20 Episode results for "Sophie Hey Kelly"

Elad Gross

Two Broads Talking Politics

21:55 min | 11 months ago

Elad Gross

"Hi this is Arthur in you're listening to allowed gross on two blocks tagging politics don't forget devote it listen everyone this is Kelly with two broads talking politics part of the cast podcast network. I'm on with my co-host Sophie Hey Sophie Hey Kelly Louis and joining us today is a lot gross who is running for Attorney General in Missouri I lot were heart high as so we would like to start off with you know the really easy question of what's your background and and why are you running yeah so I I I am from Missouri born and raised here been here just my whole life and I used to be an assistant attorney general for the State of Missouri so I was in charge of a pretty big docket of cases one of the busiest in the state they did trials all over the place that was also involved in a lot of special projects object for the office and a lot of government efficiency work all this other stuff but I've also been involved with working with kids through the education system here in Missouri for for the last thirteen years I run a non profit that teaches kids the power that they have to leave so we do free summer programming for kids and Saints Saints the city and I've been doing that for some time now I've also served as a special public defender for the State of Missouri where I worked with are very very very overburdened public defender system here and I represented a young lady who was wrongfully held in one of the worst jails and the country that's located here in St Louis I decided to run because as you could probably tell all sees thinks I'm telling you right now we have a lot of things that are not working very well in our state state and that's true in our education system it's true and our justice system it's true and so many of our systems that we have so many dedicated people who are working on who really want the best for all of us and unfortunately one of the big reasons that's not happening is our government is not serving us it's serving people with a lot of money and power our lawyers and I've been one of the lead investigators country ongoing after government corruption and dark money in our politics and we need an attorney in general and Missouri who's GonNa stand for us in our state is also GonNa take these people on all over the country so that's intend to do I've got a whole bunch of other plans for the office pissed and we'd release pretty detailed plans we just released one this weekend about Ethics Reform so I'm happy to talk about any of the aspects the attorney general touches on which catch happened to be quite a bit so it's very important office in our state yeah it sounds like it so I know you've been doing a ton of just going around the state and talking to people what are you hearing from them do people think much about the attorney general race except when they're actually voting into what are the issues and things that they're really concerned with yeah yeah I think so far in Missouri I've traveled quite a bit I actually just past thirty thousand miles today travelling in less than a year and I've had about two hundred sixty seventy things I think now again in less than a year so yeah I've actually gotten to meet with quite a few people I also talked to folks you know through social media on the phone we what is to be a very inclusive campaign so we actually do have it is reports boards with a campaign that anybody can enjoy they can share their ideas for our state in fact I was just literally just a few minutes ago I was talking to one Who is helping us with our anti-violence program that we're going to our plan that will be publishing pretty soon so I mean I I have been hearing a lot of issues around the state that maybe folks don't go touch on any general jurisdiction but they wanna see and then who's issues with violent crime and violence general in our are state of which there unfortunately has been quite a bit there have been issues around health care and protecting folks not who would need access to healthcare we've got the Medicaid expansion ever right now in our state that we're trying to the balance you insurance everybody even if you don't have money can still access healthcare with care which one was thinking would be a no brainer but unfortunately we have to petition to get that one done issues around consumer protection thinking about you we know these folks who call your phone or trying to scam you like that is is hard to be it's going to resolve this to you so there are a whole bunch of different issues. I also think that turning general's office should have a civil rights division we've had a lot of talk here in our state about people being discriminated against one reason or another and they're being a whack of protections for them in the workplace I think that we really need to make sure that everybody can participate in our system and then includes our economy in our neighborhoods and their families is everything else so I think that should be a big role the attorney general places well so you had mentioned dark money earlier and I was wondering if you'd talk a a little bit about that like what is dark money how does it work and sort of like what the effect on Missouri and what do you WanNa do about it yeah Dr Money is the worst charge money for stuff stuff he's not in this campaign contributions that also usually in the billions and billions of dollars into our political system and the problem is we can't see who the donors actually are you know normally you'll see you know maybe he ad that says painted for by Americans for amazingness or something and you go look up that group and maybe you'll see the name of an attorney if you're lucky and the pillbox Washington DC and you will not get any information about who is actually funding this thing from either of those sources so we had a major problem with your misery which actually leads to be doing a lot of this anti corruption investigations. I'm still litigating in court today but we had a dark money spending bonanza in our state in two thousand sixteen on our local in state elections and this led to you some folks getting elected especially are left governor getting elected to office because they had access to all of the dark money and when the office they started using even more money they would start nonprofit organizations to all this money into their pet project well so in the end something do because we leave their so use for the are covering today they're his his own party members of his own car were estimating him from our State House and they said we need to see the names of these donors they went to a judge and they said the judge this looks like pay to play we've got it and the judge said yes I'm going to order events released stays with their donors in two hours later or governor quit so so I thought it was wrong that ended up that voice so I started asking this as much as I could as a private under some of our or statutory lives and unfortunately had to mitigate that on my own with you know are turning general has not anything investigate take money literally just days ago was caught taking dark money from somebody that he was let off the hook for who stole a whole bunch of tax credits czar state and so it's a big problem and the problem is that the east kinds of expenditure and so we don't see who is vying our government is it is trying to influence our decision making it is literally breaking our democracy and it is demolishing people's confidence in our system and we're having a lot more people check out because they don't need to address into to a large degree as this stuff continues and continues to happen there correct and so I think that what in this campaign and my administration will be two women money and to focus on campaign finance and ethics reform in our state we desperately needed here in early around the country look at the things that the attorney general can do in regards to dark money as opposed to things that would we need to be done through the legislature so the legislature can't pass a law than dark money and that has been done in a you saved my panel is one of the notable ones there was actually a documentary called dark money. I mean if you haven't seen it Stephanie great watching you you're talking Aksu focus on it In Missouri not entirely necessary I would definitely help him with a law pretty clear attorney general already to regulate in Reese Sake charity nonprofit organizations of not abiding by Missouri's he's live actually that that you cannot do something to hide the names of political literally so it's so we we are not enforcing the law and that is a decision that comes straight from Utah prosecutors but when you have an issue I if it so often type so hard to track you need an institution like the Attorney General's Office to actually do its job which so today the attorney general investigate these men profit we could actually shut them down if he wants to he could take them to court you can cross acute criminally absolutely and none of that happened that the mobile referrals to Attorney General's obviously these issues with our last last two attorneys general one of the resulting there before you said he left in his appointed But neither either one has chosen to act or dark lending last we had a situation Zuri were anybody can do any of this money stuff they do it this way with her and so that should change you had mentioned before that scam calls for something that was coming up when you're talking talking to people can you talk a little bit about what the attorney general can do to fight scam calls yes so our attorney general and there's also a national version of the has what's called a L. Call West and this would become the nine we've by former athlete into David went on and became governor of the state to but not the Nevada close coming in and they ended up developing a list that's whole however call slam attempt to stop all harassed at all the sign for the well now we're over time you know things change to instill folks on our some of all over the place where we ended with these calls and there's usually sign gonNa get plenty of people here Kazumi incentives many of them wear down so this is your utility company actually through on your whole Almighty company there was one not while ago that was coming from a federal court it said it was coming from that corner and it it was somebody pretending to be relative to the mighty immediately and so these are all scam calls the problem is right now we could eliminate allow these calls and that comes through big telecom if they're going to do it or not so if you got a carrier usually you you can actually pay more per month to get them to start walking around the halls and and now some of these carry a few of them that are on your co the tension thing I'm calling whatever it is and we need processed celery at just those buddy could eat more for all of us and now is hoping Google Ooh over the top of that Rehab or certain General Missouri at least not very suavely calendar instead there's some some kind of statewide agreement where it's like pre press point I think we all are taking a bit more duties all over ah we need advocate going that you actually general officer that does does fall and consumer protection powers of Attorney General as Surrey as well so this is a a race that's run every four years and a few years ago it was a fairly lopsided race I think the Republican God about about fifty nine percent of the vote why what do you see happening this time around what is your path to victory in this race yeah while we we are doing this very differently than statewide race has done here at least for some time so right now in Jefferson city which is our state capital and getting out of the two sixty seven speeding a hearing on public safety not because we've had a lot of violent time occurring asleep you haven't Megyn problem in our state and there were many people were unit discuss this issue it's I was learning like I said I've traveled a lot of people and I am why person focused a Kawata effort on needing getting them to buy in showing that we have in our state and work for us and truly baking aching our government representative of people in our state in the only way that we can do that is we have to go meet people listen so I talked to folks not only folks who are Democrats I've spoken to Republican I've spoken to Independent Party folks people who have never been involved in this process before we oftentimes the first time they've ever donated money who can't I cannot tell you how many folks who told me that were part of this campaign hearing with us we are super focused on making through this a grassroots campaign that get the job done not just making it look flashy but it actually builds community community in our state and gets all over our state so we have been working a lot with state representative candidates we've been working a lot with community members on projects that are important to them and we highlight people wherever week though it's so we've got a lot of energy behind this I mean no one knew who I was I was working in the office here kid but statewide allow folks didn't know who I was and so we built this from zero to a point where people people are super excited about this campaign either as the future for campaigning and hopefully and other places to pull this off and then we'll show other people how to do it too but it's basically just doing with government there's always supposed to represent any actually carry about what they say and we're getting a lot more people who we'll have checked out to buy back in and that's what makes me really excited I'm just so excited to see how many people are so interested in getting involved in their government who never had thought they would do that in their last eight is there anything else that you would like to make sure we talk about a lot I think that there are a number of folks who you know I was just mentioning this to feel really dejected and they feel oh man like the all countries is bad pat and and never imagined that we'd be here like what the world's going on I encourage folks who feel like that to take a moment and maybe turn off the TV or stays button whatever and and local meeting people go with the people go talk to them some of the best conversations I've had with people who I disagree with on so many issue but when you find out or so many more things we agree on their snowboarding more but we share and we go and work for it they just need to know oh how so I wanNA share with closer out there no matter where you are you a little bit I you I'm like I don't know I don't know comfortable reach leaves reach out my phone number is on right now and but I right now this is a little more or I and I I I I hope so far great that we have such potential in this country to do anything for the people who are here and to some people who ooh and I got up to share that with anybody so he's calling me anytime all right so we will be sure to put a link to your website and maybe just put your cell phone number up on our website to radio basically yeah no the more the Merrier I love it I there are other ways that you'd like to make sure that people get involved in your campaign well the so the biggest help that we can get is spreading the word and you all have been wonderful your organization's I'm so excited got to see all the work that you all are doing a lot especially clear thought is results so is for sure that the message is getting out there that's really the biggest thing that any campaign has to do to be successful getting folks involved as a really big Hashemite any from that they donate a volunteer their time so there's lots of ways to get off we try to be really creative with it too and you didn't have any hosts who have had the unburnt community and wherever else it is we always tried to make it on so we gauge people who aren't necessarily always a part of this might WanNa play game go and talk about politics we'll get we'll Yeah I think there's a mom and Ethan won that the warriors okay last question what's the story behind your twitter handle Oh yeah I really it was in I write everybody out of I grow messaging we get everything and I would look in my mom and I'm not very tall so I would like you know what Albee Awhile I knew a lot you know weightlifting gold digger will be call somebody had been from me I don't know Mwanza the articles so on am I was bigger Awad wanted her came out and they had the opportunity to be big lad in framed on my own I'm very very happy to take it and I think it's it's part of you know I I I think that the more that we engage with people and oftentimes humor's really good way to do that We can bring or people in we can we can have a good time doing it you know and and it doesn't work should be having a good time there will be times were we're uncomfortable but take a lot they do dung stature the heartache to have it all right it all right well thank you so much for joining us on your very very busy trip around your state over and over again that'd be president and Yet so thanks so much and we will put up information so people can find you and call you on your cell phone okay that sounds good I appreciate Reseda thank you for listening to bras talking politics put of the dim cast podcast network. Our theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album elephant offense shaped trees by the band immune ARY and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork by Matthew Wetland and was created for use by this podcast you can contact us at two broads talking politics at g mail dot com or on twitter or facebook at to talk you can find all of our episodes episodes at two bras talking politics dot com are anywhere podcast or found.

attorney Missouri Sophie Hey Kelly Louis Dr Money State House Arthur twitter Matthew Wetland facebook Stephanie fifty nine percent thirteen years four years two hours
Beto O'Rourke

Two Broads Talking Politics

24:25 min | 7 months ago

Beto O'Rourke

"Hi this is ten in. You're listening to battle rourke onto broads politics. Part of the dead cast podcast network. Enjoy y'all This is Kelly with two brads talking politics. Part of the dumb cast family of podcast. I'm on with my co-host Sophie. Hey Sophie Hey Kelly and we are excited to be joined today by a Rourke who has started a new organization called powered by people that we're going to talk about so hello Beto. Hey there thank you all for having me on the podcast. Yeah and I just before we started with saying that my My eight year old teddy likes pronounce. Your name Betas so you know. We're going get him settled but that his mom is right south we well. I say that's which is the way that you introduce me. But I have heard Beta Which is your son's station occurred Beto Beato fall all variations In all of them are fine with me as as they vote for Democrats in Texas. That's right that's right. That's the important thing. Stay focused so when you left the presidential race you made an announcement a little bit later that you were starting. This organization called it powered by people People like me and so I got really excited about it. I don't know if everyone cares about down ballot races in Texas but they should So tell us some about about this organization you started and why why this is your focus now powered by people brings together volunteers so Your Block Walkers your phone bankers folks who WanNa text voters to work on statehouse campaigns in Texas where we are only nine seats down from commanding a majority for the first time since two thousand so this is a once in a twenty year opportunity and A couple of things about this are are exciting. To one is the chance in a sense this year After which the political boundaries in Texas will be redrawn to have a democratic majority to stop the racist gerrymandering that has prevailed in Texas for decades. We were until two thousand eighteen. The worst state in terms of voter turnout and it was not for a lack of love of our democracy. It was because we were literally drawn that way. And if you were black or Hispanic there's a good chance you were drawn out of a Congressional district to diminish the power of your boat and minimize the chances you actually go to the ballot box so this this very cynical very racist strategy was very effective so we have the Democratic majority in the State House we can redraw draw these political boundaries and congressional districts in a way the draws people in and not only does that mean that you have more progressive voices In in our state government. Does that mean that you have a greater voter turnout? It means that you make progress on things that you really care about so Gun Violence. What if Texas of all states where to take the lead on sensible gun legislation like universal background checks what is Texas the least insurance state in the country were to Take the lead on expanding Medicaid so that more people can see a doctor or healthcare provider. What a Texas This oil and gas producing state were to lead the fight on confronting climate change before it's too late. All of those things really only become possible if we win these really important elections and a really interesting note. So we're nine seats down when I ran against Ted Cruz for US Senate in two thousand eighteen. I actually won more votes than he did in nine of the seats that are now represented by a Republican. So not only. Is this possible in some ways. You could say we've done this before and the way that we did it before in two thousand eighteen was by relying on the power of people. Twenty Thousand Texans from all over the state and all two hundred and fifty four counties Picked up a clipboard knocked on doors met their neighbors are complete strangers and convinced them to vote for me. That's how we won more votes than any. Democrat had in the history of the State of Texas and we think that that power if leveraged in these races can produce the decisive difference so that we have that majority that we need and then last thing but a really important thing as you all know These down ballot races so often forgotten if if they were ever known very little attention or focus paid on them are so important for the ballot races so within every congressional district are contained. One two maybe three different house district State House districts end so organizing people at the State House level produces better results at the congressional level and it works up the food chain to statewide results. So if we want to beat John Cornyn and then for the holy grail of American politics if you want to deliver the thirty eight electoral college votes in Texas to the Democratic nominee. Whoever she or he may be against. Donald trump than organizing at this level is an imperative. And so for all those reasons we've devoted all that we got In the Org family and all of our friends and supporters across the state into this effort to make sure we do everything we can in the most important year of our lives. So you mentioned how important The power of the people was in your twenty eighteen campaign but you are also just a star you were you got you. Only lost by two percents You got more votes than any Democrat Ever in Texas And so what do you think it was about your campaign and your message that really resonated with voters in Texas you know in some ways I was too dumb to to know better than to run a campaign that would go across each one of the two hundred and fifty four counties of Texas in. Hold hundreds of town hall meetings and and do them places you might expect to find a Democrat like in Austin Ra- my hometown at all Paso but also to places like King County but voted for Donald Trump. Ninety six percents in two thousand sixteen election and to show up there in to listen to and meet the people that I wanted to represent and to serve because I have no hope of winning and no hope of being able to deliver for them if I haven't met them first and so. That was a characteristic of the campaign. That was different from any campaign that I've seen in in Texas in my forty seven years In in this state And we also ran with nothing to lose because I mean what did I have to lose? I was a really an unknown congressman from West Texas From El Paso the only sitting out in time zone in the state of Texas. Just geographically and politically isolated. And so you know no consultants. No pollsters Just going out and saying what I really believed and listening to the people that I wanted to to serve and really having a good time while while we were doing that and I think there was some something about just how honest and in raw and and in some ways unprofessional that campaign was and how much we depended on everyday people. We basically said look you live in Amarillo. Texas you live in longer you live in Carthage You want to be part of this campaign Here are the the basic rules of the road you know. Here's the open source code. And now just go for it. You just take it on and and however you want to connect with the voters in your community get after it and we'll support you in and so we really did place the power of that campaign as it raised more money and drew more attention into the hands of the people who who really comprised the campaign at the end of the day. Those twenty thousand people I mentioned earlier. Who had the courage to pick up a clipboard? Organize a phone bank at their homes. That's that's what I think. The magic was in that campaign. And that's really what I hope. We can return to empowered by people not tell you just from three weekends of a block walking in January. I really see that that power again. We had eleven hundred people come down to Fort Band not going over forty one thousand doors and I myself knocked on about eight hundred of those doors in some ways. I've never been happier. Because this is democracy stripped down to its bare bones As old as democracy itself It's exactly how they did it in Athens. Twenty three hundred years ago just meeting the people in a given community eyeball to eyeball talking to them. No more facebook ads or TV commercials or slick mailers. It's just to humans connecting and that is profound really powerful and and just made me happy and and made those who were campaigning with us very happy because as you know. Our politics has become so calculated so triangulate and so divisive so polarizing and just to back to just being cool the people and And being honest with people is really something something else so I'm really really happy to be doing this. And I I love your question because I think it is a return to what was so special about the two thousand eighteen senate campaign and really what we will need. We're going to be successful in Texas in twenty twenty so I feel sometimes like there's this kind of existential crisis in the Democratic Party right now you know are we a super far left progressive partier. Are we a moderate party in? What is that look like? How do we win? And it sounds like maybe you're trying to cut through all of that and say how we win by listening to people. And you know maybe that doesn't neatly lined up with either of those kind of polls. Do you think that that's something that that resonates in Texas specifically? Do you think that there's sort of a larger way of thinking about that? You know obviously knocking. Every door of every house in the whole country is a big ask. But do you think we can sort of solve this existential crisis by really listening to people? I think you hit the nail on the head. I mean you know the the conventional wisdom again that I was too dumb to to adopt in in two thousand eighteen was if you're Democrat in traditionally red state of Texas. You run down the middle and You don't offend anybody. And you know you just pray that it works. But there's this Guy Jim hightower. He was the commissioner of Agriculture in Texas in one thousand nine hundred eighty s and is a folk hero in the state and it's still a leader on progressive issues in Texas and he has the same. The only thing that you're gonNA find in the middle of the road or yellow lines and dead armadillos being in the middle and and and being safe being calculated excites precisely no one and so when I travelled Texas this proud gun owning state and talk about an assault weapons ban. Because I'd say look. These weapons were designed for war for killing people. Eat them to hunt. You eat them for self defense that might offend somebody right but but if I were to say that in person out of town hall and they could challenge me that can stand up and say you know what I hear what you're saying but on my ranch we use these air fifteen's to shoot feral hogs which are invasive species and it's just a tradition in our in our family and someone else would get up and say hey you're using an ar fifteen shoot those hogs and you're a pretty bad shot. Here's what I use this hunting rifle over here man. I learned so much from being at those meetings and I. I was no longer pegged on the political spectrum. I was just a fellow. Texan showing up sharing my views and and listening to yours and that holds true on an issue like reproductive healthcare which which can be polarizing but say look in the last decade. Is We have closed more than a quarter of family planning clinics only. Have we made it harder for a woman to get an abortion? Muscle made it harder for her to see from either of any kind to get aid. Cervical cancer screening and we have produced a state that is absolutely deadly for women in maternal mortality crisis. Unrivalled by almost any other state and particularly deadly for women of Color two to three times as deadly for women of color. And so there we can find some common ground if you are quote unquote pro-life. You certainly are happy without outcome. And so maybe we can understand reproductive. Healthcare Is is important for the legal rights when abortion. But it's also important for many other reasons. But can I get that across in a thirty second ad? Or a blip on on facebook or twitter. Probably not it really does take person to person direct engagement. And it's a slow laborious probably sometimes frustrating process and when you're covering two hundred and fifty four counties as we did in Texas. It's not easy and you need. You know all of the two years that I that I needed in two thousand seventeen to twenty eighteen to to get that done but I I do think not only is that a path to victory But I also think there's a way in which we heal this country and and we can have opposing views and still be civil and kind and cool to one another. That's the trick of American democracy. That's what made us the exceptional country on the face of the planet. And I don't have to tell you or your listeners. We are precariously close to losing that for the biggest reason being donald trump and his destruction of institutions norms butts. All of us in a democracy are accountable and responsible for this. So let's each do our part in and for those of us in Texas that's this effort of powered by people which you know I could raise money and get it to candidates Could be a talking head on TV. I can do any number of things but I'm devoting everything to engaging people at a human to human level. I just think it is so so important. So one thing has sort of come out of this. Groundswell of progress says activism Post Twenty. Sixteen is that we've seen a lot more women and younger people running for office in the country and we've seen a lot more people with children running for office and that's one of the things that Really was interesting to me about your presidential campaign. You're one of the few candidates for president who was running and had kids at home. Can you talk a little bit about sort of the challenges of running a campaign with a young family at home and sort of what kind of a perspective that gives you well? You don't see your family for the duration of the campaign or at least that's been my experience and and I think candidates or potential candidates should be very honest with themselves and their families about this cost. They'll they'll be folks. Who will try to talk you into it? So you know what we'll we'll make it easy on your family will make sure you see them If you're doing this well. I think you're doing this right if you do this. In a way that I'm traditionally down that you were all in and all in means You're doing everything you can to every single voter. Who will decide the outcome of that election and the heaviest burden is born then by your family Because you know you're engaged in immediate action to the campaign. They're there to to continue life as a family to do whatever they were doing before. You chose to run And also to support you and the support you not just logistically and in our case aiming you know making sure that all three of our kids get to their different. Sports Practices School into tutoring if they needed but also she's got a job And in a career her and her own life to live but then in addition you know she's emotionally supporting me and I'm the guy calling in from the road whether in the senate campaign it was emirate lower in the presidential thing in Jesus name your. I don't know that I can. I can do this another day. I'm am worn out and beat up and really having a tough time and she would always be the one to to bring you back up and set me on the path into remind me why the hell we were doing this in in the first place So you know that. That's that's something that we should be honest with ourselves about. And then I think we should also whether whoever you like in your local city council race on the Democratic presidential debate stage in wherever you you don't like you should probably acknowledge that all of them and their families have made significant sacrifices in order to run for public office and it's not easy and we should commend them for doing that. But I WILL. I will say this The reason I am so excited to support so many women in fact all of the candidates supported thus far this year have have been women is that they particularly take on a heavy load because not only are the candidate who very often has to leave their family to go out on the campaign trail and raise money and performance debates but but they are by and large still carrying The majority of the weight when it comes to raising their family or running out host household or pursuing their career. I was just talking to brandy. Chambers is one of these amazing women who's running for the State House in Texas News GonNa win this year and you know she's you know ahead of that household but she's also got a full time job and she's trying to run one of the most important. State House races in in Texas That combination responsibility very often does not fall on a man and And so I'm excited to support these women I WANNA make sure that they have every competitive advantage in fundraising In the focused attention of the electorate where I think it can be helpful and then also again really importantly in bringing the bear these these thousands of volunteers across Texas who are willing to knock on doors and make phone calls on their behalf and in lasting. I'm just convinced that if more women held elected office we would be a better a stronger. More powerful country you would not have this diminishment of reproductive healthcare writes in states like mine in Texas which are not simply a function of access to abortion but are primarily a function of healthcare in many cases a life or death matter you start to have women majorities in state legislative bodies and we will make much better decisions. So I'm I'm really excited about East candidates were seeing in Texas again a field. It's really dominated by women in many cases women of color so tell our listeners. How we can all help out with this effort and make a sales pitch for us all to come to Texas this summer I would love to see you and I wanna thank those who who are listening right. Now who picked up the phone or Texted for us even if they didn't live in Texas in two thousand seventeen twenty eighteenth senate campaign and the many crazies who drove down to Texas. And you know just park themselves in our state knocked on doors for a weekend or a week and I count myself among the crazies willing to do that. I drove across the state of Texas. Knock on doors and Fort Bend in in January so this organization's called powered by people and The website is powered x people dot. Org So instead of the word by it it is spelled with an X. powered x people dot. Org and there you can sign up and And will then call on you to join US and again if you can knock on doors in Texas We would gladly have you and host you if you can phone bank or tax to support the State House candidates in again the most important series of elections in the most important year of our lives. We'll take that help as well. And you can also make a donation those grassroots donations fund. The organization the organizers the technology behind everything that we're doing right now and and and maybe leave you with this It's hard to think of a state that could make a greater impact on this country. Our democracy and the decision before us in November of twenty twenty if Texas through this grassroots organizing starting at the State House district level is able to stop Donald Trump and deliver the thirty eight Electoral College votes that we possess to the Democratic nominee. There will be no close margin which Donald Trump could exploit. And you know that he will. The Guy will stop at nothing to hold and increase the power that he house right now and it will also forever change the electoral landscape in this country And it will make the big things that we want to do. Around gun safety or health care or climate or immigration. That much more possible. So if if you are looking for something to do and if you are tempted to despair become despondent Turn that energy into a positive direction and knock on doors with us. Not only will you help elect great candidates to the State House in Texas and maybe stopped Donald Trump in our state. I can attest that your personal happiness and fulfilment will increase dramatically. We would love to have you at powered by people ain't excellent not one of those people that texted for you in in two thousand eighteen and some of the best stories. I have to tell our the responses I got in texting. It was really fun. I love that and and it's it's again testament to the fact that you are making a connection with another person and sometimes it's raw sometimes. It's awkward sometimes. It goes wrong but the times where you make a connection and you gain a commitments and maybe even pick up a new friend that that stuff is is why we do this so very grateful that you joined us in that effort. Well thank you so much for joining us on the podcast today and We we are all in. We're excited to flip the Texas state legislature. So thank you for the work. You're doing for me on and thank you for the work that you all are doing. Thank you for listening to two bras talking politics. Part of the dim cast podcast network. Our theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album? Elephants shape trees by the band. Immune Nouri and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork by Matthew Wetland and was created for use by this. Podcast you can contact us at two talking politics at g mail DOT COM or on twitter or facebook at two broads. Talk you can find all of our episodes to broads talking. Politics Dot Com are anywhere podcast found.

