying Nice things to their body and this aromatic dressing making that space for people to give a little bit of love and honor to their body is such a beautiful thing. Yeah yeah absolutely. So how long have you been teaching and practicing aromatic dressing. So I think I learned about five years ago maybe four. I'm so bad with the numbers but I'm GonNa go oh with five and implemented it immediately and once I did it after a while I just knew it was just using from me I needed to. I share it with everyone around me and so like I said before. I've taught a lot of people to do it. Probably a lot of women respond to it really well all because they forget like I just feel like a lot of women get stuck in the Rut of taking care of everyone around them they forget to take care of themselves and so oh I feel like this is such a really good daily practice that takes less than two minutes and has a positive effect on the rest of your day and that is great. And it's so quick and so easy another aspect where you have used this aromatic dressing is in your work as a fashion stylist and now the fashion world definitely has a bad reputation for you know. Low body image and difficulty with positive body image. So how has air matic dressing and how essential oils helped you promote that positive body image in this kind of toxic environment. Great Question Love It. Yeah I get a lot of questions like fashion styling and oils. I don't really. I understand how they crossover. That's kind of the beauty of Dough Tara. In general I feel like Doh Tara can and essential oils. General can just work their way into so so many interesting avenues in life and so when oils and fashion crossover for me it was just. It was magic. It was magic for my life so my basic fashion philosophy or my foundation is identifying who you are on the inside and then expressing it on the outside side. Okay so just a quick background on me. When I was little I I knew I had talent in fashion and I just I I knew like I think it was eighty nine. I knew I had something where I could express myself through clothing and it worked really well and I started ready to rely on that probably just as much as verbal expression while so I've always really relied on my clothing and sharing who I am and showing up and making connections based on what I'm wearing so whenever I enter room I always think to myself. What can I say or how can influence this room before four? I opened my mouth. So that's kind of my foundation is if you can identify who you are. Then you have an easier time expressing who you are on the outside so with that ad in oils and mental health and really being preventative with with you know putting bad things into your body or trying to just have a healthy lifestyle overall oils play into this and so many areas. I mean I've have done things where I do a lot of really fun campaigns on social media but Fun things like right now. I'm wearing a bright yellow shirt so I would post my outfit and be like what oil would would you pay with this one royal matches this what oil you connect with if you look at my outfit or you know just somehow connect that together and then with my profession nightdress a lot of public speakers and right now I'm actually addressing a lot of authors so people who are using their words and putting it down on paper and having having an influence and effect on you know their fan base or who. They're speaking to and so lots of times before we go out on stage so all dress and style all them for their for their event and I always take into consideration. Who are they? What's their identity? What's their message? How can align the clothing to elevate their influence and so with that I utilize oils as well so before any of my clients? Go out on stage. I'll be like do. We need to get some balance on you. Or let's get some peppermint or past tents on you. I always recommend past tense and balanced together. If you are public speaking it just does beautiful thing. So I- infused oils oils in every angle of my life. I use them daily. I share them daily and I love allowing people around me to experience them even if it's their first time like most people. I'm I always offer lemon. Do you have the senior water you know. Because it's like so wonderful to drink addicted so I try and I mean I'm not not trying very hard. It just naturally comes to my life where do oils fit in. How can I elevate this human and help them express who they are

Indo Tara Vanessa Ovens Sorenson Dough Tara John Australia
"sorenson" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Chris Jones Devens attack over Kansas City Chiefs first off his his availability is in question right now I mean it sounds like a health how healthy will he be coming in dealing with a calf injury but Chris Jones is the best player on the Kansas City Chiefs defense for for for sure I think you could argue he's the second best player on the team in general only behind Patrick my homes but you know to everything you guys just said you know Hey you're talking about right he most are you talking about George kill well who's one guy that can kind of messed up that whole formula well Chris Jones can stop the run game he's athletic to get off the blocks and stop the adjoining game and all they want to keep it on play action will he's the kind of guy that can get the quarterbacks based on the fact that part of the offense of the forty Niners as well

