11 Burst results for "Sophie Richardson"

"sophie richardson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:49 min | 5 months ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve inskeep. After long delays, the United Nations has offered an assessment of China's treatment of Uyghurs. For weeks, it wasn't clear if the human rights report would be published at all, but it came out yesterday. Just minutes before the UN's top human rights chief, Michelle Bachelet stepped down from her post. NPR's China correspondent Emily fang is covering the story Emily welcome. Good morning, Steve. Why would there have been suspense over publishing this report at all? Well, there was a lot of effort from China to stymie this report. About ten months ago, Bachelet said her office was going to compile this report on Xinjiang, but China quickly tried to stymie the report. Reuters actually reported earlier this summer that China was circulating a petition to bury it, and then bachelorette herself admitted last month that she had received, quote, substantial input from China, who was a permanent member of the UN Security Council, and she was under, quote, tremendous pressure to publish or not to publish the report. Who was China's ambassador to the UN yesterday made no bones about the fact that China did not want this report out. We all know so well that the so called issue is completely fabricated lie out of political motivations. Its purpose definitely is to undermine China's stability. But as you mentioned, literally about ten minutes before bachelor is tenure was officially over at midnight in Geneva, the report still came out and it actually went way beyond the admittedly low expectations that people had for it. Oh, well, then what did it say? It was very systematic. Xinjiang just as a reminder is in western China. It's where authorities have detained and imprisoned at least hundreds of thousands of Uighurs and other ester minorities under initiatives it claims are to combat terrorism and promote economic development. But this UN report found that China's counter terrorism laws are overly broad that ethnic minorities are detained for apparently no legal basis against their will that the extensive policing and surveillance in the region appears discriminatory against certain religious, ethnic and cultural groups, and that some of the harsh treatment and sexual abuse of Uighurs and detention amounts to torture. But the report dust skirt around one big question, and that's whether all of this that I've just described events to genocide, which is a designation Uyghur activists for pushing for it, but that's just not mentioned in the report at all. Okay, so they don't use the G word, but they give a lot of details. Does this report make any difference? Likely not. And that's because the report's recommendations are merely completely reliant when cooperation with China, which has already condemned the report. Bachelor's report does not call for a formal UN investigation, but rather asks China to self investigate and provide more information to international groups. I spoke to Sophie Richardson, she's the China director at advocacy for Human Rights Watch about what that means. Three decades of exactly those kinds of dialogs have conveyed to Beijing a sense of impunity. They have never served to hold the Chinese government accountable for progressively more serious human rights violations. We're impose any consequences for committing them. That being said, it's still a big deal that the report came out and that it was so detailed in its accusations against China because this is now officially the UN stands on human rights conditions in Xinjiang. And so it will be much harder for China going forward to paint an alternate reality of what it claims is actually happening there. Emily, thanks for your insights as always. Thanks, Steve. Good to talk with the NPR's Emily fang. Not for the first time this summer, Democrats won a special election for a House seat. This election came in a red state, Alaska, Democrat Mary pelto won under the state's complicated new voting system. The Republicans she defeated included Trump's choice for the job, Sarah Palin. NPR political correspondent Don gagne is covering the story, Don. Good morning. Good morning. Okay, several layers to the story and one of them is how Alaska voted all the candidates together in an election to replace the late Don young and voting in a way that people normally don't in America. How did it work out? So on the first count of the votes, beltola had 40%. Sarah Palin was in second place with 30%. Nick baguette was a very close third behind, but under the rules of ranked choice voting, he was eliminated, so they looked at who his supporters, second choice was, without getting too deep into the weeds, Palin needed roughly 6 in ten of beggar's voters to move into first place. She didn't make it. So patola wins a very narrow victory, and I should add, it's the first time Democrats have won Alaska's U.S. House seat in 50 years. Well, if it had been Sarah Palin we would know who the person was. Big celebrity political celebrity long political record Mary peltola is less familiar to people. So who is she? She is the first Alaska native to win this seat. She spoke about that last night after her win was announced. I will have that distinction, but I think what's most important is that I'm an Alaskan and being sent to represent all alaskans. And yes, being Alaska native is part of my ethnicity, but I'm much more than my ethnicity. She's 48 years old. She's a former member of the state House of Representatives, peltola has a reputation as a person who wants to return niceness and decency to politics. So if the politics of Donald Trump and Sarah Palin is in your face, bombast, she is the opposite. She's an environmentalist, worried about climate change. She's an avid outdoors person, and she can often be found on the river of her hometown in a fishing boat. People will try to read larger messages into this election even though Alaska is a very distinctive state, and this was a distinctive kind of election, but what can we read into it? It's just one seat in the U.S. House and just to feel the remainder of a term, but this is a psychological boost for the Democratic Party. She beats a hardcore Trump supporter in a Trump state, Palin is as big a name as you get in Alaska politics, former governor, former mayor on the national ticket in O 8, but don't forget in 2009, she quit in the middle of her first term as governor to become a reality TV star. So she throughout this campaign had a likeability problem that you can see and that she didn't get nearly enough second choice votes from baggage voters to win. Well, Don Democrats seem now to have won a series of special elections in multiple states this summer what if anything does that imply about the fall election? Well, it's certainly unexpected good news for Democrats. Their voters have turned out in these places. And there's some hope that that is a sign of things to come. Can we use it to predict anything in November? Well, you know, we'll see, but