Texas Donald trump State House facebook Sophie Hey Kelly rourke senate twitter Beto Beato West Texas US Senate Ted Cruz Cervical cancer Amarillo Rourke Athens
Ken Mejia-Beal

Two Broads Talking Politics

20:41 min | 1 year ago

Ken Mejia-Beal

"This is matthew and Kelly coming to you from yachats Oregon and this is too broad talking politics <music>. Listen everyone this this is Kelly with to produce talking politics and I'm on with my co-host Sophie. Hey Sophie Hey Kelly and I am very excited to be joined rain today by Ken Mahir Beal who is running for Illinois State House in District Forty two. I can good good morning. How are you I'm great? How are you good good so I said I'm very excited and that's partly because I've known you as an activist for a long time time albeit remotely but super excited when I see people like you jumping into the race so could you tell us just a a little bit about your background and in wire running for State House sure so I have been in the financial world for over a decade? I started off as a teller and work my way all the way up to management management material within the mortgage industry. That's what I've done in my career in two thousand and eight I was laid off like most people in my industry were and it gave me time to kind of focus on causes that meant something to me so I did volunteer work with food others. I did volunteer work with AIDS and H._I._V.. Organizations and I did work with different senior organizations children organizations and so forth and I never stopped even when I started working again and over the course of doing the active of them as well it all ties to politics maybe I should you know try to sit down down and get to know some of my local politicians and I did that and that led me to helping politicians strategize and becoming a community organizer I was a community organizer for Chris Kennedy for Illinois for example and it just started gradually to the point where I am today. I am running for office as someone that has been a political organizer of political strategist for various campaigns. I was the program director for the Democratic Party of dupage county. I and it's been a gradual climb so to speak the last ten years he has to toews then about the forty second district in Illinois. I think when people think think Illinois they think it's a super democratic place and of course Democrats majorities in the State House and State Senate <hes> but this is not an historically. They've been in democratic district. No <hes> sober forty second district is a what is considered a very red district it is I believe achieve the evangelical capital of America and it's it's very red and I've been asked why would you run in this district well eight because I live here in my home and I love living here because I love the people I think traditionally Democrats that have run in this district have been amazing but I think we've had some messaging issues. I believe the people in my district care more about property tax rising revenue and they want. I want to talk about social issues but we have to message at the right way <hes> and a lot of times we have Democrats we we were a heart earnestly and that's what I love about the party and we go in and we say oh my God. These are the social issues that want to talk about but we very seldom especially in a district like this. Take a moment to say. Hey instead of me talking. What would you like to talk to me about and that's what I did? I've been on a listening tour this year in my district and I I said I'm thinking of running for office. What issues need the most to you and that's how I work? I work my campaign a little bit different than I think most traditional campaigns paintwork I went out and said what can I do for you. As opposed to this is what I'm GonNa do for you and it changed the dynamic of the conversation conversation and we're GONNA. We're GONNA flip this district. What are some of the issues that people are talking to you about in the district as you're going around campaigning so no big issue? I thought it was all going to be property tax but what I discovered in those conversations the big issue is rising revenue the cost oft of items. I heard that it almost every single door and that's why I'm gone on the record for saying I will be a no vote on increasing you think any revenue on alcohol for example we are in the top three Think we pay too much in revenue for certain things as a big issue within my district and I hear it and we can fight for it. The one issue that I heard heard over and over again also with healthcare people are concerned about health care and I understand that and what I'm GonNa do. I'm definitely going to work on how we can make medication more accessible more affordable here in Illinois but I've also taken an in depth look at chronic illness and I am going to push for public education to ending a lot of these chronic illnesses are bringing them bringing the numbers down for chronic illness. That is where we're going to see the biggest with healthcare impact if we have less sick people so to speak so. I know that you have written about climate change you. You have a climate policy that you've put out you know there are alarming reports coming out the no. We don't really have twelve years to fix things. We have eighteen months to fix. I think <hes> and you know obviously. This is just an enormous issue that we need to tackle. So what would you like to see the state of Illinois to wing to <hes> <hes> to fix this climate change problem absolutely so one of my big pushes is for the Euro Fleet Transit. It is a transit boss that recharges at every stop <hes>. It has a chargeable station at every stop it recharges. It doesn't run emissions. It is a brilliant idea and it's working in places like Louisville Kentucky. If it can work in Kentucky it can work here. We can do it another big the plan that I'm working on and I put it in my climate policy. Is We have to give tax incentives to small restaurant owners that are doing low carbon diet diet fifty percent or more of a low carbon diet. We have so many small business owners that are trying to cater to and have catering to low carbon diet and low carbon diet is you you know no beef livestock. They've been doing it forever. I say let's get these businesses. An incentive in it gives other people an incentive to open more the businesses that will slowly turn the clock our climate issue those are two of my big pushes head to people in dupage dupage county <hes> in your in your district think about public transportation in general you know you're talking about <hes> having a a bus that would recharge but are there are a lot of people using public transportation. I live of course in the city and so when I think of the suburbs I often very car the places so so what does that conversation look like. Thank you for asking me that. We don't really have a valid public transportation system in the suburbs. <hes> we pretty much have the pace bus that will get you to the metro station to go to work and then it will bring you back home and that's pretty much yet and I believe that we don't take public transit in the suburbs because it's not available <hes> and it's kind of one one of those things if you build it they will come what I've done is. I've talked to people in the district when they go out on the weekends to downtown. NAPERVILLE or wherever they're taking uber they're taking I'm left which is good. We don't want people drinking and driving of course it's good but that gives me hope that if we can provide a public transit system that's climate-friendly and cost effective people will take it. It's just not available right now. It's not adequate is a better term. We do not have an adequate public transit system here. You mentioned <hes> that your district has a lot of evangelical and it's very read what sort of I guess reception. Have you been getting getting to your campaign. Believe it or not very very good reception. You know when I said I'm going to run everyone that I talked to within my inner circle circle said yeah go for it but what I didn't like so a little bit about my stepmother is a minister I.. I'm a Christian so for me. Me Was it is not is not hard to talk to someone who identifies Evangelical <hes>. No yes there are moments at the door where people say not voting for a Democrat have a great day and that's awesome. I'm okay with that but in terms of anyone being incredibly rude or derogatory I have not experienced that yet it will probably happen today because I've just said this but no people have been wonderful and loving and it really hasn't like sparked a deeper driving me to run now because just getting to the doors I he's a good folks. These are good hard working people so i WanNa push that a little bit further because you are both African American and gay and I know that there are a lot of people in the country who who maybe are people of color who are gay who are women who are scared to run for office. You know the the when they go knock on doors. They may be treated rudely. You know that they may be attacked online so could you sort of talk a little bit about that and whether way what you have to think about in terms of a support system and prepping yourself to that kind of thing absolutely so so as you know I've been a writer for a while also that is where I got my first taste of how all social media The neg the dark side of social media works the negative comments the derogatory comments the instant messages at first I would be I would I would be a liar to say it did not bother me. It absolutely bothered me. I wrote a really wonderful article <hes> for Patriot partisan about immigration and I received so much nasty responses <hes> about being anti-american and it affected me because I'm hundred percent pro American for one and because in my head you know we you put out a good product and you think it's good and you show it to all your friends like it's wonderful and then you put it out there and you get negative. It affects he personally so it will happen if you if anyone out there listening and they're thinking running. It is going to happen what I recommend. Though is before you even announce your running running. You have to get about five or six people that you can go to M._d.. non-political with you have to have that you have to have that friend you can say so had a day of door knocking did not go well. I need to go to the movies and they'll know okay with a bad day. I also very lucky lucky and fortunate to have a wonderful spouse so when I go out into the world and the world doesn't love me as much as I love the world I come home and there's someone one that loves me as much as I love them and that makes a world of difference. I it really really does and it sounds really cliche but you have to. Have you have to have that look source or it'll burn you out so speaking of love. You had a launch event the other night <hes> super well attended. I can you talk a little bit about that event in an what that means to a campaign like yours so you guys guys. If you guys know it was newer day and I invited I invited my really good friend Renato Moriarty to come out and and speak on my behalf he's my first endorsement and we plan this about a month ago before we knew it'd be Mueller Day and a and as the day progressed he was texting me all day like you know he's on C._N._N.. All Day pretty much single W._T._t.. W needs me on tonight. I maybe a little late and I said Rinaldo if you cannot make I understand and he walked through the door with my launch party about a ahead attendance of about about sixty and I'm going a little bit under because I am not president trump and I don't want to Oprah so we'll say sixty. It was the you know packed room. Renato comes in any goes I just cancelled. I cannot miss your run means that much to me and and that is just the power of of not ne- As a person of this campaign people believe that we can do this and renounce on the smartest the people I know is. He didn't think I could do this. He would not have showed up on such an important day in our nation's history. That's awesome and you had a at least one previous guest of ours Marine Newman. was there as well yeah. She's a great friend Marine Lumen one of the first people bowl that I said I'm thinking of running and <hes> she'll probably kill me for telling the story I apologize. I called her and I said Maria I'm thinking of running and she goes okay. We'll talk about it. I'm super busy because she was in the middle. You know herself running. I go to her home. She's getting getting ready to go out to all these events I came over with coffee and she's doing her makeup and doing her hair and giving me pointers and let me know you can do it and it was so beautiful beautiful that this marine is one of the most productive people I know. I don't use the word busy for her. 'cause she's doing stuff and for her to take just a moment to invite me on. It takes a lot for someone to invite you in as they're getting ready <hes> but I'm sure you guys know what I mean when and you're getting ready you're trying to present yourself to the world you kind of neat that alone time for her to invite me in while all this is happening meant the world all to Russian a lot of it right up until the very last second of the legislative session sue you know I think some really good progress was made in Illinois the share share but what are some other things that you would like to see happen. I if you're elected in going into the twenty twenty twenty twenty one concession sure so my climate policies are going to be pushed heavily also what I'm pushing for the cold cloth <hes> and that's GONNA be coming out very soon on my website. If one of my labor policies win the governor called for a state of emergency and ask for citizens to stay at home. You should not have to worry about calling your job. You shouldn't have to worry about Oh. We'll do. I have to take a day off to an each call McGaw if the governor says that you need to stay stay home. You need to stay home so I'm pushing for policy where we are in a emergency like we were this winter. When it was negative fifty degrees there were still employer thing well? You can make it. No you can't make it and I wanted to change that. You should not have to worry about losing your job. If the governor is telling you to stay home that's one of the policies and pushing for well the other policies that I'm want to adapt statewide just a fair workweek work for non salaried employees that work for non emergencies <hes> so outside of hospital fire police. If you are working in an industry where your schedule changes I mean just weekly. You should get a two week. I think it helps to manage. Families are thinking about single MOMS and it helps. I was a bartender many lifetimes ago Oh and there was nothing worse than getting to the getting to work on a Sunday and knowing like okay. I'm I'm usually off on Monday and then looking at the schedule like but I'm not author Monday and already made plans. They got everything around some pushing for that heavily. I'm also pushing to criminalise puppy mills in Illinois. We have to get rid of them. Their barbaric and it is not okay. What's happening to animals in those puppy mills so that's another push of Mine Kennedy more things as you would like to make sure that we talk about well? My website is K._M.. BE FOR FORTY TWO DOT com. You can follow me a K._M.. Be for forty two and that's that's pretty much macho running for change and you have one last bonus question. I WanNa ask you and that is a you do stand up comedy as well and so. I'm wondering if you could talk about her. Doing stand up prepares window office. Well you know how you mentioned earlier about like the world not being such <hes> you know it can be a negative place. The world of comedy is cruel. You get heckled. I mean it can get rough making someone laugh is such an involuntary response would you you have to just be good at your craft so what it taught me a taught me. They can smell fear so don't be nervous. It also taught me people like those involuntary voluntary feels they leave like laughter and being happy so just to be myself and present who I really am. I think when you put on especially especially in comedy if you go on and you try to be something you're not are you try making jokes about something. You have no idea about the audience can sense it right away immediately a but when you're on your authentic self people can see that and it is a beautiful thing I love that so everybody could go do some mm stand up comedy and then run for office not everybody everybody perhaps perhaps not so we will certainly post links to your website and your social media people go to your website it click the big red donate now but in and help you out anyone who is in the Chicago area and we certainly have listeners in the Chicago the area this is not too hard to get too nice close by race that you can help flip so I hope everyone will go help out and they can <hes> enjoy enjoy the suburbs. That's a beautiful place yeah all right. Well Ken. Thank you so much. Thanks for running. I'm I'm super excited excited that you're running and I think you can absolutely do this. You can flip this district's. You know this is the area that overlaps some uh-huh with Lauren underwood's district on Castaneda's check so you know I we we saw those flip and I think this conflict to we can do it all right. I can do it excellent. Thanks can thank you. Thanks for listening to to broads. Talking politics are theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album elephant shaped trees by the band immune hurry. We're using it with permission of the band. Our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew with Lynn and was

Illinois Sophie Hey Kelly dupage county Ken Mahir Beal Renato Moriarty matthew State House Chris Kennedy AIDS America Kentucky Illinois State House Democratic Party Oregon toews program director
Dr. Sophia Yen

Two Broads Talking Politics

25:03 min | 10 months ago

Dr. Sophia Yen

"Hi this is teddy in your will to Dr Sophia yet onto rods talking politics Eh Woah. Everyone this is Kelly to broaden talking politics which is part of the cast family of podcast and I am on with my co-host Sophie. Hey Sophie Hey Kelly and joining us. Today is Dr Sophia Yen. She is the CEO and Co founder of Pandya Health and also a clinical associate professor at Stanford heard. Hello Dr Yan. Hello and thank you for having me. Yes so we are excited to talk to you so maybe just to sort of frame the conversation if you could tell us a little bit about you and how you came to be founding and CEO of Pandya Health. Yeah so. I am a pediatrician. That specialize in teenagers so I did double the years of training just to specialize than what we call sex drugs rock and roll a little sports medicine in some acne and being a academic clinical associate professor at Stanford Hanford. I had to pick an area to choose but just my passion has always been women's rights reproductive rights and specifically birth control preventing unplanned pregnancy. The preventing sexually transmitted infections and more recently minute passion is. I'm all about hashtags has had a period optional and and letting anyone who bleeding one week out of four no that that is optional and we now have the technology turn that off and how much better would like be without without random blood one week out of four hitting you in random places at random times love it and How kings have become the CEO and Co founder of the only woman founded women lead? Dr Founded Dr Lead Birth Control troll delivery Company was I was giving a talk much doctors. Why don't those Pesky women and their birth control and one of the top reasons glove? We didn't have time to run to the pharmacy. Go get it and my friend and I were like. It's two women. We all saw this. We will ship it to him in and keep shipping it to them until hill. They tell us to stop. And then when we ran ads for free birth control delivery sixty percent of the women. That responded didn't have a prescription either expired fired or they never had one to begin with and I'm a doctor. I can write prescriptions so we added in a synchronous telemedicine where you just a lot of questionnaire. Same questions I'd ask you to came into my office. You know what medical problems you have given your blood clotting disorders with drugs have you tried like you know etcetera etcetera and Mana and Self reported blood pressure Selfie a government. Id to prove that you are who you are and then our doctor looked at it. If it looks good we write the prescription billet Tier Insurance and pharmacies and to your door set it and forget it what happened. Yeah health worries. And you don't have to so doing that. Because it's kind of culmination of my life's work. Is You know helping women make their lives better. So what type of control are available with Pandya health. Yeah so the beauty of Penny health is that we are a pharmacy so we carry all the birth control pills patches and ring. There's pretty much nothing that we don't carry. There may be a specific generic bran that we don't carry because our pharmacy doesn't have that contract. But I would say ninety nine point nine nine nine percent. We've got you covered. And we take all insurance except for Kaiser and we're working on Medicaid in different states cause some states deep have one medicaid for the whole state. So that's easy contract. But if they have is a California a different Medicaid for every single county then you have to deal with like fifty different counties and we are all about access so we want to get those medicaid contracts so we basically are services free if you have on an existing prescription at a pharmacy. You just tell us where that and we move it from that pharmacy to our pharmacy. We bill your insurance ship it to your door and then we also conclude a goody every month so sometimes it's height you very popular and now it's gotten colder. We're GONNA be chocolate which I'm excited about Gear Delis it's peppermint Bark as well as sea salt caramel and mint and then We also Provide information from other female founded founded female lead companies Were sending out some makeup By I think it's pocket pals. Forgive me forgetting the name wrong but it's you put it in your person so if you're an emergency emergency needed a little lipstick or Mascara or some rouge. It's already in there in this little pocket pal. I believe we've also given out. Feminist pins condemed Wyndhams a free subscription amid magazine a discount off of my friends vibrator the most Internet of things vibrator if you WANNA check that out lioness I mean company uh-huh so and all that is free The only thing you have to pay for is if you do need a doctor's appointment we absolutely prefer you use your doctor or your provider but if is not we WANNA make sure women have access and so in California and Florida and soon to be Texas and soon other states as soon as we get that going. It's twenty nine dollars once a year. Air To use our doctors reliability legal and all that and you have accessed relearn sixty four days to our passionate excited academics. And so as I'm listening to you say that this is all about making things easier for women I am struck by how many of the reproductive laws that we are seeing being passed around the country are seemingly designed to make life harder for women to make things Accessing healthcare harder to make things like making personal autonomous choices harder. What are ways that we could be? Better advocating four four laws. The that do exactly what you're talking about that make access to things easier instead of harder. That puts choices and decisions back in the hands of women doctors. Instead of lawmakers I think with the current administration and the current people that are in power in the Senate. It is dark times for anybody with a uterus and I don't understand the Republican Party when they say they want small government. They want to get into your bedroom into your uterus My favorite frayed my uterus my choice nor uterus your choice and this country it is about freedom of religion and even amongst the same religion Catholics for choice. They believe that you listen to your conscience and your connection with God what is through your conscience and what God wants you to do with your uterus And not from some outside force telling you what to do so I I love that attitude attitude and I love the diversity that this country represents and I don't think one religion should be pushing a view on another religion and I think that reproductive rights needs to be seen and as bodily autonomy and freedom of religion as equality. I if I'm not here to be your breathing cow how you know and if somebody rapes me that doesn't give him the right to my body and to grow whatever he wants to grow inside my body my body my choice oyster your body your choice so What our company does is unfortunately needed? I would love a world where our company isn't needed it though not for our investors but just that everyone had access all the time but we also bring birth control to wherever you have Internet in the mailbox. So it's about care convenience and more importantly confidentiality so you can't be slut shamed so that you have access people who live two hours away from the nearest clinic. Two hours away from the nearest pharmacy. People who worked two jobs and don't have time to run to the silly pharmacy. Go get their medication or even in Liberal California where I'm located gated you walk in the pharmacy. Your comes in after sees you there and then the Pharmacists Sophia your birth control and then your boss knows and and then everyone else behind. You knows nosy. Nancy then tells your entire village you know so I think this is the future for Medicine and from the policy side. What would help us is to One for the public. I don't think they realize this has come up. A Lot. Is these p. b. m.'s. Pharmacy benefits managers. If you guys haven't covered this before They are a monopoly and they control the mail order and brick and mortar pharmacies overseas. And they're squeezing out any possible new innovation competition but also the Independent Pharmacy They make people signed contracts that that make them lose money. which is crazy? Talk though when you signed a contract with CVS or care mark or something like that and you're a small independent pharmacy. They'll give you wolf. Oh for this drug. We'll give you ten dollars for this drug. We'll give you five dollars and some of them. You make money but some of them you lose money and I'm like how can they force they don't force worship take it or leave it but how can they even give you a contract wherein you lose money and and that's that's the sad part. We're seeing a ton of independent pharmacies. Die Why because of these monopolies and the government is not aware of them and I was on a call with the newest youngest congressman. And he's out there to reform reform pharmacy and he didn't know about pharmacy benefit managers and I was like. Oh please educate yourself and get people who know stuff right. So that's the other small matter. Week is telemedicine laws. So the question is what is defined telemedicine who is allowed to do Telemedicine tele-medicine and interstate licensing or physicians. So we answered this to take a national exam for the American Board of Pediatrics. The actress and I shouldn't be practicing pediatrics. Any different in California than in Florida Than Maine or whatever but I need to get licensed in all fifty fifty states or a big portion of it if I want to practice telemedicine and I'm happy to pay the fees if I have to but to fill out all these forms and and get certified by every state is absolutely ridiculous so we we need to reform that and then the other thing is whether or not Insurance Company wants to reimburse different types of telemedicine so ours is a store and forward method where you capture the information and then you Ford it. It isn't by phone isn't by video and we like that for the convenience and the confidentiality But some people consider that telemedicine some people say is explicitly not telemedicine. Some people say you can't prescribe unless you physically seen the patient but If you were to come into my office I wouldn't do anything anything differently. I would ask you these questions. I would check your blood pressure and medications so to make it invalid or not legal is decreasing people's IOS access to birth control and same thing going with specific laws against abortion pill. That's not my company but I have a lot of friends in that field and and they're facing specific log going after them. So as I was looking through this sort of process of how you get control with India It made me think about how it's a lot of it is sort of a formality and it made me wonder about sort of the ongoing. I'm going to be. It's over whether birth control should be a prescription medication or be available over the counter. And I've heard until recently it was mostly Asli People on the left. Who wanted to see it be available over the counter but recently there's been sort of pushed back on that Where people are saying well but then insurance companies could up not to cover it? So I'm wondering what you think about birth control as a prescription medication and whether how you think we can resolve that kind of dilemma. Yes I think. It's unfortunate that the Democrats and those who believe an access to birth control do not want it to go over the counter because they're they're afraid insurance won't cover it so the solution is not to not let it go over the counter. The solution to pass a law that you will cover it right and that is what has been done under the affordable care act any. FDA approved method of birth control for women have to be covered by insurance whether it's over the counter or prescription Only and Some insurances have some insurances or some companies have been opted out of it for religious institutions. Unfortunately we like Georgetown University or Jesuit colleges. Certainly you know Catholic church unfortunately might extend to Catholic. Hospital have opted out of covering birth control. And as I said it's fiscally stupid and morally wrong to not cover birth control because for every one dollar you spend on birth control troll you save six dollars in healthcare costs and that is not including Pre and post natal care and the effect on families lies. When you have an unplanned unwanted pregnancy it should be over the counter of the American College of Setris and Gynecology in two thousand twelve and two thousand sixteen and I believe again in two thousand nineteen hundred affirmed firmed? Did they believe birth control pills and consequently the patch and the ring are perfectly safe if you give women twenty questions which are the twenty questions we ask them on our website website. They are perfectly capable if they mark anything in the wrong column to realize this is not safe I will get a blood clot and I could die and so they will exclude blue bins where they've actually done research with our. They had a bunch of women take this quiz and St. How many of them got it wrong and decided to give birth control? They didn't give it to them. Just you know questionnaire are and all the women excluded themselves correctly from taking birth control. I would still like to see some physician guidance. Only for if you have Difficulties picking it or if you are obviously fit in any of the no categories then you need to see a provider to deal with that but I absolutely absolutely supported going over the counter and I think the solution is not to not get over the counter for fear of not insurance coverage but rather to mandate insurance coverage via the affordable care act and California has passed an extra law thing if the forcible character is reverse then these contraceptive rights and access are guaranteed that it will continue to be available with no co-pay no deductible as long as it's an FDA approved methods of birth control. And I believe probably five to ten other states have done similarly all the progressive states Washington Oregon Are often in well. Well it strikes me plenty of other over the counter medications. That people don't always exclude themselves from practically. Yes we always say that a tylenol. Aw is far more dangerous than a pack of emergency contraception then thing than a pack of pill. You can't do too much damage with one packet. So so what are the other things that we talk a lot about on. The podcast is a women's executive could have power. So we're we're talking on another series of episodes about the possibility of a woman president and one of the problems. People seem to have an envisioning joining a woman. President is that they don't envision women in executive roles at all We have very few comparatively very few women. CEO's for instance. So I'm wondering wondering if you could talk to to to that piece of what you do of being a CEO and a woman and and a doctor and an how that role in seeing women in those roles is so important. Yes I have heard the phrase and I I believe that Sally Ride. If you can't see it you can't be in certainly unle. Many of us have shattered. Glass ceiling entered areas where others have not been before and we definitely have our male allies and I am thankful for all those that our are allies but being a woman. CEO has absolutely opened my eyes to the continuing ceiling against against us. When I go and pitch I have all these negatives seen against me? I'm a woman I'm a mother. I'm a doctor. I'm over the age of forty five and I see vs all as benefits because I'm over forty five. I've got amazing connections and networks. Because I'm the mother I know how to multitask because I'm a doctor. I know the field inside and out and I will make sure that our customer gets the best care possible and and I think it's really important that we as consumers and we're going to start a movement it's going to be either called full and then female founded female lead our heart heart full and the glasses half full and the sky is at least half full or it's going to be while like growl women on women lead and and we're GonNa have a stamp of approval that says this company is women owned women lead women's founded because I don't know people arch checking when they look at the companies out there that this company is run by this run companies. Run by a guy. This companies run by a guy. Who's a lawyer just wants to make big money? This companies run by a woman who was passionate and just wants to prevent unplanned pregnancies and make woman's life easier and make the world a better place for her our two daughters. Which company do you WANNA patronize? And people are just like going for the cheapest possible option and we are. Prices are very competitive additive. But it may cost more because we have better doctors we have providers that are coming from. UCSF UCLA harbored These kinds of things and But it's a different the five dollars a year. You know or or a couple of dollars there but mainly I want people to look look at the company I'm choosing who is the founder who is the leader and ask for accountability if you own shares of stock look at how many boards awards have women on it and I am perpetually horrified and shocked whenever I get this vote on your stock thing that only one out of ten one out of twenty on t it is their woman representation there and what's beautiful being woman. CEO is that my daughters and those around them all know that so you can be a CEO. What really touched me with my daughter for Had John Wayne at her summer camp where you can dress up in June or July forget in and whatever costuming wanted and she's just us as a CEO so that was really. There's a picture of her. I always wear my Pandya. T T shirt a white skirt and I carry on bag and I was like do you want to carry the combat is like no mommy a dote but she had. She had the shirt that she had this skirt and I was talking to sleep. And she's like mom and giving them business cards hand them out semi camp Camp Counselor and I was like yes. They'll do the perfect target audience. Audience here takes them business cards. And so you know. I love that. She seeing this and knowing this and I love my husband for his support in my family and and everyone anyone out there and they're for anyone contemplating there is a huge community of support for you but it is a hard and long haul and I hope that women realize realized we have the money we have the power and weakened in power more. CEO's if you purposely look for a company run by woman and Support Court that if you have money to donate You can actually help. Fund female founded female lead companies through various organizations that just portfolio or impact acid. And you can actually do it through a nonprofit donation impact assets if you have a donor advised fund or if you just have money and and you can also just do it straight up with your money if you WanNa make money. But sometimes people like doing it through their non profit donations so I think it's really important to get more women. CEO's out there but also more women CEO's found funded and we need more women to invest. Women are really good at donating but they're not investing and we need you to invest in women. There's also she. EEO Give a shout out for them. And we're you know I believe the minimum vestments like a thousand dollars but there are other platforms where it's I think like Iceland women in like zero dot. Well you have to give something to invest in a woman founded did one in life company. Is there anything else that you wanted to make sure we talk about. Yes I just want If any real listeners WANNA learn more about turning off period and the safety and the science behind it to go to Pandya health dot com slash periods optional and on top is a nicely presented and find some safety on the bottom. Is My tech talk on the science and safety in the middle is if you're on the pill patch ring how to do it and also WanNa give a shout out there. We're GONNA have a black Friday cyber Monday special for those of you who want to check it out. We can deliver again to all fifty states and Lincoln Prescribe in California and Florida and soon to be tecos and soon the entire United States But always happy to answer any questions about periods about reproductive rights and One parole I always like to give Pearl is no that there are four types of emergency agency contraception and two out of the four are better than the one that most people know which is plan B or leaving gesture all generic and those two are the copper. IUD Is the most effective ninety nine point nine nine percent effective and the second most effective is the prescription only emergency contraception called Ella and because under the Care Act etc it should be available. No Co pay no deductible AKA free if you have insurance and that one is better at every time period and if your BMI twenty six or greater and I say you know my Bmi twenty-five and after Thanksgiving it's probably GonNa be twenty six no Don't be using plan. Be An generics. Ask Your providers prescription of L. A.. And have it on the side as they fire extinguisher anguish or just in case of emergencies. And when you get to ask your pharmacist for the one with the farthest expiration date after one expires today excellent will put it links up on our website and links to your youtube channel as well. Because I know you've answered lots of questions on there as well so we'll put links up for all of that. Thank you so much. I'm yeah always happy to chat about The horrible attack on Women's reproductive rights. But hopefully that will change everybody the vote and everybody who donate twenty twenty all right well excellent. Thank you so much for joining us and I'm sure that Hopefully everything will go great. And we'll get that our laws but if we have more attacks on women's reproductive health which we likely will maybe we'll check back in with you. Thank you so much for having me and I love what you guys are doing and I love women helping women all right thank you thank you. Thank you for listening into two bras talking politics. Part of the dim cast podcast network. Our theme song is called. Are you listening of the album elephant shaped trees by the band land and we're using it with permission of the band. Our logo and other original artwork is by matthew wetland and was created for use by this. podcast you can contact contact us at two broads talking politics at g mail dot com or on twitter or facebook at two brides talk you can find all of our episodes at two broads talking politics dot com or anywhere podcast found.

CEO California CEO and Co founder Pandya Health CEO and Co Sophie Hey Kelly Florida Dr Sophia Yen FDA Dr Sophia Dr Yan founder Stanford Stanford Hanford clinical associate professor
Connie Schultz