Sorenson
"sorenson" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

05:43 min | 2 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Ability in the intelligence to do it I love those two safety say have dental Sorenson's made so many big plays to in the last two games I don't think the safeties are playing great yeah they are they definitely are and you're right honey badger does have kind of that trolley Troy Apollo maillot we just talked about can move around you never know where he is all right I'm going to coach bill okay I'm gonna send you buddy I will not now that how they do that with us too obvious okay the hell with him I'm going with Steve's Bagnall of all right the defensive coordinator I am you know because of my tattoo buddy yeah yeah it's a struggle is going to have to have a creative game plan you know one Hey to what you're talking about with Tyrone Matthew gonna to be smart and disguises right to trip things up for Kyle Shanahan so he can't get in the get a bead on to like all when they're in this formation the pie in this defense and then he draws up some play that just screws it over you got to be careful of that so we've got to be creative but yet sound at the same time because within being that creative in like you know to what we're just talking about my my the Tyra Matthew jumping all over the place as you know you don't wanna disguising so much to where Hey you're responsible for this gap in the run game but you're back you're acting like you're playing free safety should be down here and also any let up a fifteen yard run so there's gonna be a delicate balance there for him between creativity and being sound and yeah so I'm gonna go was this bag I think the line backers for the forty Niners are going to be a huge key to this new could pick any one of the yeah I'm gonna go with Drake Greenlaw okay because they wouldn't be here without him right he made the play in the Seattle gays adopting Jacob Hollister there on the goal line and that's why they're here now I have no doubt about that that play he made in he just seems to come up and and make some a player to every game that kind of stands out so I'm gonna pick him as my linebacker but I think all three of those lines I'm backers are really important for the forty Niners against Patrick my homes a what he can do well and and yet to Europe do I mean I don't know we think that that would be probably the guy they use this file right that's okay yeah you got to have a I almost picked him to for that same reason you got to have the spy who doesn't fall for the head fake Okey Doke instead and go flailing by and that was the first domino that fell yeah twenty seven yard touchdown account when he does the full turn you have to have a spy who is capable closing the deal yeah forty Niners do that I dated else I got that right last for me and I got I gotta give a shout the big cap because we did a draft on Friday of the most likely MVP candidates other than quarterbacks and this is a smart pick and I think this is a critical guy MVP or otherwise me call Hartman I has a what he can do in the return game right hello look at what he did in the in the game against the the Texans are down twenty four nothing he gets a big return yeah that contribute so that on that fire that got them moving and you yep Desmond Howard I think back to that Super Bowl the Packers in the patriots you know you get a couple of big returns you flipped the field position at what you make it easier for Pat and hope to get a touchdown and it's it's one of those things is one of those little pin pricks did you just those things that can make you feel like it's not my day and if you're not able to make that tackle in the return game to get a cheap touch down to get a short field that's the kind of things to be hard for the forty nine server com when you know used to be in the Superbowl if you fell down seven or ten points you just cut a lawyer in the planning and everybody I feel like this one could be that way because they feel so evenly matched going in like I feel like if somebody gets up early there's a chance that it's just going to deflate for the team the falls behind I think both teams are mentally tough enough to overcome it yeah but it reminds me of those days where the team that got that first big move that first big break that first big lead right it was game over I I don't I I do feel like there's more of a sense than that this year than normal I I you're right I wouldn't bet on that I do think it's going to be a close football game but I I don't know why but I guess it's because of you know both offenses have areas of dominance where they can take over the game and I'm I'm with you there's a part of me that almost said Sir and because it yeah I don't know if either one of these teams will be either come out if they get too far behind early I'll tell you feel like that if that happens it's going to be the Kansas city is going to be that team is going to be dominating don't you know I think because you have a sense that the forty Niners should be the team that would be I I don't know I think you go either way I think I'm running game running game is there for the forty Niners that when they run that trap play on third Nate and scored a touchdown for the first point to the game against the Packers in the NFC championship game and the collective responses it's done yeah I mean yeah that if if the chiefs cannot stop the running game and they go down the field and score a touchdown in the first couple the drives and have that's it that's what I feel like the chiefs because the chiefs fall behind like they've done any SO two playoff games they're not coming back it's a forty no not against this team I I agree with you I don't think they will either think how by ten or more well maybe ten or more I think it's the big point is of the get up but if they get behind and that type of lead to like what we've talked about already I mean you're just talking about a front for who down I was like okay there's no worry about the power run game at all they're gonna throat every play and we just have to get more homes in their front for if you just gonna let them think about that all day long there they're gonna ruin the game all right that's our draft for today good job one good job getting guys that you get the the trophy there is no trophy when we return tonight is opening that used to be media day regardless it is a cluster of fun we're gonna talk about what question would like to have answered when everyone is available for the media tonight we'll be back with our pets learn if this be your nose hubs so congested use the Vicks side X. nasal spray starts working in.

Sorenson
"sorenson" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The server runs on around the defences thought occurred to down the wall is a keeper lose all the boxes back what walkers are covering for the defense the minister of over and sing called will take control of their own and friend and bush's unable to close full first keep the missiles were well covered by Saint Paul Walker again I'm going to college to many men on the Laughlin hop back on the fence as well Sorenson was on the problem and are still putting our draws back up after that pacified but loss for the whole S. there also was a river mover was at a grand rapids more of a grand rap they don't teach is that kind of stuff and well we go first perfect for the long pause pause slice the left wing of Sorenson Johnny Sorenson working on next to the fence from for Saint Paul we'll shop with the traffic jam prevented it from going anywhere close to the another Minnesota family coming purchasing quality housing to please for Wisconsin Fulton poll sixty meters on the ice on the delayed penalty the card into the Minnesota is owned the former for hinges who's turns off the board always after the point so for the initial the group will be penalized the.

bush Saint Paul Walker Johnny Sorenson Minnesota Wisconsin
"sorenson" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