China Emily fang UN Xinjiang NPR news Rachel Martin Steve inskeep NPR Alaska Michelle Bachelet Sophie Richardson Bachelet Sarah Palin advocacy for Human Rights Watc Emily Chinese government Steve UN Security Council Mary pelto Don gagne
"sophie richardson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:47 min | 5 months ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Today. We have delays right now in NJ transits northeast corda in north Jersey coast launch. In the news, new state gun control laws now make it illegal to carry guns in New York's so called sensitive places that includes around Times Square and in schools, playgrounds, healthcare facilities, restaurants, and on mass transit. New York has also must complete a training course to get permit to carry in public areas where the state will allow guns. New York City mayor Eric Adams says signs designating Times Square as a gun free zone are already posted. You can not tell me this is not a feeling of being surreal. And our city would post in these signs. Gun free zones. In June, the U.S. Supreme Court decision made it easier to get a concealed carry permit in New York. A bill making its way through the New York City council would make it illegal for home health aides to work more than 12 hours at a time, double NYC's Caroline Lewis lays out what caregivers stand again. This city council Bill would finally stop the practice of 24 hour shifts, something that local home care workers have been trying to put men to for years. Those shifts can be grueling and under state law, home health aids only have to be paid for 13 of those hours. But the bill would also cap the number of hours aids work at 50 per week. The healthcare union 1199 SEIU is opposing the measure. The union says it would prevent workers from earning overtime pay. Home care workers say they would be open to adjusting the weekly limit if 1199 was willing to collaborate on the bill. And Oklahoma official wants to revoke a teacher's license for connecting her students to the Brooklyn public library's books unbanned program that offers free access to ban books. Oklahoma secretary of public education, Ryan Walters, wants to punish high school teachers some are mie for violating an Oklahoma law restricting the material teachers can use. This teacher shouldn't be teaching anywhere in the state of Oklahoma. This teacher should not have a teaching certificate in the state of Oklahoma since she chose to knowingly and admit publicly that she wants to violate state law that doesn't allow for indoctrination. Mommy, you told WNYC she's resigning because of the censorship. 71 of mostly clear Sonny and 84 today and tomorrow sunny and 80 into the weekend, sunny and dry and low 80s. It's 6 O 7. Support for NPR comes from the NPR one club, bringing the wine world to people's homes with wines inspired by NPR, like tiny desk, Chardonnay, available to adults 21 or older, more at NPR one club dot org. On the next Brian layer show, a year after the U.S. withdrew from Afghanistan, the federal government has approved only a 123 applications for temporary admission to the U.S. out of the thousands filed by Afghans still there. We'll examine why, and whether the U.S. should recognize the Taliban government, even though we don't approve of it. Also, what Serena Williams has meant for you, the running rare show at 10 a.m. on WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news, I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve inskeep. After long delays, the United Nations has offered an assessment of China's treatment of Uyghurs. For weeks, it wasn't clear if the human rights report would be published at all, but it came out yesterday. Just minutes before the UN's top human rights chief, Michelle Bachelet stepped down from her post. NPR's China correspondent Emily fang is covering the story Emily welcome. Good morning, Steve. Why would there have been suspense over publishing this report at all? Well, there was a lot of effort from China to stymie this report. About ten months ago, Bachelet said her office was going to compile this report on Xinjiang, but China quickly tried to stymie the report. Reuters actually reported earlier this summer that China was circulating a petition to bury it, and then bachelorette herself admitted last month that she had received, quote, substantial input from China, who was a permanent member of the UN Security Council, and she was under, quote, tremendous pressure to publish or not to publish the report. Zhang Jin, who is China's ambassador to the UN yesterday, made no bones about the fact that China did not want this report out. We all know so well that the so called issue is completely fabricated lie out of political motivations. It's purpose, definitely, is to undermine China's stability. But as you mentioned, literally about ten minutes before bachelor is tenure was officially over at midnight in Geneva, the report still came out and it actually went way beyond the admittedly low expectations that people had for it. Oh, well, then what did it say? It was very systematic. Xinjiang just as a reminder is in western China. It's where authorities have detained and imprisoned at least hundreds of thousands of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities under initiatives it claims are to combat terrorism and promote economic development. But this UN report found that China's counter terrorism laws are overly broad that ethnic minorities are detained for apparently no legal basis against their will that the extensive policing and surveillance in the region appears discriminatory against certain religious, ethnic and cultural groups, and that some of the harsh treatment and sexual abuse of Uighurs and detention amounts to torture. But the report dust skirt around one big question, and that's whether all of this that I've just described amounts to genocide, which is a designation Uighur activists for pushing for it, but that's just not mentioned in the report at all. Okay, so they don't use the G word, but they give a lot of details. Does this report make any difference? Likely not. And that's because the report's recommendations are merely completely reliant and cooperation with China, which has already condemned the report. Bachelor's report does not call for a formal UN investigation, but rather asks China to self investigate and provide more information to international groups. I spoke to Sophie Richardson, she's the China director at advocacy group Human Rights Watch about what that means. Three decades of exactly those kinds of dialogs have conveyed to Beijing a sense of impunity. They have never served to hold the Chinese government accountable for progressively more serious human rights violations. We're impose any consequences for committing them. That being said, it's still a big deal that the report came out and that it was so detailed in its accusations against China because this is now officially the UN stands on human rights conditions in Xinjiang. And so it will be much