Two Broads Talking Politics

35:43 min | 5 months ago

Connie Schultz

"Hi steady now. I've got a joke for you. What state is round on the ends in the high middle? Oh hieaux in. That's where we will be hearing Pulitzer Prize winner. Connie shots from today onto rod struck politics part of the Democrats podcast network. You should really stay home and stay safe. Hi Everyone. This is Kelly with two brads talking politics part of the dumb cast family of podcast and I am joined by my co host Sophie. Hey Sophie Hey Kelly and our special guest today who I'm thrilled to be talking with. Is Pulitzer Prize? Winning journalist Connie Schultz. Hi Connie by there so we are excited to have you with us where all Ohio natives here on the call. So we'll we'll talk some about Ohio but I just tell us a little bit about how you're hanging in there during this intense quarantine. Well I at home full time with my husband Shared Brown and because of his job as you both Us Senator. We don't usually spend this much uninterrupted time together so for us. It's felt like a blessing in that way. We do joke that we're lucky. After sixteen years of marriage that we still like each other so much and we are with our dogs slaughtering. Franklin are for kids in their spouse isn't all our grandchildren are healthy and that matters a lot I've had some friends however going through on the including diagnoses of Cohen Nineteen with various results. We've not lost on an immediate friend but we have certainly lost some people that we knew and other than that. It's work right. I finishing up. I just taught my final two classes at Kent State Mama Mater where. I'm a professional in residence air in the journalism school. We are doing a lot of zoom sessions. I'm to miss them terribly. And my novel comes out in a month. Two daughters very towns so I've been winding up a lot of all. The talks have been cancelled or postponed. Even the sell out events which can break my heart. It's like he might perspective Lucky I'm that everybody's doing what they can to keep everybody healthy and alive so do a lot more onscreen stuff or the book and I'll be doing a lot more video interviews than I headed to support it but I'm actually getting kind of excited about all of bat and I'm writing and I'm working on something new in its. It's a life of a writer you know you're always always working and if you're not you're wondering what's wrong with you so you get to writing just normal again just to your at Kent State and we're coming up on the fiftieth anniversary of the May fourth shooting. My my parents were actually students there at the time. I think you were slightly after that. It was can planning to have been doing things you know. In Memory of the fiftieth anniversary. I assume they're not doing things in person now. There was a lot scheduled including Jane Fonda coming for a keynote to the campus. All of that is on hold. Of course they will be doing some stuff online. Some virtual events but the most significant thing to me about this in addition to courses acknowledging the. It's a it's an anniversary of a tragedy. Not just a kiss David in the country and I would never have come back to teach at Kent State. I graduated in nineteen seventy nine so I started there in the fall every I I would never return. Had they not really own their history and made it part of the curriculum against dating? I don't know if you've been on the campus a recent years but now they're a murderous. Each of the students were killed. There is information Each and every we have a museum dedicated to made for one of that existed. When I was there in the seventies and the seventies the university was really trying to just pretend it never happened and was affiliated with the events on the anniversary date of a year and now the university hosts those events. I consider that great progress. You mentioned that you have that you have children who who have kids at home. I imagine this has got to be really hard as a grandmother to not see her grandkids. I know when we are having zoom calls with my parents. It's palpable. How much they miss getting to to hug their grandchildren. You know what are you sort of? You know there's all these mixed emotions that we're all having about all of this and wanting to stay safe and all that but but what is this sort of emotionally been like being away from the grandchildren? I told her kids day. I've never felt were worthless as a grandmother because it is my nature Sweep been and start helping childcare. Helping even with the teaching at home But none of them want US around because they're all trying to protect us right so we are. We have seven grandchildren. Our oldest grandchild is twelve and then we have the other six are on seven and under most of them were way under four or younger and I missed the terribly. Fortunately we've got kids. Her kids have been great. We do a lot of face time or send each other mail. I ordered a bunch of pop up cards. You know. I love sitting in to the kids and draw pictures on the notes. Write little notes that I know their parents reading to them. So we're doing what we can't. I again emphasize enough to the young. The parents of young children listening this. It means everything to grandparents to get those photos to get those videos to do the video chats and I know you're exhausted and tired but it's good for your kids to to see us in it really A LOTTA. We're lucky we don't we have each other. We're so busy. We don't feel lonely of there are a lot of grandparents who are living alone right now and I. Never WanNA guilt anybody. 'cause there's so much going on already. I'm just making a request that you can take him over to an even. Just send a couple of new. Pictures Day. It really can fill some gaps that were feeling. It's a longing. It's just a longing grows longer and deeper and wider as this progresses whether they have to really work hard on his not China. Imagine how long it will be before I can even hug my grandchildren again. Because I find that takes me into a Bali pretty quickly. You teach journalism. I'm wondering if we can talk a little bit about cub in nineteen enter. Lsm Sure I would like your take on sort of how you think. The pandemic is going to affect political journalism and coverage of the twenty twenty elections. Because I'm having so much trouble. As a former journalist understanding how people are supposed to cover things like the convention or political speeches and rallies. How is that GonNa work with cove? Nineteen thank a what. What sort of impact? You think that this is going to have on the coverage of the election. Guess is that none of those things are going to help. I don't think we'll see can I don't think we're GONNA see political rallies? Less the president of the United States tries to do something. That's I just I can't imagine we're going to be that far along we're gonNA WANNA squeeze people shoulder to shoulder and have them shouting cheering together. Not because we know how it spreads right and we know how important social distancing is right now as far as the journalism. What are the challenges for journalists covering this nationally or responding to the national narrative? Here is that we're having to counter allotted misinformation coming from the White House quite a regular basis in. It can be pretty stressful for some. This applies to see the ten the clear tension not always acknowledged between the public health experts and the president and his administration. So we've never had a time where it's been. Were to be providing accurate information. But all he has to do is say something really dangerous. Like speculating that ingesting disinfectant might be up and you have poison centers around the country. Saying they're getting a lot more calls in this is this is a hard issue to cover. It's hard enough to cover it because it's affecting so many people but when you were also trying to battle misinformation from the very top of leadership supposedly Bending I could see the challenge in that when I teach it with my students of course their lives were abruptly uprooted. They had to leave the campus. Suddenly so much as many of them were supposed to graduate they will still graduate but there will be no ceremony. There will be no and a year stuff. I don't hear them complaining about that so much. They are really wondering what happens next with their careers because the virus internships are being canceled or delayed. And we're doing what we can at the university to help them through that I've been advising though all of them to be taking notes to be keeping journals because they will be the storytellers of this pandemic. We will be feeling the impact of this for decades and we want to believe I learned this running the memoir shares Senate race in Chicago six when I did the book for Random House and his lovely wife there were so many moments I thought. Wow this server gonNA forget this. I'm so glad I wrote it down anyway because there's so many big things are happening quickly. You do. Forget and really important. You could forget how you felt in the moment which may be different than how you remember it later right because you may feel differently about the whole experience later so been encouraging students to find purpose in this they are meant to writers and also had a lot of future filmmakers and ethics class documentary filmmakers as well feature filmmakers in addition to the journalists and. I told them it really is true. That whatever you can get through all material it all informs work and that they are in. I was telling them before. This that they were in a they. Were Living History Right now. Because of the trump presidency this has magnified. Dad is impossible to calculate by. How much terrible as the information. Coming out of the White House has been and as terrible as these press conferences have been one of the sort of shining moments of all of this is how well the women journalists in these press conferences have been have been doing the the sharp questions they've been asking you know you came up in journalism at a time when there weren't as many women journalists you know what what is that What does that sort of look like? Do you think that this is inspirational to two women who are thinking about journalism? Journalism continues to be a career that That works that that pays money well. We'll always have our journalists and one of the reasons I'm more optimistic is because the younger generations that have come up since are going to help us figure out how to save it and how to make it worthwhile as far as the women. One of my favorite things to do when I am in Washington is our experience is how many of the young women who are covering politics up and introduce themselves today and I always tell the same thing you didn't exist. I was your age. It was so hard to convince any editors we should be covering politics and that is one of the biggest changes and I think we're really seeing why it should have been happening a lot sooner because they can be tough and it's particularly important with a president who belied women so regularly to have these young women by young and look. I'm sixty two so you can live a lot of. You're still be younger than I am at this point to watch these young women. They don't flinch. They don't grimace. They just keep pressing pressing pressing for the answers and the more angry and hateful. He gets with them but more support. They are finding around the country. I hope people are being expressive about it. I'm certainly hearing about it and I see it on social media because you know what there's not a woman who has been ambitious in her life who has dealt with some sort of abuse like that and somebody who's trying to tell us what we can and cannot do and how unworthy we are to have these positions so in some ways. A lot of us can identify with that in. It just feels wonderful to watch the you've hit. He gets no traction when he tries to intimidate them. So I want to ask you about this book that you've written. I believe this is your first novel of the daughters of Erie. Towns pills a little bit about You know how what sort of the inspiration for writing this was why why you're trying your hand At novel writing and Sorta who who you hope reads the buck. I've always loved fiction. I grew up reading fiction. I think every policy all day long my rule at night only read fiction because I so appreciate being taken away into other people's worlds into other people's minds right and but it never because I have such reverence for fiction it. I never imagined that I could be anomalous. But fortunately for me by editor at Random House. Is Kate Medina? She has edited so many of the greats and she also happens to be my editor and she came for me right after the Pulitzer. She wanted me to work for her. She wanted me to be a random house author so I did a collection of essays for them with new material and then it was her idea that I write the memoir of sheriff's race but right before that second book came out in two thousand seven. She really started to push me to consider writing fiction. And what are the way she put it was that the working classes really underrepresented in modern literature and a disagreement that I am a come from working class. I'm the first family to go to college. I want to stress by working class. I need a racially diverse working class which it has always been affect my class every classroom. Elementary School was half black. So I say that because I feel so strongly nuts talking about that enough when we talk about working class people and also. I don't ever accept if you grow up. Were were white working class. You have to end up being racist. I saved frequently that. Our roots are beginnings Notre excuses and in my case even though my father struggled with raise all of his life. I had a lot of black friends in school. And so when he would start ranting I I would see their names their faces and had so altered at such a young age. How I saw my father on that issue so what I started thinking about it more. I started Magin that maybe I did have a story to tell it. Took me a lot longer than they would have wanted. But I have to say Kate. Medina is relentless impatient at the same time she she gets her claws into you in a good way and she does not let go so. This is a story about four generations of women in their men of course in the story as well but the daughters of town is there not always related but they are daughters of this town and this is a small working class town on the shore of Lake Erie written by a woman who grew up in a small working class town on the shore of Lake Erie and while it's not named after my hometown. Ula there are certainly some similarities there in the book that people are Mythical of course but the people who helped raise needed in a small town near so often you have all these circuit self appointed surrogate parents right locals and the souls and dreams of something. Um have shown up I find in the characters in this book and so it's about love and forgiveness and it's about really big mistakes. And how much are we capable of forgiving in win? Is it okay not to it is about women's lives over a period of decades and how we could ball over time but how so which it yet to happen but you only see that to the lives in constant struggles actress in these women's lives but at its heart? It is a story about people who are very much like affluent people until the big problems come and they have no money to fix it and that's when dreams die for working class people become so much harder. Speaking of your books. I really enjoyed your memoir. And his lovely wife and I felt I felt very much like a kinship with you I. My husband is not a politician but he was for a while Piscopo priest. I am also you know a feminist married to someone in a political position in which my you know. Marriage is very much scrutinized their automatic expectations of us a pastor's wife right definitely as by same thing. I don't mean to suggest that your husband isn't in an honorable profession. Of course I happen to think this could meet a quite the calling as I married to one of the finest ever automatic role. People WanNa soon for you can be a challenge. How did you deal with it? I didn't deal with gracefully. Which I guess is probably part of the reason why he has moved away from that but I just sort of ignored it and I don't think I did that very well. Your heart. I suspect you're being hard on yourself but Kipkoech but I was wondering if you talk a little bit about your more recent experiences Being you know married to senator in Ohio because I know that book was published in two thousand seven. Yeah I'm ago well. It's a couple of things that are different. I would say one of them is I. I don't worry anymore about proving myself. Was that anybody that I can still be journalist. I remained a columnist all these years ago. We have a whole new scary thing happening with the novel. But you know as I tell my students. If you're never getting scared you're not growing so. Grossberg right. I am often asked and you didn't ask it this way but I just want to respond partners way. I'm often asked. What is it? Like to be a senator's wife and I always respond with the truth. Which is I? Don't know what that means. I only know what area to share a ground and his job is really important. But we wouldn't have gotten married in middle age if we hadn't had a lot in common and we do have a lot in common and we believe in each other so much and we've often said to each other. I have won the Pulitzer without share it and he does ability has said he wouldn't have won the Senate without me. And it's not because we meddled work. It's because we believed in each other and made each other braver in the and the most scary at times in the times when we were feeling the weakest or most vulnerable. We've always been there for each other and I feel really fortunate to have this marriage sixteen years so we were just talking. The other night said we've done usually had this much time together and it's been wonderful because usually he leaves for Washington on Monday comes back Thursday evening short flight. But it's still built into that has been an independence here have handed but independent woman. So that's been helpful on when he's on recess just such a funny term because it means working all the state and less because he's all year he doesn't come home tonight so we're together more in we've evolved so much as a as a marriage in good ways they can only have a with time and I only personally and still less defensive about the fact that I would journalists Mary to a senator because I couldn't be more transparent about that. All My byles social media make it clear. I've written an entire book about a Senate Race. It doesn't it all mean. I can't be who I am and he jokes way. He likes journalists probably more than a lot of his colleagues but he couldn't have married me didn't 'cause that was at right so I think that the most the biggest evolution here is simply my comfort with the whole thing I am so happy to be shared wife's but I'm also so happy to be all these other things when I wrote that book. We didn't have any grandchildren yet. There are so many changes in my life right. I'm grateful for them for the most part. I certainly hope that came across. The book in part is because as you know from reading. I was pretty scared when I had to take back since I just won a pulitzer in your usual career move is not to take a leave of absence and get about politics but I really wanted to support share it in his Senate run. I wasn't sure what was GONNA happen after I know what I wanted to have happened. Was IT turns out. It's been much bigger than I ever expected. But it had to start with my neck giving up on myself quite aware of that. Ask a little bit about Ohio. I think Ohio has been. I'm always fascinated by Ohio. Anyway but the most fascinating to watch in this in this krona virus pandemic. Because you know it's it's a state people think of as read although I don't think any of us on this call think of it as a red state and It's a state with a Republican governor in a republican state legislature. And yet. It's a governor who has listen to science listen to scientists been very careful about The the stay at home order. What is it about Ohio? Ohioans That leads to sort of all these. What seemed like contradictions from the outside Do you think that that the politics isn't straightforward in Ohio? I think a lot of people. Maybe think it is well. It never has been right. We've always been a swing state in a bellwether and I had kind of a spirited exchange where somebody from. Cook report this big on twitter who send it Ohio's relevant and I I well I think all formulas though we can never assume they work anymore right after two thousand sixteen and I think Ohio is in play. Does he have to win out win. No but why would you ignore how because you can't you? It would be assuming Wisconsin and Pennsylvania and Michigan it. We just don't know how it's GonNa be. It's April from. We're talking about this. But the thing I also played out is that Two years after Donald Trump won Ohio by eight coins shared ran and won by seven and he needs. He had to get some of those trump voters and he did. We know he did. We know from the data. I sat in on focus groups with trump orders the numerous times throughout the campaign. The men from the women and they don't know you're watching the understand of they'll be watching they don't know who is watching and it was really interesting to me because the men were lost. They were never going to they. Were I remember two weeks? After John McCain died we had a focus group of men and to the number talking about how he wasn't really a war hero because he got caught. Which is straight out trump's playbook rightness in its hall here and we both knew. John Respecting a great deal and he didn't agree with them. WanNa politics but there is no denying his war hero status during the Vietnam War. The women though started peeling off and the women were peeling off or two issues at the time. Healthcare and family separations at the border. Now this was before we had begun massacre in Dayton and it was before covet nineteen in the president's mishandling of that and then we just had a bald walls. Poke come out. I believe today that says binds ahead by one again. We have a long way to go but that certainly sounds like a state in play to me. Yeah I'm glad that you brought up the point about different demographic groups Peeling off because they just heard. I just read an article this morning. About how the polling indicates that some older voters are actually peeling away from trump because of the corona virus. Do you think that that's something that's happening in Ohio as well? I don't know because I haven't seen that polling yet. I will say this. It would not surprise me if it's happening because we are seeing this administration talk about people. Is there some groups discardable? Are we not and one of them would be older people? It's a crazy strategy coming out of the White House. Because older people almost always they vote larger numbers right so. I would not be surprised if that's happening. I can't stay as fact yet that I've seen any of that kind of forty. I mean my parents are in late sixties in Ohio and they're certainly not voting for trump. But they weren't going to anyway. Is that right? Yeah I mean look we are so tight end with Labor here for example and also in so we know that while they were angry and I also just think we have to be really like here. There are many reasons. People didn't vote for Hillary Clinton and there is no point pretending that a lot of the Denver because they didn't want a woman and that is something we're always dealing with. Look how this played out in this primary It there is just no denying this and I get really frustrated when people want as they get something about well. It was her record or She'd been around too long. Yes sure some did some Clinton's cheek no question. I I recommend new documentary on right up about. Hillary was wonderful nightmare. I REMEMBER MY THIRTY YEAR. Old Daughter Calling texting me one point she said. I'm watching this documentary about Hillary and I'm crying and really summed up. How so many of us felt a lot of young in her as well. And a Lotta young men. It's funny that you say that 'cause my mom and I both watched that Hillary that same documentary together got angry together because my mom had visit me and we just it was so good but it was so frustrating to to sit there together and know what had happened. I really think it's important to acknowledge that in this time because right now we're basically being told. I understand that Joe Biden is going to be the nominee and we've got to unite around him. There's no that the most important thing here is to feeding Donald Trump. I would never want all the women in this country in the men who love them to this means. We're also going to put on pause. What has been happening to women in this country in it continues to happen to women in this country including the lack of opportunities for us to lead. So that is still on the agenda always. It's just right now. The most important thing is to get the most dangerous president. We've ever had a newest history out of the White House. Yeah and I you know Although it is not what we had hoped for I think having a a woman vice president is no small thing. We haven't had that you know and I think change can then come very quickly if we can move past this initial hump of just getting trump out. And then you know push toward What can be a really great future. That's an excellent point. Kelly about humor vice president. I I can't imagine it will be I'm particularly hopefully a woman of color and that will be moment for not just the Democrats for the country. We had a female nominee once before. But this we we. We have never seen the likes of these times right. Everything is different in new hope on. So thank you for bringing that up. Well so are there things topics that you would like to make sure that we talk about today things. That are really sort of on your mind as we're in this moment you know it's twenty twenty. There's the pandemic there there's so much going on Of course the Senate is is going to be back in session soon. So I'm sure that your your have that on your mind as well. It wastes it weighs a lot of my mind. Actually because I may forgive rampal in this lifetime I don't tend to be. Somebody holds a grudge. But he really scared a lot of us when he was tested. New Even tested didn't let anybody know he was waiting for results and potentially infected a lot of other people it in the meantime. Those kind of things are inexcusable. No matter who it is but when it's a United States senator doing it. You do not want a large percentage of the elected body neither the House or Senate to get coded nineteen if the country is to continue running it because they have their so much on their plate right now and they're you know right now. They're concentrating additional legislation to help so much of the country. That's in need right now. So I have deep concerns about how soon they're going to go back because I want my husband in his staff and I don't want to be exposed to it if we don't need to be. The country needs help. I it's just a real tension and everyone's feeling right now. I also want us to be mind call. We have so many parents with young children at home right now who are trying to work. Anti also take care of their kids. I have a threat going public facebook page right now back It is just heartbreaking. I told Sherrod I want him to sit down. I'm going to read some of them to him tonight not that he's not already aware but I wanted to understand fully feel I guess the magnitude of this problem. And what are we going to do for all these working families when the country can get back to some version of normal? How are we going to make childcare affordable for all families quality childcare affordable for all families win? Are we going to prioritize that as a country? It's also going to be to see how many of these companies who insisted parents must were days that we in these offices. Now they're finding the parents even with the kids at home can be incredibly productive when they can pick their own hours of productivity during a day and still hit. The marker still make the deadlines so there's that piece of it then I was which respected to this central workers. Many of us have always I come from a family of essential workers if my parents were alive right now and if to the main characters in my novel real people they would be working right now because one is a utility. Were which is what my father did. Keep the power. On and one was a nurse's is a nurse's aid. Which is what my mother was it. So she would've been on. The frontlines healthcare taking care of patients. Those of us who grew up with people like this or I've always seen this invisible always known to be essential and while I'm heartened by how many people are for the first time acknowledging how -portant including our trash collectors are all the delivery people who are helping us all the people waiting on us in hospitals in stores in groceries. They see them now is essential. What I'm hopeful for is that we're going to talk about them differently. After this is over that we will start taking better care of them after. This is over that we will respect the work. They do. Which is what we always should have been doing. And if you're familiar with rebel you know I I. I know harp on this but this is an opportunity to drive it home. I think yeah I think so too. You know. And I've seen a lot of people who now have sudden respect for teachers now that they're trying to deal with their own teaching their own kids at home you know. I think it's too bad that it took something like this for us to realize how important these people are in our lives but yeah I'm hopeful that it will sort of change that dynamic I as a parent am concerned about the transition back eventually back to work back to school especially if things don't line up right if if schools are not back in session. We're suddenly expected to back at work at. You know how these things work also talking with my daughter. Our youngest daughter the transition for children are going to be hard to right because all of a sudden they took some real adjustment to be around a city of younger younger Sean Daycare Preschool kindergarten. And they're finally getting custom to being with appearance regularly in some sort of and then that will be uprooted again for them so parents will be adjusting to getting back to the workforce will also be dealing with emotional stress of their children adapted to this. There is so much to consider moving nothing just snaps back into place right now and. I'm hoping that we're becoming more mindful of all the people who are who help us without ever expecting gratitude. My mom always said. Don't marry him until you see treats the waitress and what she meant by. That of course was how we treat the people were allowed to. Mystery is the measure of re are and there are a lot of people mistreating for a long time and now we're realizing how essential they are. I do WanNa hear what you're saying about. Wow now they they also respect teachers and it's very frustrating. It took this but my attitude is this that whatever gets in there right. We can't ask people to change and then not give them the chance to if they're willing finally took knowledge. How these teachers are in our children's lives. I say let's run with it. Yes well hopefully. They learned to acknowledge that with you. Know paid family leave and level wage and stuff as opposed to just calling people heroes and absorbed in other words. Put the box where you say. Your beliefs are now. Because you're so behind other similar countries in terms of how we don't take our children and families who are raising them all right final question. Have you picked up any new exciting quarantine hobbies besides cutting your husband's hair? We'll have my sewing machine just arrived and I have not had a sewing machine since I was in high school but I didn't know how to use one and I want to start making mass shooting for our neighborhood wanted to do something useful and so it just arrived As soon as I finished reading it she'll be in the next couple days. I'm going to set it up and I've got all this fabric and I'm going to start making base mess for everybody wants one orbit and that's a pretty large orbits. I'm so I'm looking forward to doing that. I also have to say. I attempted a jigsaw puzzle to my best friends. Drop them off on poetry me patiently getting better at it. I really living my mother's life now. I used to teasers going and I find when I work on a jigsaw puzzle. It is the only time I don't think about anything else because I'm so determined to get those pieces interlocked let that. I've turned fully into my grandmother. I'm knitting baking. Why so I enjoy the cooking. Anti get creative but I find that. I'm appreciating that as well. Look we're going to be different. We are going to be different when this is over. That can be in many ways a good thing but to deny that this will change us today. I think is natural thinking. So let's let's with attention decide how we're going to be different all right. Well thank you so much for joining us on the PODCAST. This has been a really fun. Soapy said she felt an affinity with you. I have always felt a certain affinity with you being from a similar area of Ohio. So I- so I'm so glad you were able to join us today. That means a lot coming from two women who are far younger than I have to tell you that I day naked. Both of US say okay. Yeah you too. Thank you for listening to two bras talking politics. The dim cast podcast network. Our theme song is called. Are you listening of the album elephant shaped trees by the BAND IMMUNOLOGY? And we're using it with permission of the band. Our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew. Wetland was created for use by this podcast. You can contact us at odds talking politics at g mail DOT COM or on twitter or facebook at two brides talk. You can find all of our episodes at two broads talking. Politics DOT COM or anywhere podcast found.

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Cory Booker, United (Book Club, Episode 6)

Two Broads Talking Politics

24:38 min | 1 year ago

Cory Booker, United (Book Club, Episode 6)

"Hi this is Teddy. You're listening to the sixth episode of the two broad talking politics Democratic presidential candidates book club on Today's episode. The Book Club Discusses Cory Booker's book united you can find all the episodes episodes in the book club series at two broad turnball dot com slash book club or at our regular feet anywhere podcasts are found everybody. This is Kelly with too broad talking politics. We are back for another edition of our Democratic presidential candidate Book Club. I think I missed some words in there. Today we are Reading Cory Booker's united thoughts on finding common ground and advancing the common good will get around to whether we think that subtitle actually has anything to do with the book or not so joining me today as usual is Sophie Hey Sophie Hey Kelly and the other members shares of our Wonderful Book Club we have with US Caz wider hike says hello and also Elizabeth Thorpe Hello Elizabeth. I ladies all right so let's jump into it. Corey Booker of course is not very high up in the polls at the moment but we've got a while to go so who knows what will happen between now and whenever it is that we're going to choose our presidential nominee so let's start with just a general. What did you think of the book overall overall? Did you like it. Hate it somewhere in the middle so after we've had a lot of conversations during the club about how we feel differently about the book that we read it or listen to the author read it so one thing that I've excited do from now on is it turns out on Amazon. You can hear a free preview of like the first chapter for pages read by the author so I've been doing that and then reading the the book and I felt like Booker's just so charismatic that it changed kind of the whole experience for me listening to him it was so much funnier and more interesting and he read what he had written. No other people read read or heard it but I felt like I feel like that's always meal cory booker like on paper and like men and then he says things and I'm like off and he's so charismatic. I don't know yeah so I listened to the book and I mean I will admit I listen to it on double speed because it's a long book. I didn't have a lot of time that he's perfectly. He's perfectly comprehensible in double speed and I don't know but probably like him better and double speed but yeah I mean there's a ton of emotion in his voice and I think that really helps. I don't know if I would have liked to reading it on paper or not but I really liked listening to him. I could hear him in the book even without having read it I got it from the library and read it and I felt like the way that it was his voice came through pretty clearly but maybe because I've heard him speak off enough that I can hear it in my hand and I had a similar experience so beware sort of I went into the book with with the same sort of attitude that you have about Corey which is like you know he's okay and then I was like oh about like Corey. You know <hes> he's kind of. He's one of those guys have some preconceived notions about who he is but because he's took humble about it. He wouldn't be a little bit when I actually sit down with him. I think he's very much a people person comes through pretty clearly on the book. This is Elizabeth. I also read it and Caz share. All your thoughts <hes> I really liked it without hearing his voice surprisingly like that because I've been also interested in what he has to say and his followed his trajectory for being the mayor <hes> and then elected d- to the Senate but I found myself liking him immensely after reading it yeah I mean I think I it sounds like you guys agree but it felt to me like far and away the most emotional of the books that we've read so far I mean certainly certainly way more than like Pete Buddha Ch- Kamala Harris that that you can really sort of feel when he's feeling in this book and you know in a sense that there's a real compassionate person they're like you may or may not agree with his policies and various other things but you can't deny his his compassion and I feel like finality just shine through so much like the self-deprecation hilarious. There's a couple of points like make fun of himself herself for like he admits that he made a mistake and I just found him really. I hate to use the word authentic. I know that's like terrible but I felt like he was a real person. <hes> right buck one of the criticisms. Did you hear about Corey a lot is that he's show right that he likes to steal the spotlight a little bit but I think he knows they have a tendency to do that and it was very clear book that he has learned that lesson a little bit <hes> and he doesn't try to take party. He can't solve every problem by himself and he's not dared be a super hero in that would be does that sometime. What happens is that real solutions happen and I in the same way I appreciated did how self deprecating he was about that and how humble was out you know the whole passageway chases the the guy down the done like a classic Corey Days in the Mayor's off and he's go singlehandedly tackle with on the street corner but he he knew fun of himself right and you saw that was probably not about bullshit and how he learned experience night? I think that was very rushing that way yeah you know and we've seen this in most of the books we've read. There's been a very ex- with the definite exception of Elizabeth Warren. There's been this sort of linear trajectory right like and then I did this and then I did this and then I was in second graded in this was sort of loosely organized around moving around his life but there was definitely some jumping back and forth and there were themes that were important in different chapters. You know what I think. He's he's actually a very good writer. I mean the the writing style dialogue. There was very compelling agree. I mean some of the books that we've read. I've had to really kind of slog through <hes>. I wish I had known about double time. It's super helpful you but I actually found myself reading this book out of sheer enjoyment not because I have to finish it before our podcast <hes> so let's talk about maybe would I want to jump out of our normal format and talk a little bit about Ah now about what we think. This tells us about what kind of president he would be normally. I saved that question for the but I think that's the piece that I I struggle with the most about this kind of book you know I think it's a it's a good book and we can talk about sort of our favorite moments and things. Maybe we wish were there but to me. The question at the end of the book was great. I loved it was fantastic memoir. I'm still not sure how this sells me on him being president. I don't know if you guys had similar reaction. I feel like me me. This book solidified something that I had heard for but not really understood which was the comparison to President Obama. I heard that comparison made a lot the twin cory booker and putting it Obama and at first I was like <hes> what like. I don't see any connection at all other than the fact that they're both black the Senate but cory booker in book comes across very very similarly to Barack Obama actually and dreams of my father <hes> to me like very cerebral very introspective perspective's very self reflective and he's got a very similar message to what President Obama's message was in two thousand eight and even in two thousand twelve which is the whole like <hes> sort of body by his famous speech to the at the N._C.. About you know the Purple States the United States of America being purple not red or blue <hes>. He's got like a really similar. No less just get along. Let's find common ground E._M.. Going linked to book. I mean it's called United also his candidacy and so those similarities make me wonder if he wouldn't be similar as a president to Obama but also make me worry because I feel feel like that sort of call for unity is kind of. I don't WanNa say like out of fashion but I think that maybe harkening that to a time. That isn't now <hes> it's less that's practical and I. I felt like it was in two thousand now. It's a little naive right yeah at this point if feels a little naive to think that it would be that easy I saw that I felt like <hes> I appreciate him really talking in depth about some of the major things he struggled with the mayor and how he focused on creating coalition to tackle those thing and how he found uh-huh inspiration through some of the community leaders and really dug deep into some of those projects entitled last merge things that come. I thought that the locked couple of chapters were especially this way talked about like that community garden written in Newark and how horrible it was to have people who had criminal record come in there and get jobs and be able to work and do something and provide for the community and how rewarding that was not much for them but where the community I I got a sense that this is the president that he would be <hes> and and so much rock where he would focus on what can we do to leverage what we're already doing and make it better and what partnerships coalitions can I utilize to do that. He seems like a he's a relationship guy and I get a sense that that how he would probably handle the executive yeah I think I you know I can see him as an executive. It was specifically typically a president. I had trouble seeing so like obviously it's easy to understand why he made a good mayor. I could see him as governor pretty easily. There was just something that was. I don't know felt somewhat limited to me. I think you know part of it. May Be needed more policy details not necessarily more policy but more sense of understanding of the whole country like I got a good sense that he understands New Jersey well but not necessarily that he understands the rest of the country. New Jersey is a fairly small geographical state. You know that that part of it. I think you know if you're comparing to Obama. Obama head lived so many different places by the time he ran for President Camara's book. We've seen you know she. She grew up in different. Places lived in Canada for Awhile Elizabeth. Warren similarly has lived in lots of different places cory booker just felt very much like of the place he lives an an hasn't necessarily experienced a lot of other places and and I didn't get the sense that his understanding of helpings work in Newark was necessarily GonNa Relate to you know where I grew up in Ohio that sort of thing that you know what not that you necessarily have to have all of that but that was the one thing that I was sort of left wondering. Wondering about the opposite criticism that I had of Mayor Pete where I said he was running to be president of the Midwest for you to be president of the eastern seaboard or New Jersey right yeah I mean I guess that's sort of an you know that that is in no way to say that I I think he wouldn't be a good president of the whole country. I just didn't get that from this book. I finished taking him a little more seriously as a presidential candidate than I did before <hes> just because he is so articulate and I liked you know he made a very atypical decision by moving back into the projects after he was raised like you know upper middle class Newark because I've lived on the east coast for so long as you. You definitely have a resurgence obviously but it it you know it's quite a dicey reputation. It's not where you would probably choose to live so I I really I really liked that and I felt like you know his <hes> example with the I hop waitress and the living wage and his concerns about you know racism and I just felt like he's he's obviously got the smarts and humanity which we don't currently we have now in the White House and Policy Chops even though we didn't get too far into the weeds to be able to handle that job he's he's still not my first choice but like hundred percent feel confident that he could absolutely be a positive force in the White House so what we're some of our favorite moments from the bug favorite things we learned maybe about Corey from this book. I mean he slyly confirms confirms that he's heterosexual he yeah I mean there isn't too sly. Hey Mayor is married to a man barely mentioned it surely so I don't know or is that kind of falls into the bucket of you know separating personal and professional. What did you think of that how he felt for that girl yeah? No I liked the story and and I thought it was very sweet. I did kind of wonder if it was shoehorned in just to be like hey I'm not gay because otherwise he doesn't talk about relationships with women his own age much at all you know talks a lot about his relationship with these women who are like mentors to him but but not so much with women his own age dating Rose Barrio Dawson for several years you just keeping it quiet right right. I just putting it in the book was a little you know seems like it. was there for a particular reason well. I think probably the editors reading like hey like what you just raise Kelly. There's no personal details in here. You don't have any girlfriends boyfriends relationship state. You know give me a story. I really liked the the moments where he talked about learning from elders in the community the the guy who I told him he should run for. I don't remember if it was city councillor mayor and the the women at the the two different towers in a word the one where he lived in the other one who who sort of guided him and helped him along the way and became you know people who were really pulling for him. I thought that was we talked so much about sort of youth energy in in the importance prince of of young people in activism now and in seeing these people in his life who were older and who were really helping him and that was it was neat and it's something I haven't read in a lot of political memoirs lately so if he did you have a apart you really liked I think having a person could have already discussed or they weren't are already like sort of overarching themes. I liked it overall but nothing else that hasn't already been talked about so that. It to me as something I loved than his voice which like I could listen to him. Literally read anything. I don't know what it is about his voice. It's like me with Kirsten Gillibrand. He's got like I don't know. I really nice voice with Ernie things that we thought were missing or wanted more of I don't know that this is something that's missing whether they wanted more of its just something that like I realized as I was reading reading this book. I've been thinking about these books that we've been reading wondering why I had so much trouble like sort of identifying with the sort of narrative of the candidates <hes> paint about their childhood put in their life which is the of my parents raised me to have this really strong work ethic and to believe that I needed to work hard and needed to earn everything and Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and almost all of these books had that moment where they talk about how their their parents or caregivers instilled this sort of drive in them and I can't say that I really identify with that. I just always feel feels like I don't know it always feels like kind of a political ploy to preempt any criticisms of the left that come off from the right about entitlement or whatever because I wasn't raised to care that much about my productivity or to feel as though you know I had to work I bought off to get every single thing that I had my parents focused much more on like kindness and you know developing your personality and becoming a good person more than Mike you have to work hard earned everything and so every time I hear politicians talk about how that was instilled in them it just sort of feel Sassy to me and there's that moment here to where he talks about his his fanning instill these values and the second one was you know have communal belief but the first one was to work really hard and I just can't really get get me on that. I think yeah although I think that also might be like more prevalent in like minority households also sometimes just because it is harder when you're a person of color that maybe we hear that narrative more than let's say you know I did in my house because we lived in a white suburban picket fence you know situation but I he did really like hearing about how his parents had these high expectations and how he was very close to his dad. You know it just gives you an insight into you know how the adult person is going to turn out in my opinion like that was something that I really thought laughing pizza book yeah. I mean definitely the the relationship with his parents. You know whatever their lessons were definitely comes through that. He's got this really strong relationship unshipped with them. I you know it was interesting. We didn't hear much about his brother and then everyone smell he'd be like Oh and my brother and it'd be like wait. You have brother so that was a little bit odd but the relationship with the parents was a you know very very clear in seemed deep and meaningful I mean I don't know I was raised to value work. Ethic and work really really hard so to me those you know I don't get the same sense from those comments but I can see that <hes> you know I mean that definitely seems like something that they're all sort of taught to say in their their memoirs James. I think to course parents have a pretty fat meeting. Your Dad was the first black salesperson for idea kind of hard and I'm sure you can get there by not working hard right. He's got his mom. I really won't they met at I._B._M.. His Mama's an executive I think too. I thought maybe it was an I._B._M.. Idea I think they I mean I thought they were like one of the two. Black up first black executives but maybe I'm maybe my fact check isn't right but I thought they met at work and they were both. You know fairly successful 'cause he was born here in Washington D._C.. Well in the this story early on about a you know them being sort of the test couple to see if there were racist housing policies and you know whether realtors were pushing people black people away from certain certain areas <hes> you know that was really fascinating and in having president who's been on that side of it as opposed to the president we have now who is on the other side of it would certainly be an interesting juxtaposition him having experienced those kinds of things in his life. If I think there is a certain value to that in when people are making policies that they understand you know what happens as a result of those all right well. Is there anything else that we want to make sure that we say about this book. I was just thinking about your question that you posed earlier would he make president and there was like I feel like when he was the mayor of Newark and even <hes> now a senator like when there's an issue he it does into it to learn more about it to make the right policy like he's. He talks about that parable about you know swimming up a river to find out why children are drowning. Do you guys remember that part <hes> so that's definitely not happening in the current at all and then I like how he addressed like you know mass incarceration the environment affordable housing you know. I feel very confident that he's he's route scholar. He knows what he's doing. He's very smart. He's hard working and then finally again being raised by two IBM execs. He chose to move back into the Newark projects so I feel like his heart's in the right place so I'm I'm excited to get to know him a little bit better and you know I agree with cavs entirely. I thought you know I read it and he was <hes> he is very good writer. I felt it was authentic about you know he. I didn't have a ghostwriter and then just have some detail. What do we think of the title? Let's see it's united thoughts on finding common ground and advancing the common good. I think it's completely appropriate. What's happening right now? I I understand why one would want to title a memoir of presidential candidate that way. I'm not sure that's the title I would have given this book. Yeah there's not a lot of meat there right at the minute super plan and Title I I feel like some sort of like running toward danger or something like would have been more appropriate for the Cory Booker that we got this book warrior all right well. I think we all will recommend this certainly as a good book to read whether or not you're actively considering cory booker's a candidate and then maybe after reading this book you will be considering Cory Booker as a candidate but either way you should go read the book it's a really good read especially especially in this <hes> genre which doesn't always lend itself to good reads all right and next up three weeks from now we will be talking about Amy Klobuchar Moore's book the Senator Next door which is from a little bit it earlier. I think it's a twenty fifteen book <hes> so this came out in Twenty Cory Booker's book came out in twenty seventeen so he probably had a good idea he might be running. A mclovin showers put came out in twenty fifteen so we you will see a memoir. It is our love that title but that's a great title. Yes it could be like a murder mystery for all we know Oh man if any of these end up being murder mysteries that that will immediately become my first choice of candidate degree all right well. Thank you all and everyone if you click on our website on this particular episode you will see links back to.