06:33 min | 2 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Make it till five o'clock today before we talked about the alleged victim of a crime and that's presidents alliance that's three different times president Sorenson at least three different times has denied being pressured by the president the call shows laughter pleasantries cordiality so good I I love that Indian I would know that is the I'm not trying to floor speeches of standard not a lawyer but that was submitted to the Billboard it down to look this is the you know it if we're gonna put on the crime here list we have boom boom boom more Kelly I'm trying to just a moment is able to stay with us a few more minutes and answer your questions so hold tight sharing in Williston and Tim on I ninety four and that we have another one of our listeners to stop by for some of our free prizes and low res here the race from Bismarck hello ray how are you today I'm good wonderful do you listen to the show sometimes we make you mad you gonna turn turn on Ashley music or what did Tonya thank you you can be honest just as I do listen to country music do you that's that's that's beautiful great glad you came by the open house today thank you so much thank you and we have some of what you work with crystal there decide which one mall of America passes we but we've added those now because we're running out of pillows but what what whatever you what you think would be great okay sounds good I personally would pick the body pillow but the mall of America passes are good if you take a bunch of people down there I think the mall of America pass my kid is on when riding yeah thanks a lot good to meet you thank you nice meeting you speaking of kids are there will be some children they will not have their parents home for the Christmas holiday and some of those parents are folks involved in this three ring circus that will have the so vote before Christmas that could be that could be you Kelly I mean from from a perspective of somebody new to this game in in in the sense of being a freshman member of Congress made did you did you ever think you have to let your wife they only have about I can't be home for the kids I can't I can't can't be Christmas I mean this this is just beyond the pale isn't yeah and I mean hopefully that doesn't happen and I I think I'd be remiss not just this last great she sounded like a nice lady but the Charles how you services is one of the coolest I mean no eight back I was very humbled but they do a really tough really important work they do a really well really really well so if we ate in the Christmas season when you're doing that don't worry about Kelly Armstrong in DC think about some of those kids who may need a little support and in the agency needs a little support to sell but you're right I mean it's we're we're already going to be in an extra we can I hope in that week we can do something like U. S. M. C. A. and you know actually from the government are responsible manner but I think it's gonna be impeachment and I mean I think speaker Pelosi told the site this morning she was asked in the in the Arab press comes today you know why this fast why the speed do you think more time would give more members to your chance to get up to speed on everything on other vote she said we'll bring them along that was that was that was your answer so numbers it's on the track at a time when is this going to happen wow is by the way let's make sure we understand that the time line the political section the reason they're moving at the way they're moving it is because our members have to go home for the Christmas break and because they are Iowa caucuses at the beginning of February in two thousand twenty so the reason they're moving at the speed has nothing to do with the underlying case it has everything to do with politics present sherry in Williston for Congress runs from go ahead yes I have a quick question after all this impeachment garbage if the possibly done are there going to be any area repercussions for these people they broke the law they have fabricated lie cost taxpayers millions of dollars it seems as though to a bunch of us that off from bill and Hillary Clinton on up a plethora of people it it looks as though they're gonna get away with all of this trees nest on an illegal action and I know there's probably a few of the numbers that would like to see here yes caution on these people human nature is well we got we slip by that and didn't get held accountable and nothing so next time we're just going to do it again only working to be more underhanded didn't sneaky so everybody's concerned about this repeating itself over the next elections in my opinion view more than flapper Monaghan maker hurt there should be present time there should be fine there should be dismissed will of offices or light that what in my opinion to help avoid kind of thing happening again sherry I can hear your voice the frustration that many people out here you're you're speaking for all of us right now and how how would you answer her Kelly well politically they have to pay a cross at the ballot box I mean that's the way it works one of the problems in the house and this goes on both sides so many of these people come from Saddam safe yes X. the the best answer I can give you on that is the Attorney General Barr has appointed attorney dot dot Durham to look into these things and bad sport what were those kind of consequence after com but I would say I there is a difference the Amy one of the things I want to be careful of because I think this is one of the things Democrats did Republicans and again I mean my criminal defense background gives me a different view of this not all of them are equally culpable I mean there are repair are people who are politically culpable and then there are people who are potentially legally culpable and if they're legally culpable I think we have the right Attorney General we have the right price prosecutor to investigate it see if there's a crime see if the conduct fits the crime and move forward in there and mean and there's a reason they empanel a grand jury and we'll see what happens there we should call very much and I understand your frustration you keep up the fight and when will do the same to keep us accountable K. let's go to Tim travel nine ninety four for congressman Kelley Armstrong yes good morning they are if I were to be traveling to Minneapolis that he definitely stopping by your open house you may get some gives a sheet fortunately I can't do that today but what your father.