China Oklahoma north Jersey coast Eric Adams Times Square Caroline Lewis healthcare union New York Ryan Walters WNYC Brian layer aids Taliban government New York City council NPR news Rachel Martin Steve inskeep Brooklyn public library Emily fang
"sophie richardson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:31 min | 5 months ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"After long delays, the United Nations has offered an assessment of China's treatment of Uyghurs. For weeks, it wasn't clear if the human rights report would be published at all, but it came out yesterday. Just minutes before the UN's top human rights chief, Michelle Bachelet stepped down from her post. NPR's China correspondent Emily fang is covering the story Emily welcome. Good morning, Steve. Why would there have been suspense over publishing this report at all? Well, there was a lot of effort from China to stymie this report. About ten months ago, Bachelet said her office was going to compile this report on Xinjiang, but China quickly tried to stymie the report. Reuters actually reported earlier this summer that China was circulating a petition to bury it, and then bachelorette herself admitted last month that she had received, quote, substantial input from China, who was a permanent member of the UN Security Council, and she was under, quote, tremendous pressure to publish or not to publish the reports. Zhang Jin who is China's ambassador to the UN yesterday made no bones about the fact that China did not want this report out. We all know so well that the so called issue is completely fabricated lie out of political motivations. Its purpose definitely is to undermine China's stability. But as you mentioned, literally about ten minutes before bachelor is tenure was officially over at midnight in Geneva. The report still came out and it actually went way beyond the admittedly low expectations that people had for it. Oh, well, then what did it say? It was very systematic. Xinjiang just as a reminder in western China, it's where authorities have detained and imprisoned at least hundreds of thousands of Uighurs and other ethnic minorities under initiatives it claims are to combat terrorism and promote economic development. But this UN report found that China's counter terrorism laws are overly broad that ethnic minorities are detained for, quote, apparently no legal basis against their will, that the extensive policing and surveillance in the region appears discriminatory against certain religious, ethnic and cultural groups, and that some of the harsh treatment and sexual abuse of Uighurs and detention amounts to torture. But the report does skirt around one big question, and that's whether all of this that I've just described amounts to genocide, which is a designation Uighur activists for pushing for it, but that's just not mentioned in the report at all. Okay, so they don't use the G word, but they give a lot of details. Does this report make any difference? Likely not. And that's because the report's recommendations are nearly completely reliant and cooperation with China, which has already condemned the report. Bachelor's report does not call for a formal UN investigation, but rather asks China to self investigate and provide more information to international groups. I spoke to Sophie Richardson, she's the China director at advocacy group Human Rights Watch about what that means. Three decades of exactly those kinds of dialogs have conveyed to Beijing a sense of impunity. They have never served to hold the Chinese government accountable for progressively more serious human rights violations. We're impose any consequences for committing them. That being said, it's still a big deal that the report came out and that it was so detailed in its accusations against China because this is now officially the UN stands on human rights conditions in Xinjiang. And so it will be much harder for trying to going forward to paint an alternate reality of what it claims is actually happening there. Emily

China UN Emily fang Xinjiang Zhang Jin Michelle Bachelet Bachelet NPR UN Security Council United Nations Emily Reuters Steve Geneva Sophie Richardson Chinese government Bachelor Human Rights Watch Beijing
"sophie richardson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Global news China is calling for an end to what is says is it basically malicious hyping of the Chinese stenosis controversy at Baxter covering it all from the Bloomberg 9 60 newsroom in San Francisco Eddie a Doug that's the exact words that they're using malicious hyping The foreign ministry says her well-being is not a diplomatic matter and should not be politicized SMP reporting ministry points to remarks made to IOC president Tomas Bach as proof that she is okay So malicious hyping Human Rights Watch meanwhile as accused the IOC of covering over serious human rights violations in the case HRW China director Sophie Richardson saying that she was hopeful that China would show some spine and that the IOC would show some spine and stand up to the Chinese but with a Winter Olympics coming up obviously they won't and she calls it sports washing U.S. meanwhile has invited Taiwan to the summit for democracy which will be hosted by the president Looks to be held 9th and 10th of December European Union has called for China to provide independent and verifiable proof of the well-being and whereabouts by the way of Pong a footnote to that story Latest COVID-19 wave in the U.S. is hitting some states intensive care units and several parts of the country say it is as bad as it's ever been that is the case in 15 states They say in the city of Denver while it's led mayor Michael Hancock to reimpose in door mask mandates I know it's disappointing that the decisions of some again mean additional restrictions on are vaccinated residents and in certainly and I certainly share in that disappointment because I know a lot of work has gone into getting us to where we are We are the mandate says that people who don't want to wear masks show proof of vaccination at the door So waxed or masked WHO forecasting deaths in Europe And by March based on current Trump near a 5th surgeon called it health minister reporting out 30,000 new cases in the last 24 hours and we've been telling you this week about Germans profitable German Chancellor Angela Merkel now is held in emergency meeting with leaders of the likely next government coalition to discuss measures to fight its explosion of cases Some good news saint tower reporting the beginning of reopening of the border between Hong Kong and China December 10th and New Zealand is going to ease travel restrictions in January Bloomberg examined O'Brien says New Zealand did well early on Very early on particularly in 2020 it was all about containment and they were able to wall out the virus Like a number of other countries in the Asia Pacific did Singapore and China which is still persisting with it But where they did get caught out in which saw them drop in the resilience ranking is in that pivot toward reopening toward their vaccination they were slow on vaccines and slow in reopening as well Yeah Emma says we'll see how cases respond after the opening In San Francisco I'm at Baxter This is Bloomberg All right all right Did he be Thank you Let's get to our guest for the half hour Katherine Jung is here with us She is investment director at fidelity international on the line from Hong Kong Catherine thanks for being with us I think one of the key points for markets right now not just the threat of rising inflation but the response on the part of central banks we saw the move today from the reserve bank of New Zealand We also saw a little bit of a spike in rates yesterday and a continuation of that trend here in the U.S. on the notion that we may be looking at a quicker rate of the tapering process Are you concerned about the rate of change right now that's happening in the rates environment Indeed we are and it's something we've been looking at and focusing on for some months So interestingly when we look around the world at New Zealand as you just mentioned China also bucks the trend So after two years of somewhat tightening neutral stance next year we'll probably see China enter 2022 with more than easing bias which is going to be very different to potentially when we look at global markets and global central banks are more hawkish monetary conditional conditions that we do expect to see So in terms of the outlook for growth more broadly in China what are your expectations The growth is somewhat disappointed in the second half in terms of the broader macro picture And you only have to look for example that last week's earnings from Alibaba which reflect some of this weakening demand But having said that it did come from a very high base and what's the priority it appears from a government perspective is to ensure that we do have this consistent level of domestic demand and hence that's why we're probably going to see both some easing or supportive measures both monetary policy wise as well as fiscally and also with the leadership changes we are seeing in China next year ex at the very very top level This tends to go hand in hand with more fiscal easing measures Isn't the eye of the storm the property market And how might the government respond to the kind of weakness that we have seen Yes Property tends to be viewed in the past as a backbone of the economy in China We might see a bit of a shift away from this over the medium to long-term But more recently we have seen some indication of easing whether it's a bank's lending to the developers It's crucial for example when we look at the various developers that yes we might see defaults from single company perspective but what's really crucial is that if you put a down payment down as citizen that you get that apartment So construction and development really remains a key focus from a government perspective and you will probably see policy going in this direction Catherine we continue the conversation I'd like to get your feeling on the geopolitical risk that is out there particularly where U.S. China is concerned right now that the market may not be fully discounting or may be surprised by if there is an event here on the horizon that you can see that could kind of destabilize trading that we are seeing right now not only in risk assets but maybe in the rates environment as well Katherine young our guest from fidelity international.