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Adam Cohen with Lawyers for Good Government

Two Broads Talking Politics

34:31 min | 1 year ago

Adam Cohen with Lawyers for Good Government

"Hi, this is teddy. You're listening to Adam Cohen onto broad talking politics. Are you? Listen. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am on with my co hosts Sophie, Sophie. Hey kelly. And today, joining us for a bonus episode to talk some about what's going on at the border. We have Adam Cohen, who is on the board of directors for lawyers four, good governments, and also is a managing partner at his law firm. Cohen and Siegel. Hi, Adam, Joey, hey, sofi. Good you know as good as we can be, I think when the world seems terrible. But hopefully we can talk some about ways people can help make it slightly less terrible. So could you start by telling us just a, a little bit about what lawyers for? Good government is and how you got involved in it. A lot of organization we started began at the end so to speak or or ended up the beginning. I'm not sure wish or founder a co stuff on Facebook, believe it or not. She's a lawyer. Simply wanted to do something good and expected, you know, maybe she get fifty. Maybe a hundred lawyers at most responding and within a day had ten thousand and within a week had hundred thousand and we topped off at about a hundred and twenty five thousand lawyers who simply said, we cannot abide what we think is going to happen. And we want to do something we believe that we have the skills and the training and the ability to do something. So let us see what is that we can do, and I joined the fray pretty early on probably the first or second day and just began getting my point of view and. Becoming more noticeable and. Chrissy fight law who was the founder saw that I was saying and, and that it aligns with what she saw as vision for the organization and asked me to take on leadership role, which I willingly did. I say it was really shocking to me because I'm dealing with a lot of Harvard, yell trained, lawyers who had high coat file Johnson. I in anything that I went to Canossa law school it certainly. I'm proud of my, my legal education, but I have a small firm and all things I focus on workers compensation and social security disability law and not constitutional issues or immigration by any search the imagination, or, or even criminal law. So. So the fact that anybody was interested really in what I had to say, was and still is his day, shocking them. But regardless, we forms we didn't quite know what to do until the Muslim ban kind of crystallized us and Moyer for the government lawyers, along with countless lawyer, some other groups started going to the airport. I reports I should say across the country. We organized we helped form a national coalition of groups who share information. Tell each other, what are you seeing here? What, what, what is cutting importer patrol doing their? What policies are they following? And of course he hadn't a nuance. But I guess one of our core principles was born out of that awful Muslim ban period of time and immigration became one of our key focuses I about a week, af K myself. Well, I think about it a part of everyday for a week, just trying to help wherever a Moyer that was not trained in this area could help you know, trying to bring resources trying to help share information trying to. Answer me a of employers that were skilled in the areas. And since then we Adela. Programs that address climate change every working with Sierra Club and Bloomberg philanthropies on that intact, I think it was Sierra from that cold on climate change program, which involves believed but one hundred and fifty two hundred lawyers called that a game changing program where we're trying to help me Nissim polities and local. Local groups chains to renewable energy and really sort of fill the ideas of the Paris accord, even though the president of cold asylum. We're also trying to formulate on our week when lesnar program dealing with election protection by taking a look at seeing what each local election board. Of course, the country's doing, which is really kinda Mamat has because there's so many localities and so many different somebody different places cover what we wanna see there's an any kind of issue that really needs to be dressed, because it's -scriminate story and depriving voters of their sacred about. But I think we're probably this point best known or project cortisone, which is our border project, where we had been sending attorneys. Team that southern border for over a year and also been participating in had had other attorneys participating in remote proceedings for credible fear interviews and remote bond hearings. And the idea is obviously C in get. Pass the first hurdle or Clamper asylum and. Immigrants are going to be held in detention. At least see if we get a court to offer them the opportunity to post von so that they could be freed from detention. Fortunately, the government is leading through that remotely. So, you know, it's very hard to have the Terni travel dance the border to do one of these years can talk some about sort of a wet the situation at the border is, so I think a lot of people who are sort of half following the story. You know, obviously, we know there's, there's something going on. We know they're people it being held in poor conditions, but I think a lot of people don't sort of have a very good sense of what, what the situation normally looks like if there is such a thing as normal. You know what what's happening now? What's different could you sort of tuck little bit about, you know what, what exactly is happening? What happens? When people cross the border in how do they end up in facilities again. I'm gonna give it a little bit of qualified, you're here because this is not my expertise even though as as. A sort of lay person attorney, I got a little bit more familiarity. Because I have an extremely acted with promoting in sitting project cores on, but previously people try to enter mostly mostly legal fortune entry, and if they could not they tried to cross the border unlawfully, and really from Houston to most of the years when Obama was president, my understanding is that you had Stanley's attempting those on walk across ings. It was really migrants that were looking for work individual. Don't. And generally, even if you do cross. Not an accord it entry. That's considered to be misdemeanor. And that is not something for which would generally be held in detention for months and months, which is where the awfully names term. Catch and release came from or if you do cross in you immediately turned herself in and claim asylum, whether the claimants now or not that is your right to do as an unfortunately, there seems to give misinformation that. If we do cross unlawfully than you should be locked up in a detention. So he didn't really have. This number of people, when, that's the other thing they the amount of people that have been closing has certainly increased and. You can put the blame on that for a upon whoever you wish, I couldn't tell you whether that's just simply. Inflow or it is the result of Coney and policies issued by the president, although they seem to be causing the, their, the number such certainly increased. And now we've got families coming rather than on the company adult men and we're having. The families being kept were months and months at a time in detention. And as we've seen through the news reports in utterly deplorable and horrifying condition on got children. Thomas one year old two years old, even vulgar that are being kept in some facilities. It's not all disabilities, but some and in well-documented that are not being cared for by Dulce but they're being cared for by children that are seven eight, and they don't have diapers. They can't even wash the children because they don't have so you don't have to faith, and toothbrushes. These are they? Facetti and things that you would under on the common decency on a happy, children that for some reason, even though it costs upwards of seven hundred seven hundred fifty dollars a day per child that used to sorties do not have for these children. It's really both unconscionable and unfathomable that this is happening. And if more and more each day, the last time I checked. It was some fifty to fifty two thousand immigrants that will be kept in detention and I think some six thousand or more children that were being catching detention and still according to reports being separated from their parents. I it's. Unbelievable to say, but that is still happening. And with even worse. This is being the. Why members of congress and there was a at elite? It was a CB issue, testified within the past couple of days and congressional hearing that the reports that we seen, which have been from lawyers, because the press courses out allowed, and so these and nobody is allowed to take those video of what's going on. So the only people that aren't allowed pursuance to a negotiated settlements of a supreme court case that, that would be the floor as case, if you've heard of it, I was site escapes me for the moment. So the only people that are able to see these children are ROY Ayers, under vis settlement of this case, they are reporting the condition to the media. The media is reporting it and CB now says voyeurs are lying because they have. Interest in the case. I mean. If meet wrong. And we will I smelt pleadings rely becomes our license tobacco for it, that simple, it, it is not something that you do not convention. What other either civil or, or perhaps, even criminal charges can be against you for lying. Especially if you why in a smart statement of any kind, it's perjury. I mean drive so. What what's going on? All reliable accounts. It is something that none of us really thought would happen country after World War Two and the Japanese interment yet, here we are. How is? We go. I don't know how to phrase this, but, like, I have a three year old, and if I kept my three year old in conditions like this, I would be reported CPS, and probably my three year old would be placed in a foster home woma investigated. So how is it legal for the government to do this is it legal for the government to do this to children? That's a very good question. And. Under the floor as settlement. Children aren't supposed to be else more than twenty days. So you can start their children that have been held for months violate that settlement. Whether that would be considered a criminal violation, or a civil violation that I don't know, the difference would affect what the ramifications would be another would criminals somebody could go to jail, if it civil than it's really highly unlikely improbable, although it possible if the if the violation were agreed just enough that it works could say, you are in contempt of court, and, and I'm going to put you in jail until this is renovating, bump that is a very extreme responsible court. So. It's very difficult to, to find illegality, especially since the government unders acts, I should say under the cloak of. Immunity in many cases from criminal prosecution. In other words. Sort of presumed that their actions are taking in good faith and under the mall. And if there is some sort of a mistake that their actions were not then they are generally immune from contribution. I mean you take everything that, that happened in and look at it in your jaw hit the floor when you read about some of this stuff, and it was mine. And you wonder how could this possibly be in? How can we get away with this? But on the other hand, you look at some of the other things that this administration is doing such as refusing flatly to comply with congressional subpoenas, and making what seems to be ludicrous claim that anybody that worked as an adviser visor in the White House has immunity and is not subject to congressional oversight. And, and you just especially if you're wanting you, listen you say, how can Nate awfully get away with this, and then remember the fragility under which our system works, right? I mean they're in fact to, you know, Brown versus board of education. Well, I didn't how was president when that occurred when. Network decision was issued, and what would have happened is power has simply said, you know what I'm not going to follow this wall. I'm not going to do. Abide by this cream court decision 'cause I don't even and you start to understand that our system. Really only works. Everybody abide by the wolves. And that certainly isn't happening here. I don't know what the fall is going to be, I hopefully find out soon if not by twenty twenty at the latest. But it is really claiming I can't tell you how many on side so Pam, we're on the edge of a constitutional precipice and our country is really. Staring down the barrel of dissolution or another not necessarily understood the wa- more, I want sound alarmist because that's really. Really? Not generally, my point. But it is extremely, you know, going back to when I was in JFK going, the Muslim ban. I was there the night, dad. From fired Sally, aides who the acne Torney general, and then I can't remember whether he fired the director of ice or that person resigned. And I think that there was another resignation or firing that same evening. And here we are. Rico to into Trump administration and I'm wondering if he's going to collapse that quickly, so you know, and again, I, I mean. I, I recognize that, that towns you know, almost moving. Chris for me to say. But when you've got news, kind of policies that are. Completely antithetical to our national ethos being implemented with such slickness and such. Cedary. Gives you great pause and makes you wonder what is going to happen next? We probably can't solve all of that. But what I would like then to focus in on a little bit is how people who are listening can help your group can help project Kors on, you know, with, with the things that, that we can do some of this, if courses going to involve a really big lawsuit some of this is going to involve regime change. Right. We need a new president. We need a new administration. How can we help individuals right now who are in these terrible circumstances for in in? I always has to say this because it's not what I wanted to hear. I got back. Of course, you everybody remembers where they were at nine eleven in the aftermath it you were alive, and all of that, right. And if you remember whether they tell us I live in Westchester county, which is immediately north of New York City. I, of course, every gay went to work grabbing my work clothes. You know, my, my, my, my boots in my work on a lawyer, you know, my, my gardening out that and wanted to go down to know what, of course, we couldn't. And what all of us were were told across the country was well, really donate donate to the Red Cross donate to, you know, whatever organization. You think it's appropriate to help and then it was frustrated me. And that's one of the reasons why I, I'm so active voyage for the government. But ironically debts, the first thing that I forget because we all wanna rush down the border. We all wanna help. We all want to grab an hug, these kids and, and, and, and volunteer to be forced to parents for them. You know, volatility give them a place, and we want to send supplies, we want to send diapers dot sick, you don't think diapers which open I don't understand that. But. That's not what organisms actions that are looking for. They're looking for money. They are looking for people to volunteer remotely at times on and, and. Annunciation house and rights is our mood organizations to volunteer to buy, you may be able to volunteer for remotely or if you can get down to the border, but you really need to contact them to see what the opportunities are on troll. Landau also. And I know I am really butchering that might might sandwiches is Spanish is bad. It's my knowledge immigration. I think, but that is nother organization that might offer volunteer opportunities and actually. Warriors to government dons and. You are an immigration motor oil you can travel with an immigration lawyer. We maybe able to help you traveled to the border to help some of these organizations and some immigrants with credible theory entities. You are bilingual or can work with somebody that is bilingual as we do in my office. We can have you do think interviews with detained asylum-seekers by telephone remotely. Voyeurs at large firms and can have their are pro Botum coordinators. Work with us. There are other opportunity as well. If you don't have money to donate understand, if you have say frequent flyer miles that we will happily take because that can help us get more people down to the border. And if I can give our our web address. I would love to do that. Yes. Chris to lawyers for good government dot org. And I'll still that. L. W. Y. E. R. S. O. R. G. O. D. G O, the R N N, NC got or but any could she can get, you know, any thing that you can do? This is something that we cheer for, because it's a passion because the competition is important to us, because the law is important to put me because human beings. Have values and we reckon uh sense out, and we cannot abide. What is happening to them in what is being done to them? For whatever reasons. I could not possibly justify. And so unnecessary. I shake my head in just. My inability to understand that you can say, on clearly, rendered little stitches fi, what I see happening. This is not who we are. And, and. It is. Then we need to change it and we need to change in the media. We've seen this play out. In countries all across the world. We see the plight of refugees and this being. America, which is supposed to be most welcoming Crutchley for immigrants on the planet. They have us doing this to have our president saying the country is closed. Han immigrants apply for points of entry apply for were silent ports of entry, and being told. Well, I'm sorry. You can't see today and they had. When when they have really choked, or the amount of people that are allowed to apply for Silom important to trickle. I have an invest peration trying to cross the Rio Grande and had them wind up eight down. Drowned to get. I don't understand how let that happen cuts, such wealth, invest parenting. I don't really know what else I can say particular news services or Twitter feeds that you would recommend that people follow for really good up to date information. Well, absolutely. I mean you concert. We follow mine, which is accidental liberal, that, that's a pretty good one. I would say that great Maganga goes is an excellent originalist in posting a list. And she's well over fifty four places that you've been donate to were or organizations, that are helping that the border Ricardo to end and hot on a man are also excellent. As democracy storm Adam Rifkin. I find I find karma is also a. Wonderful as far as news services and reporters Jacob sober. Aw. With MSNBC has been excellent on this. As has the Texas Tribune. They have been just one of wonderful source. They're, they're right there. So it makes sense and within Cathy has been very good as she has to be a friend. So I would certainly follow them as well. Texas Tribune Oregon's is so those are some of the ones that I follow on a regular basis still really thankfully, there have been a lot of reporters that have been on top of his story, and that stay on top of the story, unfortunately, there's a story that we can stay on top of Adamus or anything else that you wanted to make sure we talked about. I. Hope that we can separate the politics, which I understand her do. That we can separate the facts here from the truth. The truth is, whether we like it or not. This is happening. And children are getting sick and they are being kept in in. Terrible. Terrible conditions. And they are unfortunately, in some cases, dying resulted. This. It doesn't have. Me can fix this. And we have to fix this. You're just. Greeting a moss generation of children for no purpose. I hopefully we will be able to let you guess duster I can use shoulder. Hopefully, we will be able to unite them with their families. And hopefully people will find in their hearts to contribute to our organization, and these other words ation that are doing. Wonderful yeoman's work to help which all this problem. He he Medicare and classes. Again. You can debate who caused it. Some, some point, I don't care as long as we kicked it. And then we can argue about. Who started? But while we Dicker. Children are suffering. And that's not right. We've got to make it that. Adam, thank you so much for all the work that you've been doing and for really staying on this story. You know there's this hashtag, don't look away. And I think it is so tempting sometimes to look away because it's so horrifying. It's so hard to, to hear about into read about, but, but I really, I think you and the, the other people who are doing this, this work and not looking away. Not not a removing ourselves from the situation. No, thank you for having me on gave him the opportunity. I probably droned on par too long on the lawyer opportunity. Eight shut me off. I will say you could look out for the hash that contract cars on because I when I tweet him at this stuff, and I'm on Facebook as well. But we mainly on Twitter is point. I will use that ask, and I will probably be tweeting along read of. I can't counsel people that went to the border contract. Clothes on. The past I, I've gotten some more more comporting back from people and I am going to be Niamh sure thread within the next day or two. So I, I can't say that, that, you know, something that you should really look for with bated breath because it's certainly not the topic that you really wanna see, but. Don't look. Yeah. All right. We'll thank you, Adam, and we we'll put links up to, to those Twitter accounts and also to places where people can donate on our website. So I hope that people will check that out. Very much always Gopi. Thank you guys for the opportunity. Thanks for listening to, to broads talking. Politics, are theme song is called, are you listening off of the album, elephants shaped trees, by the band immune ary? And we're using it with permission of the band, our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew Wesleyan and was created for use by this podcast.

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Andrew Yang, War on Normal People (Book Club, Episode 9)

Two Broads Talking Politics

22:54 min | 1 year ago

Andrew Yang, War on Normal People (Book Club, Episode 9)

"Hi this is Kelly with the two brads talking politics podcast part of the dumb cash podcast network. This episode is part of our Book Club series where we read in review the books by the Democratic presidential candidates enjoy mm-hmm everyone this is Kelly with too broad talking politics and we have another other book club episode for You. This is our Democratic presidential candidates book club and I believe the final episode of Said Book Club. Stay tuned for the end when we talk about how we're going to morph this so joining me as always is my co WHO's Sophie. Hey Sophie. Hey Kelly and we have freelance. Writer has wider Eh high cavs. Hello and joining us again is actress and writer Elizabeth or pilots with ladies all right so for today we have read or some of us have sped read Andrew Yang the war on normal people. The Truth About America's is disappearing jobs and why universal basic income is our future from the organise of his title. You may sense that is not the best writer ever so. Oh loves jump into it. Did you like the book. Let's let's say our answer on account three at the same time and see what happened all all right one one two three. No yes all right so yes. I said Nah all right so sophie that that was the most enthusiastic cancer so go to go for it. Tell us which I still I was kind of torn because he is not a very good writer and as a person who is an actual professional writer like supports herself and her family with writing. It was pretty painful to read. I also didn't like and this is a problem that I always have with the Yankees like the sort of schmaltzy terms gives for things like he calls in his UB. I like the freedom dividend and freedom dollars and he I mean the title itself is kind of cutesy about like normal people being in different than people who are good with tech and like I just don't really like the way he phrases things. I think it's kind of like pandering. Almost it's kind of cheesy and it just turns me off on the other hand. I did like that. It was a book that was very heavy on information and theory and like not as heavy at least I didn't read it all the way through a skill I sped read it but it didn't seem as heavy on like the inspiring personal story which which is always what kind of annoys me about these types of books so that's why I would give it a four or a five on my scale from one to ten uh-huh okay not out of five no no no no no no and I would say it was my least favorite book of the books we have read so far but I I did think I did actually like one thing about it which is that it was very focused on policy and not so much on getting all Right Affair Kasim. What did you think I mean wrong. I think that's the best thing a guy can say about this book not wrong and hasn't journalist actually written about Nubia and studied it myself. I agree with with him about the necessity for universal basic income but I think I also come from the same base as the rest of you which is Gosh does he have to phrase things the way them all right and words matter right and a lot of this language is kind of like there were a few passages. I'm not just referring to sort of the overtones of them that you got in some of this. It was one section that just blew me out of the water. Where in one sentence can you equate the party atmosphere and like the loose morals going on on college campuses with rape and I was like Whoa wait those thank don't belong in the same sentence we need to back up run there quite a few points in this but grind with like really I I guess he gets points for at least understanding the issue but he is by no means the first the person to come forward these sorts of policies in these sorts of concepts and I really don't like the way that he did it and the way that he phrases things in this book and in quite a few places I really liked that you pointed out the sort of like way in which he'll be served talking about something that makes sense and then suddenly he'll try to connect to something that seems like sort of unrelated or not equivalent and use word so he does that with with marriage and the family. It'll be like Oh yeah Ayoubi is important because we're going to lose all these jobs and the meaning of work is going to change and then also this is why marriages have been failing and I was like we what what like there's no connection there but he keeps doing those sort of logical jumps were he'll be you'll be with him and you'll be agreeing with him and then all of a sudden he'll be laying and this is the other thing happens and you'll be like what what show your work right yeah so Elizabeth. I know you didn't like it the I did. I didn't like it so much that I didn't finish it. He's he's a horrible writer and I get that but like that's what professional editors was there for two so I kind of like Publishing House thought that was a good product but also think he's Super Hokey and honestly if I didn't know who he wasn't. I read that I would think that that person was ninety five years old because he's just talks like got and his deliveries so uncomfortable but I I mean I'm interested in learning more about the automation and the job displacement but at the same time he I was falling asleep like it was so boring other books that we've read have at least spend intriguing or interesting or you know felt like I should you know continue. Read really felt was cringe-worthy cringe-worthy. Was You know his stereotypical bullying story about being Asian and kids were teasing him about having a small penis. I know I could not believe I. I was listening to a presidential candidate talk about his Pena's stop. Please stop so like it was it was a way so obviously the P. The p the pena part like was censored by somebody it was it was a wild I mean it was a really bad book goes. No I usually listen to these a- As audiobooks and so this one I listened to and I kept trying to bump it up to triple speed because I wanted to get through it quicker but he talks too fast asked for that so I could get to like two and a half speed and still understanding than sometimes. I'd be like just triple speed the next part. I don't want to listen to all of this. I mean it will say my my least least favourite part of Yang style is that when he decides to list things he can't list just like three examples of something he has to list twenty examples samples of whatever it is he's talking about so he'll be like you know the cities of and then he rattles off twenty cities. It's like we didn't we didn't need all of that. We could have gotten the point with two or three he and I just like it just is so many words so many unnecessary words and this is also the first and only time I have done an audio book where they cut referring referring to a pdf they had to look at because there were too many things that like didn't work as audio. I guess too many charts that I never bothered to go look out but that it was a unique experience no doubt he's super smart and has things to contribute and some creative ideas ideas but he's just he lacks any charisma in my opinion to be like public official yes so. I guess that is the The real question I have coming out of. This is why he thought that running for president was the best next step there. There's there's no explanation in this book. Even if it had been better written there's no explanation for why you take these ideas and then run for president then like I feel like there's a lot of good things you could do. There's a lot of ways you could talk about you. Be I get more people thinking about then running for president. I don't know did I miss something in the book to we feel like he has any sort of sense of how to run a country yeah. I miss the same part so I'd like. I'd like to be enlightened. I mean I didn't think there was anything in the book that indicated it. What connection would have to his actual campaign for President outside of the book. I assume he's like Ralph Nader type who is running in order to like get visibility for his issue which is fine but it it would be h. leaper for him just to donate to his candidate of choice and campaign for them. It'd be a surrogate at a very top level and then go in to be like you you know the Labor Secretary or something you know what I mean. This is true. I mean I I didn't supposing if he doesn't actually want to be government which I suspect he doesn't since he has never actually been in government before and he is not you know he hasn't run for anything before and he doesn't seem to have any interest in any other government positions and I'm assuming it's just solely to get exposure which are also I think experiences previous debate performance as well. I think a lot of it is to like get attention for or ub as an idea and inject it into sort of the public consciousness kind of the way. I think that Bernie Sanders although I think Bernie Sanders actually wanted to be president the way that Bernie Sanders kind of injected the idea of Medicare for all into the twenty sixteen election well and Yang whole attitude in the book about I'm sort of Dan faster from Silicon Valley coming down to talk to all your normal folk all my tetreault friends. I don't get it or to snobby to understand yourself involved or to whatever and so in that way although who doesn't directly say it's kind have like he's playing entrepreneur hero. I'M GONNA come to you guys from this catastrophic thing. That's about to happen to our economy that you have no idea about and for me. I was like yeah. We been ringing a bell. Everyone has been ringing about for ten years. We have have an idea. It's just we don't have anybody in place in government to do something about it. I'm not sure you're the guy I wanted in that position. Not sure you're the breath depict guy to put a plan in place. He's his understanding of you'd be. I and how it would work and then how it would work artifically. If the government were to implement. It had some pretty significant holes in it. I wasn't one hundred percent on board with so right. Yeah I feel the same way I feel like. That's always what comes up with. Yang for me like I'm a huge supporter of YOU BE I. I just don't actually want Yang. The person who if like I think you'd be I is both a good idea and also kind of inevitable but I would rather somebody who has sort of a firmer grasp of quote unquote normal people and the reality is that they face in America today to be implementing it 'cause it a little bit of have when he starts to talk about the specifics of it of what he plans to do would always sort of goes off the rails and I would really rather more focused serious candidate talked about it and explained how they were GonNa do it. I also there was a part where he is like talking about his colleagues colleagues venture for America and how they had this theory working theory that smart people in the US you know g one of like like six things in six cities you know academia consulting finance law medicine and it's only a New York works San Francisco Bog Boston. La DC and I thought that was incredibly lame I mean it's like they're no smart people in Peoria Illinois that I mean it just and and condescending and so like he's a part of that tech Bro Culture so I you know I when he criticizes it and then says something like that. It's just have to follow. I guess you know Kasmin you were talking about. He's trying to play the hero like he has this whole section toward the end of the the book where he's talking about video games and on and on and on video games and like I wonder if you SORTA I'd be glad he's he's making what could be an interesting a nuanced argument. It's not by him but an argument about how video games or sort of immediately rewarding and you know of course it's more fun to play video games than you know go to work but going to work is what pays the bills et. CETERA I mean I'm not sure exactly where he was going with it but I imagine there could be interesting places. You could go without but I think that he is is part of video game culture. I mean I don't know enough about video game culture to to sort of connect all those dots but I feel like it's very clear that video games are very important to him in the that that kind of mindset makes a lot of sense to him and so maybe he does sort of unwittingly see himself as a hero of some sort or wants to be that kind of hero okay given a little more time I could could. I could flesh that out but I'm going to just write on the level that he writes for now right so I don't now the usual question I ask is. What kind of president would this person be based on his book so I think I know the answers. I suppose my answer would just be kind of clueless totally out of touch and not not qualified. I think what alarms me about. Yang is the number of people I've seen who are like super anti trump who are like oh but you seemed like a a good alternative and I'm like well if your problem was the the commander in chief is like a person who is completely unpredictable and has no idea what he's doing in office because he didn't do any sort of preparation in his lifetime for it. This is not the person you want to replace it with. I think that there's something to that alarmed me in the book that if I didn't know this is Andrew Young and it was reading it. I might assume they were. GOP Talking Point things about how people routinely abused disability and the system holy rigged and how you know when he's talking about video games and how they lead to disenfranchise men and all that they're not positive or that they can't be positive way for people to invest in building community and how they really. I don't think video games are the problem I think maybe they're symptom in some cases but he seemed to be sort of threading these wines. They kind of skirted awfully close to some things that I've heard from. GOP candidate that left me wondering like what site is Yang on like what are his actual ideals. I'm not sure that I know yeah and I've noticed this is Elizabeth Breath. I've noticed on twitter that a lot of kind of former trump supporters who aren't jazzed about what's happening now like shocker. You know kids in cages. All sorts of horrible. You know things going on are now young supporters. I mean on the you know during the debates when I was asking a very real question wise he even on the stage a lot of these folks you know and they're aggressive kind of came at me and a good amount said they support trump so I just find that interesting. It's like exactly what has reference there's kind of Republican undercurrent there so we might be remiss if we didn't mention since we're talking right after the debate that Yang wants to give away a thousand dollars a month to ten families. I think for year and you know when I heard that I it was like okay seems a little hokey. Whatever I I I understand what you're doing but then I learned that he's going to do this with campaign funds which seems I don't know not legal to me. I kind of Dan well. That's not bribery. I mean I know the F. E. C. is like kind of not working right now but I don't understand how that in and of itself is not bribery I I don't I was very confused by it and honestly as a person who used to like a lot more than I do now. I was really turned off by it but in the debates dates like it may be a really turned me against it made me really angry that he kinda like did this cheap video game or not video game game show kind kind of thing where he's GonNa get ready to look at his website by bribing them with surprise that really gross me and and you know the his press secretary said this candidate will make an epic announcement of massive proportions. nother candidate has ever done and I'm like that's it related elitist. How this guy has a net worth three million dollars like what that's not. It's it's just it was yeah. It was again cringing for lack of a better word. IRA. Is there anything else. We need to say about this book. Are you more or less likely to vote for him. Now that you have read his book I mean it's pretty equal rights awesome account a three. I mean isn't the answer probably just like equally because none animus. We're GONNA vote for him. In the first place I yeah but like even more so I have a ah you know yeah yes all right so let's talk about something happier. We are going to change this book club because we are now out of you've presidential candidates that we who's books we want to read in clearly one past where we should have stopped to those and we we are going to switch the book club up a little bit. We're going to keep reading It's been fun reading and talking to you ladies so I'm excited to keep going but within that were far we're interested in reading so everybody should sort of stay tuned for that. We haven't quite figured out what the next book is but I think we're going to go to every four weeks instead of every three weeks. Most of the other books we'd be interested in a little bit longer in denser and we actually care about reading them so we will We'll get get back to everyone on what those books might look like. If you have recommendations for us we're obviously interested in intersectional feminism and environmentalism and you know all sorts of civil rights and all sorts of interesting topic so do you have suggestions for books. I let us know where on twitter at two broad stock run facebook to Bradstock in politics and everywhere you can find us everywhere all right it. Is there anything else that anyone would like to say before. We wrap up. Yes no maybe all right so thank you again to Sophie Chasm Elizabeth Sir for joining me today to talk about a book that none of us liked very much I want I want my you know three hours of my wife fat giving that hey at least mile thousand dollars a month at least now in the gang comes out you. You can be like look. I've read his book. I still don't like it. I'm positively positive that this isn't going to work for me. All right well thank you. Everyone and we'll see all cure in four weeks to talk about a book that we hope will be much much better. The normal people thank you. Thanks for listening to to broads. Talking politics takes our theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album elephant shaped trees by the band immunity and we're using it with permission of the band. Our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew with Lynn and was created for use this podcast.