president Sorenson
The Mysterious Kidney Disease Striking Central America

All Things Considered

03:43 min | 2 years ago

The Mysterious Kidney Disease Striking Central America

"A mysterious form of kidney disease has killed tens of thousands of people in Central America many of them are relatively young farmworkers in their thirties and forties kidney failure is now the second leading cause of death in Nicaragua and El Salvador the new disease has also turned up in hot humid agricultural communities in India and Sri Lanka some researchers now say it may be linked to global warming and Pierce Jason Beaubien reports in an editorial in the current issue of the New England journal of medicine doctor Cecilia Sorenson calls this new mysterious form of kidney failure the Sentinel disease in the era of climate change probably wouldn't have occurred if it weren't for the extreme global temperatures that we're seeing Sorenson from the university of Colorado has been studying chronic kidney disease of unknown origin also known as C. K. D. U. for the last three years the disease was first flag by doctors and central American the nineteen nineties farm workers from sugar cane plantations in Nicaragua El Salvador and Guatemala we're turning up at clinics with end stage kidney disease yet they didn't have diabetes or hypertension or some other traditional factor that might explain why their kidneys were failing among the early cases almost all work in agriculture but it's also been found among miners fishermen and workers in hot industrial plants then farm workers in Sri Lanka in tropical parts of southern India started coming down with a similar condition it's very difficult to prove direct attribution to say this person is sick because of climate change right if that link the very difficult but we can say is that this disease is occurring in parts of the world that are experiencing unprecedented warming which we can directly attribute to climate change there are many theories about what's causing CKD you most focus on heat stress and dehydration others are looking at heavy metals and chemicals in the drinking water sure Lanka banned the herbicide glyphosate sold under the brand name roundup over concerns that it was causing CKD you early on some health officials blame the epidemic on home brewed alcohol Neil Pierce at the London school of hygiene and tropical medicine is also studying CKD you in Central America and southern Asia he's skeptical of the link to climate change it's very unusual phenomenon you know it's all done with in this general area for forty years and it's and it's very unusual to come across something on this the disease destroys people's kidneys incredibly quickly distract some sugar cane workers to over a two year period lost a third of their kidney function it may well be true that heat street and they're extremely bad working conditions in Central America that ending on the link to climate changes that can you he doesn't think that the relatively small rising global temperatures of the last few decades would cause such a significant epidemic also Pierce has looked for CKD you in other places with similar climatic conditions to central America's Pacific coastal plains and hasn't found it if you go to South India this villages that are very close to each other and some of them were getting CKD you and some of them and not you know and the bicycle the house and then all the hottest have been the yeah there's something very strange going on there that you really interesting scientifically and obviously tragic in terms of the death and illness that is caused Sorenson in her editorial doesn't claim that she has the exact answer to what's causing this strange kidney disease but she just about everyone else study it agrees that the disease is heat related and as global temperatures rise she warns that health professionals should think about how climate change may be driving what

Kidney Disease Central America Forty Years Three Years Two Year
Hickenlooper shakes up presidential campaign staff

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:23 sec | 2 years ago

Hickenlooper shakes up presidential campaign staff

"There's a shake up in the campaign of one of the Democrats running for president former Colorado governor John Hickenlooper at least five senior staff members of Hickenlooper's campaign are leaving first national finance director Dan Sorenson is leaving to join battle Rourke's campaign and Hickenlooper announced he's brought in a new campaign manager ousting Brad Komar who ran his twenty fourteen gubernatorial campaign ABC's

President Trump John Hickenlooper Dan Sorenson Rourke Brad Komar ABC Colorado Senior Staff Finance Director
Hickenlooper shakes up presidential campaign staff

John Batchelor

00:34 sec | 2 years ago

Hickenlooper shakes up presidential campaign staff

"Getting closer to the point where that enormous field of democratic presidential wannabes is going to get a little smaller word of a major shake up in John Hickenlooper's campaign at least five senior staff members of Hickenlooper's campaign are leaving first national finance director Dan Sorenson is leaving to join battle Rourke's campaign and Hickenlooper announced he's brought in a new campaign manager ousting Brad Komar who ran his twenty fourteen gubernatorial campaign then a short time later it was confirmed Hickenlooper's communications director digital director and New Hampshire political director will all be leaving

John Hickenlooper Dan Sorenson Rourke Brad Komar Director New Hampshire Political Director Senior Staff Finance Director
"sorenson" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on KOMO

"And Sorenson is left the Hickenlooper campaign to join rival better Rourke's election bid Hickenlooper's communication director said it made personal and professional sense for Sorenson to be in Texas and that the Hickenlooper campaign wishes him well president trump says military tanks will be on display in Washington DC this form will have a great fourth of July in Washington DC it'll be like no other it'll be special and I hope a lot of people come in it's going to be about this country and it's a salute to America and I'm gonna be here I mean to say a few words and we're gonna planes going overhead the best fighter jets in the world and other plans to and we're gonna have some tanks stationed outside speaking in the oval office the president says the tanks will have to be stationary though because they could destroy the roads federal investigators say they started analyzing the cockpit voice recorder from a twin engine turboprop that hit a hangar after taking off from an airport in suburban Dallas ten people were killed in the crash including a family of four your listening to ABC news ever wonder why European seem to speak so many languages maybe it's because they use babble the number one selling language learning Japanese battles award winning technology gets you speaking right away whether you're learning Spanish French for German and best of all you'll remember what you've learned I always thought I was bad at languages but after using battle I can tell you I was just talk the wrong way using battles ten to fifteen minute lessons you can be speaking confidently in your new language within weeks I was amazed that I.