China IOC foreign ministry Bloomberg Tomas Bach Sophie Richardson December European Union Michael Hancock U.S. New Zealand HRW San Francisco Katherine Jung fidelity international Baxter Winter Olympics Hong Kong Eddie Doug Angela Merkel
"sophie richardson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:07 min | 1 year ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"China is calling for what it says is malicious hyping of the Chinese tennis star Pong Shui in the controversy surrounding her he wants that to end and had Baxter has the story from the 9 60 news from it Yeah we expect the reaction Brian we got it Foreign ministry says her well-being is not a diplomatic matter and should not be pulled a size as CMP reporting the ministry reports to remarks made to IOC president Tomas Bach as proof that she is okay But they're calling it malicious hyping Meanwhile Human Rights Watch has accused the IOC of covering over the serious human rights violations in the case HRW China director Sophie Richardson saying that she was hopeful that China would show some spine and stand up to the Chinese but says with Winter Olympics coming up obviously they won't be calling it sports washing And the U.S. meanwhile is invited Taiwan to the summit for democracy which will be hosted by the president It looks to be held December 9 and ten that's not going to make China very happy either Latest COVID-19 wave in the U.S. is hitting some states intensive care units and several parts of the country say it's bad as it's ever been That is a case in 15 of the 50 states to now In the city of Denver this has led to mayor Michael Hancock to reimpose indoor mask mandates I know it's disappointing that the decisions of some again mean additional restrictions on are vaccinated residents and in certainly and I certainly share in that disappointment because I know a lot of work has gone into getting us to where we are Now the mandate says that people who do not want to wear masks show proof of vaccination at the door So waxed or masked WHO forecasting deaths in Europe from COVID-19 will reach 2.2 million by March based on current trends France appears to be in or near a 5th surge of COVID health ministry reporting out 30,000 new cases in the last 24 hours German Chancellor Angela Merkel has held an emergency meeting with leaders of the likely next government coalition to discuss tougher measures to fight its explosion of cases Now some good news Saint tower reporting out the beginning of reopening of the border between Hong Kong and China December 10th and New Zealand is going to ease travel restrictions in January Bloomberg examined O'Brien says New Zealand did very well early on Very early on particularly in 2020 it was all about containment and they were able to wall out the virus Like a number of other countries in the Asia Pacific did Singapore and China which is still persisting with it But where they did get caught out in which saw them drop in the resilience ranking is in that pivot toward reopening toward their vaccination they were slow on vaccines and slow in reopening as well Yeah Emma says it will see how cases respond after the reopening In San Francisco good luck Paul with booking your tickets In San Francisco I'm Ed Baxter This is Bloomberg all right Brian All right thanks very much The time here is 8 and a half minutes past the hour Let's get to our guest Julia Wong executive director and global market strategist at JPMorgan private bank Juliet seems the market is tilting a little bit towards the likelihood of a slightly more hawkish fed I think many people will sort of believe it when they see it but that's what we're hearing from the fed presidents What you've got view is the fed about to turn more hawkish While we think that there's certainly been a putting forward of tightening expectations over the last couple of months we think we're at the point where some of that looks to us to be overly aggressive Especially given our demand trajectory look like it is trending back to trend growth Not really in the U.S. but in other parts of developed markets if you look at supply side inflation there are some signs that bottlenecks are easing So if inflation is coming down a little bit and demand is also weakening It doesn't really set up this picture where the fat will be that aggressive So we actually think the market pricing is a little bit over the top at the moment We saw a slightly more restrained tightening than we were expecting out of New Zealand The bank of Korea is meeting tomorrow What do you expect to see there Well I think that one of the trends we'll see next year will be one of Central Bank divergence because while there are some similarities there are also big differences when it comes to domestic contacts in each economy how the labor market is Whether it's an open economy it is susceptible to commodity price inflation its financial stability at risk In some economies in Asia and in emerging markets these are bigger concerns and central banks have less of an inflation credibility in EM So we think these economies might well move forward with more rate hikes But the fed and ECB which are two central banks that end up paying the global financial market in our view are very unlikely to be hiking on next year So that underpins a more pro risk and somewhat benign view for risk asset as a base case for us next year When I teach your appearance I said you had four conviction calls and that I had an issue with one of them sort of journalistic issue But I think you've already answered the question and just for the audience's sake those four conviction calls long dollar long U.S. treasuries that's the one that I raised an eyebrow on Japanese equities and a weak Japanese yen A lot of that is understandable The long U.S. treasuries you've answered you don't think inflation is going to be that sticky You think growth is going to come down to be value in treasuries So with that in mind how low do you think the yield on the ten year may go then Well I think that first of all before it comes down I think if you could probably still overshoot what we have as a year to date high on the next couple of weeks So in terms of timing it would still wait for this rally to this treasury or rally to be over before we go into that call We do think that around 1.5 is.