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0186: Juanita Charles (2/28/2019)

Two Broads Talking Politics

17:05 min | 1 year ago

0186: Juanita Charles (2/28/2019)

"Hi. This is stormy Tennessee and your. Charles on onto bras, talking politics. Oh, you listen. Hey, everyone. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I'm on with my co-host. Sophie. Hey, sophie. Hey, Kelly and today, we're bringing you another episode with someone running for a special election. We're really excited about the special elections around the country. We are talking to Nita Charles who is running for state Senate in Tennessee in district twenty two Hiwa Nita. Hi, thank you so much for joining us. So maybe just to to start. We'd love to hear little bit about you and your background and why decided to run for the state Senate who again, my name is Juanita Charles. I'm running for Tennessee State Senate district twenty two that encompasses Montgomery County Stewart county and Houston county right now live in Montgomery County, Clarksville Tennessee, and I've been here since two thousand five I was in the army, and I got stationed at Fort Campbell. My husband was also acted through the army, and we facing camera in two thousand five when we left the army. We just decided to say in this. Area. We really liked the area. So I'm originally from Savannah, Georgia my husband's from Brooklyn, New York. And so we chose Clarksville Tennessee to be our home in the place that we raise our family. I have been real estate to two thousand nine an active full-timer Lissette agent since two thousand nine and a large part of what I do is what I plan to do when I take the Senate seat is really just talking to people here from people and figuring out what their needs are except you know, with the state Senate. He I'll be able to actually do more about it. But you know, but that's a large part of just what I do. Anyways. Just getting out talking to people meeting with people. So yeah, my husband we've been married it'll be fourteen years in July and we have three daughters debates Yana in various, and they are ten twelve and five months five-month-old. That's brave. That is definitely the word for it. Definitely the word for. So you know, I it can be a lot. But I will say like, my husband is amazing. So we don't have to do like childcare. My husband is also rose her. So our schedules are kind of flexible will we do we just kinda pass the baby back and forth, depending on who's got what kind of works out like that. So. Yeah. So sometimes we take the babies to meet, you know, take the baby to meet new clients, or whatever it may be most people under families who don't have issue with it. So. Yeah. So it works out pretty well. Excellent. So you told us a little bit about the area of Tennessee. Were you are, you know, in terms of what what towns and counties are there can you took a little bit about what this district is like, though, what are what are the kinds of jobs that people do there? What are the things that they're concerned about so Alvin Clark with industry? Twenty two in Montgomery County, and fell Montgomery County is very divert. We are very close to Fort Campbell army base, which is right on the other side of the line. We live right, basically on the Kentucky, Tennessee mine right there. But we have a lot of factories. We have some a couple of different industries. But a lot of the work that people do is like factories. We have awesome piece that university right here in town, which is awesome college that you know. Of course, they got a lot of great graduates that going to do a maze ING things and. That they in the community. So Stewart in Houston county are more roles, and we have I think Aaron might be the biggest city in Houston county, and Dan Dixon is probably the biggest city and the most up and coming city in Stewart county overall still pretty rural. But I think the next biggest city Clarksville might be Dixon. If we're looking at, you know, all of district twenty two so we have we have amazing school systems. We have you know, again, we have a very diverse population. Which is a part of the reason why we decided to say here, but you know, we're growing metropolitan area when it offensive growing cities as far as one of the fast growing cities in Tennessee. And probably I think the top ten in the country from not mistaken, according to something that came out from New York Times at the beginning of the middle of last year. Actually, you had mentioned that your veteran believe the army, and like, I would suppose that that would give you kind of like an insight into veterans issues. I wanted you to I was wondering if you could like talk a little bit about, you know, the importance of your service and how that like. You know, maybe shapes the things you plan to do an office and sort of what you'd like to see Tennessee do for veteran. Yes. So yes, I'm arming veteran. My husband's also army veteran. I think when we talk about this tendency in what they do for veterans. They definitely make an effort, but I would like to see just a little more, and I would like to focus in the right areas. So I think there's a couple of misconceptions about veteran, and and what we have available to whom release on Thurbers duty. So I did not retire from the military and a lot of us when we leave the military. We you know, we didn't do twenty years. So we didn't get the full retirement. And so what happens is a lot of people believe that what you leave the army or you get all of these benefits. You know, you have free healthcare. You have this you have that. And that's actually not true. So I think one of my main party once I get into office will be healthcare. So Tennessee is one of the unhealthiest states, and we have over four hundred fifty thousand people who have no access to quality healthcare. And so that would be if we could expand, Medicaid, which is which is the most common sense. Log away for to get access for those four hundred fifty thousand people that don't have it. Once we do that. That will have a tremendous affect on the veteran population because a lot of people don't realize that most of veteran we actually get a healthcare through Medicaid, not far before our family is you tend to be if you go on to the category of a disabled veteran, then you can get healthcare from the from veteran affairs from VA, but your family's eligible for that here. What happened is a lot of people if they themselves get health care from the VA, then their family will still be covered by Medicaid. And so we've fan that if we fan, Medicaid in and take the gover- the federal government up on their offer, you know, to pay ninety percent of the call, then we will be able to help not only, you know, the general population, but we'll be able to help veterans and their families as far as obtaining health care that. So right now, one of the biggest issues that we have is we have twenty two for prime military per day Kment who thought so that and maybe you seen that. But they, you know. Twenty two per day. So that is definitely a mental health issue. That's not being addressed among veterans. And I think if we're able to fan, Medicaid and get that care that we need that would include mental health care as well. And I think we'll be able to hopefully, curb the the rate of suicide among the veteran population. So in Tennessee in the state Senate, it's an extreme super majority Republican right now in this district two was previously represented by a Republican. He went on to become a US congressman. So what is sort of your your strategy your roadmap for winning in this district winning district that has previously been held by Republican and flipping it to be a democratic seat? What the good thing about that it card to that Republican holding a democrat held it it. Yeah. His his name is Tim Barnes. We've actually we've actually taught a couple times, and he's just been encouraging me along the way. So right now, my strategy is realistically just. Get my people up writing that we wanna hold on the people who think like me who believe in gone with commonsense answers. And and and making sure that we take care of everybody, and I kind of want to reach out to those people let them know number one, the desert special special election, even happening, and then energize them and motivate them to get out to the polls. So that's the really the the crux of it. Because in our area, we are about sixty is like sixty to sixty five percent Republican versus thirty five percent, more or less democrat. And so special election are notorious for low voter turnout, so the so the best thing that I could do is just get my people out because it and just my people it makes focus on them. Because if everybody came out the boat, the numbers would not work in favor. So that's just kinda kind of what we're doing. I wanna let people know exactly who I am a hundred percent what I'm about because I'm open book. And I'm very transparent, I'm very, you know, so and I think because of that, and because I have a lot of friends in the real estate industry, maybe they are Republicans usually, but they know me, and they know what I'm about it, you know, and I kind of politics from everybody. So I've, you know, I've got a lot of those people who are who are planning to support me or have told me that they support me anyway, because they know the type person I am who I am. But outside of, you know, those people that I know personally is I'm not gonna make a plan of it to go around and try to flip Republicans and try to change, you know, people who are maybe extreme-right or where wherever they may fall, try to change their their mind. What I wanna do focus on people who are who already believe in. What what I'm saying who are believing fan for and it just gets them out to the polls looks like you might have a little bit of an advantage in that. You are the only democrat running in their still four Republicans who are vying for the Republican primary so you can sort of be on the ground getting people ready. For for the general special election. Yeah. Because it it. It's so quick. We are actually in early voting for the primary right now. No, the primary lectu will be marked seven, and then our general election will be April twenty third. So it's really really really fast the Republicans thing. Yeah. There for four them. And then we have to independence, and I'm only democrat. So yeah. So I definitely have the advantage as far as going into the to the primary portion. Yeah. It's just a, you know, it's one of those things it's like, I'm just I'm out everyday. Like, I would I would say probably literally everyday have wanted to vent at least I think Saturday at three or four minutes. But you know, I'm out anywhere that the people are in trying to talk to people, and you know, and just let them know who I am. And and hopefully, they're on board. We we're doing meet and greet. You know, just being out wherever the people are trying to trying to connect and trying to as many people as possible for our listeners who care about getting more women as. Representatives than I hope that one hundred percent of our listeners do care about that Tennessee is really really bad in terms of female representation at something. Like fifteen percent of the representatives are women seems extremely problematic. That sounds very accurate. So for listeners who both care about flipping seats back to mcadoo and care about getting more women representatives. What are some of the ways that people from around the country can be helping out with your race? We are doing phone in tech banks so phone banks. It used to be that you have to do in person. But now you don't have to do that anymore. So you can actually to my what fight at a Charles four Senate dot com. Flag, volunteer or you can go to the website. You'll be the bottom tier thing. And you can find up Emma, volunteer organizer when we have phone bakes and things you can see the information you can actually phone Bank from your house. So with that is you're basically calling democrat or whoever strong democrat and just basically let them know about the special election and encourage them to come out in both anything with the tech banks, and then money, you know, just to be Frank money. So I am a I'm not a politician as my first time ever run for office. And I was not even a hundred percent prepared for the. Run. And so we need as much help as weaking it. So any contribution would be? I mean, more than appreciated somebody sent me three dollars the other, Dan almost cry because I figure that's probably probably all they could give and they thought enough about needs to give it's me. And I was just it was I'm just grateful. So it on my website Charles for Senate that palm there the donate. The you can click that and you can give you know contribute to the to the campaign as well. But really just the Bredon. The message farm wide any information that we have the we're on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram so any that you see me on social media. It's Trump for Senate in on Twitter is talk for Senate with the number four because it wouldn't let me make it wrong. Characters, but any information that you save you wanna share it breaded, you know, let your friends and family know, and just no, you know, for the yes, I will be representing district twenty two. But no, whatever bills laws that I bring this half. We'll we'll cover the entire state Senate be I just wanna stand up into his right for the NBA, the voice of the people for for Tennessee. So I'm sure you're five-month-old has no idea what's going on. But how do your older daughter's feeling about you running for office? They seem to be pretty excited and they're. I think it was more exciting it first because of the oh, you get to do this thing. But now, okay, you're never hear what? Get be a lot. But you know, and it is vice, but you know, we all just kind of keep in mind that it's it's for the greater good. And you know, it's not always about us. And and you know, when we work we get elected kinda get a little, you know, get a little breather and then found to get to work, but my daughters are I mean, extremely proud, which is awesome. And one thing that I have a lot of people. You know, the truth matters representation matter, so rather, you are a minority rather your woman, rather, you're young person. Just seeing somebody do something that maybe you didn't think we're possible for you is enough to just kinda let you know that you shouldn't limit yourself up. So I'm just kinda I'm just excited. I've even come across a couple, no college students retaliated would, you know, they're just like, you would fire us, and I'm like, I'm so grateful with full humbled by you know, all of this stuff that I hear 'cause I'm just a regular. You know, I'm I mean, I'm a I'm a mom got a small business wife. You know, we just I'm just a member of the community kind of stepping out and doing what I thought was right and far. As you know, sometimes you you think that needs to be done. You don't have to wait for somebody else to do it. You just stuff up and do it. That's what my girls all the time. And so that's what I'm planning to you know. Well, that's what I'm doing. Now as far as just leading, by example. And just letting them know if there is something that you wanna do you don't have to wait for somebody. You you can do it just do it. It's there anything else that you want our listeners to know that we haven't covered. So the election of April twenty third with early voting from April third to April eighteen you know, it is it is for state Senate district twenty two covering Montgomery Stewart in Houston county. I'm I think one of the most significant thing about this races. You know, while we have a lot of people running. I will say that. I am not just in the community with the community. If that makes it I've lived here since two thousand five and my kids have gone to public school here. I was a soldier here in this community win I left the army. You know, I made that difficult transition from military to the villian life, and I was. Actually, you know, military wife at the time. And then, you know, my husband got out we were completely civilian household. And we had what we struggled. You know, we we we work in without enough pay sometimes without hope insurance, or whatever it may have been because we're just regular people like everybody else. You know, we started started real estate business in two thousand nine and it was kind of like a little bit of a struggle getting it off the ground, you know, but we we've done well. And I say, you know, even during that time, we were you know, we went to college my husband, and I both went back to college. And we got our degrees. You know? And and I have to say we've seen different aspects of life living here in district twenty two you know, we've struggled we've been soldiers we done. Well, we've all of that. And I think all of the roles that I have played during that hun has helped me have a better perspective of what life is like in district twenty two for different people. Not just the people that I hang out with not just for people. When I when I go here there for everybody, you know, so whether they are, you know, high income earners or they are of a lower. Socio economic class. Like, I'm here to represent everybody because I've been there I've been there. I've seen it done that. And I just wanna make sure that everybody here has a better opportunity to just live their best life. I wanna make sure that everybody has the opportunity to have the best quality life. I love it. We'll put your information up on our website night. Hope people will help out your campaign, these special elections or so so important in it's really important that we help get the word out and make sure Democrats turn out to vote. Thank you so much. Thanks for listening to to broads talking politics. Are theme song is called. Are. You listening off of the album elephants shaped trees by the band, immune ary, and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork. Is by Matthew Westlund and was created for use by this podcast?

Senate Tennessee army Tennessee Houston county Medicaid Dan Dixon Nita Charles Montgomery Stewart Sophie Montgomery County Stewart coun Kelly Montgomery County Savannah Montgomery County New York Times Hiwa Nita Fort Campbell army base Alvin Clark Brooklyn
Vote Her In: Part 2

Two Broads Talking Politics

18:50 min | 1 year ago

Vote Her In: Part 2

"Hello everyone. This is Rebecca five guest with sofi and Kelly on the voter in segment of two bras and welcome to this show where really excited about doing this. We're hoping that you'll find it interesting valuable, and inspirational and most important we're looking forward to sharing what we know and working together to make this dream of voting in our next woman. President come true. So let your friends snow welcome. And let's get going. Thanks. Are you listen? Hello everyone. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I'm here with my co host, Sophie. Hey, sophie. Hey, Kelly, and we are joined today by our regular recurring guest, Rebecca Saive. Hello, rebecca. Hi, good morning. This is the second episode in what is going to be an ongoing series called vote her in and the the context we're talking about in this episode is kind of how do we get to the next big systemic breakthrough? So how do we get to electing a woman president where where we come from? There's a long history here, sir. We're gonna talk through that today. But we're gonna take step back. Just for a moment to sort of recognize what happened in Chicago yesterday. So we are recording this on Wednesday, February twenty seven yesterday was the Chicago may oral election, and we had a really historic. Orrick election here, we had fourteen people on the ballot to be the mayor of Chicago. And we're going to run off on April second in that runoff will be not just to women, but to African American women, and this is really a just tremendous moment for Chicago. Rebecca, do you wanna talk a little bit about that? You've been in Chicago and Chicago politics for a long time. I just like to say and one of my friends said this to me this morning, you know, sometimes dreams do come through. Right. And which she was pointing to is what you've just said is the victory by not one. But two women two women of color, one of whom is going to run the third largest city in the country. And you know, there are many things that are important about it. But one is that, you know, being the mayor of a city regardless of size, but certainly of a city the size of Chicago is all about the wise use of executive political power, right? Which is exactly what. We're examining in this series. Until one of the interesting questions. I think we'll be able to look at going forward as we watched the primary campaign. And so on is are there lessons to be taken from what happens in this mayoral election for what may be pertinent for the women running for president? So I think that's a big piece of this. I would just say one thing on a personal note that had you said to me when I started out in Chicago politics that this could be the case it really is. It means more than I can even express clearly, and I think that you know, while Tony and Lori may disagree on important things. They are in unity with the rest of us about how important this is. And how careful we should be in has smart. We should be about, you know, women who care. So it's just a very exciting time. And I think we're gonna learn a lot that we can then apply to this other movement of the interested. To see statistics from this year about mayoral elections. We also have the possibility of having our first female mayor of of Madison, Wisconsin, we had our primary election a couple of weeks ago, and rather unexpectedly it came down to the current incumbent there and a local female activist. And I don't think whole lot of people expected her to make the top two. And so she hasn't. So we might actually have a female mayor, and I've heard a lot of other stories about women this year making their runoff for mayor. And so I'm wondering if maybe we can see this as a continuation of the quote unquote year of the woman in twenty eighteen sort of continuing on to the executive level, at least on IMO politics. Yeah. I think you're right. It's sort of to be seen. I think that the, you know, the data so far, and we'll see how it rolls out in this year as you say is that women are less of around twenty percent. Of the mayors of cities over thirty thousand in population. And at the moment only, there's only one woman mayor of the ten largest cities. So I think you're right. We're going to see a lot of progresses here. And we also have a long way to go to to reach parody. Which is you know, exactly what we're looking at with the presidential. Right. Even if we elect a woman next year, we'll still have a long way to go and lots of poverty unity for other women to run for office to. I think to appoint that Sophie makes often it's worth noting that of the top six finishers of the fourteen people who ran of four of the top six inch icago where women women of color, and fact, and only one of the top six was a white, man. So Chicago, of course, does not equal the whole country. But this idea that white men are somehow more electable is I think being just turned on its head. It's absolutely true. And you know, when I was looking at the history of the woman, the women have run for president as you both know, I know, but our listeners will hopefully wear more about Victoria Woodhall who ran for the first time in eighteen seventy two the first woman to run for president her vice presidential candidate with Frederick Douglass, the abolitionist. So there's a great history of collaboration of women and people of color on this issue and on running for office when they really. Really have something important to say whether or not at least in that circumstance, they had a reasonable expectation winning, which of course, they didn't. But would hall and Douglas stepped out and then with holes stepdad again a couple more times. So it's you know, I think all of the women who ran for mayor had a, you know, felt that they have an opportunity to make. But even if their heart of hearts, they knew it was going to be tough on you know, they had something they wanted to say. And I think that's a really important piece of this history that the women who've had the courage to put themselves out there have been clear about a message and platform. Let's talk a little bit about Victoria would hole in. You know, why why did she run in? What was the the message in the impact of her running for office? So very long ago. Yeah. Yeah. I it's really interesting because when I first heard about her. When I was studying all of this in graduate school. She was known as a quote free. Love advocate, and she's very interesting personal history that kind of fun to read about, but when she ran she ran as a suffrage it, of course, it was another fifty years until American women got the right to vote, and and she ran on the platform in for a party called the equal rights party. So I think that you know, there's a really important. Message. There about the continuity of women saying there ought to be equal rights. I'm going to advocate for them and put that out there. And I think that, you know, obviously, her willingness to run again, a couple more times showed that, you know, this was paramount in her mind, so she's really important both because she was the first person to do this. She was a sort of out of the box person. And because she began this now historical tradition of advocating for equal rights. And you know, I would say just as a little footnote here not so little that not every suffrage is at the time was keen on with whole pantley, Susan VM Anne and Elizabeth Katie Stanton. We're not. But I think that also goes to the fact that the kind of women who have the courage to run for president or just that they can take it. Right. And they'll just keep on moving. Tend unevenly think that she ran when women couldn't even vote. So so she couldn't even count on. You know, the roads of women who wanted to see themselves, you know, represented at the federal level. That's kind of amazing to me. Yeah. I think it it. It was amazing to me too. When I realize, you know, it's a half a century until suffrage, but it's the power of these women and the their willingness to to step out as I said, and you know, the the woman who ran next was Belva Lockwood, and she ran in I eighteen eighty four for the first time or eighty two and she's a similar kind of courageous woman, very different personal history. You know, kind of a mainstream sort of person a lawyer, she was the first woman to argue a case before the supreme court, but she to stepped out at a time when women couldn't vote when property rights were problematic for women, and one of the really interesting things I learned when I was looking a little more closely yet at her bag. He was that after she ran for the presidency she and poor too. But she became a particularly strong. Advocate of Paek with the equal economic opportunity. Which is you know, when you think about it astounding because it really wasn't until you know, almost one hundred years later in the nineteen seventies that various professions, including the law really opened up to women. And I knew we had a lot of parents of young kids who listen to podcast. I just wanna point out that there's a great kids book about pivot luck. Would it's called lady has the floor in its written by a Kate Hannigan who is an author who's local to me. But it's a it's a really beautiful book and my kids really enjoy it. And you know, so do I. You know, when I I'm glad you mentioned that because when I was doing research actually for the resources section of my book voter in. I had so much fun. Looking at all these children's books. I mean, everyone from Belva Lockwood to you know, Dolores where to disown you. So to my or I mean, there are now all these wonderful books that you know, parents can share with their children, and you know, where these stories are told. So it's a sort of another wonderful thing that's happened recently. And I kinda think all part of what we're trying to do here, which is educate ourselves about what's really possible when you know, how we can support other women. So I would tell you that also when I was doing this research, there's a sort of if you look at the period of the periods of women running for president. There's really two one this first one when Woodhall ran in Lockwood ran and the third woman who ran before the nineteen sixties. A woman named Gracie Allen who was actually a comedian. And what's interesting about her is that the idea of running for president because she's a comedian. She says that it was sort of a joke, and that she ran on something she called the surprise party. This was in nineteen forty running against FDR who won. But the thing that she apparently did was go around the country and actually talk about why she could be present. And why she wanted to be president. It doesn't seem as though her. So to speak platform was, you know, deep in the way that the Woodhall one was or the Belva Lockwood one was, but this is in the, you know, the era of depending how old you are your parents, your grandparents great, grandparents a woman was out there in pop culture talking about a woman president. So that that was pretty cool. That's neat. I think we see a lot of echoes of that today. Not necessarily running for president themselves. But a lot of Hollywood actors in pop stars who are using their voice using their platform to talk about politics. It's happening a lot really in the past two years. You know in saying, hey, you should vote for there were a lot of them saying should vote for Hillary Clinton. And I suspect we'll see a lot of that in twenty twenty as well people's reviews. Ing their touring around the country or their award show platforms to talk about that. And you're there forever. They right. I think that's probably one of the takeaways also from the would hole in particular is that she really used through celebrity this so-called free. Love advocate to you know, go to something that she cared a great deal about you know, which was equality. I also think it's interesting when you think about it that and it's different from today. And we'll we'll be talking more about it is that these women. Women. Alan was you know, it was the surprise party wasn't a real party. But the parties that would hole and Lockwood ran on were real parties. Equal rights party the national woman's party. And there's a history there of the fact that it's easier for someone who's a minority or woman to be able to run. For office in one of those parties, just because it's not the big party that needs the national support that the Democrats and the Republicans require and sort of easier to make the case and get out there and say, I'm willing to do this. So they're obviously different points of view among people about whether you know, these smaller parties are important or whether they interfere with the process. I don't know that I have a point of view on it. But I think it's good for us to know, you know, as people who care that when there's this opportunity with smaller political parties women have taken it. And that that as you and I Kelly discusses extended into modern times. Well, why do you think there was such a big gap between Bill the an Lockwood in Gracie Allen, I wanna I mean, I'm assuming maybe it was the wars, but women's suffrage is really heating up at the turn of the twentieth century so depressed, there weren't more women running between them. Yeah. I don't I don't know the answer to that. I think impart lies in the fact that there were these smaller parties where there was an option to be a candidate. It's also true that there was an enormous effort by women who cared about public policy and Civic Leadership during that time to build other kinds of organizations, you know, the league of women voters all kinds of organizations that came into existence and provided a platform and the other pieces what you mentioned, which is that the Pfeiffer suffrage was just so deep, and there were differences among the leaders that fight about how to proceed which of course, you know, took up some of the oxygen. So I don't know that it's entirely clear, but I guess I would say looking back, I guess with, you know, the advantage of hindsight, then I'm kinda glad that these women spent the time they did on, you know, fighting for sufferers. Because who knows how long it would have taken if they hadn't he sue. We're going to save sort of the the next section in history of for the next episode in Rebecca, can you talk a little bit about sort of why we've decided to break things up this way. When I was a history. I realized that when Margaret chase Smith who's the next woman who ran for president announced her candidacy in nineteen sixty four the country was really in a different place and president Kennedy had been elected and among other things he appointed a commission that looked at issues related to women's rights. And of course, she was followed very quickly thereafter by Shirley, choose home. So I think that you know, what we thought made sense was we would look at this really own history this pre suffrage history, and then we can take a look at in. Our next episode will what's been this trajectory since nineteen sixty four when women have run for the presidency or thought the presidential nominations with the major parties. So I think that's where we'll focus and that was kind of thinking h in. Of course, we will continue to be looking at the Chicago mayoral race. I'm sure we'll be talking about that unfazed book in Twitter. Wanna check that out? I just I'm so excited about this race. When I think there's a lot of other races one of mayoral races and things around the country that are going to be exciting. But you know, it's a it's a good moment to Chicago in. Yeah. I was going to say on that point. I if a good moment to be a woman anywhere in this country. Who cares going to the point that Sophie was making earlier, you know, about what happened in Madison so Anward and upward. Right. Absolutely. All right. We'll reducted. Thanks so much for joining us. Again, this episode, of course, will be airing for the first time at the start of women's history month. So we have good timing yet again, and we're excited to keep going forward with the story all a pleasure to be here with you. And I look forward to our conversation. The vote for in segment is a collaboration of two broads talking politics and author Rebecca side are same song. It's called are you listening off of the album elephants shaped trees by the band, immunity, and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork. Is by Matthew whiff land and was created for use by this podcast. You can contact to broads talking politics at g mail dot com or on Twitter or Facebook at two bronze talk you can find all of our episodes at two broads talking politics dot com or anywhere podcast or found.

President Chicago Belva Lockwood rebecca Sophie Kelly president Victoria Woodhall Twitter executive Gracie Allen Madison Rebecca Saive Wisconsin Rebecca side FDR Hillary Clinton Frederick Douglass Douglas Kate Hannigan
Amanda Barge