Sorenson Rourke Hickenlooper director Texas trump America president Washington Dallas ABC fifteen minute
"sorenson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And CEO. Arne sorenson. This is Bloomberg. Adopt US kids presents what to expect when you're expecting a teenager learning the lingo goat, O AT acronym, stands for greatest of all time as in spaghetti sandwiches for dinner there. My dad, you're the go. You don't have to speak team to be a perfect parent. Thousands of teens in foster care love you just the same. Visit adopt US kids dot org. Brought to you by the US department of health and human services, adopt US, kids and the Ad Council. When you want to. Right now. You can get both sprints unlimited plan and the all new Samsung. Galaxy S ten included for just thirty five dollars per month per line for five lines. All you need is approved credit in an eighteen month lease no trade in required. Visit sprint stores sprint dot com or call eight hundred sprint one who fifty dollars a month after twenty to fifty credit applied within two bills against overly remain. Limited. Six thirty twenty eight thirty dollars per month per line for five lines with auto pay data deprioritization rejections be Mexicans. Use. Restrictions apply. This week. Find great deals at Walgreens, now pure laundry, detergent, one ninety nine with card and buy one get one fifty percent off sun protection products like banana Vode offer. Good with card now. Thirty six twenty nine nineteen get great deals on the essentials, you need right here at your neighborhood. Walgreens, well greens, trusted since nineteen o one while supplies last. Restrictions and exclusions apply. See store for details..

bloomberg department of health ceo bills council ad arne sorenson
Marriott CEO diagnosed with stage 2 pancreatic cancer, will remain in role

Chris Plante

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Marriott CEO diagnosed with stage 2 pancreatic cancer, will remain in role

"The CEO of Bethesda based Mariott international has been diagnosed with stage, two pancreatic cancer Arne Sorenson who had been working with the company for twenty three years says he plans to stay on the job as he fights the disease. In a statement Sorenson says the cancer was discovered early. It does not appear to have spread in the medical team. And I are confident we can realistically aim for complete cure Sorenson is sixty jeopardy host Alex back. Also. Recently announced he is fighting pancreatic

Arne Sorenson Alex CEO Bethesda Mariott International Twenty Three Years
"sorenson" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Xtra Sports Radio 1300 AM

"Of minutes face off to the right of Martin Jones. Nineteen shots already for the avalanche. They have two goals came to Rodwell fire Instinet not on target. Eric Johnson will reach board and keeping alive for the avalanche killing can't get to Carl Soderberg behind that Soderbergh peeling away one handed of apar- corner Soderbergh skated up the wall unsure where he was trying to go knocked away by market wear glasses and the Ansari rate group Alexander curve out to offer air Johnson got away from him. Aggressive is Derek retard. He'll slap around farside. The nearside Soderbergh has it. Here's a shot say may tones healing ways. Brisard bonkers losses skate Johnson that ply is blocked by Sorensen here. He comes to the sharks with Gordon Sorenson Thornton shot school. Joe Thornton is sticking goal. The playoffs and a tool and one Eric Johnson. Well, the shot was blocked led to a odd man rush for the San Jose Sharks. And they make the ads pay for their mistakes. Boy playoffs. A fascinating. The momentum is all avalanche. There are up to two one situation. They get a four minute PowerPoint. They fill spore the Diplock shot and with Thornton does. So well he waits for a second. And he just waited for our open out just a bit as he's coming across Broza five whole Thornton is so much conversation about a great passer. Put a sport a lot more goals, but he always looked to pass break shot. So we're to hear the second period halfway through this hockey game. Calvert will grow a check pocket. Susana quarter game. Ryan. It put online akitas at door on his man down to the ice. It's reveal Huggins loose on the nets picked up by sharks fast behind an Vander. Kane is there wraparound tried tonight and trying to break out the direction that Calvert back and feed in the quarter, four GT compromising you wanna put rates Tom for their ahead of Justin Braun pockets held up along. The wall comes free Nikitas door pinching downbeat and tend to take care of the puck beer the door will get it free. It's in the space Macron is there. She's open space up ice in entertainment appointment, get it onto center where reveal will bring it ahead mostly being offside. Here's a shot say by grew our hill, hang on. We'll take time out. I know to go in the second goals by Wilson and Thornton here in the second period back and forth tied to you're listening to the Stanley Cup playoffs on the radio network. You've got the Stanley Cup playoffs on the altitude radio network. Sports fans, Vic.

Gordon Sorenson Thornton Eric Johnson San Jose Sharks Soderbergh Rodwell fire Instinet Calvert Derek retard Sorensen Carl Soderberg Martin Jones hockey Alexander Justin Braun radio network Ryan Broza Huggins Kane
Caver who helped rescue Thai soccer team rescued from Tennessee cave

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:32 sec | 3 years ago

Caver who helped rescue Thai soccer team rescued from Tennessee cave

"British cave. Diver who was part of the dramatic rescue of Thai youth soccer team last year was himself rescued from pitch black underwater cave in northern Tennessee on Wednesday night. Josh Bradley was retrieved from the cave near grains, Gainsborough by technical cave. Diver Ed Sorenson, his mental state was impeccable. He's a consummate professional. So he did a great job eighty as rescue and we were in and out quickly and smoothly. Bradley. It was made a member of the order of the British empire in December for his role in the tire Eski was in good, shape and refused medical