China Pong Shui Foreign ministry IOC Tomas Bach Meanwhile Human Rights Watch Sophie Richardson Michael Hancock COVID COVID health ministry U.S. New Zealand HRW Ed Baxter Brian Julia Wong JPMorgan private bank Juliet Baxter Angela Merkel San Francisco
"sophie richardson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:27 min | 1 year ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And should not be politicized as CMP reporting the ministry points to remarks made to IOC president Tomas Bach as proof that she is okay Malicious hyping Human Rights Watch has accused the IOC of covering over the serious what they call human rights violations in the case and the HRW director Sophie Richardson says that she was hopeful that China would somehow show some spine and stand up to the Chinese but says with a Winter Olympics coming up obviously they will not She calls it sports washing European Union has a call for China to provide independent and verifiable proof up of the well-being and whereabouts of Pong Headline up on the Bloomberg terminal now that Hong Kong and mainland travel may start around December 10th It is a saint tower report We'll get you more details Latest COVID-19 wave in the U.S. is hitting some states intensive care units and several parts of the country say it's as bad as it's ever been That is a case in 15 states in the city of Denver meanwhile mayor Michael Hancock has reimposing indoor mask mandates I know it's disappointing that the decisions of some again mean additional restrictions on are vaccinated residents and in certainly and I certainly share in that disappointment because I know a lot of work has gone into getting us to where we are Yeah mandate says people who do not want to wear masks must show proof of vaccination of the door So vax or masked WHO forecasting deaths in Europe from COVID-19 will reach 2.2 million by March that is based They say on current trends and France appears to be in or near its 5th surge of COVID health minister reporting out 30,000 new cases in the last 24 hours German Chancellor Angela Merkel has held an emergency meeting with leaders of the likely next government coalition to discuss it U.S. president Joe Biden today as well as announcing new oil supply efforts as we're carrying here has touted the economy made historic progress over the last ten months Unemployment is down to 4.6% Two years faster than everyone expected when we started this job was over 14% Wages are rising disposal line comes up and Biden says he sees more job growth in the near term Former football great and current co host of ABC's Good Morning America Michael Strahan has gone a bit Spacey And less than three weeks on December 9th I will be blasting off in the next Blue Origin space launch There it goes What a face You're a brave man Yeah with George Stephanopoulos there Quarterbacks I think they saw stars after being hit by the Giants great In San Francisco I met Baxter This is Bloomberg Douglas All right Eddie thank you And we're getting this hot headline right from the Bloomberg terminal the U.S. is invited Taiwan to a democracy summit that will happen at least the invitation has been extended for the month of September Let's get to our guest for the half hour David kudla is with us He is the founder and CEO of mainstay capital joining us from Detroit Thanks for being with us Dave Let's talk about what's happening in markets as it relates to interest rates because it seems to be rearranging the furniture here We've got a number of fed officials supporting the idea of a more rapid pace of tapering those asset purchases in that brings us to the idea that maybe a rate hike could become sooner rather than later don't you think I don't think so I think that the fed is going to move as slowly as they can They have a problem because the inflation hocks that are on the board those that believe inflation is going to grow even more next year and we may even see hyperinflation So the fed is trying to balance that with what they know to be the case We still have an economy that is in the U.S. and globally that is recovering We've just seen we've got another wave of COVID going through Europe and we know what that means potentially to the economy So I think that they're at a measured pace right now to remove accommodation slowly That's where they'd like to stay I don't think we see an interest rate increase in the first half of the year I'll be surprised if we see one in the second half of the year People thinking that they could be hyperinflation and when you think of hyperinflation you're thinking about countries like Zimbabwe Right Well to be honest a lot of times you hear it associated with someone who's selling Bitcoin or gold because that obviously is something to put out there But there are people that expect that inflation is going to continue to grow through next year We believe the reality is is that inflation has been increased These are all COVID impacts to the economy domestically and globally Inflation is increased because specifically of durable goods inflation And as much as that surge this year we expect it to be declining even a deflationary force within our inflation numbers as we get into 2022 and a year from now we look for inflation to be running quite a bit lower You know and it's interesting because in your notes Dave you indicate that you prefer the small cap space that speaks of a lot of optimism I would think in the domestic recovery Maybe.

HRW IOC Tomas Bach Sophie Richardson Bloomberg terminal Michael Hancock U.S. COVID China Bloomberg Douglas Winter Olympics David kudla mainstay capital Dave Let Angela Merkel European Union Michael Strahan Joe Biden
"sophie richardson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:08 min | 1 year ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Well the Chinese government is calling for an end to what it calls the malicious hyping of the controversy surrounding tennis star pung shy Let's get the head back through He's got a global news from the 9 60 newsroom in San Francisco Brian exactly right foreign ministry says her well-being is not a diplomatic matter and should not be politicized SNP reporting the ministry points to remarks made to IOC president Tomas Bach as proof that she is okay calls it malicious hyping Human Rights Watch has accused the IOC of covering over serious human rights violations in the case Now China director Sophie Richardson says that she was hopeful that China would show some spine and stand up to the Chinese but says with a Winter Olympics coming up obviously they won't do it And she calls it sports washing European Union meanwhile let's call it for China to provide independent and verifiable proof of the well-being and whereabouts of Pong Latest COVID-19 wave in the U.S. is hitting some states intensive care units several parts of the country say it is as bad as it has ever been That is a case they say in 15 states and Denver meanwhile the city of Denver had led to mayor Michael Hancock to reimpose indoor mask mandates I know it's disappointing that the decisions of some again mean additional restrictions on our vaccinated residents and in certainly and I certainly share in that disappointment because I know a lot of work has gone into getting us to where we are Yeah the mandate says people who do not want to wear masks show proof of vaccination at the door WHO meanwhile forecasting deaths in Europe from COVID-19 will reach 2.2 million by March based on current trends France appears to be in or near a 5th surge of COVID Health industry reporting out 30,000 new cases in the last 24 hours U.S. president Joe Biden the day as well as announcing new oil supply efforts recovering for you here has touted the economy He made historic progress over the last ten months Unemployment is down to 4.6% Two years faster than everyone expected when we started this job was over 14% Wages are rising disposable income is up Now Biden says he sees more job growth in the next in the near term as well And well former football great and current co host of ABC's Good Morning America Michael Strahan is going a bit Spacey and left in three weeks on December 9th I will be blasting off in the next Blue Origin space launch There we go You're a brave man With George Stephanopoulos there Now just side note many NFL quarterbacks saw stars after being hit by Strahan during his career Brian Yeah Good one He is a brave man He was a tough boy He was tough Yeah and he's funny too All right it is now 8 minutes past the hour Thanks very much Ed will get another news update in about 15 minutes or so Let's get to our guest It's and a hand equity strategist at Wells Fargo Anna if you look at 5 year 5 year break evens and other inflation bets it appears now that inflation fears are coming down and traders are betting on a more hawkish fed Now that is not a widespread view among commentators but that's the way some of the smart money is positioning If that's the case how do you play it Well I think you ramp a great point It's not a consensus view So this is why you've been seeing the rate volatile we have And there's one side that argues inflation is going to come down We're getting a hawkish fed That's what Powell means to get confirmed for next term But if you want to play a rate rising environment you got to think about what is pushing yields higher Is it real yield or inflationary pressures And in an environment where real yields are finally picking up off those negative lows we like the cyclicals And that number one for us is banks and banks tend to be that economically sensitive group but they tend to do well in a real yield rising environment So that would be my first pick And also when you've got a steepening yield curve That certainly helps You bring up a good point there And something to keep in mind though is that it's not going to be a steady run here We're going to have some back and forth We're going to see as the view or as a consensus move from how many rate hikes and how soon that's going to cause volatility So this is not necessarily a quick one and done here We're playing this trade out for several months if not quarters And we have to watch the supply chain issues because that's playing big role in what's happening with inflation I don't know if you've got the comments so from U.S. secretary of commerce Gina raimondo I found her comment a little bit interesting perhaps even odd And this is about Samsung building in Texas She said we're thrilled about Samsung's investment in Texas Domestic semiconductor production is critical to preserving and growing U.S. leadership Almost as though this was an American company that's bringing production back to the United States But I suppose you could say it's a good sign Well I think the point is to get business going right And it's to have people going back to work it's to have to help the E sort of the late labor shortage that we've been having And with that that too is going to help the supply chain issues we have But that's only one side of the equation You got to keep in mind we're coming at such an aggressive economic recovery demand is off the chart Yeah Well I was just kind of portraying it as a bit cheeky to call that U.S. leadership But maybe it is maybe it is U.S. leadership in enticing Samsung to build in Texas We'll continue our conversation with Anaheim in.