Two Broads Talking Politics

20:37 min | 1 year ago

Amanda Barge

"This is Lee from San Francisco, California. I'm you're listening to two broads talking politics. Are you listening? Hi, everyone. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I'm here with my co hosts Sophie, hey, Sophie. Hey, Kelly and today, we're joined by Amanda barge who is running for mayor of Bloomington, Indiana. Hi, amanda. Hi, I'm so happy to be here. Yeah. We're thrilled to have you here. We're excited to be talking about women running for executive offices. So maybe you could start by telling us just a little bit about your background. And while you're running for mayor. Sure. So I have spent most of my life my teenage to adult life in that kind of feminist causes. And probably when I was about nineteen sort of found passion in in volunteering for groups like Planned Parenthood. And I just had always been interested in politics, and I majored in gender studies and political science and ended up getting my masters in social work. And I spent about I've spent about twelve. Thirty years kind of working in that field in community mental health and just kind of all corners of this community. And so that sort of lends itself really well to government, and I got involved with a local group called the Democratic Women's caucus and got involved in in a lot of women's campaigns. And that was really inspiring to me, and sort of what I learned from that is hey, I can do this. You know, if I can help other women I can do this too. And it gave me kind of courage and confidence to run and I ran for county Commissioner, which is an executive position it's a collaborative roller three of us. And one thing that's kind of exciting about that is that we are the first all female board of commissioners in history of Indiana in the state of Indiana. Pretty citing. That's pretty exciting. So we are pretty excited about that. So sort of my social work background kind of lead need to wanting to serve my community and kind of more macro way. And that's how I ended up here. All right suit, tucked us, a little bit about Bloomington, Indiana. So I think when people think of Indiana, they think of this super Republican state, but I think Bloomington is not that so Larry what is Bloomington like, Indiana is yes, very conservative. And and sometimes we are sort of the pun in a joke. You know in our joke from the conservative side. But Bloomington is extremely progressive. It is a college town. So basically, you know, half of our population or college students, and we we are centered around around eighty five thousand people, and the the great thing here is that we we have actually been a democratic community since the seventies. So back in the nineteen seventies. There were a group of people that. China's a slate a group of Democrats, and they sort of completely switched our city council and since then we've been democratic. So so we are we're very blue here. And it's pretty exciting. And in fact, a lot of the debates end up being who's more progressive than the other one. So if there's candidates running against each other, and you're actually challenging an incumbent democrat who's mayor currently, I am I am. Yes. So what are some of the issues then that are driving your campaign, and and that make you want to then challenge an incumbent about a year ago? I was kind of out in the community and and working on different issues specifically really working hard on the opioid epidemic. And that's one of the issues that propelled me to run for office. With just the fact that we had we had an epidemic. We had people who were dying. And I didn't think there was enough of a coordinated effort to tackle that issue. And with my social work background. I knew I could just hit the ground running, and and and improved things. And so you know, that has been one of the focuses of kind of my role as Commissioner is bringing people together on that issue, and one of the issues that sort of struck me, I you know, I volunteered for the current mayor. I was supportive of him. And you know, what I was noticing out in the community is that people felt like kind of his vision wasn't there. A vision of what they wanted for this community. And I, you know, one of the things that sort of made me decide to actually do it was that the administration posted overdose death data on the city website. So you could find out where your neighbors had overdosed and died, and you know, I spoke up, and I just said this is an okay, and I don't think our current administration is really in touch with real people. And I'm happy to say that I've gotten a lot of. Port. We actually have only had one elected female mayor in two hundred years. So a lot of people a lot of young people are excited that I'm running and a lot of young women are particularly excited to see kind of different a different face or different voice out there. What do you see as your sort of path to victory? What are you focusing on going into the election? Yeah. So when I ran for Commissioner, I focused on being super grass roots? I ran against a former deputy mayor and a chancellor at a local coach and a also an another a former party chair a to two very well known males in our community. And you know, I I had a pass that was difficult, but I could phone grassroots and knocking on doors, and I focus on the issues that I was hearing people care about. So this time around I wanted to make sure I really understood city issues because I'm very familiar with county issues. I know what's going on. And so I did something that may or Pete Buddha. Judge who droughts running for president? He did when he ran for mayor. He this awesome thing called hundred cups of coffee. So he had one hundred cups of coffee with people. He didn't know. And so I did the same thing. And I have to say I'm a lifelong resident here, and it was amazing. I learned so much, and I really enjoyed it. And so I kind of wove that into. To my platform. And I think my victory is really the issues that people care about so transparency climate change is huge in this community. People really want to see people stepping up and making a difference there. And then, of course, kind of social issues homelessness poverty, addiction mental health. And so making sure that I have my finger on the pulse of issues and just knocking on every single door. Those are my kind of my two things that I'm focusing on C, you mentioned transparency in that something that's on your website as well. What are the kinds of things should like to do to increase the transparency? Yeah. One of the first things I wanna do is just come up with a transparency improvement plan, which sounds a little wonky. But what I really want to focus on is coming up with protocols for why we hire consultants. My opponent has hired an unprecedented amount of consultants without sort of explaining why. So it's it's a lot of money spent. Sometimes we hire one. Two three consultants, you know, after another and really want to sort of narrow down, you know, what are best practices for hiring consultants. I want to narrow down sort of water best practices on you know, if you're going to purchase a large vehicle, for example, that was an issue that was problematic for him. We purchased a large militarized vehicle with very little to no transparency if we're going to spend a certain amount of money than we ought to be including the public on these decisions. And so I really wanna come up with a plan when identify gaps, and I wanna fix those gaps immediately, and I'm really used to being transparent because our county government, we do everything in public. And so it'll be a natural process. I think for me to be able to do that. I think when we think about how the policy is sort of sh needs to be shaped by community. It's not hey, I came up with this idea. And I wanna push it and make it happen. It's too. Me. It's the opposite. It's I see the needs. Let's figure out how we can meet those needs fill those gaps. And let's do that with folks at the table. What does the city government look like in Bloomington? So what we know you're talking about these things that the the mayor has done in terms of hiring consultants and buying vehicles. What's the relationship? Is there city council? What's the relationship between the mayor and the city council, how does that work? And how would you see your role as sort of the the chief executive for the city? So yet absolutely be administration. The city administration is the our mayor, and then our deputy mayor, and we have several departments in it's crucial that they work closely with the city council because they are the legislative body. And you know, that is a major issue right now is that the city council, and the mayor aren't getting along very well. And there the communication is difficult. And that's where you know. I've brought my social work experience. That's we're being a therapist is actually really helpful. So I've done this in county government as executive I I consider these kinds of relationships to be a team, and we work together collaboratively, and that is something that really needs some improvement because often policies or projects get stopped simply because of lack of communication or lack of coordination lack of that feeling of like everybody having buy in. And so, you know, right now, we are at a point where our city council or legislative body and our administration aren't communicating as well as they could be. And so I would so look forward to to kind of bringing people together and be more of a team. And that's just kind of thing. I really enjoy is just like I I actually enjoy sitting down with people who perspectives or completely the opposite of mine and figuring out a way to sort of. Thread, those threat those folks together and bring people together around a common issue. You're a mom of two kids. I think they're fourteen and twelve yet. What is it like running for office with your children? What do they feel about the campaign? Are they enjoying it? Wow. I I laughed because we Iran before my kids were like, yeah, it's going to be so fun because there was like food events and stuff, but I would say about a year ago when I started really thinking about this. We had a lot of family meetings. And it was like, you know, my husband, and I sit down and just like, hey, we're thinking about it. What do you think? And they were both excited about it. And we're like but remember at first, but it's not like the end when everyone's really busy. But I have to say that, you know, I'm running partly because of my kids, and I really do want to leave this community better than I found it. And you know, so I think they've benefited so much from being at meetings with me, I take them as many places as I can obviously they have to have, you know, a normal life and hang out with their friends. And and and do the things they want to do. But I do try to bring them to things and sometimes they're really bored. And sometimes we'll even though actually be like why did that happen? And the other day my daughter were granted. A school. And she's like why is this road taking so long to get fixed? And I thought, you know, we're really it's it's good for them to see their mom kind of out there and in the community. And you know, it's I know that this is a positive for them. But yeah, it is hard. And gosh, I tell you what I I've been asking my friends. I'm like, I think I need a meal train like we need help, you know, from the basic like Palese, and you know, it's it's okay to ask for help. Because I can't do it. All right. And we're doing we're definitely a team, but it is difficult for sure and they're going to be happy when it's over. You'll be happy e mentioned earlier, the climate change is a big deal in the community, which makes a lot of sense with a big college. There. What are some of the things that you think you could do with the city level to improve renewable energy and in meet goals? You know, we think a lot about sort of what is the country doing? But I know there's a lot that can be done at the local level as well. Absolutely. Yeah. One of the things that kind of sticks with me when I'm talking about climate change is the practicality of it and just being a social worker and having worked with people marginalized populations for so long. But I think about okay, solar panels are awesome. And they should be on every thing in house, they're expensive. And so I wanna really look at creative alternatives. Like, you know, solar co-ops and helping each other. There are programs for folks that are lower income low to middle income being able to get solar panels. You know, I want to do things like get solar panels on every single school in our school district. And I think that's something that we can do like we can work together on that one of the things that I was initially involved with when my kids were Littler is I worked with I worked with a friend who's really involved in the PTO and she got recycling in our schools, and we weren't recycling. I mean, which is to me in this mazing. But now the kids are really into recycling. We did it at our school. And now they're kind of it's at every school, and it was that kind of those kind of like partnerships. So we partnered with our local solid waste district. And every every kid now recycled and they want to they have by it. And so I just I love partnerships. We really have to focus on not just people who are ready understand or get it. But like people who like moms who are just trying to get their kids to school and get their dinner on the table. And you know, how can we implement climate change activity? How can we mitigate climate change for folks that, you know, quite frankly, that's not their first concern on that's not their major concern. So really interested in that. I'm really interested in working on some this is a little more detail oriented, but on my I am on the solid waste district. And I think bringing jobs to our community bringing green jobs to our communities, really important, and we're working on. We're talking about a compost business a county wide, compass business. We're also talking about bringing in business where people are recycling televisions repairing them. So to be reused. So I'm really all about kind of community economic development. So how can we improve an issue and also improve our economy at the same time. So is sincere challenging incumbent you're running in the primaries. The win is the primary election. It is may seventh and and I will say in this community being as progressive as it is that is generally the election, right? No, I live in Chicago. I got it. You definitely do that. Yeah. So may seven that's coming right up, and we have early voting. And so that starts from my we're like right around the corner. And so if listeners would like to help out whether their local or maybe a little bit further away, what are some of the ways that they can do that. Absolutely. So we we have a website barge trip, Bloomington dot com. We're really looking for people that want to make some calls knock on doors and obviously donating. We definitely that is an area where I differ from my opponent. You know, he has over one hundred thousand dollars in the Bank kind of an unprecedented amount for our community. And it's raised a lot of funds outside of our community. So we're working real hard to raise raise funds within our community. So any any amount helps for sure, but we have a we have a really really good group. I consider this to be more of a movement than I do just, you know, a boring campaign. I consider this to. Be a growing movement. And I think it's important that we offer choice, you know, 'cause we get to do that every four years. And that's a good thing. It's not something to be uncomfortable about and I think we we are getting more and more comfortable with challenging incumbent s-. And that's kind of the the gift that we got from twenty sixteen of things so many people running. It's if there's any gift, there's not very many, right? But is there any gifts? It's wondering is that we we a lot where people are getting involved in and challenging the status quo. So Amanda, stop anything else that you wanted to make sure we talk about I just want to say, I one thing. I love about your podcast is you're encouraging women to run, and I'm really involved locally in in helping women run. It's a big part of my life. And I mentor a lot of women, and I just wanna say to those who are listening that if you're thinking about getting involved do it. And and you know, there are support networks out there. And definitely I think women get involved. When there's an issue they're concerned about whether it's potholes or your kid's school, or whatever it is. But you know, definitely don't be afraid to get involved. And I think moms can do it. And you know, we need more moms getting involved because we want better representation in our government. Right. We want people all backgrounds. We don't just want retired. Folks. We don't just want a certain segment of the population. I think it's so important that women women's step up in in any way that they can in any way that they're comfortable and maybe even not comfortable, right? Challenging yourself a little bit. Yeah. And I think when thing we're exploring in our every other week series vote her in where we're talking about electing a woman president is how important it is to have women in executive roles were seeing so many women enter the legislature, which is great but having executive roles at county level city level at state level is going to be increasingly important as we want to start thinking about having women as. President right. And I I actually developed a course when I was in college. It was women in politics. And I think back how long ago that was and I remember that was like my dream, right? We'll have a female president, and that was the nineties and so the late nineties, and so here, we are, you know, still hoping to break that final glass ceiling, and and I I know as an executive that we have a lot of women in who are in leadership roles and executive roles in our community. And I have to say, you know, that's really nice. But when we look at you know, like we we're doing a project right now that involved with business community, and that's all older men. Right. So there's still a lot of feelings to be broken through. And I think women still get challenged and questioned as to whether or not they're capable. And oftentimes it'll be well, you don't have the experience right or you don't have the right skill set. And and that's just not true. And so I think it's great that you're exploring that because. I think women are amazing executives women are tend to be super collaborative and creative and passionate. And you know, we're great leaders. All right. Well, we will put at links to your website your information up on our website. If people want to check it out and help out with the campaign and Amanda, thanks so much for running for challenging I think that's always important as you mentioned to offer choices and thanks for taking the time to talk to us. Thank you so much. It's been a pleasure. Thank you. Thanks for listening to to broads talking politics. Are theme song is called. Are. You listening off of the album elephants shaped trees by the band, immune Newry, and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork. Is by Matthew Wesleyan and was created for use by this podcast?

executive Indiana Bloomington amanda Commissioner president Democratic Women Kelly San Francisco Sophie Bloomington California China Lee chief executive Pete Buddha chancellor Newry
Vote Her In, Part 3

Two Broads Talking Politics

23:21 min | 1 year ago

Vote Her In, Part 3

"Hello everyone. This is Rebecca Saive against with sofi and Kelly on the voter in segment of two bras and welcome to this show where really excited about doing this. We're hoping that you'll find it. Interesting invaluable, and inspirational and most important we're looking forward to sharing what we know and working together to make this dream of voting in our next woman. President come true. So let your friends snow welcome. And let's get going. Thanks. Are you listening? Heavy one. This is Kelly with two brads talking politics were here for our third installment of the vote her in segment of the podcast. Joining me today is my coho. Sophie. Hey, sophie. Hey, Kelly and our partner on this project, Rebecca sigh of high Rebecca hi glad to be here. Yes. Real heavy use. So we're at the third installment here. So last time around if you haven't listened yet we talked about the early history of women running for president in the US. And now we're going to talk about sort of the the next section of time. So post Gracie Allen, pre Hillary Clinton. And I think we're we're talking about this in general because we think it's really important information. But it's very fitting, of course, that we're doing this during women's history month. So the the next big installment will be Hillary Clinton, and we'll talk about that in some detail. So we'll we'll end right before that for this one. So let's talk. Then let's sort of start in on on what we're talking about here. Last time we talked about as really early people who ran and one of the points. We made was that they were running, and it's sort of independent or third party kind of races. And so now, we're looking at people who actually were running for major party nominations whit. What do we think is sort of the the important thing to think about in that? Yeah, that's the big difference kind of mid century of the twentieth century. Although it is important to note that a number of women throughout of the twentieth century did seek nominations for smaller parties where you know. There was probably little expectation of even getting on the ballot, but they did set forth and express a point of view. And I think it's important for us to acknowledge that group of women to but you're right starting in. Nineteen sixty four actually with Margaret chase. Smith women have run in the major party primaries or sought the nomination or been placed in nomination. And I think a lot of us know about surely Chisholm in nineteen seventy two, and I guess we'll talk about her in a minute. But the first person was Margaret chase Smith, a Republican from Maine, and her story was initially kind of kin to, you know, a lot of women's experience in elected office, which is that you know, they took a seat that their husband and held or something like that. And in her case that was the truth of the case for her. But what also happened was she then started to run herself. And she is the first woman who in her own right served in both the congress and the Senate in the United States successfully for you know, several decades and after. Asking the party to consider her as the Republican nominee. They rejected her and she ran anyway. So she's really a an amazing figure both for her courage electorally and also as we were talking about a minute ago for her courage on some issues that resonate today. So I was really glad when I was writing voter in and looking at all this, you know, to sort of study up on her because I didn't know everything about this. And it was just incredible may favorite thing about her. I think when she announced that she was running for president. She said I have few allusions and no money, but I'm staying for the finish. When people keep telling you, you can't do thing you kind of like to try. Yes. You are my kind of she was a Republican. But she's my kind of woman. Right, right. I thought it was interesting from Maine. I feel like Maine has type right has a bent towards moderate, Republican female senators. I mean, you know, they have Olympia Snowe. They have Susan Collins who is not as moderate or she likes to believe, but still somewhat more within the Republican party. I think it's interesting that maintenace sort of the home of the moderate, Republican female Senator. Yeah. You know, I I grew up in a democratic family. And so, you know, Margaret chase Smith was sort of out there on the, you know, the periphery when we would sit at the dinner table and discuss things, but I do recall, my parents who were stalwart Democrats, you know, giving her proper, right? You know, because of what you're saying that she was moderate she stood up, you know, for certain important things in their minds. Most importantly stood up against a Joe McCarthy in the early fifties and all the kind of red baiting activity that he fostered. So when I was reading and writing for voter in I found this quote from what Smith called her declaration of conscience when she spoke out against McCarthy. And I thought it was so pertinent today, and what the candidates today think about and what they're speaking against because she said her basic principles of Americanism where the right to criticize the right to hold on popular beliefs the right to protest and the right of independent thought. And then she went on to say the exercise of these rights should not cost one single American citizen his reputation or right to a livelihood. And I mean here we are right fast-forward. This was said in nineteen fifty. Instill Margaret, she Smith was in sixty four. And so it had taken a long time to get from sort of the early run to to then. But then we actually not that much later had another woman running for president who a lot more people who listen to have probably heard of Shirley Chisholm. And this is particularly a amazing that that Shirley Chisholm ran not just, you know, only one of the first few women to run. But of course, the first African American woman to run for president all the way back in nineteen seventy two. This is the story that I think if you said a lot of see and hear about early throughout the year, but certainly during women's history my, but she just sort of embodies right that courage and believe in herself, and that, you know, figuring out a way where there's no way, and I actually was in college at the common. I remember here. Hearing about her. And then the other day, I just happened to be talking to a friend. And she said that she's them came to her college. This is in Minnesota, speaking of 'em states. And she spoke, and Linda said, it was unbelievable that she was so inspiring. And so I think that when I looked to with her is that model for but the other thing about her that's important. And I think relates to the current the candidates at least on the democratic side, if she was really smart about policy, and so for instance, when she was as a member of congress appointed to the egg committee. She sort of made some reference to the fact that there weren't a lot of trees in Brooklyn. Which is you know, where district was, but then sought out advice and was one of the people on that committee responsible for developing the food stamps program because it was in the purview of agriculture. So it was just this, brilliant example, right? Right. Not only of courage, but of policy making in we have an echo of what Margaret chase Smith said when she said, she was running Chisholm said she ran for office in spite of hopeless odds to demonstrate the sheer will in refusal to accept the status quo. I love it. I love these women. I'm going to get those quotes tattooed. I think. Another t shirt in your future, right? One thing. I will note about Shirley Chisholm to is as far as I can tell there is no kids book about her. So I were actually saying maybe we should write one because this is a huge oversight. I think in the children's publishing industry that's an interesting point Harper medicine. But there you are there could also be more than one. Right. She deserves at least one. Yes. Yes. Fisher, you know, one of the things I think thinking about, you know, looking at two, and then sort of what happened next was that? There was a set of women over the next couple of decades. And and unlike the women we were talking about a moment ago who were really engaged with these smaller parties, these are women who had significant political and governmental experience, and sort of the mainstream and the three there several of them. But Carol Moseley Braun, of course, from Illinois from Kelly's neighborhood, Michelle Bachmann in two thousand twelve and Pat Schroeder. Her in nineteen eighty eight. And then the last one I would mention his Patsy. Make who actually ran on. A piece flat form has a member of congress from Hawaii. Also in nineteen seventy-two when Chisholm was running and the thing that struck me about this. These women is as I said they were right there in the mainstream. They had something to say they were able to be heard right because they had that platform, and it leased for some of us, you know, coming of age, for instance, in the eighties and nineties, we we heard petro talk about equal pay for instance. And we heard Carol Moseley Braun talk about you know, what it was like to be the, you know, only African American woman it ever been elected to the US Senate, and these were sort of important guideposts, and I imagined for younger women who've read about them or heard about them from their moms or whatever that served them as well. We've been telling you about people running. President. But I wanted to talk a little bit about Geraldine Ferraro who was actually the nominee for vice president in nineteen eighty four. And the reason I wanna talk about her is because even though I was born a few months after the nineteen eighty four election. So I wasn't even alive when she ran. But she loomed really large in my childhood growing up as a little girl who grew up wanting to be involved in government and being interested in politics. She sort of was talked about a lot to me both by sort of detractors as look at what happened to Geraldine Ferraro and also sort of as almost like a token, sometimes like, you know, oh, well, you shouldn't complain about things because Geraldine Ferraro got to run for president. But when I was looking, you know, it was researcher her a little bit more for the podcast another thing that I think is about her is that her run a lot of the things that have. To her around her during her run sort of pre-stage, what would happen later to Hillary Clinton. So I'm wondering if we could talk a little bit about her campaign. And I know Rebecca you had mentioned you were involved in that as well. Yeah. You know, I think. We're having that time was there appeared to be an opening for perhaps promoting a woman, and there's a there's a group of women in Washington colleagues of mine and who were people involved in a row and the national women's political caucus. Oh, really kind of just looked at the women who are in congress at that time and said, let's try to make something happen. And they did there's wonderful story about this. As I recall in time magazine, which kind of just told how this will happen. And so then, you know, Walter Mondale did choose, Jerry. And when we got to the democratic convention, some more of us, myself, included, we're sort of helped out of it. And I actually remember the other day, I'm going to get it and send it to you. Maybe you can share it on Twitter. I have this wonderful caricature. That was done of Jerry, you know, with the thank you on the bottom that I have kept all these years. But the thing about her that my free. When they initially have this idea remarked was how feisty she was. And that goes to what you were saying so be earlier about the experiences. She had that we're so similar to what Hillary subsequently had. She was tall, you know. And she saw something she wanted to do. And she realized that were perhaps some downsides that would cause some negative breast. But you know, she went for it. I would also say one other thing that. Kinda like the Hillary story. She also Jerry was charming warm. Funny. A mom who loved her kids. You know, all those kinds of things that we you know to rarely see. So I I'm glad to hear that people talked about her with you. And that you knew about her because she was something else. Apparently, her campaign also led to the adoption of more people using the owner effect MS for which I am forever. Grateful. I guess I mean the story that I've read is the New York Times refuse to use it for her. But William Safire of all people was a convinced that it should be used because it wasn't appropriate to call her miss because she was married, but it wasn't appropriate to call her missus because she didn't use her husband's last name. And so two years later two years after she ran the New York Times finally agreed to use MS which is amazing. And the New York Times has now used misery for to me. So thank you Geraldine Ferraro. I just thought it was really interesting. How parallel her we'll talk about Hillary Clinton in the next episode as you mentioned, but for our heads sort of cooled unquote scandal during her run and looking back at it. It's looks pretty stupid. It was like, I don't even really understand it. Her husband had tax returns, and she didn't want to release them because he had a job, and it was all like sort of this made up scandal. But it turned out to be apparently. There was a study that said it turned out to be the most talked about issue in the eighty four campaign, and that sort of reminded me of the way that the Hillary Clinton, quote, unquote, Email scandal became this huge thing that people focused on so much twenty sixteen. And now we look back at it. And we're like why was that a deal, and you know, it's sort of kind of food sides to the coin on the one side. You don't want anything that sort of give people negative use of? If you could possibly help it. But on the other side, it's pretty unlikely that that's going to happen for anyone right though. The question is how do we as you know, concerned voters and concerned advocates? How do we make sure that these women candidates get equal treatment? Right. Even if it's in the context of review of stuff that might not be so hot, right? Not disproportionate treatment on you know, whatever their, you know, false may be or things they did that some people may not agree with and to me. That's the really large issue here as you point out. You know, the Email thing looks small by comparison to what's going on on the other hand, I would say that if something like that arises with one of the current women candidates, it'll get blown out of proportion to and it'll be up to us and say, no, let's take the measure of everyone equally. Speaking of scandal, ridden female, VP candidates. The last person we should talk about is Sarah Palin. You know, I think one of the things I think about with this. And of course, this is the one that probably most people listening are most familiar with is just how it it was a terrible choice. I think McCain made terrible choices advisers advised him terribly. But I do think it's interesting that even the Republican party of two thousand eight thought that electorally it was important to have a woman on the ticket and that that would help them. And I think that shows how far we've come despite her not being a very good example. Of a woman, and perhaps actually setting us back. You know, I think that it when you think about it between nineteen ninety two which was, you know, the so-called, you know, first year the woman right when women were elected to the Senate, and then sixteen years later there we are at Sarah Palin. You're right there is I mean. There were all these years to see these women and increasing numbers of them over that period being elected and seeing their ability to serve and and their ability to make policy, and so I don't know what was in John McCain's mind there his advisors minds, but it was clear that in that time period. You know, American women have had this chance to really demonstrate their fitness, you know, for office in their leadership in big federal offices. So perhaps that was you know, one of the factors. You know? I think also the case was that he knew he was up against someone who is a really compelling candidate. And you know, let's think out of the box here. Right. They certainly did. And they're Palin was actually initially a popular choice that happened, but she wasn't very well vetted. And so after a couple of weeks people figured out that she wasn't a good choice. But initially she was very popular on the Republican ticket. There's always the assumption. You know that can in kind of sort of. The can be said that well, you know, vice president one is vice-president really do. So if the decision is we need to do something different. We need to portray ourselves differently. You know, that's been a route that presidential campaigns going down. I guess the good news. Is that in that case it included, you know, a woman as it had in nineteen eighty four. And now it's like, no big deal. Right. So I mean, we heard Cory Booker V other day, right? When asked this question, he said, we'll of course, I would be looking at the women. I you know, where I the nominee. I mean, I don't think if we have a man who's the nominee for president this year the on the democratic ticket that they can not select women as VP let it be interesting to see. I was sort of thinking we're closing this phase of our discussion that we should just kinda take a moment to celebrate where we're at right? We're midstream and women's history month, and of course, every month to be women's history month, but you know, here we are right. And they're all kinds of up there doing all kinds of good things we've seen what, you know, women have built in terms of presidential campaigns. So mentally really glad we're going to conclude the month with Hillary because I think that a closer look at you know, what happened with her both in a way to end sixteen is going to give us a really good sort of framing, you know, for what we look at going forward. And as we look at you know, the candidate that are in front of us. I would just say one other thing related to it. Which is that when we in our last episode, we talked for a moment about the fact that two women to African American women had been selected to be the final cannon. Dates and the mayall runoff here in Chicago. And we're now two weeks closer to that. And we're really seeing them also sort of stand up and say what they think as well as tough it out. So I think that we're in a good place to just learn a lot about what it takes for women to lead, particularly as executives. I think it's important that when you have a lot of women running as opposed to just sort of the one token woman, the the you can judge them on the merits, right? So we in Chicago now have a chance to decide between two terrific African American women in decide which one we won and not worry about you know, image in my making the vote that's gonna make history. Either one of those votes is going to make history. That's exactly right. I'm so glad we said that. 'cause it's it's just a moment of wonderful. I hesitate to use the word triumph. But it really is a triumphant moment for all. Women. You know, have worked so hard for us to get to this place, irate. Well, Serena wrap up this as I mentioned, this is the third installment in we will continue to move forward. Next time talking about Hillary Hillary if you're listening, and you wanna come on the podcast. You have the forever. Open invitation, I will fly to New York state to interview. But for everyone else if you didn't check out the purse to installments, please do if you go to too broad, stocking politics dot com slash vote her in you can find all of our vote her in episodes, and we will continue talking about this. It's so important in we're all so very very excited right now about the state of politics for for women in this country. Thank you Kellyanne. Sophie, I I look forward to seeing you again in a couple of weeks. Yes. Thank you. Thank you the voter. In segment is a collaboration of two broads talking politics and author Rebecca side. Our theme song is called. Are. You listening off of the album elephants shaped trees by the band, immune ary, and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew whiff land, and it was created for use by this podcast. You can contact us it too broad talking politics at g mail dot com or on Twitter Facebook to broads talk. You can find all of our episodes at two broads talking politics dot com or anywhere podcast found.

