5 Burst results for "Sophie Khan"

"sophie khan" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

06:51 min | 5 months ago

"sophie khan" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Questions with us. Good Evening, Mary. Beth. Hi, How are you? I'm good. How are you? Doing great. Thanks like that. The city cute that we're family. Oh, just hang on. I got a whole lineup of cute stuff for this. Oh, man, I'm just scratching the cute surface. All right, um Happen to write a book once, and I thought I would do a thing about my family at the beginning of it, so I Videotape my father, who was long since passed away. And he told me the story. And I'm going to tell you because it fits perfectly with what we're talking about. Okay, we go. I was very close to my mother's family, and especially my grandmother, Sophie Khan. When I was an adolescent and visiting grandmother in Berlin, my cousin and I became interested in our family history. Nobody seemed to know much about the earlier generations of cons. But they remembered there was an old abandoned Jewish cemetery in town that might offer a few clues. So we took along someone that could read. He grew and we found several gravestones. My cousin took meticulous notes and wrote down all the names and dates from the gravestones, and he promised to do more research when he got home. Unfortunately, he lived in Hanover and had to take a train. Back to his hometown. Now the bathrooms in those trains were notoriously bad, and this one was no exception. When he went into the bathroom stall, he noticed that they didn't have any toilet paper. Well, this was an emergency, and my cousin had only one piece of paper that would solve that problem. The piece of paper with all the notes about the family's history. Couple family history was literally flushed down the toilet on a train to hand over There you go. Yeah, That's the story. That's the story and your book is so mad. I just really enjoyed it. Because this whole ancestry quest is such a Hot topic, I guess is one way to put it. It's very popular. Um, there's a variety of ways of doing it. And Your book has not only Suggestions on how to do it. But it also has suggestions of what not to do, and it has also some collections of Great stories, some of them heartwarming, some of them a little shocking. Depending on what your genealogy and your DNA's A reveals Tell me a little bit up. Tell me a bit about putting this book together and Talking to these people. Okay, well, the initial I got the idea for the book because my in my family, the heritage is Irish. And my Irish mother would never talk about the fact that her father left when she was two. And disappeared. And so we were never allowed to talk about it. But when my mother was dying, she said to me, you know very bad. Would you Would you try to find out what happened, My dad and you know she was in her nineties so he would have been in his 100 twenties. And so I said around this mission to try to track his ancestry and, um you know, three ancestry dot com and some of the sights and then Edna 23 me, but at the same time I was doing it. I started realizing that everybody around me had a story on by some of the allows its story for shocking. You know, they're you know, the person found out that their mother wasn't there, Mother. That had that or they found out that they had eight siblings. They didn't know about or that you know, there were first through infertile, you know, through Sterilization laboratory. And so you know, I'm the former journalist, and it just really grabbed my attention that this was such a phenomenon and I started researching it and The numbers are pretty shocking. And they say that 26 million people buy flip the end of last year had taken Didna test and that 27% of those found out about an ancestor or a parent that they didn't know that they had. Wow. That's you know, Yeah. And this is the life that this is the time of year that these things were given his gifts. Uh, aren't they? I mean, yes, right. Exactly about the experts that I've spoken to, you know, people hire private detectives now to find Mary ancestry and a lot of people are studying this and You know, they said, people are have good intentions They set out like here's a fun gift to do for Christmas and then There's no secrets anymore because of the Internet and because of DNA's A and so you know, 27% of the people are finding out things that they were pretty shocked about. Well, some of the stories and they're all they all have their own unique appeal. But then some are like the story where they did a search and found out that these I believe it was sisters lived 30 minutes apart from each other in Georgia for 10 years. Both of them gave birth to their Children on the same year. They were both pictures on their school softball team. All right. They had the same breed of dog. And both. And both were preschool teachers. That is really something. I mean, I got you. I got you think about stuff like this. And they had originally been adopted, You know, and lived on different sides of the country, but only in the left. You know, since they were adults, they ended up living that close to each other. And you know their story. The beautiful story. They are really good friends now and They look at each other. It's like looking in a mirror. You know, and that they are both of them. Both said that they were, they always felt that there was something missing. And they never really knew what itwas because they were raised by adaptive families in really good homes with really loving parents. They just Out like something was missing. And then when they found each other, they realized what itwas so And on the think you made reference to this, on the other end theirs in a story about finding out her parents were actually her grandparent's and her sister was a month was her mother. I mean, that's that's a whole different story and will doom or those With Mary Beth Sammons, that the author of the Great book, Believe me, I read it. It's good ancestry Quest when we come back on 7 20 w G. N.