Chinese government IOC Tomas Bach Sophie Richardson Michael Hancock China U.S. Denver Brian Yeah Human Rights Watch Winter Olympics Michael Strahan European Union tennis Joe Biden George Stephanopoulos Brian San Francisco
"sophie richardson" Discussed on The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media

The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on The Slow Newscast from Tortoise Media

"In fact if you listen to sophie richardson. Who's the china director at human rights. Watch she argues that. Actually the two thousand eight. Beijing summer olympics were a catalyst for further abuses. It was a way of test driving surveillance systems in fact selling some of these surveillance systems to countries around the world and so at the second time that beijing rolled around and was applying for the olympics. This is in two thousand fifteen going for the two thousand twenty two winter games this time. The international olympic committee should have known that what they were told back in. Two thousand one never came to fruition and yet the international olympic committee voted for beijing. To take those games. Jews made a really important point where we would tool king and one that i think gets forgotten when beijing won the twenty twenty two winter olympics. They're see weren't that many other options on the table for the is e most of the cities that might have been more obvious or easy choices. Dropped out munich. Oslo stockholm only almaty in kazakhstan and beijing. We left and neither of those is famous for their commitment to democracy the united states right now. I think it's fair to say that china has become sort of bipartisan punching bag. And i think something that we need to be aware of as we walked toward the beijing olympics. It's just all too easy for politicians on either side of the aisle democrats or republicans to make all manner of claims about china. Some of which are true. Some of which are not really another source of fightback. Maybe hosting the olympics in beijing is human rights groups. I have much more respect for their position. Generally because they're evidence driven arguments. The things that are happening with human rights. And you know they argue that essentially if you look at the olympic charter that guides the actions of the international olympic committee. There are all sorts of amazing ideas about freedom and Universal notions of what's fair. And it's not what's happening in beijing and so the argument from those human rights watch. Groups is just a clash of principles. The international olympic committee charter says one thing. And what we're seeing in. Beijing in china more widely is very much another and so the question is what should the international community do about it. Gills makes the point that governments often try to use the olympics. As a way to publicly launder and improve their reputation and the image they get diplomats around the world coming to shake their hands. They can look respectable and organized by running a good games. It's the definition of good geopolitical. Pr basically there's this concept of sports washing which is the idea that governments use sporting events to try to launder their international reputations on the global stage in other words. if you're a human rights abuser and you can host one of these big events you can look really important. You can announce the opening of the games you can have all these diplomats come from around the world and shake your hand in front of the cameras and that actually lens in air of legitimacy so sport washing is very much come under pressure lately from human rights groups and activists around the world and trying to stop the benefits of sports washing. You know. I would also say that. I feel like a lot of times. Sports washing is thrown at countries like china or russia but i think it could also be thrown at places like the united states which is

beijing olympics international olympic committe sophie richardson china Beijing kazakhstan Oslo stockholm munich united states olympic russia
China Sanctions Wilbur Ross and Others, Responding to Hong Kong Warnings

All Things Considered

01:49 min | 1 year ago

China Sanctions Wilbur Ross and Others, Responding to Hong Kong Warnings

"Fresh sanctions on a handful of US individuals. It's retaliation for sanctions the bite and administration imposed on Chinese officials last week. Over Beijing's crackdown on democracy in Hong Kong. Its latest attack comes just days before a visit to China by Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman and US China ties are already tense, though, as NPR's John Ruit reports there is no sign China's sanctions will derail the visit. Sanctions are the first imposed by China under a new law passed in June, which facilitates retaliation for foreign sanctions. Among those it hits a former Commerce secretary Wilbur Ross, and the China director at Human Rights Watch Sophie Richardson. For years, Beijing's responded to US sanctions and tariffs with tit for tat measures in Beijing's calculation, it had to respond to the US Bonnie Lynn, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, says doing so before Deputy Secretary of State Wendy Sherman's trip makes sense would disappear better if it happened a couple days after Deputy Secretary Sherman's trip that she says might risk being interpreted as a signal that the meeting didn't go well. And Sherman will be the most senior U. S official to travel to China since President Biden took office. Relations are at their worst in decades. But there's speculation that the trip could start to lay the groundwork for a meeting sometime this year between Biden and Chinese leader Xi Jinping. There is a desire to be able to showcase that the two world leaders can work together and part of that is being able to meet and discuss issues they agree on as well as those where they have differences, and I really hope As we see more of these incidents is on either side that they won't derail progress towards the usual meeting because both sides, she says, have significant incentives for Biden and she to meet sooner rather than later. John Ruijin