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Daniella Gibbs Lger

Two Broads Talking Politics

28:11 min | 10 months ago

Daniella Gibbs Lger

"Hi this is Teddy. And you're listening to Danielle Gins ligget onto broad todd politics and hey everyone this is Kelly Kelly with too broad talking politics part of the dumb cast family of podcasts. And I am on as usual with my co-host Sophie as Sophie. Hey Kelly and we are excited today to be joined by Daniella Gibbs Jay who is the executive vice president of Communications and strategy at the Center for American progress. Yes Hi Danielle. Hi guys sell US super excited to be talking to you on this very slow news week. Nothing and happening at all happening at thought. Maybe we could start in with a little bit about you and your background and how how you got started in the work that you're doing sure So it's a really long story so I won't tell it because this is a shorter podcast We basically the everyone in my family. I have two older siblings. We all got really into politics from really we were born because my parents just believed in being involved in the political process and following the news. And we'd sit around the dinner table every night and talk about what had happened. And I'M GONNA date myself with this anecdote but like one of my earliest earliest. Political Memories is knowing at age five. That was really mad that Ronald Reagan Won The presidency so politics and sort of been in my blood would For for years and I'm just really fortunate. Get to do the work that I do. Excellent and so it for people who might not be quite as aware of Sweat Center for American progress does. Can you tell us a little bit about the work that you do sure so we are a think tank based in Washington DC. We we have two arms or to center for American progress and our advocacy arm the Center for American Progress Action Fund and basically we are. Were think tank. We develop policy progressive so policies to better the lives of all Americans and our action funds. We sort of put those policy ideas into action and we. We work a little bit more political critical on that side. We don't endorse candidates or anything like that but we do engage in the process and hold our elected leaders accountable for things that they say in. Do I work in communications. I have been lucky enough to do two stints at cap with a break for two and a half years in the Obama White House which was incredible And what I really love about about working here is that you know fundamentally at the end of the day we are a think. Tank Sodas about the policies and ideas but we also you understand that. Those ideas are great but they won't do anybody any good sitting on a shelf somewhere. So how are you going to move them into action. How are you going to move a policy the into a law? How are we going to change the conversation around something like healthcare? We have to invest in communications and outreach and that's something that I think we do exceptionally well and I'm I'm not just saying that because I run our communications team. It was acceptable for. I did it and We just try to carry on the excellence that this place was founded upon. And you get to Co host a podcast too. I do I do. I co- coastal podcast with my lovely colleague. Ed Chung called the tent and and it is as you think we talk about the Big Progressive Tent. Um some days it's a circus but I like to think mostly it's just a big tent We you know talk about what's happening. The News of the day have really interesting guests. Obviously the last couple of weeks. It's been all impeachment all the time so bill. This is probably a stupid question. But I've I've always wondered what. How does it think tank work? I understand that you create you. Oh you're researching and creating policy but like is it literally people sitting around thinking all day. What does it look like on the ground so like if it is? How do I join great? So so there. There's a lot of our people think we are very collaborative place so we have around nineteen different policy teams But we try to make sure that they aren't all working in silos because all of our policies are interconnected into each other so we have a team that works on combating poverty but obviously they work very closely with our economy team because a lot of the tools that you need to do that. Our economics space our tax policy based they work very closely with our race and ethnicity team because unfortunately disproportionate number of people of Color Fall into the category of people who are in poverty so You know they were closely with their education team because he know that if you get a good start a good foundation of your education that can help reduce your chances of becoming Or possibly living in poverty so all these things are interconnected So like I said we worked very collaboratively across our policy teams names but yes there are people who do sit may think about all right. I want to figure out how to create an immigration system that is based on the rule of law. That is that treats people humanely in other words is the exact opposite of what this administration is doing And so they work with their colleagues they work with people outside of of this building other experts and they created a rule of law framework that is based in progressive values about how we view immigration. How we understand understand that immigrants are very important part of the fabric of this country but we are also a nation of laws? So how you reconcile those two things so yeah so. There's is a lot of individual thinking and work that happens but there's a lot of collaboration within teams across teams. Then they work closely with the communications team. Our government affairs team that works with not just members on the hill but also with With mayors with governors with other state. Legislators slater's to push these ideas out to work with them to implement these ideas at the local level So that's how we operate We like I said we put a lot of resources into our outreach outreach. INTO COMMUNICATIONS OUR PODCAST Our video outrage booking are experts on TV. This is something that I think that can really got a head of in terms of what other things. Thanks to Years ago and now we see other think tank sort of catching up to us in investing in those outreach properties as well so that's how we operate that's how we look at being a think tank were also an action tank. I think you've even more Arkansas fee that this is a place for her job. Openings you can go to American progress dot org so We're on the recent heels of elections state legislative elections. That happened in earlier this month in twenty nineteen and and of course. We're all looking ahead to twenty twenty and the kinds of things that we might see going into twenty twenty s so. I wonder if you could talk a little bit about sort of what what we did. See In in twenty nineteen and what that might tell us you know you obviously work for a an organization that values progressive ideals There's no secret that Sophian I also get it quite a bit about those. But there's this sort of large conversation going on in the Democratic Party about into attack toward the center to get those people do we lean into to progressive ideals. Think it's a false dichotomy but you know what what did we see in twenty nineteen in what might that tell us about twenty twenty. I think what we saw in twenty nineteen gene was when you talked to all voters when you give voters something to vote for and not just vote against when you are clear in what so you believe in and what you will do people will go vote like people are angry right now. and Progressive Democrats especially a really angry about. What's happening but that doesn't mean that all you can be is anti-trumpers anti gop and it also doesn't mean that you should spend all of your time trying to reach out to voters I who are pretty much like entrenched in the you know trump camp you know the trump side of things? I think you have to speak to everybody but you have to focus. I think on those voters who are either persuadable or you know who would be with you if they had a reason to get Out and vote so when you look at what happened in Virginia also running good candidates house like what's the start like the baseline like there are there. There are brilliant people who if they had enough support. It doesn't have to be financial support. But they had support they would run for something and so finding those people and cultivating them giving them a support system. helps and you saw that in Virginia. Where over the last several cycles you've seen more more and more people running in fewer and fewer uncontested racists even in places where the Republican you know? The last time they won they won by ten fifteen twenty points but they were. You know a lot of times. They'd run unchallenged but they were being challenged every time. And that's how you build a movement and that's how you you build. The victory is that you make people fight for every single vote that they get even if it seems like. It's an uphill battle because sometimes you might surprise yourself. Actually you might windows battles. I was at an event with Stacey Abrams who I just love Adore. I think she is one of the most remarkable political talents counts. I've ever seen in my life and full disclosure. She also sits on our board of directors. And She just tells such a great story about how while while she didn't win in Georgia Georgia. I think there are a lot of reasons for that. Mostly voter suppression and Brian. Kemp being the crooked creek that he is but she won more votes than any the Democrat had ever won statewide and she did it not by modulating who she was or or changing her stump speech to you know reach out to one on Kupa voters. Here they're like. She stayed true to who she was. She had a message that resonated with everybody sure you can emphasize one piece of it here one piece of but there but there was a through line that ran through everything that she ever talked about. And I think that is a lesson that all democrats and progressives can learn learn. Is that if you feel like you have to change your message when you're talking to you know white rural voters verses as you know voters from you know an urban center then maybe need to rethink what it is that you're doing because she shows that it's possible that you don't have to do that I like that. You mentioned persuadable voters. I think that's something that we need to work on us. Progressive not necessarily seeding the way that Our issues discussed to Republican but rather persuading people of our actual policy ideas. Do you have any like sort of suggestions for the best last week to to do that. I think that we need to like break ourselves out of this. Binary like you know choice that you either just just motivate your base or or you reach out to like the thirty percent of hardcore trump supporters. You know who are. I'm sorry my bidding. Those people people are never going to vote with you for you like just leave them alone. That's like thirty percent. He's got him there in the bag. There aren't there watching Fox News every single day. That's great But then there are the people who for whatever reason voted for Obama twice and then decided to vote for trump and where I differ with. Some people is that. I don't think you need to spend all your energy there. I don't even think you need to spend half your energy there but I think you need to spend some energy there because I think there are lessons that can be learned in why those people did that. That could help you with everything else that you're trying to do. Oh but I'd I but I I definitely I get really frustrated with a lot of the cover. Should I see in media. Sometimes where it's like they cover these voters over and over for again. You know the diner in Ohio where you know Joe voted for Obama and then he voted for trump. And you know Sally voted for Obama and then she didn't vote Odin like I think those profiles are important but they shouldn't be ninety five percent of what I see in ninety five percent of what we're talking about so I think it's important into like I said talk to persuadable voters. Think about why it is that they voted the way they are. What are they care about? What do they care about right now? And how can we move them. They're they're disappointed and trump. Obviously a lot of them are disgusted by him. Bad we move them into being democratic and progressive voters. That's important but at the end of the day for me you dance with the ones that brought you and the ones that brought you are the Obama coalition and that our people color young people college college educated whites. And how do you make sure that that. Coalition is solid and strong as it wasn't twenty twelve because of that coalition had turned out in two thousand sixteen away did in two thousand twelve. We'd be talking about President. Hillary Clinton right now and that is not to say that I put blame on any one group of people because there are sixteen different reasons why Hillary Clinton did not win in two thousand sixteen but this is one of them so I I hope that through twenty eighteen and twenty nineteen that that Democrats and progressives are learning the right lessons of which voters you're talking to where you're putting your resources and your energy and that you are not not ignoring your base voters because you think they're always going to be with you because two thousand sixteen touch you that they're not yeah so to that end you know. There's this ongoing conversation about whether women are electable to the presidency in it. It sounds like from what you're saying and of course it's biased By what I think in the first place but that we can actually inspire more voters if we are not choosing you know the white man or whatever you you know as as the the presidential nominee and and I'm not GonNa make you like go on record with who you support or anything but you don't do what do you think of that dynamic. I mean it sure seems like in two thousand eighteen twenty nineteen that we're seeing lots of women and people of Color winning down ballot races. Do you think that translates up to the presidency. Yeah I think it can I am officially neutral and actually unofficially neutral to. I haven't made up my mind but I think it can translate up there just just bigger hurdles and barriers at the presidential level and you hear these conversations that keep happening over Like ability and collectability I think is sometimes really code for likability or just being a woman and it's super frustrating like as a woman period it's really annoying to have those conversations but it worries me a little bit that there are people on the progressive recive side who buy into this notion that the only way that we can win is if we you know nominate somebody who is you know like like trump Or if we you know nominate somebody who is the antithesis of Hillary Clinton like I just I think we're buying into their arguments arguments and were turning it into a self fulfilling prophecy if we keep doing what is most important is nominating. Somebody Eighty who inspires and will motivate people to go out to Poles. Who is the candidate who is going to get the person who maybe the now has voted? But he's never gone out to canvas or done a foam bank like who. Who's going to be that person Who will take that individual and push them to the MEX level of Civic participation like that to me is what's most important so we can't avoid talking impeachment altogether sir. It's so they're always thinking about. So you know as someone who worked in a presidential administration What what what are your thoughts on? Just how abnormal what is going on is it's so it's so strange and and I feel like I'm living in an alternative universe on a different plane in the upside down. Every single day with this administration restauration The fact that we are going through I think what our forth impeachment in our history is a really really really big deal like huge huge monumentous. But because it's trump and because he probably doesn't impeachable offense like before he gets out of bed in the morning morning it's I don't know that that people quite understand what like what moment we're in right now and understand the gravity of what we're talking about and and the gravity of what he has done because and I don't think this was purposeful on his partner his administration's part. I just think they're so terrible. That when you commit these crimes and when you do all these things that are impeachable offenses when you do like the really really bad thing. That is so obvious and blatant you know asking a foreign the power to interfere now elections that people are like. Oh Yeah Yeah. That's bad. Only GonNA impeach him over this so it's yeah it's it's really This administration drives me to drink sometimes like a Wyatt but I. I am glad that that we are that. We are here and that if I can pull a silver lining from the impeachment hearings MM So far is that it has restored a little bit of my faith in humanity to see some of these career officials you know. Put their our careers on the line like they could have hidden behind the threats. Basically from Secretary Bumpy Oh donald trump and not testified But they did so there are maybe some decent people still left in this in this political orbit of Donald Trump You know we'll see what happens pens maxed but yeah it's it's not normal. This is not normal. And this that thing that I- I scream at the TV a lot When I when I hear the media covering something that he the fact that he had to give two million dollars I think in fines because his foundation stole money? The president of the United it states on backing away from the micro foundation stole money for veterans. That's not fucking normal and it got covered for like a second these people I mean about wanting a drink. My goodness sorry anyway. I think we all need to head to the bar now it so I questioned that I've been asking everybody lately because it's so much top of my mind is is what happens after twenty twenty. I think we're also focused on the next year and with good reason it's hugely important. Not just the presidency not just impeachment mint but you know up and down the ballot the the Senate everything is really important but you know as someone who's been at this work for a while. What do we do after after twenty twenty? Let's see we do defeat Donald trump and everyone's like up all right bullet dodged you know and it goes back to their lives. How do we keep up the momentum? How do we make sure people keep staying involved? Yeah I think if you know if trump is defeated in two thousand twenty there is so much work that has to be them them to try and reverse of the bad things that have happened There's a lot that is that's been going on at the agency level that gets absolutely no coverage outside of very rich media Like EPA HHS rolling back regulations Department of Transportation things that are making us it's making Our lives less safe life so the next administration is going to have to come in and immediately hit the ground running to fix some of that stuff On on a bigger scale I think the next if the next Democratic president needs to have the most solid of agendas and big agendas. Because there's so much like I said that we have to fix. It's going to take big structural changes to do some of that and to prevent some of this really bad stuff from happening in future. And so it's important to have those ideas but not just that to have a plan of activation so like you said all all these people who will hopefully get engaged and turn out and vote. How're you then turning around and getting them to push for your legislative agenda because let's be real? Oh you're going to have a very short window to get anything done before people start talking about the the twenty twenty. Two congressional elections and members start thinking about running for reelection so it is crucial that while people are running for president when we have a nominee next next year Hopefully before the convention that they are dual tracking it and I'm sure that they will be there trying to feet donald trump but then they are thinking about what that robust policy what executive actions they can take but also assuming Democrats either you know. Keep the House and take back. The Senator Senator maybe narrow the margin in the Senate like what policies are they going to be pushing through and then what is their plan to actually get it done Because we're only going to recover from the trump presidency if the next president comes in and shows the American people that this is what it means to have a progressive government and look at all the good. It's done in your lives that that's the only way we survive this so tenderly. So you're the mother of a toddler and I you know I think a lot about how we raise kids right now during such a toxic time when we are also distracted by what is happening. So what. What is your approach? Would how how do you deal with that Particularly thorny issue well I am fortunate enough that my toddler is under three so he doesn't quite understand what's happening I think unfortunately he recognizes who who president trump is. I heard him say trump the other day I was like Oh God stop watching so much. TV But you know. I talked to a lot of my my my parents friends who have slightly older kids and for them. It's just reinforcing that yes you should respect the office of the presidency but that respect is a two way street and that if somebody is disrespecting that office than you you do not you. Can you can treat them differently than you would. Somebody like Barack Obama and that it is not okay to mimic bad behavior. No matter where it comes from even if it comes from from your parents or the President United States that these are like you have a set of rules and morals that sort of guide the way you interact with other human beings and that nothing should really push you off of that path And it's it's easy for them to say this and for them to instill that in their children dron. It is harder for them to deal with the other kids who don't have parents who are having this conversation. And you know. There's nothing more heartbreaking king then you know my mom friends Whore Latin X? Who Talk about the kids? Who Tell their kids to go back to Mexico? Sokoto who were these are kids. Who doesn't matter that they were born here but they were You know or you know. I think kids of color who are being bullied Or who were like. Oh you know. Trump's president now's you guys are screwed. I mean these are things that are coming out of the mouths of like six year olds. They learned that at home. And it's hard to combat that and it's hard to comfort your child when they're hearing this from their peer so I think building resiliency in our kids. It's like heartbreaking to even think that this is yet another conversation that you have to have with your children so young but I think it's important and I don't think that it goes away if trump loses next year because I think unfortunately you've had like now kids that have this. It's in their bloodstream. And they see it from their parents and just because there may be a progressive president in office doesn't mean that they aren't GonNa take that learned bad behavior and continue it. So like building that resiliency zillion city in our children. I think is really important. Yes And you know my. My kids are slightly older. They're eight and five and one of the hardest things for me. Is You know they they got it. The that trump is not a good guy in the where you know we can think certain things about him but but they almost take things so far the other way that they want to make all Republicans villains the Tucano Donald Trump. And and. So it's like no. This is a person we deeply disagree with. I don't want him to be president but I don't wish physical harm on anyone sort of those constant discussions. It's it's all it's exhausting. It really is and that's really tough because there's always like that five Percent Jersey side of me is like Yeah Yeah Kid. I know that's not right. NOPE nope not appropriate sure. I'm not saying there's no part of me. That feels that way I just. I can't let kids know that. Exactly exactly that's through. The Mommy Techs chain. Well it Daniel. If people would like to learn more about center for American progress or listen to your podcast token how can they do that. They can follow the podcast along at the tent. pod That is at the tent pod on twitter They can follow me. I'm at the Gabar. one-two-three I do talk about a lot more than just politics. Be forewarned and you can follow cap online at cap at Cap Action for our C.. Four and at an prog for our C.. Three excellent we'll put links to those up on our website In we'll tag argue on twitter when we post this episode as well so thank you so much for joining us. This was a really fun. Conversation as terrible as a lot of the topics are thanks for having me guys really appreciate it all right thank you thank you. Thank you for listening to two bras talking politics. PUT THE DIM cast podcast network. Our theme song is called. Are you listening of the album elephant shaped trees by the band. Immune ARY and we're using it with permission of the band. Our logo and other original artwork by matthew wetland was created for use by this podcast. You can contact us at two broads talking politics at g mail DOT COM or on twitter or facebook at two broads talk you can find all of our episodes to broads talking politics dot com or anywhere podcast or found.

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Dr. Arati Kreibich

Two Broads Talking Politics

28:33 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Arati Kreibich

"This is too broad talking politics and today's episode. We talked to Dr Arti Cry Bic. Who's running for Congress in the New Jersey Fifth District in the episode? We say that the New Jersey primary is scheduled to be June however just after we recorded. The New Jersey Governor announced that the primary had been moved to July seventh. Hey everyone this is Kelly with two broads talking politics part of the dumb cast family of podcast and I am thrilled to be back on today with my co host. Who has been a little bit swamped under with work for the past few weeks? Sophie? Hi Sophie Hey Kelly. It's great to be back. I'm very excited. Hopefully I can continue to be back. And we'll see how this pandemic goes. Yes indeed and joining us. Today IS RT CRY. Bec- who is running for for Congress in the New Jersey. V too strict Rt Hi thank you so much for having me over. Yeah we are thrilled to have you with us. So let's just jump into it. Tell us a little bit about yourself in wire running for Congress. Yeah that's great so I am a mom like y'all I am a neuroscientist by training. I'm an immigrant. I am an elected official Councilmember in gun rod and all of these form identities right. Give me an important perspective. I think on on where we are in the role and where I think we need to go And I'm running for Congress. Because I really think that we need to elect more folks like me More scientists more women more immigrants more people with a different perspective than the status quo and frankly more plausible candidates who are not to status quo. Who are not politics as usual or not these As it has been and I'm running because I have an elected Congress member who is supported in two thousand sixteen when he looked at district and I realized at least important in two thousand eighteen. Because I am really wedded to the idea that we need to keep our district as well as possible and not only has he not really fought for the things that I thought who's going to be fighting for For All of us. He's really undermined. The democratic policies the kind of policies that. I think that we need to put out there. That are helping people in general across the board and to create real change particularly now given what is happening in the White House given what is happening the world with Colored Nineteen in Greenie liked folks. Who are actually going to be standing up for our values and we're going to be fighting the fight on behalf of all of us So yeah that's why I'm. That's why I'm running. Bronchitis can you tell us a little bit about New Jersey's fifth district like what? What is that like demographically and culturally? Just tell us a little bit about it absolutely so the fifth district is North is in North Jersey and so it is gerrymandered and So it includes a lot of Bergen county which is suburbia which is a very suburban of. You know let's folks who commuted to New York City for example is while we have couple tones in passaic county in then. A few towns are half of Sussex in Warren County which are more rural. So it's you know it's a it's a mix of everything. We had is mostly have Caucasian. In terms of in terms of racial demographics. But we do also have significant minority of other nationalities other necessities as. Well maybe that's an important point. It's nice change quite a bit even the last four years. So when we look at at Where we were in two thousand fourteen Look at political Graphics in that way as well we had a lot of folks It was it was much more of a Republican district and even fourteen. We've been trending blue now in twenty twenty we're actually solidly blue. We have more registered. Democrats THAN WE HAVE REGISTERED. Republicans but in New Jersey and edgy five. Really we have a lot of folks who are unaffiliated and I think that they are unaffiliated in general because you know New Jersey politics sucks right. That's kind of the. That's that's. That's the stereotypical idea of establishment politics particularly New Jersey. I think that's the reason why people are reluctant to go one or the other anything that particularly now more than ever. What we need are folks who are going to stand up or who are breaking the mold of what people expect politicians to be I think what resonates with folks regardless of the economic or political leanings. Is that people who are standing up. Who want to fight for their constituents are going to have stories that resonate with them and who they believe are going to be honest and not part of a system that is corrupt and not part of a system that takes advantage of people so I believe the primary scheduled for early. June is that still the plan. Is that likely to happen? In what what has all of this you know being sheltering in place and everything done to especially primary elections you know. I know it could be that. We're all still dealing with this going into the general in November but this has been sort of a turn on a dime moment for people running in primary so so talk to us a little bit about that. Yeah it's been a you know. I have to say that right now. The primary is still June second however we also know that our governor mansion just a couple of days ago that he would be stunned if it stayed June second. So we're anticipating that. It's going to be pushed forward. That's GonNa Postpone our Sunday's floating around but we don't know yet. We think that it's maybe July. That is the latest that folks are kind of banding about so we don't know there's there's a certain amount of uncertainty there But really the whole world right now feels like it's so uncertain on so many different levels rate so we are in Bergen County. I live in Bergen County right now and We Are we have the most cove nineteen positive cases at all of New Jersey. I think at last count. We had more than a thousand in. My husband works actually at the hospital where we have the most cases within Bergen County so for us. It's pretty we feel like we're in the middle of this In so many different ways There's so many friends and family that have been there at the front line in terms of healthcare workers and I know neighbors and and other friends for whom job our have been caught who are facing unemployment who are facing loss of businesses. And of course I have kids like U-haul do who are doing this crisis Distance Learning Right. We're all trying to weather this crisis together in a way that we are keeping in and we're trying to protect ourselves and our family and our communities. My parents are in the High Risk Group of. They're not living with us but we certainly have seen them for from for more than a month at this point. Yeah definitely the whole community Is Feeling this on film different ways. We decided as a campaign. I decided even before Bernie shutdown down in New Jersey that we had children plays Orders that were given. I decided to actually cancel and suspend all in person events. Lisa think a week before that's up virtual because kind of south is coming you know while before we were made to and so we are all virtual now And we're lucky that we've had folks on the campaign. I have a great team. We've done really well Moving to a virtual model in terms of time to make sure that we are still organizing that we're still reaching out to voters as much as possible. Virtually but really my focus. The last couple of weeks has been to make sure we're doing everything. We can in terms of mutual aid. One of the first things that I ended up doing was making sure that we were raising funds for Food Pantries because The Lore. Is You know that certain parts of our district very athletic at food insecurity as known being Here is something that people don't talk about is very real very Of the first things that that food pantries gone empty. It's such a complicated issue In terms of volunteers not being able to and and you know all the logistics of that. So we've done a lot in terms of raising money for Food Pantries. We've done P. equipment. Unfortunately we've had to have like a lot of folks gathered pd for our frontline healthcare workers and help with that. We continue to do that and You know how Kobe nineteen resources on our web page. I'm so in what I reach out or when our volunteers are reaching out to voters. It's really Morbid Tech N Call to make sure that folks are okay. Make sure the folks are healthy and if they need how You know we we are. We are connecting them with the resources of the state has put together at now locally together really I inform us who are trying to help arc nearly as much as possible across all four counties in I think within that in terms of campaigning Of course we can't go door to door. Of course we're not meeting people in person and for somebody like me who really enjoys that connection. Who really finds value in that have always done? That's particularly difficult. But we know that this is we can still keep up a sense of community and we can connect people in different ways so with the phone banking with texting with all that I mean in. I think the last four phone that we've done again mostly check in calls we've done more than fifteen thousand phone calls Which is which is substantial For a campaign our size with the kind of attitude so that the focus for us has been reaching as many people in our community is possible on trying to help as much as possible. You manage the day earlier. That you're a neuroscientist and that you think it's important to elect more people To Public Office. Who are Mantis? Can you talk a little bit about why you think that's important? And what your background as a scientist sort of gives you in terms of Being able to understand the problems facing our. Yeah no I think that now more than ever I think folks in the middle of the pandemic are also understanding the value of having people in Congress or people in decision making roles who are going to understand science and data we're GONNA be able to focus on that The able to see something like a public health crisis of this magnitude coming out and advocate to make sure that we are prepared for this right now. We need folks who are willing to help us get out of this crisis by helping the most amount of people that we possibly can right now. also to be able to have policies that means more resilient in the future this administration has been the most anti science administration that I can think ever and that's crisis has been exacerbated so much more by this unwillingness of blindness. Chew Science. We've muscled our public health experts. We've muzzled Reeve. Silence experts who in scientists who've been talking in raising alarm bells about this for months. I mean this is not something that was Nami that nobody could have predicted. This is clearly something that we saw coming for months. May and we've all been people warned at our scientists. Were trying to raise along those awesome. We didn't have enough advocacy enough people standing up saying. Hey we need to be much better prepared for this moving board so I think you know within the crisis they need more scientists in Congress who are going to speak out against what this administration is doing. An advocate for policy And be able to to really advocate against the attacks that are made to intimidate researchers and scientists who are telling the truth About public health but also about things like climate change has far reaching implications across the board You personally in terms of being a scientist and what I bring to the. I think it's up trained scientists. This would have been hurt life So the way I think The way I make decisions is rooted in that and what that really means is looking at the evidence with the data being able to research that question and understand and be able to interpret and analyze data showing but what I also says he will I think like a lot of right are various. Different perspectives. Being women are being from our gender whatever identify where from our life experiences for being grant and what that brings is understanding that the questions that are asked me not always be the right assumptions that are made may not always be the race options. So I think the duality of looking at the data but also taking a step back and saying where this data come from. And what are their sunshine surrounded on both of which are really important philosophically And being able to kind of bring that to the table I think is really important for all of us in decision making roles you mentioned that you immigrated to the US. When you're eleven there are still not that many members of Congress who are themselves immigrants. What what would that look like a to have someone with your experiences to know what your parents went through moving here in Congress. What would that mean for solving immigration issues? You know what What are the kinds of things you would like to see Congress doing to help? People both immigrate to the US and then feel safe once. They're here culturally. You know. Make sure that there are not people attacking them for for who? They are what they look like. One of the reasons I got into. This race was immigration immigration reform and in my story as an immigrant. So I mentioned I did. I came to this country in eleven. I still remember getting off the airplane at JFK. I still remember trying to corral my really pesky younger brothers were still has gay. Just a lot older now you know and they were. They were very excited. I remember being very excited being very hopeful but also being very anxious as we got off that plane and I remember my youngest brother asking if us can recognize our dad because my dad had come here a couple years earlier to save money and bring us all over there with my brothers and my mom and I remember all of battery. I remember this this hope and excitement because my parents believed the promise of America. Believe that you know coming here and working hard is GonNa make our dreams come true And I remember the anxiety of being whole new environment in a whole new. You know unknown billy for me and so while we were really fortunate even though my parents were not wealthy Were rather poor at times to work. Two jobs simultaneously Yeah we were very fortunate and the kinds of opportunities that we had And that we were able to work hard and be able to really you know. My dreams definitely came true. I always wanted to be a scientist and I am one and we were very fortunate that happened for us but the reality is of course that we have systems in place that unfortunately ensure that this is not the way it works for everybody and this is the way it should work for. Everybody and that inequity I feel very strongly and personally and I'm very passionate about making sure that we'd do everything that we possibly can to lower those barriers to be able to have the kinds of opportunities. I'd had the able to really work for them for everybody. Across the board and bring that perspective to the way I govern at the city council and the way that we will be able to change things at a congressional level at a national level federal who will say that you know and that is also the reason why I got into politics in the way I did so after the two thousand Sixteen Elections Matt election to is another memory that I hold on with the same sense of excitement and anxiety and eventually dread that election day. We were very excited. My kids were eating eleven. They you know they. They were very excited with me to go. Volunteer and V voted. We went out to Pennsylvania to district to try and to try and get out the vote. All wearing pants suits. I mean matching pants. We were knocking on doors. And we came home and we expected it to be elevations and it really wasn't and my kids were devastated It was hard as a parent to explain to them. What happened is still very difficult to explain to them. You know what has happened and has in addition to that deep disappointment and devastation that we had the day of the elections for is you know in the weeks that followed hate. Crimes are spiking in our communities. People were talking while four and she talking about. We're seeing a lot of reports of folks having encounters that they hadn't before other people being much more unbolted Eke Out in hate to do things that were that. We would've imagined to the extent before the elections An atmosphere my eight year old came to be one I Really upset and worried genuinely worried. Deeply afraid that I was going to be deported and I was not going to be able to be his mom anymore. In America and mad my parents grandparents were going to be even more targeted and the same thing was going to happen to them because they have much more of an accident that I do They look quite a bit more In the Naidoo and it was devastating. Right here that and I still you know. Remember how horrible that felt that my child was so worried for me. We come up in where we were in this safe neighborhood. Where the leg? We had done everything we could to become part of the society that I had done everything I could to become part of the psyche as much as we loved are proud of being American citizen and that my child felt worried for me in this in this in this way was definitely felt like a failure as a parent and failure of our community. But the thing is I was able to hug him and say this is okay. This is not going to happen to me and this is why. And here's why people safe that the reality is. This is not the way it happens for everybody. The reality is that there are so many of us who are not able to reassure our kids now especially now the reality is that there are so many of us who are feeling so much more insecure in more vulnerable either because we look at particular way. We dress Away received particular way or because of who we loved or how we identify and that was unacceptable name and I really felt as if he needed to step up and do a lot more and I needed to advocate All the different ways that I could Which is really how I got to marching in organizing and eventually stepping up to run for council. And you know it's the same story is to why Run for Congress at the end of the day My Congress member who again as I mentioned. I thought it was going to be voting. Boris or woody a advocating for us. He enjoyed when we are hearing about kids in cages. We're hearing about the kinds of things that were happening at the border. The humanitarian crisis. That was happening over. Their role in. Separating families are role in unfortunately tweeting kids away. We still do And the fact that folks are still dying in two weeks after that there was an emergency appropriations fell. I came up in commerce and my comments member led the charge to make sure they were no guardrails and new accountability in this bell that gave millions of dollars to see if he is the same agencies that were responsible for the for enforcing the policies that we had. In terms of separating kids in terms of tearing apart family is in terms of propagating the humanitarian crisis that we had for their and to me when he did that he made me as a volunteer as a former supporter has morally complicit in that decision making that decision and I really couldn't be morally complicit in that anymore and now was development. That turned the tide for me That made me feel as if I needed to get into that race and I needed to make sure that we had people in Congress who were going to draw those lines who are going to stand up for the kinds of values that we need to make sure that people are standing up for because the thing is no matter how you feel about comprehensive immigration reform measure how you feel about undocumented folks think as Americans we all can agree and we all do agree that the crisis that's happening right now is inhumane that we need to do everything we can to make sure that we keep people safe and the fact that my Congress member could not not only not advocate for that ensure that we are not putting any accountability and to even have a modicum of control or Modicum of oversight was reprehensible and at least at the least. We need to do more so if our listeners would like to help out your campaign Between now and June second or whenever the primary ends up being. What are some ways that they can help out? Oh I would love an in all helping me are looking for folks who give volunteer In folks can do this remotely. We have a ton of that happening. they can go to our website. Aren't the for Congress dot com that's E. R. A. D. I F. O. R. CONGRESS DOT COM? We are looking for folks to spend the word To share if you if you share the values of you believe in any way shape or form in what? I'm trying to do here. I would love it if you're able to share information about the campaign and of course this is a grassroots campaign. I'm not to incorporate. Pack many or fossil fuel money so donations in support in that way are always essential necessary and welcome so any amount of the amount of money. You can spare that you can share goes a long way campaign so we'd love donations as well that volunteering remotely at being able to share information matter campaign and amplifier message and and donating all those can be done and I really appreciate that. We're on twitter or on facebook. We're on instagram. We're on our website and all of it is the congress dot com all right. We'll be should put links up on our website. Is there anything else that you'd like to make sure we talk about today? You know but then you know what right since in this mic that we are in and those crisis that is affecting all of us and at the end of the day. We're going to find that. This is a collective series of traumas that we all are going to be dealing with some more than others or somewhere deeply than others. I think that day we all need to understand. Concentrate on being able to have folks in decision making roles. That are going to advocate for all of us. They're going to advocate for policies. That are GONNA make us more resilient in the future and to me more than ever the kinds of things that have been fighting for So to make sure that we collectively indecisively do something about climate in less than a decade that we have last to mitigate the worst effects to make sure that we have policies in place to help with healthcare. Healthcare should never be tied to our jobs to be able to Make sure that we have policies in place that for paid sick leave and family. All of those things are are necessary now more than ever. We need to have a stronger. Social Safety Net for all Americans moving board so my hope is that folks are able to not only understand that this truly now. Hopefully the silver lining. But I see people. I see all of his coming together. I mean my community coming together really to help in this crisis and I'm hoping that the same sense of community spirit is retained as become out of this crisis and translates into policies. That work for all of us. I hope that everyone is staying healthy and continues to be so I thi thank you so much for joining us on the podcast today. I I wish you a lot of luck. I live very near the district that Marine Newman is in and of course Marie was able to win in her primary at just a couple of just like a month ago now. I guess it was only a few weeks ago. Time has all a compressed together but you know I. I'm very hopeful that that will be able to see the same thing in your district. Yeah I am too. I think. Similar to what marine human did we are also putting two at their abroad. Coalition of your suburban. Moms and progressive voters from from endorsements from organizations. Like what Mama That we just had yesterday out to Working Families Party indivisible and our Progressive Change Campaign Committee. All of those you know show that really have a movement. That's happening here so I remain hopeful. There's also thank you so much for that. I really appreciate it all right. Well thank you so much at soapy. It's good to have you back on the podcast as well and I hope that everybody stays home. Stay safe and saves lives. Yeah thank you for listening to two bras talking politics. Part of the dim cast podcast network. Our theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album? Elephants shaped trees by the band. Immune Nouri and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork by Matthew Wetland and was created for use by this. Podcast you can contact us at two broads talking. Politics at G MAIL. Dot Com or on twitter or facebook at two broads. Talk you can find all of our episodes at two broads talking. Politics DOT COM or anywhere podcast or found.