Mary Beth Sammons Hanover Sophie Khan softball Berlin Edna Didna Georgia
"sophie khan" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"sophie khan" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Better like, I'm half Taiwanese and half Brazilian heart. Mexican Lupino they talk about these types of things I was recently watching this on Univision like what that like for the first time ever in my life, like they acknowledged Asian Latinos in this was like last week problem. Everybody. Who knows me has known me for over a decade will tell you that I am constantly reinventing myself, I pick and choose whatever is more than Thisiis from me at the time in the position that I am depending on what I'm trying to do. So in a way, I think I have a pretty stable core. But at the same time, I want to tell you that is constantly shifting. There's always something changing. And they're all this competitions are great because they shed light on things that oftentimes they've Nord. And I think that that's even going on in today's political sphere and everything that's going on. And we only get to understand these things once we are made aware, and I think that it's it's a lifelong process where we're always trying to see and discover ourselves and try to understand why we do the things that we do. I would say understanding that grew up in Argentina where there is a lot of psycho. Therapy. That was really well done. The highest ratio per capita of therapists to human beings. So that was very eloquent true story true story. So fi just wrap it up. I find love in the community. I mean, you wanna talk about like a community of folks that have gone through so much within their own families within society within like different issues in the legal system. That's where I kind of find a safe haven to be quite honest, where I'm not getting picked on because I don't I don't know how to make the mollis or I'm not getting picked on because I messed up and eight with my left hand because the left hand is considered the dirty hand in a slum and the right hand is considered the clean hand. And you know, like, I just being me and loving and connecting. And it's love is love. And in the end, love winds. Guys. Thank you so much for speaking with me, so econ bubble Kim, Christina Saudi-owned and David Chang. Thank you so much for opening your hearts and sharing with us. We really appreciate it. Yes. Many ethics. David Chan is a project coordinator for nonprofit in San Francisco Christie or Saudi is a community organizer in the bay area. Public Kim is a chef and entrepreneur. And Sophie Khan is an actress who stars in the award winning one woman show called his Donny growing up Mexican and Pakistan in America. And I wanna thank all of them so much for such an honest conversation. And next we're going to turn to a conversation.

Kim Univision Thisiis Sophie Khan David Chan San Francisco Argentina coordinator David Chang Pakistan Donny America Christina Saudi-owned
"sophie khan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"sophie khan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Better like, I'm half, Taiwanese and half prison hurt Mexican and Latino. They talk about these types of things I was recently watching this on Univision like what that like for the first time ever in my life like they acknowledged Asian Latinos in this was like last week. Bob'll everybody who knows me has known me for over a decade will tell you that I am constantly reinventing myself, I pick and choose whatever is more than Thisiis from me at the time in the position that I am depending on what I'm trying to do. So in a way, I think I have a pretty stable core. But at the same time, I want to tell you that is constantly shifting. There's always something changing. And they're all this competitions are great because they shed light on things that are oftentimes if Nord, and I think that that's even going on in today's political sphere on everything that's going on. And we only get to understand these things once we are made aware, and I think that it's it's a lifelong process where we're always trying to see and discover ourselves and try to understand why we do the things that we do. I would say understanding that bubble grew up in. In Argentina where there is a lot of psychotherapy that was like really well done. Has the highest ratio per capita of therapists to human beings. So that was very eloquent true story true story. So fi just wrap it up. I find love in the community. I mean, you wanna talk about like a community of folks that have gone through so much within their own families within society within like, different issues and legal system. That's where I kind of find a safe haven to be quite honest, where not getting picked on because I don't because I don't know how to make the mollis or I'm not getting picked on because I messed up and ate with my left hand because the left hand is considered the dirty hand in a slum and the right hand is considered the clean, and you know, like, I just being me and loving it and connecting and it's love is love. And in the end, love winds. Guys. Thank you so much for speaking with me so fee con Kim Christie, sodium and David Chang. Thank you so much for opening your hearts and sharing with us. We really appreciate it says many. Thanks for having us. David Chan is a project coordinator for a nonprofit in San Francisco Christie audio is a community organizer in the bay area. Public Kim is a chef and entrepreneur. And Sophie Khan is an actress who stars in the award.