Deputy Secretary Of State Wend China Beijing John Ruit Wilbur Ross Sophie Richardson Bonnie Lynn United States Deputy Secretary Sherman NPR President Biden Hong Kong Center For Strategic And Inter Human Rights Watch Sherman Xi Jinping Biden John Ruijin
"sophie richardson" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

08:51 min | 2 years ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on PRI's The World

"United states gala. has it but a ludicrous. But my son tells me he doesn't want to go back to honduras and he says he knows it's too dangerous for him there but they only have about fifty dollars left. Eddie knows some parents are choosing to send their children alone across the border knowing the. Us must taken kids who arrive by themselves. Eddie says he can't imagine doing that but he isn't sure of other options right now for the world. I'm monica campbell. As a biden administration grapples with the situation along the us border. They are also looking much farther south. What has officials say. They wanted to address the reason. So many people are fleeing central america. The highest percentage of migrants are currently coming from honduras for more on this the world. Latin america correspondent or valencia joins me or. Hey president biden. Talked about this yesterday. What what specifically struck you from his news conference. We'll marco i got deja vu. Actually because president biden was speaking about addressing the fundamental reasons. Why people are fleeing central america. And this is something that he himself worked on when he was vice president. Back in two thousand fourteen. You might remember that year. We had thousands of young children arriving to the united states on their own. So here's what president biden had to say. Yesterday it causes of migration is because of earthquakes. Floods is because of lack of food because of gang. Violence is because of a whole range of things that when i was vice president had the same obligation to deal with unaccompanied children. I was able to get it slowed up significantly by working with the heads of state of those communities. Now marco what's interesting about biting speaking about heads of states of those countries. Is that one of them. The president of honduras one or landau has recently been connected to three drug trafficking investigations by federal prosecutors. In the state of new york. They say that in short he has taken money in order to allow drug traffickers to operate in his country so now the biden administration in addition to those other factors that they're mentioning can't avoid the factor of corruption. Right what is the biden administration saying then about how they're going to deal with corruption in honduras anything concrete you know nothing concrete yet. President biden had a delegation come here to mexico city this week to speak about the subject of migration. They didn't say anything publicly about how they would deal with issues of corruption or governmental oppression in the region. But if you speak to anybody who has done any research in honduras they will say that. The state department's policies under the obama administration and under the trump administration are contributing factors to governmental oppression in honduras. I spoke with dana frank. She is a professor emeritus at the university of california at santa cruz. And here's what she had say. First of all the government of us would not be empowered today. If it wasn't for us support for the security forces back him and without the military he would not have a viable base because they keep him in power and they repress the people that protest you know hit it seems the honduran presidents connections to drug trafficking would be special challenge for the biden. White house What is the evidence that drug trafficking contributes to people getting forced out of under us right. Well when i've interviewed people who are fleeing from honduras the most common factor that they site is organized crime in their neighborhoods and enlarge swaths of the goosey gal by the capital or something. It'll la the largest city. Large swaths of the city are controlled by criminal groups. But that isn't happening in a vacuum. I spoke about this with adrian. Pine she is a professor. At american university has also done. Extensive work hunters. There is impunity at the highest levels for politicians who are leading drug trafficking operations and working hand-in-hand with other major traffickers and cartels but also that impunity extends down to the gangs. That are terrorizing people in their neighbourhoods. So marco i'm interesting in seeing now is how the biden administration handles this president that they have previously seen as an ally how they handle that. Because this is this is now heart. Of the quandary that the administration faces in central america. The world's jorges valencia. Thank you very much. Thank you marco. Let's turn now to china. Relations between washington and beijing have been frosty and now getting frostier accusations and sanctions are flying back and forth. european nations have also been getting the mex- pointing their fingers at china for the white house. The big concerns are the treatment of the weaker people in china's xinjiang province and beijing's ongoing efforts to crack down on hong kong. The world's rebecca cancer is in. Shanghai has been watching all of this. What's been the overall mood. This past week in china. Well since those talks between the us and china in alaska. I've been seeing a real rising nationalist sentiment and defensiveness in china online in my friend circles on we chat. I'm seeing a lot of posts about having a strong chinese response to foreign criticism. And there's certainly t shirts and hats for sale online with pro china slogans like stop interfering in china's internal affairs. Wow so yesterday. We talked about a boycott of the clothing. Brand agent. adam was prompted by the government but gladly signed onto. It seems by a lot of chinese are a lot of paying attention to this though. Yes that was because of a statement. H m made months ago about not using cotton sourced in xinjiang because of reports of forced labor and suddenly now social media is just going nuts and people are boycotting nike adidas and other companies that have stopped using xinjiang cotton and meanwhile has completely disappeared off of some of china's most popular online platforms. Of course there's also been some more measured responses like posts. That said chinese people should be supporting people in xinjiang not just products from their every day of this week. The ministry of foreign affairs has been fielding questions about xinjiang and spokesperson. Watching has had some real zingers today she accused of conspiring to destabilise china through xinjiang. Well jim may found team jungle. Bushy lack bushes should in the us. Today's china is not iraq not syria nor is it the china of one hundred and twenty years ago. China is open and honest and the facts and truth will expose all rumors and lies against china amidst all of this. Rebecca china apparently also issued a human rights report this week yes on wednesday china issued its annual human rights report and it only covers the. Us it's very first line was. I can't breathe and it blasted the us on systemic racism gun violence and the us's poor response to covid nineteen. So i spoke with sophie richardson. Who is china director at human rights. Watch i asked her. Why china would put out a human rights report at this time. It is largely a propaganda tool. I think the chinese government was serious about reporting on compliance with human rights treaties. Which of course would be a helpful step in the right direction. We would see it be more honest about its own track record rebecca. What do we know. In fact about forced labor xinjiang the better cotton initiative which many of these brands are members of has stopped sourcing cotton from xinjiang because of reports of forced labor and back in january the trump administration also banned imports of xinjiang cotton. The chinese government is having none of it. They basically call these accusations completely baseless the ministry of foreign affairs spokesperson says they're using mostly machines to harvest the cotton at the same time. The shanghai office of better cotton initiative says it has not found any forced labor in xinjiang cotton facilities in the past eight years. Of course it's hard to know whether the chinese government influence that statement. Richardson expects this kind of pushback is only going to continue. I think we can reasonably expect to see. The chinese government go even further than it already has in denying that there are serious human rights violations. Taking place in trying to prevent certain kinds of scrutiny. Personally i'm wondering what more is going to happen in the months ahead. I mean we've got the beijing winter olympics approaching. And i can imagine this is going to become an issue for global companies. If they choose to sponsor there's going to be global pushback and if they choose to stay away then they've again unleash the wrath of china. We'll wait and see. Rebecca cather is the world's correspondent in shanghai. Thank you very much. Rebecca thank you. You're listening to the world. i'm marco werman..