Josh Bradley Ed Sorenson Tennessee
"sorenson" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:36 min | 3 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"And I'm your host Paul IRA. Today's guests are John Sorenson from Zappa's. Good morning, John. Good morning. How's it going marvelous as well? As Michael Cooper in James Stein old hats here in the studio. Good morning, gentlemen wondering and they're from southwest gas. So our guest today, we'll talk about local sustainability programs at their companies as well as their participation and sponsorship of the upcoming green fast who goes to green fast everybody with a brain celebration downtown Summerlin on Saturday April twentieth from ten to five. So I gotta plug green fest a little bit that our our tenth year. I think my seventh. I'll be there selling raffle tickets, please. Combine see me. That's the only way to win some great prizes last year. They gave away an air conditioning unit residence where condition unit and installed. It. The year before that they gave wig beautiful red bicycle which I one there's prizes. There's a lot of fun for the kids. There's earth balls for the kids to play on. There's a beer tent for you to sit in while you watch your kids planet earth balls or watch the music up on the live stage. So lots of fun. Great. Sustainable booths everywhere electric vehicle parade in the morning of STAN Ryan here. Let him plug that a little bit. That's his baby. It's going to be wonderful. It's getting bigger every year. Like, I said it's the tenth year. It's a lot of fun. Last year was a nice sunny day. There was a food food court. Not a food court a farmers market. Great stuff in there. Tons of tons of products foods of trinkets, lots of things there. So come and join us for green fast downtown Summerlin, April. Twentieth. Ten to five so today, we're talking with John from Zappa tells a little bit about yourself. John your background? And how'd you got involved with sustainability? What's your job? It's apples. So my mic. My coral is apoptosis customer loyalty team. And we are the folks if you get soda from Zappa's, you get two left shoes you call our team. Will you make right for you? Oh, there's a poem. So there's a there's there's ways that we can spread our wings as opposed to a really proud of that tradition as EPO. So if you have a passion, and it doesn't turn the company backwards and actors one or more of our core values, we get the green light to go. And my first step out of my Korhola was the leaf program and leave stands for leading environmental awareness for our future. And it's a passion for passions for projects. It's it's totally not paid. It's all volunteer force. And I was given the the lead lead link role. So we have the chance to have our advocates out in our community and engage our community with all kinds of services, we team up with nonprofits we team up with our local infrastructure like a rebel Serb Republic services southwest gas, and we have our birthday festivities on board. We also have our big film festival. We sponsor though, while the Senate film festival firm friends of our wilderness. So we've got a lot on a lot on the plate you do. So that's great. So tell me about Zach Posen how. How are they sustainable? What are they we have we've worked with nonprofits quite a bit. And we take ours. Poignant saw well. For example, went down to Huntington harbour yesterday and bid at big cleanup pulled out four hundred seventy six pounds of trash in somebody's lawn chair. We did it all on kayaks and paddle boards too. So we have a lot of fun. So we also engage. Our opponents in maybe changing our lifestyle habits on insides Apple's campus, and we are able to engage agents so much that they can take those practices from campus to their homes as well. And maybe teach their children the same same practices that we hopefully can teach them on campus as well. So not we know that not everybody comes to the plate with the same kind of education or training. So some know about sustainability some don't so we have to make sure that those pieces are built head, and we provide those for our advocacy program as those that's great tell us a little bit about Tony Shay. You're you're fearless leader. I shared a mohawk story with have so both him. And I were there at the only ones that report Mohawks for a while. Is apple? So it's pretty cool. But beyond that, Tony is fantastic. He is I've personally feel that Zappala says it's a incubator for aerial ship. We have a chance to grow ourselves twenty provides that avenue for us. He's a super super CEO. I just I love the guy is super for everybody to just have the chance to meet this guy is just it's it's without question. One of the most admired real experiences you could ever have. But he allows everybody to just grow themselves turn to ten themselves into what they want what they want to be. If you have a passionate like I said, if it doesn't turn our company backwards ashes one or more of those core values, we have the chance to make those those passions girl. So a little more about your background. Where'd you come from share? So few years ago. I stepped stepped away from twenty one years with the air force had a great career there. And through that the tail end of that career. I was in a program where we had to look at our recycling and sustainability programs within our squadron those those those project. Right. There is what's installed the the passions of mine who wants to gear up not just the the the material. But the person the person power behind those those projects and find out what you know, what really makes people tick behind that what really gets people to get behind these projects. And I found out that there's a lot of want to. It's just the direction of how to get people into those into these avenues of of of making those avenues approachable and to -able, and so through Zappa's it just elevated again, we're able to pro-choice nonprofits and gets help from let's say green alliance and and find out what they're doing and how we can team up and make those projects kind of similar on southbound. We also engineer our own programs inside, and we share those with green alliance as well. Our friends of Nevada wilderness are the Huntington Arbor surfrider foundation, and we share those ideas. And so those those just manifest great great values, and we can share those whether community in our in our insiders Apple's campus as well. Well, I know it's apples is probably globe. As far as delivery. What are you guys doing outside of Las Vegas to help the planet outside Las Vegas? We're trying to well we have a carbon offset program. So when we travel we travel quite quite quite broad. You know, we travel all over the world. So having a carbon offset program where employees can gates the amount of airline miles, and we put those into carbon offset program, which are evaluated every year. So we can just our flights or flight patterns. So you keeping track of yourself. We are we've tried to be accountability. Yeah. That's that's great house understands apples us a little renewable energy. How you harness that and include energy efficiency practices in your corporate culture. Yeah. So we have we have..