Kim Christie Univision Sophie Khan Thisiis David Chan San Francisco Nord Argentina David Chang Bob coordinator Kim
"sophie khan" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"sophie khan" Discussed on Latino USA

"I love in the community. I mean, you wanna talk about like a community of folks that have gone through so much within their own families within society within like different issues in the legal system. That's where I kind of find a safe haven to be quite honest, where not getting picked on because I don't because I don't know how to make the mollis or I'm not getting picked on because I messed up and ate with my left hand because a left hand is considered the dirty honed in a slum and the right Hon is considered the clean, and you know, like, I just being me and loving and connecting. And it's love is love. And in the end love wins. Guys. Thank you so much for speaking with me so fee. Con Bubalo Kim Cristiano Saudi and David Chang. Thank you so much for opening your hearts and sharing with us. We really appreciate it as many. Mighty affects. David Chan is a project coordinator for a nonprofit in San Francisco Christie or Saudi is a community organizer in the bay area. Pablo Kim is a chef and entrepreneur. And Sophie Khan is an actress who stars in the award winning one woman show called nexus Donnie growing up Mexican and Pakistan e in America, and I wanna thank all of them so much for such an honest conversation. This episode was produced by Janice woke up and edited by Marlin Bishop to let you know USA team includes the Musseuw's so. Yep. Lisa. Antonio he Maggie freeling and say or give with help from my equity. Additional Eddie by Elsa..

Con Bubalo Kim Cristiano Saudi Pablo Kim Sophie Khan David Chang Maggie freeling David Chan San Francisco Lisa Marlin Bishop coordinator Janice Pakistan Antonio Donnie Musseuw USA America
"sophie khan" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

04:20 min | 2 years ago

"sophie khan" Discussed on Latino USA

"You're like, okay, I gotta tell I gotta ask something of Latino USA. So what was the question? So the question that I wanted to try and figure out was how do other Asians identify coming from Latino background? My name is David Chang. And I grew go into Chinese Emerson school and speaking Spanish at home. Tino in Latin America, a lot of people that are are called chino. You know that could be from Creon backgrounds. It could be from Japanese backgrounds. They could be from a number of different Asian backgrounds, but they're still considered chino and growing up. I think I heard that word a lot both in Latino communities that grew up around friends from central America, South America. I also grew up in California. So I look Filipina, and I would just by my own family members be called Gino or just in the streets of L A B called Gina. My name's Christie Ozorio. I was born in Los Angeles to a Filipino and Salvador, Ian couple, I actually asked my mom about this. I was like, so what do you think about this? And she's the Filipina and she's like, oh, yeah. She no that's just a cute way of saying like Asian girl on Mike. Okay. Cool because you know, I get called chino. And she's like what you're not Chinese. I don't get it. Like, how do you really feel about this? I mean, personally for me, I think growing up in California a lot of people have really embraced it. Like, I ride by this car every single day that has she need though as a giant sticker on the back of the car. So I don't know you have to put it in context. And it's all about like intent to someone's trying to use that word derogatory towards me. I'm like, I'm not feeling it. But if someone wanted to just call me a Cina because it's an term of endearment than I'm all about it. So Bubalo you were a contestant on the moon show. Master chef Latino putting these misleading. In fact, I let go see the muster shipped Latini, and you had your own experience with this term genome. So tell us what that was when I'm public him. I was born in Argentina, my parents were both Korean and I moved to the states in two thousand I've been living here ever since this was about a year ago. And we were in Miami Goto. Brought to his brother racing. People are just referred to me as it, you know. And I'm like case like, it's cool. But you guys don't really know me all that much. When you don't know me. And you just me just because it's the easiest thing for you those like I kinda take offense to that. I think I've come to feel over the years that as long as I am not reduced to one unique characteristic of my appearance. I'm actually okay with it. But then again, it really comes back to the relationship with that person. Can I ask you guys? How often have you sat around and had conversations about being letty? No Latino and Asian the first conversation if anything was with my parents because they were the ones that kind of had to street in a lot of things. Hi, my name's Sophie Khan. I am bicultural and bilingual, and bisexual, and my parents are Mexican Pakistani. And I am all of that. I didn't really realize what I was until I had a babysitter that what you know. A lot of my babysitter's were either black Regan and on. So you can imagine what my Spanish sounded like like, mommy, you'll get all those phone you'll get and so. Like, what are you getting to sponge from and I'm like well. Yeah. That's that's that's how talked knowing. She's like, no me. Ha she's like, then it wasn't until later like this. She explained she's like, no, you're you're babysitters Puerto Rican, and you were Mexican and Pakistani. So let's talk a little bit about the multiplicity of identity and how you guys kind of live with that. So David you've talked about, you know, when you go to Peru, which is your parent's homeland being Chinese for you is essentially just being Peruvian because it's pretty common. Correct. But when you come back to the United States, you're Peruvian side, basically disappears in everybody just sees you as Chinese I grew.

chino David Chang California Chinese Emerson school Tino Latin America Christie Ozorio USA. Los Angeles Regan Latini United States Gino Miami Goto South America America Peru Mike Sophie Khan Gina