nike Rebecca cather sophie richardson marco werman mexico honduras Eddie dana frank Rebecca alaska january monica campbell new york yesterday syria china Richardson this week central america wednesday
"sophie richardson" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

06:59 min | 2 years ago

"sophie richardson" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Science and technology. The Communist regime even has a published manifesto with a catchy name. They have something called Made in China 2025 in these national strategy, they absolutely call out wanting to be the dominant leader. And this biological age, so wanted to be leader and being able to develop vaccines. Precision medicine for all the classified briefings about China that dilemma Nina received The threat really hit home when he called home. This is the argument we're having met with my dad is 10 years from now, my dad gets a phone call on still hate. By the way we understand you are going to develop hypertension and you're on the verge of Parkinson's. Here are three medicines. You should take moving forward to help alleviate some of the symptoms. My dad's like, How do they know this? And the companies from China. Because they've already micro targeted my dad based upon his Edna and my dad says, Okay, I'll do it. Doubles advocate argument would say, Listen, if you're able to Pinpoint something in my Edna. I'll sign up for that. That's exactly my dad said. And so my argument is to him from a long term extension cost our nation we won do that. We want to have another nation systematically eliminate or health care services. Are we okay with that as a nation? If we are the nation, then so be it. But that's what's happening. Our dependence on China during Cove ID for PPE for masks will pale in comparison to our potential health care dependence going forward, according to Edward, you of the FBI. What happens if we realize that all of our future drugs? Future vaccines. Future health care are all completely dependent upon a foreign source. If we don't wake up will realize one day we've just become healthcare. Crack addicts in someone like China has become a pusher. Healthcare crack addicts, you say right if they're in a position to be able to offer you Personalized, effective low cost health care. Would we be in a position to say? No, I don't think so. How close are we to that? E. Don't How close we are, but I could feel it breathing down our neck just sounds a little xenophobic. If China is the industry leader here, why wouldn't you do business with them? Well at the end of the day, it's not about the Chinese people. It's about the Chinese government. He says. China's government understands that their future success hinges on accumulating large amounts of human didna. They're building out a huge domestic database. And if there are now able to supplement that with data from all around the world It's all about who gets the largest, most diverse data set. And so the ticking time bomb is that once they're able to achieve true artificial intelligence, then they're off to the races and what they can do with that data. You're saying biggest data set wins correct. Think of DNA's the ultimate treasure map, a kind of double helix chart containing the code for traits ranging from our eye color to our susceptibility to certain diseases. If you have 10,000 DNA's samples, scientists could possibly isolate the genetic markers and the DNA's a associated with, say, breast cancer. But if you have 10 million samples, your statistical chances of finding the markers improved dramatically, which is why China wants to get so much of it. It is one side of the that China passed a law last year. The Chinese government is absolutely clamped down on any access to their biological data or their biological sample. So it is a one way street So their data is not leaving China, but they're sucking it in from all over the world, right? It's not just DNA's A. According to Billa, Vanina, He and his colleagues have been tracking China as the country uses less than honorable method to vacuum up all sorts of data from outside their borders. They do it both legitimately and illegitimately. They still some data, but they're very strategic and how they acquire it for around the world. You're saying at least in some cases China's hacking to get this information. China is number one in the world that any kind of hacking capability and they're brazen about it. December. John Radcliffe, then the director of national intelligence, went so far as to name China as the number one national security threat to America, citing specifically their theft of data and technology. We have probably five or six health care companies last five years who have been, I would say Penetrated, expel traded hacked by China. What's the likelihood you and I have been hacked by China 110%. Personal data personal data. Current estimates are that 80% of American adults have had all their personally identifiable information stolen. The Communist Party of China. The concern is that the Chinese regime is taking all that information about us what we eat, how we live when we exercise and sleep and then combining it with our DNA's a data. With information about heredity and environment. Suddenly they know more about us than we know about ourselves and bypassing doctors. China can target us with treatments and medicine. We don't even know we need think about the dawn of the Internet of things in the five jean networks in the and smart homes and smart cities. We're going to be sensors everywhere. It's going to be tracking your movement, your behavior habits and ultimately is gonna have a biological application, meaning that based on the data that gets collected I'll be able to analyze it and look at improving your health. That data becomes incredibly relevant and very, very valuable. You're describing data almost as a commodity data is absolutely going to be the new oil. All this may sound like a premise for a dystopian, futuristic science fiction movie. U. S. Government officials say the picture gets even scarier. Given how China is already using DNA's strategically against its own citizens. Today, these are some of the most serious abuses that the Chinese government has committed in modern history. Sophie Richardson, director of the China Program for Human Rights Watch, says China has rounded up more than a million week ear's Chinese citizens who are a Muslim minority and jailed them in camps. The U. S government calls this a crime against humanity there being subjected to political indoctrination. They can't use their own language They're not allowed to worship. Those people are highly restricted in how they can live their lives. This is a population under Constant surveillance. Yeah, it's it's a region that's awash in surveillance technology ranging from facial recognition software surveillance cameras. Data doors. WiFi sniffers, Part of the social control includes the forced collection of Didna under the guise of free physicals for week. Ear's Richardson says China is actually collecting didna and other biometric data. That's then you specifically to identify people target other family members and refined facial recognition software, and those national security officials say are just the uses..

China Chinese government Communist Party of China Sophie Richardson hypertension director Edna Nina Didna Parkinson FBI U. S. Government U. S Billa Edward