Apple Zappa John Sorenson Summerlin Las Vegas Paul IRA Tony Shay James Stein Michael Cooper Huntington harbour Serb Republic STAN Ryan Zach Posen Senate Zappala CEO
"sorenson" Discussed on Around the Rim

Around the Rim

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"sorenson" Discussed on Around the Rim

"I know she's excited to be in the tournament this year of after winning the w an IT two seasons ago. So she knows what it takes to win. And she really has these kids believing and what she wants. Well, I. I wholeheartedly agree with that. I love Hailey Brown as well. And let me tell you Michigan makes it past Kansas state and logo pass Robert Morris. What a game that would be an old began matchup from Kim Barnes Rico, Saint John's days and Jeff wall global, Dave. That would be a dog fight. So yeah, we'll definitely be watching. And we'll be watching you Kristie. We know you will be in Iowa. So we'll watch you on the two, but we're else can we catch you on social media where can fans follow you? At Christie, w Scott fifty one on Instagram and Twitter, and I will be heavily utilizing my social media during the Iowa City bracket. So actually one of our kids from southlake through I coach she's a freshman at Mercer t Evans, the nudie. So it's like this crazy connection of going there to see her play as well. So it's going to be a lot of fun for me personally. But I love the game. So it's going to be awesome. Getting to see one of your former players from south lakes in the NCAA tournament. Wow. How awesome would that be? Yeah. I forgot to add that to your resume. Coach is well, congratulations on your run and the Virginia state tournament as well. Thank you so much Kristie. We appreciate your time. And they continue just being amazing be life going for me to Riga. We need we need role models. That's you. Doing for the game. And and just keep pushing pushing and letting people know what a great game when this basketball as we love you guys. We love you too. Thanks christie. These days. Well, it's Rica. Just informed me that we are on interview number eight, which it may not be in order the way you're listening to it. But we are bringing in our favorite number eight. And that is none other than women's basketball analyst Steffi Sorenson. Welcome steffi. Thank you try on so happy to be here going. Yes. You are the best dress analysts that we will have on this show right now. So I just want to give that crown. Yes. Better dressed than me by far better dressed. It's Rica, even though she may, you know. Two. I just get bored. I have to put it up, we'll get bored and come and do my closet. That'd be nice. I. Silence. So I sent her away. Yes. Please do please. Do we want to start off with you in the SEC where you spent a lot of time this season? And we'll get back to Mississippi State because I know you're you're headed to star Vegas for the first the second round. But for people who may not know about Auburn or Kentucky are those two teams that have a chance to to make a big run. I mean Kentucky comes in. They'll be in Raleigh facing Princeton. And then obviously, that's where NC state and main are. And then for Auburn, you know, a very intriguing team because of how well they play defensively code flow. Does now standing job, but they are starting off in Stanford, which is not an easy place to start. They'll be taking on BYU. And then probably have to make it past. The Stanford cardinal to get to Sweet Sixteen is they're taking on UC Davis. Tell us about Auburn Kentucky why they have a chance to make it out. You know, I really like Auburn this year because you know, for years coachloads system, which they would turn you over twenty twenty five times, but they just were scoring in the sixties. But now this season they've got people on the on four at any given that can score. And that's why they're in the NCAA tournament. That's why they're in the position they are is that now they're turning point those turnovers into point, and they're so fun to watch. And I was just disappointed at the FCC tournament. Because deja Alexander has had such a good year for them. I mean, we know about uniting the K one card..

Steffi Sorenson Kristie Auburn Christie NCAA Stanford Hailey Brown Auburn Kentucky Kim Barnes Rico Iowa Kentucky Jeff wall Virginia Robert Morris deja Alexander SEC BYU Kansas analyst
Ceo Arne Sorenson, Starwood And Senate discussed on Jim Bohannon

Jim Bohannon

00:55 sec | 3 years ago

Ceo Arne Sorenson, Starwood And Senate discussed on Jim Bohannon

"Last November Marietta announced one of the largest data breaches in history. Just yesterday the hotel chain CEO faced tough questions from a Senate panel looking at the causes of data breaches on how to stop them. Karen Kafer has details from Washington companies two of the largest data breaches in history to all of our guests. I sincerely apologize Marriott. Ceo Arne Sorenson testifying before a Senate subcommittee about a massive breach. Of the Starwood reservation system announced by the hotel chain. Last November Marriott completed an acquisition of Starwood in two thousand sixteen Sorenson. Now says information from up to three hundred eighty three million guests was compromised, including passport and credit card numbers. We have shared everything we have with the FBI, including the the addresses used in the mail where tools used in the system. So that they can do that kind of investigation. We simply didn't

Ceo Arne Sorenson Starwood Senate CEO Marriott Marietta Karen Kafer FBI Washington
Why the cost of airfares will never make any sense

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:04 min | 3 years ago

Why the cost of airfares will never make any sense

"Listener, Jeff Sorenson has encountered even more crazy seeming airfares he found. A one way economy ticket from demo- into Seattle with a stop in Phoenix, and it was one hundred fifty dollars. Same exact flight from join to Phoenix alone costs hundred and sixty two dollars. So the airline will fly him fourteen hundred miles farther for ten dollars less to be honest. I have never understood airline pricing structures. Well, let's try to figure them out. I when you travel by bus or train the ticket typically costs more the longer the distance you're going, but with airlines says industry. Analysts Henry heartfelt at atmosphere research distance really doesn't come into it. It doesn't cost an airline twice. As much to fly you twice as far not even close. Once the plane is in the air at cruising altitude the cost for additional fuel is pretty marginal. Seth Kaplan at airline weekly says these hard to fathom fares are common on airlines own websites and also travel sites like Expedia. There are times when you will pay more to fly from Portland to San Francisco than from Washington to Hong Kong. Kaplan says tickets price at any given moment isn't based on the airlines cost to fly you from here to there. But on how many other people have already bought tickets to fly that route how many seats are left how long before the day of travel. They look at empty airline seats. When flight takes off kind of the way a bakery. Looks at bread at the end of the day. Spoilage airlines call it the airlines gonna take something for Nazi rather. In get nothing at all for it in the end, which determines airline fares is a complicated. Balance of supply and demand says Henry heartfelt. And how much competition there is between airlines to service that supply and demand on a moment to moment basis airlines or the industry that pioneered revenue management how to price each individual seat on each flight to extract the maximum economic value. So let's go back to Jeff Sorensen's flights where it would have cost less to fly from Des Moines to Seattle through Phoenix than it would to just fly to Phoenix heartfelt says there could be a few reasons for that Des Moines to Seattle may actually have more competition on it. There may be multiple airlines that can take you there through different hubs. And it's possible there could be a budget airline. But for a flight starting in Des Moines and terminating in Phoenix or some other hub airport. There may be only a couple airlines competing. So ticket prices will likely be higher heartfelt says in the nineteen ninety s several airlines actually tried to price their tickets based in part on the. Distance travelled. It lasted about a nanosecond longer distance route that has more competition just has that much more battling going on between carriers for those customers. So it's best not to try to think logically. When you're looking at air because Bill only drive yourself crazy, which is not recommended when preparing to

Phoenix Des Moines Seth Kaplan Airline Weekly Seattle Jeff Sorenson Henry Expedia Jeff Sorensen Bill Portland Hong Kong San Francisco Washington One Hundred Fifty Dollars Sixty Two Dollars Ten Dollars
Marriott hotel temp says she was fired after speaking to The Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle Business & Technology News - Spoken Edition

03:22 min | 3 years ago

Marriott hotel temp says she was fired after speaking to The Chronicle

"You're listening to the spoken edition of the San Francisco Chronicle. Mary hotel. Temp says she was fired after speaking to the chronicle by Rowland Lee from business. A temporary hotel worker at San Francisco's Mariot marquee said she was fired after speaking to the chronicle about her claim of unpaid wages, Maria Coller, say Salinas resident said she was fired Thursday by Marriott contractor environmental service partners which hired temporary cleaners to replace striking hotel workers. The Mariot strike has spread to eight US cities and is in its fifth week in San Francisco with workers demanding higher pay and safer working conditions. The conical reported on Thursday that Kelly said she not been paid for three days of work, California law prohibits employers from firing or retaliating against an employee after he or she made a written or oral complaint that he or she is open on paid wages. Callous is the second Marriott marquee worker. This week to say, they were fired by environmental service partners. A Hayward firm another worker who gave his name as Carmelo has filed a federal charge alleging. That he was fired on Tuesday. After speaking to a union organizer before his shift, Carmelo and callous have both alleged unpaid wages Kelly said she lined up at two AM in Salinas on Thursday to board a bus that transports workers to the Marriott marquee in San Francisco. A supervisor named Veronica told her she could no longer work at the Marriott marquee. Callous said. Kelly spoke to the chronicle on Tuesday during a lunch break outside the Mariot marquee. Carmelo said callous was one of more than a dozen workers who haven't been paid on time when Francke came to the line and took my name. She told me that I couldn't work anymore. I asked why. And she said because I took my lunch break to speak with reporters. Kelly said in Spanish, I told her how is this possible? This is unjust. I was speaking with my friend Carmelo in. If I knew that I couldn't go out during my lunch break, I wouldn't have. She said Veronica told me, she didn't know those were her orders. They fired me unjustly, and I have the right to speak. She. Said they're trying to intimidate me. Environmental service partners has not responded to the chronicles inquiries about alleged labor violations since Wednesday on Friday woman who answered the company's phone said, she wasn't authorized to speak and said, the company would respond later, we suggest you contact ESP with any concerns about their pay or employment practices. Marriott said separately on Friday. San Francisco's board of supervisors held a public hearing on the strike around one thousand hotel workers who are members of the unite here. Local to attended the meeting Marriott. Ceo Arne Sorenson declined an invitation to speak at the hearing said supervisor Hillary Ronen who said she was insulted by the Marriott officials decision not to show up while Mr. Sorensen was unable to attend. He did send a thorough response to supervisor Ronin on the current negotiations in San Francisco, we do not negotiate in the press and therefore will not be commenting on these specifics. The. Company said.

San Francisco Chronicle Kelly Carmelo San Francisco Marriott Marquee Mariot Marquee Marriott Supervisor Salinas Rowland Lee Mary Hotel Veronica Ceo Arne Sorenson Francke United States Hayward Temp Maria Coller Hillary Ronen Mr. Sorensen