Congress New Jersey Bergen county scientist US twitter America Sophie Dr Arti Kelly official New Jersey Fifth District New York City facebook Bec U-haul passaic county White House
Shannon Watts

Two Broads Talking Politics

25:38 min | 1 year ago

Shannon Watts

"Hi, this is our sir. You're listening to Hanan wants onto bonds talking town takes you can find our podcast onto bonds targeted by takes dot com or anywhere podcasts are failed. Enjoy. Are you? Heavy one. This is Kelly with two brads talking politics. I am on with my co-host Sophie. Hey sophie. Hey kelly. And today, we are thrilled to be joined by Shannon watts who's the founder of moms demand action. Hi, shannon. Hey, thank you for having me. Yeah, thanks so much for joining us. So it was a perhaps a little bit of a rough weekend for you. We're talking on Monday. And so this will be airing on Wednesday. But we're talking on Monday and mother's day weekend. The NRA decided to attack you. That's right. Starting on Wednesday. And again, this is something we've never seen before. I've certainly had as spokespeople go after me, but I was pretty shocked on Wednesday when the array posted me in three different posts on their Instagram. They have over a million followers. I just made my Instagram page public for a book, I have coming out, so I only had about four thousand followers, the day, they did that, then they took that. Same campaign over to Twitter and really haven't stopped for about five days. And so why, why do you think they're going after you? I mean they've been you know what why this this pointedly right now? It's really interesting. I'm not sure I know exactly I think there is an effort to distract from a lot of the articles that are being written about them the investigations there under the fact that way up here spent over half a million dollars in personal travel and on his wardrobe hundreds of millions of dollars have been funneled at a so called note nonprofit organization to friends family. Favored contractors, they recently had a coup, which Oliver North lost and, and Wayne up here stayed as the organization's leader. So there's so much going on that it negative right now within the NRA and we know there's a track record of misogyny. So the only thing. When imagine is that, you know, this is sort of payback for the fact that I am immune action have been so incredibly successful. In fact, the Washington Post today called us one of the biggest winners of the twenty nineteen state legislative session. But also as a distraction. Tell us a little bit about some of those recent successes with moms demand. Yes, you know, we have been working in state houses ever since the mansion to me Bill failed to pass by a handful of senators in two thousand thirteen and that was a bipartisan Bill, that would have closed the background check loophole. It would have required a background check on every single gun sale of the country. And when that failed, we pivoted and started doing this work in state houses knowing that often congresses, where this work and not where it begins, and we've had huge success. We have every year about ninety percent track record of killing bad and are able, and we passed hundreds of good bills. Keeping guns out of the handed, domestic abusers, requiring safe storage, red flag logs the which allow family and police to get a temporary restraining order, someone appears to be danger to themselves or others. Just a whole host of stronger gun laws. And in fact, after the Perkin shooting tragedy, when this became a very major conversation in the Geist of America, we tripled inside as a as an organization, we now have hundreds of thousands of volunteers on the ground in every single state, and we were able to take that power and parlay it into political win. So last year, two thousand eighteen was the best year, we've ever had in terms of passing stronger gun laws twenty states, pass stronger gun mounts nine of those laws were signed by Republican governors. And then we parlay that into electoral power, we outspent in outmaneuver. Erred, the NRA in the midterm elections. We elected over one thousand Gunson's candidates across the country. And we were able to flip seven state legislatures to have what we call Gunson's majorities, and we've already gone in and pass stronger gun laws in many of those states. So we've had huge success at the state level last more than six years. So I think that starts to answer one of my questions. But what, what keeps you motivated, what keeps you going, especially in the face of things like the NRA attacking you personally. Well, I'm a volunteer and I have been now for over six years. And I wake up and do this work every day because we're winning. And I get asked a lot, aren't you numb are disappointed. Aren't you dejected? And if you really knew what the winds were on the ground. How many bad logs we've stopped? How many good laws, we've passed the changes we've made in boardrooms you know, I was just leave is last week speaking to over a thousand employees because that company has made this a major part of their philanthropy. And so when we look at the laws that have been passed the lives that have been of saved the fact that every single democratic presidential candidate is competing to be the best on this issue, going into twenty twenty you can see the change in American politics on this issue is no longer third rail. And I believe that this will happen in my lifetime, I on so that it's, it's what kind of keeps me motivated. And gets me up every day to start working on the fresh as well as so many of volunteers who do this almost another full time job. And I think a lot of people this is maybe changing some, but especially a lot of women have been afraid of getting attacked on social media know we saw this before the twenty sixteen election that people were in sort of private Facebook groups, in things instead of talking about their beliefs outwardly on social media. Do you have advice for women, especially who you know, are worried about being attacked are worried about, you know, how to respond when people go after them on social media? I get that it can be scary experience. It was for me in the beginning, there was this underbelly of America that I really didn't know existed. You know, that I would immediately have my life threatened my kids lives threatened threats of sexual violence, just because I supported things like background checks and. That took some getting used to it, it was uncomfortable. And at times frightening, but it's really become white noise to me. And I think the trick is first of all, block, anyone, whoever insults, you or engages in at homonym attack. Those people should not even have access to anything you say, and so that's just something I do. Now, the other piece of it is it can be used against the gun lobby, I have, I think become sort of an expert of in taking what they say and do and turn it around and making it a win. I was just talking to the woman who runs my website, my views on my website, have gone up five hundred thirty percent. Since Wednesday I sold hundreds of book, I couldn't have asked for a bigger gift than the NRA to come after me, two weeks before my book might like a mother comes out because it's going to benefit gun violence prevention organizations. I'm donating a majority of the proceeds to. Groups like moms demand action and others. So it is really about understanding that they attack you because they fear you, you mentioned your new book fight like a mother, that's coming out. I think it's may twenty eighth. Can you tell us a little bit about your book? Yeah. So I am really excited about this, because I have had countless calls and outreach from mostly women who say what you created here with mom action is exactly what I would like to do maybe smaller scale, you know, in my neighborhood or in my community or in my state, and maybe it's around another issue like the environment or abortion or -education, or whatever it is. And they want to understand, how do you create a grassroots movement. And so this is in part, how to manual it is impart memoir. I talk about who I was and how I started this and. Guilt that, I brought to the table, this kills I needed from all the amazing other women and mothers, who helped me do this, the impact that becoming a full time, volunteer and being busier than I've ever been in my life has had on my marriage and on my parenting and it's also a manifesto. It's why women in particular are the secret sauce to organizing and why they need to not only have these skills, but also take them. And then use them to run for office, we've had over forty months action, tears run for office in November seventeen one we train them. We encourage them and that was everything from city council congress. We see MacBeth my former volunteer and colleague at months action is now a congresswoman in Georgia. So I really think there's a moral imperative right now for for women to run for office, and it talks a lot about how that can happen to. You were talking about all the, the women who run for office. I know you're on the board for emerge America, have you thought about running for office yourself? I thought about it. I feel like I'm getting so much done doing this as opposed to maybe even what I could be doing from congress, that, that I'm really happy, where I am right now. I'm not totally ruling it out. And I know that if I did the NRA would use everything in its arsenals, so to speak to come after me and moms demand action, but I also know that I have this grassroots army of bats women, who would have my back. So I'm not really out. But for right now, I feel like so much changes happened. And we're really on the precipice of changing the trajectory of this issue and gun violence in America, that I'm really happy and excited to, to stay the course speaking of all that change. You mentioned some of the successes that you've had in there, frequently women driven, and we know from the twenty thousand election that we've seen a huge swing in women running for office, getting involved in the political process, getting involved in particular issues. What do you think is sort of the source of this like, huge upswell in women's grassroots movements? I think women felt so angry. I think we were headed in this direction anyway. But after the election in twenty sixteen what happened to Hillary Clinton, the election of Donald Trump really seeing the impact of not having a seat at the table has made women feel that they have an imperative to run for office that they have a responsibility to protect themselves their families, but also other women, and that has what has been so encouraging that women are really answering clarion call, and, you know, women for so long have only had really two or three levers of power to pull their voices, their votes, their spending power. We pull all of those levers at moms demand action, but we. We really need to be making the logs and the policies, that impact the safety of our families and communities. And you know, be honest with you, I spend a lot of time in state houses, and they are eighty percent. Men, I wouldn't trust many of them to make me a Cup of copy, let alone make laws that my, my family safety depends on, you know, I think a lot of popular media relief forever has had trouble envisioning women women's groups, women's friendships. One thing that has struck me at the moms demand action events have been to. I went to one of the, the state legislative days is, is just how how much of a community it really is. These these deep friendships, that have been formed among the women who are involved in, you know, like you say they really have your back key talk a little bit about that aspect of mums demand in if that was something that you sort of expected at all going in. Oh, I loved that up survey Shen it, it has been overwhelming amazing. You know. I am an only child, I'm an introvert I've moved around a lot. I've never had so many friends in my life. And that is, what has been so incredible to me, this idea of finding your tribe, and some of that is just lightning in a bottle that these women were able to gravitate and find one another, especially in the rest of states and feel like they had a home. I have met so many women that I thought were friends their entire lives who said no. I just met this person through moms demand action a year ago and they're going on vacations together. And I also think that social media makes us feel like we know one another and then every single year we have something called gun sense, university. I can remember the first year. We did it two thousand fourteen we had sixty people there last year we had over fifteen hundred and it was only half of our leadership volunteers this year August. We're going to be doing it in, in Washington DC, and it's just such an amazing opportunity for these women who know each other feel like they knew each other from all across the country to get together and solidify. Those relationships and the other mazing thing that I've seen happen over the last six years, is that women are getting tattoos, whether it's of our or our name or something that says, one tough mother so many of them have these permanent tattoos because they feel empowered. And I think that really is what Foster's these relationships and this, you know, throaty sometimes has pejorative connotations, but I do think it has become the sisterhood, and that is something I never could have predicted. So your, your children are all a little bit older now as Sophian, I have young sons to, to have advice for mothers of younger children. So my kids are seven and four in Sophie son, is three, you know, sort of thinking about our kids going to school, thinking about sort of raising our kids to be to be strong and fierce. But, you know, also. Being very mindful of what the world is really like right now. So many of our new volunteers come to us, and I wanna be clear that we're no longer just mothers. We were mothers and others much like mothers against drunk driving. We welcome all carrying Americans men, non mom's etcetera. But so many of them come into the phone's not because they've necessarily been impacted by gun violence. But because it had to send their toddlers, or their kindergarteners to either daycare preschool or kindergarten. And those very tiny children, have had to be a part of what can be very traumatizing lockdown drills, the idea that you're going to hide in your bathroom closet. And a piece of wood is going to protect your child from the spray of an air fifteen strikes fear into the heart of every single parent. That is often why they join our organization because they think I gotta do something. This is so scary so absurd. We act as though gun violence is an act of nature that it can't be prevented when in reality, we know that it is a man made act of cowardice, you look at any other high income country. We have twenty five times higher gun homicide rate than any nation. And so this is just unacceptable. And that is why so many people come into the fold because they don't want their children to have to endure lockdown drills. We are talking not so long after yet another school shooting at a school shooting in Colorado. If, if people are looking at that are thinking about, you know, sending their own kids and worrying about that at, you know what, what are some of the things that you would suggest that they do. How do they join moms demand action? What are some of the, the ways the you want them to, to get involved in to act on this? Yeah. You know, I am Colorado, parents two weeks ago. I woke up to attack thing that my. Didn't have school. He was one of five hundred thousand kids across the state TEP tone because an eighteen year old was able to fly from Miami to Denver by along gun and ammo and terrorize an entire state, and parents had to grapple with how to tell their children. What happened children had to grapple with whether they were safe in school. And then just a couple of weeks later, there was this horrific school shooting in Denver minute. Sounds like the teams were able to take the gun from a set of parents and that just really brings in all of the issues that we work on. We do work to raise the age. Limit at which someone can buy a gun from eighteen to twenty one. We'd you talk about. We sponsor gun storage to reprogram call be smart. And if you're interested in talking about responsible gun storage with family or friends, they send your kids over for play dates go to beast. Mark for kids dot org. Four point five million children with in this country with unsecured guns being there, lot unlocked, and moated, which is really a terrifying prospect, and all of the different pieces, that we organized around, including background checks including red flag laws. Many of these things could come into play in the shooting. So I know that we only win when their strength in numbers for so long this vocal minority had been afraid that they're gonna they're gonna be taken away. But as parents, we're frayed our children will be taken away. There's eighty million moms in this country. The vast majority of whom deport stronger gun mom, so it is about getting off the sidelines. It is about becoming a vocal majority, and you can do that. You can go to our website moms demand action dot work. Our Twitter handle is at moms demand, and you can tact. Join two six four. Three three. We try to make it very simple to get involved and get active and use your time wise. Like a piece that you wrote recently about Nancy Pelosi and some of the things that you've learned from her when did if you could talk a little bit about that. I recently saw Nancy Pelosi speak just last week actually, and she's just so inspirational and I really liked us lot of sort of looking to her. You know, people tend to much like you. In fact, you know, demonize her about certain things, but, but looking to her as sort of a source of inspiration for mothers. Yeah. I that was really an honor to be able to interview her in San Francisco at the wing. She has been an inspiration to me from the very beginning, when we had a press conference in two thousand thirteen around the mansion to me Bill, we were not even six months old and here I was that stay at home mom from Indiana, and she welcomed us with open. Arm to have a press conference. She stood at our side. I can remember she whispered in my ear. You know, you should be so proud mothers. We'll get this done, and she has been with us every step of the way for the last six years, regardless of, of what condition she was in and by championing gun safety. She made sure that just five days into this new congressional session that a background checks Bill was introduced and pass through the house HR eight were waiting for the Senate to take it up. But several pieces of gun safety legislation passed the house already this year. And I know without a doubt that she will make this happen to me. She's so incredibly inspiring. She was a momma five when she became a congresswoman in her late forties. And she is so not intimidated, nor does she care about the blowback that she gets on anything people, mostly men are raid of her and her power. Our and she talked a lot about how being the mome gave her the skills that she needed to negotiate and to manage her time and to multitask. And I think those same characteristics are exactly why moms demand action has been successful because our volunteers inhabit those skills as well. I love when she says a new say this in your piece about her too, and she says, no year. Why that seems so powerful to me to think that if you know why you're fighting you, you keep going, you know? And I think for so many of us who are moms. You know, our, our kids are a big part of our y and that's what keeps us going and what keeps us fighting for things like gun sons, but also for things like climate change, you know, that, that knowing that there's something that lives on beyond to you is really a powerful motivator. I totally agree with that. You know, I had this really interesting conversation recently went Seraya Shomali. She's a feminine. Twos. Written the book rage become her, and we talked about the double edge sword of being a mom and being an activist. Because on one hand, you shouldn't have to be a mom, you should just be able to have credibility as a woman, but we know that in America, ever since prohibition that in order to be a woman in an activist you can't really be fighting about your own Inger you're fighting because you're, you're angry on behalf of your children. And that is just an incredible incredibly powerful emotion and a motivator. And we also have to be pragmatic, you know, she talks about how this is the reality in twenty nineteen that, that, that candidates want our own tears, to stand with them in the red shirts as mom, because we're the majority of the voting public, and it is sort of secret saw to organizing and my favorite, quote, is a quote actually by Agatha Christie, and she says a mother's love for her child is like nothing else in the world. It knows. No law. No pity it dares all things and crushes down. Remorselessly all that stands in its path. And I think that's exactly right. On no matter what the issue is you should not get an mothers way when she is on a mission to protect your child. Remind us how to get your book. Yep. It would be great if people would preorder preorder help make the book a bestseller. Get it on television. And get it noticed as I said, a majority of the proceeds will go to nonprofit gun, violence prevention organizations, so we're hopeful that it will do well, and also it dick, a pen in the eye of the NRA, which I'm all about that, but it is available may twenty eighth. You can go to fight like a mother dot org and pre-order order the book, and for those who order ten or more copies. Save your receipt, and check the box online, and I'm happy to do a virtual event with you or your book club. Excellent. And it you did the audio for the audiobook, right? I did I did audio an audio book that is available. Audubon talk talks fail and Amazon, that was a really interesting experience took many cough, drops and throat code. But I thought you know, that was a really really fun part of it. And also, you can look on a fight like a mother Oregon, St. where I will be doing about some very excited to have an event with Debra messing in New York, the Barnes and noble. And with Karen Tumblety of the Washington Post politics and prose in Washington DC, and a lot of other. So go online, and I hope to see they're all right. Thank you so much for every really you've been hugely inspirational to me, and to so many women. I know. And, and thank you for speaking with us today. It's an honor. Thank you. Thanks for listening to, to broads talking. Politics, are theme song is called, are you listening off of the album elephants shaped trees, by the band? Newry and we're using it with permission of the band, our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew with Lynn and was created for use by this podcast.

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Vote Her In, Part 5

Two Broads Talking Politics

27:32 min | 1 year ago

Vote Her In, Part 5

"Hello everyone. This is Rebecca five guest with sofi and Kelly on the voter in segment of two bras and welcome to this show where really excited about doing this. We're hoping that you will find it. Interesting invaluable, and inspirational and most important we're looking forward to sharing what we know and working together to make this dream of voting in our next woman. President come true. So let your friends snow welcome. And let's get going. Thanks. Are you listening? Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. We are back for our fifth episode of the vote hurt in series. I am here with my co host Sophie, hey, Sophie. Hey, Kelly and joining us again is our partner in this venture author Rebecca sigh of Hira Becca high to be here yet, thanks for joining us again. So for listeners who have not been listening to the full vote her in series. You should go back and listen to the first four episodes, but we are talking about the effort to elect the first woman president in this is an especially good time to be doing it. Because there are so many women running for president. So we're going to continue the discussion that we were having in the fourth part of the series talking about some of the systemic issues that women face in becoming elected being elected to executive positions. But especially to the. Presidency. So Rebecca where would you like to pick up our conversation on this? Well, we covered a lot of ground the other day. But you know, there were some things we touched on. And I thought we could delve more deeply, and particularly now that I think the races, you know, really heating up and just read this morning that the molar reports going to be released soon. And so these candidates are going to I'm guessing being a whole new phase of you know, what they're saying and doing and campaigning. And it may well be depending on what said about the molar report, for instance, that there are some women on the Republican side who, you know, make some noise. And so in that context thought we might, you know, start today's discussion by talking about the fact that it's, you know, not a given, and we should say that out loud and discuss it that the first woman president will be pro-choice woman or even democrat, right? And that there are certainly women on the Republican side. There may be some independent women who you know. Decide to run just as men have who don't. Share the sort of progressive agenda that the four main candidates on the democratic side share. And so I thought that would be important for us to look at. And you know, there's been a lot of discussion in the past about Nikki Haley, and you know, after she resigned from the UN ambassador position, Hugh months ago. Of course, she was asked well is your next running for president? And she said, of course, no. But then in the meanwhile, you probably saw this too. She's got a book coming out. She's got some think tank projects, and there's really, you know, the possibility of that. And what does that mean, you know for women if we have a woman president who's anti-choice and quite conservative on other women's issues? I think sometimes Republicans may be like two to devoting, you know, in general, they don't seem to like women's issues. But I think sometimes. The they sort of give themselves out when they vote for women. Well, we'll look we support strong women too. And there are Republican women like Kellyanne Conway who liked to play this sort of feminism card, even though you know, really what they're doing is often not all that supportive of other women or women's rights in general. But you know, I think that that that we've ERI well could see that just like we saw Sarah Palin nominated for vice president who is, you know, certainly, no friend to women's issues were sort of an interesting question because I I recently read a book about the history of the Kucuk clan in the mid twentieth century, and you know, basically in the nineteen twenties, and there was a whole chapter on the women leaders of the clan. And I mean, I don't think I've ever heard about this before, but the author who's brilliant. Historian made the point that there's no sort of automatic connection between a progressive you on issues, whether it's racism or sexism and being a leader wanting to be a leader asserting yourself. And so it's a sort of really tough question. And I kind of feel that you know, when I was writing my book, I had to grapple with it because people would say to me. Well, what do you think that you know, how even feel that woman? We I elect is anti-choice and doesn't support qual pay. And you know, it's something for all of us in consider is it worth more so to speak to have women's voices. They're notwithstanding their views on some issues, and maybe they'll be good on a few others. I think that's something. We all have to face. He I mean, I I know that I personally would come down to voting for a progressive democrat over voting for a Republican woman. You know, even if that means. Voting for a man. But, but I think it's a definite thing we need to think about I mean, luckily for those of us who need to make those choices the Republicans aren't running that many women comparatively speaking. But it definitely could happen. It could be something. The it's a choice that we need to make. Well, and true that there's been, you know, after the two thousand eighteen congressional elections where you know, the overwhelming number of the women elected were democrat that you know, some were really bemoaning the fact that there weren't women on the other side because knows women tend to be more in the middle perhaps more mainstream on issues that that women care about. So, you know, it's a tough thing. And I would you say one of your thing about it that struck me reading the news at this last week, or so and all the discussion about Joe by and his, you know, behavior, and you know, I. Been in this long enough to remember when Joe Biden, Paul Simon and many other upstanding Democrats in the minds of progresses were anti-choice. Dick Durbin was too. And you know, we couldn't just say, well, you know, we couldn't just forget about them. They were in power. They had a role to play. They had Boyce's they kept paying reelected. So I think that it may be the case that, you know, if we're faced with this fact that there are Republican women running who look like they have a chance that we really will want or Republican sisters who are more in a position to do it. You know, work hard to try to convince them to change their minds. Just the feminist did thirty years ago changed dick Durbin mine. Can't let that go. I don't think he'd woman like win their work in primary. Although like, I keep coming back to this idea that one of the reasons when induce a well in the democratic primaries is because the democratic base and the democratic like voter pool is heavily female and the people who tend to vote in Republican primaries are often more heavily male. And so I feel like the people at this juncture, the people who are in the Republican party who are voting, you know, in these primaries. Most of the time are going to be the people who have not found the less, you know, say for here's of Republican politics so horrific that they've left and therefore more likely to be the type of people who consciously or subconsciously wouldn't vote for a woman wondering, do you think they could even get through? It's a really important point. You raise? But I think it's interesting. I mean, just as we saw on this recent you know, announcement yesterday of yet another man running in the democratic primary. I mean, there could be a lot of people. Right. And then the votes get split and then discussion occurs about well. Who's a person who can bring us all together and have a chance to, you know, pull over people who are independent or conservative Democrats. So I would postulate we don't know I really important point. But that if say, Nikki Haley were in it, she would be a person, you know, who could make that case. And she would say I'm more electable at this point in a one on one. So pick me in this primary. And of course, you might not prevail. But she would. Position herself for the future and say the democrat is a male candidate than once again. We're looking at electing our first woman president, it's all kind of mystery right now. But you're right. There's a lot going on. You know, I think that this is something that a lot of the organizations that are training women to run for office are also thinking about rights, so we have organizations like an lease list. For instance, that will only help pro choice democratic women. But you know, there are plenty of organizations that are training women who also want to be training Republican women to run for office. And you know, I don't know what the numbers look like, I don't know. How many Republican women are are stepping up to run for office with these training programs? But it's definitely something that, you know, it's interesting to see which organizations choose to go which way with that. Well, and I pro-. Hooked. I've done a fair amount of work, we boat run lead. Which is an example, both that are nonpartisan. And you know, they make a very strong and powerful and convincing argument about the importance of a training every woman who wants to run. And so, you know, how those numbers break out. I'm not sure and they're big victories. You know this past year word democratic women. We used to the congressional level. But the case there about women coming together is a powerful. And you know, we just sort of have to. See who can really, you know, move out there because you're right? It's hard to run in the Republican primary win the women are generally more liberal. I think the other thing related to this is another factor, which we hadn't yet talked about think is really important, Republican or democrat. And that the issue of how long one has been in public service and the sort of the burden so to speak of a lifetime of vote. And I know we're going to be discussing the recent Chicago mayoral in greater detail in our next episode, but I wanted to just touch on that here too. Because you know, there's a strong case to be made that among the challenges Hillary Clinton had was, you know, all these votes. All this record all these issues, she had staked out of position on for instance, by contrast to Barack Obama's so in two thousand. Eight and you know, that something that I think women really have to take a look at it. And in the case of this recent may oral you know, the woman who won or life had never run for office before. So she didn't have she hadn't held the seat from which taken a lot of votes. So that's another issue. I think that who have this systemic challenge that the women have is if they work their way up the ladder gradually as has been the case for most women who hold office was they do that long resume. Like contrast say, the mayor Pete or Falwell who's, you know, they're thirty seven and thirty eight, and they don't have that kind of Drucker people can poke it in as people have been pointing out in the media recently. You know, it women ran for office leader. I mean, there's all sorts of reasons that that happens a partly because raising families, partly because the. The unabridged to be asked more times to run for office. I and this is true in the workplace as well. As it is in running for office, the women run for office that they think they can get or apply for jobs that they think they meet every single requirement for and men are much more likely to reach. So if women are running for office later, they're going to have a lot more things in their history. You know, whether it's in elected office or not, you know, there's just a lot more life to to have made decisions that may be questionable or things that people could spin, you know, if you're Pete Buddha judge near thirty seven years old, there just isn't that much of your life that people can be critiquing as opposed to if you're Elizabeth Warren, and you're sixty-nine years old. So this is not just true of women versus men, but if women are by and large money, especially for the presidency or executive offices like mayor governor much later in life. That is something that they're going to have to think about how to navigate, and we're going to have to think about how to make sure that that we're looking at people in sort of an equal ground. Remembering the that long history can be a good thing as well. Yeah. I think I it's also the case that what we're seeing. And again to go to the Chicago would sample of people are both men and women now deciding I don't know what the percentages are. But that they're going to run for whatever office. They wanna run for regardless of whether they've ever held office or whether that's an office for which arguably they have little at least, you know, job experience so to speak. They may have an inclination an aptitude. And so obviously, the biggest example was Donald Trump. Right. But people are increasingly doing that. And I think that with the women who won, you know, congressional seat certainly the. Bigger names, you know, in several cases that was drew for them. So I'm kind of thinking here that to figure it out some more. But there's something of a difference between the older generation like Elizabeth Warren as you point out years of experience years, upholding different job, lots of track record and the younger women who are you know, angry and also gifted and just say, I'm running for congress. Right. So it's a, you know, then, of course, they do have to worry about you know, what may be in their personal background is anyone does. But at least they don't have that burden of that Hong resume and long list of votes, which may be a good thing. Note that I will have the burden of, you know, two hundred plus podcast episodes that people can listen to exactly how I feel about if and when I ever run. And that gets to. You know, it was something else which used the win one decides that young age so take these young women who are now in congress. They're going to have many votes. Right. Just like you have many, Bob. So if anyone of them decides g I want to run for New York, Senator or whatever they're going to have to face that as well or decide. Well, gee whiz. I'm going to stay here because I've got seniority and I do have a track record. And of course, I would say going to one other issue that we wanted to. We wanted to touch on is something that's always been true. I think regardless of age or experience, and that is the notion that as Shirley Chisolm could it sexism, Trump racism, you know, that she had more had felt she had experienced more discrimination as a woman, then as an African American and. This hasn't been said, but in the case of Hillary Clinton, and Barack Obama the choice was. A man of color versus a woman. And how do we think about that was that also an example of what Chisholm was talking about that ultimately for an executive office like the presidency? What we want is a guy 'cause guys run things. I think this is you know, kind of. Under the table, so to speak, you know, sort of behind closed doors, people don't like to talk about it. Some people argue about it. But history seems to hold on it. So even more interesting, of course, if our first woman, president is come la- Harris. If we have a a woman of color, you know, if we sort of can break a bunch of barriers all at once, you know, and I think that in some ways. So the same as what we saw in the Chicago election that the women of color have historically been doing so much of the the work of progressive politics of Democrats, you know, in an I think that a lot of us are recognizing that and saying we need to elevate that in because they've been doing that work. There are people who who've been around been doing important things for so long that you know, if you can start to to recognize women's work that one of the things will recognize how much role the women of color have been playing. Yeah. I think you're right about that. I think it's also the case that this sort of the individual person, comma Harris is a really good example. I mean, she she was a first in her other elected positions right in. So those women just like the men who are for you know, they have such incredible courage, right and personal strength. And so I think that, you know, while you're right that lots of different kinds of women, including women of color have been the backbone of progressive politics. It's also true that for those who are going to. To seek these highest physicians they really have to be personally prepared. And I think that that's in personally prepared when they step out for a form of sexism. So to speak that the rest of us won't experience because we're not stepping out that way, which of course, makes it all the more notable that they're doing that. Also, something that applied or applies today to you know, to the white women in a major party because as we've discussed before, you know, that's only a very recent phenomenon. Right. So these women generally are just sort of. Remarkable people. And I think probably understand even if they don't mention it that I'm prepared to break down barriers. I have the courage to do it. And to keep on doing. If for instance, I lose couldn't did. Well, ran again by and my guess is that for the women who are running. Now, you know, it may not be the last time if they don't, prevail. Either. He I think that's something. We didn't see at all of for better or worse than twenty sixteen that we're really seeing in twenty eighteen clearly most of the people running or not going to win the nomination. But so many of them. I it feels like they're either saying, well, if I run that's good national exposure for potential VP's slot, or, you know, this is great for for years from now eight years from now when I run again, you know, obviously, that's not true of Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, but you know, for people like Pete Buddha, judge, you know, does he expect to win? I don't know. But but clearly a lot more people know who he is now than to two months ago. Yeah. It's an interesting question as to whether I mean sort of want to put yourself out there, right, male or female, your subject, all kinds of scrutiny. Right. And he's after all kinds of rules and regulations. Regarding running a campaign or being candidate. So you're right that the good news is they get themselves out there and their name gets noticed and they're prepared to run again. In most cases, if they don't win the first time on the other hand, they really have to take stock of what's my life. So with just goes back to in my in my view, just such a ration- these women, and and just. Aren't we lucky so to speak aren't we fortunate that we can? Have such people decide to run and put themselves out there for president for mayor for whatever it is. And I just I kind of feel since we're just kind of recovering from this Chicago election to say out loud. I mean, you know, we are blessed dry women are willing to do this. And that we're able to talk about it and be supportive put our shoulders to wheel. Absolutely. I know that we'll keep talking about the twenty twenty candidates. But one thing that has been just so amazing to see how much the women are supporting each other who are running. You know, you don't see Tomlin Elizabeth Warren taking jabs at each other. You see them supporting each other in in calling out each other's good ideas, and that's just incredible in. So so such a breath of fresh air. Really I feel like twenty. Sixteen with terrible. And I would obviously change it if I could. But the one good thing that's come out of it is that I feel like it's activated. So many women and made them realize that we have to support other women candidates ethically. In a way that I don't know whether we would have been activated all at one in this way. If if twenty sixteen hadn't shaken out the way that it did. Now, I think you're right. I there's no evidence to suggest that as many women were activated in this way ever before. So hopefully, we can make something wonderful. Come of it. So for some wonderful things already have, but wouldn't the presidency be the best. Right. So I'm looking forward to keeping talking in particular thing forward to our next episode when we think pick a it'd be good to take a closer look at this Chicago election. Absolutely. In the context, we just we're in about how women both the candidates that want to won the won a loss and the new women in the city council, and those of us who've been active what lessons we can pull from that about how women can organize nationally. And I was just put one thing in the minds of the listeners as you think about this the case that and I believe this is unique that together Laurie life would who will be mayor of Chicago in a month, or so and Toni preckwinkle who's president of the Cook County board together are now running a regional set of two. Governments larger than close to half the state right with with responsibility for healthcare in criminal Justice and comic development, and what a wide open wonderful opportunity there is there for them to sort of show the way, for instance, for what women presidents could do. So I'm looking forward to the conversation in that context. And I just wanted to say that here in Madison, not only did we just elect a woman as mayor. But we now have our first all female school board of the Madison metropolitan school district, which has been really exciting to see because a lot of the women normally the school board is a nonpartisan election, and so people run for specific seats, and that was still true. But a lot of the women teamed up several of them ran like co campaign together, you know, if you vote for me, you should also vote for her and it worked out really well because now we have an off, you know, Gobert, so we're also sort of it's going to be exciting to see what happens in medicine to as our leadership become almost exclusively female phenomenal. Or just look at what we have. You know, these women running things, right? Yeah. I say. All right. We'll that is a nice happy note to end things on for this episode will be back in two weeks again, and we'll dive in a little more to the Chicago election in some lessons that we learned there should thank you once again. So he and Rebecca for joining me today, and this is exciting will will keep talking about how we vote her in. Of course, everyone should feel free to tweeden atas Facebook, Instagram E mail carrier pigeon hover you'd like to reach us. We will be happy to talk to you. Right. The voter. In segment is a collaboration of two broad talking politics and author Rebecca side are same song is called. Are. You listening off of the album elephants shaped trees by the ban, immune ary, and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork. Is by Matthew. Whiff land was created for use by this podcast. You can contact us to broads talking politics at g mail dot com or on Twitter. Or Facebook at two broad talk. You can find all of our episodes at two broads talking politics dot com or anywhere podcast found.

Chicago President president Tomlin Elizabeth Warren executive Pete Buddha Rebecca Nikki Haley Hillary Clinton Joe Biden Barack Obama Republican party Kelly Dick Durbin Facebook Sophie Kellyanne Conway Sarah Palin Hira Becca Rebecca sigh
Vote Her In: The One-Year Anniversary

Two Broads Talking Politics

31:35 min | 7 months ago

Vote Her In: The One-Year Anniversary

"You're listening to the one year anniversary episode of vote her in a collaboration between two broads talking politics and author. Rebecca Saif where we look at the movement to elect our first woman president. Hello everyone at this is Kelly. You are listening to vote her in which is a collaboration between two bronze talking politics and author Rebecca Xiv where we look at the movement to elect Hopefully our first woman president may be at least our first woman vice president and some issues that are surrounding. That's a for our one year anniversary of vote. Her in I am joined by two people today. One of whom is my two brads talking. Politics Co Hosts Sofi. Hi Sophie. Hey Kelly and of course also with us is Rebecca Saif Lower Rebecca Ivor So Rebecca I will turn it over to you now as we look at this sort of one year anniversary of this project we've been working on together and In where we are in the state of electing our first woman president so good could be with both of you so fi. It's good to hear your voice. So yeah as Kelly mentioned we thought it was a good Sort of point at this first anniversary number one to kind of declare a victory for our bit of trying to share the news about women and inspire women to be active on Candidates behalf but also Take a serious look at what looks like it may be ahead You may remember that we took a look in late December in our last show of two thousand nineteen. I'm what we had learned or thought we had learned in this series of interviews. We did Last year and there was also an article summarizing those which you can see them cast. If you haven't yet which I encourage everyone to take a look at it in any event but today we're at a point We're doing the show on the day off and after last night's yet again another Debate and we'll get to that shortly but just to give everyone a frame of reference in refresh. Everyone's memory we've gone through two caucuses one primary. We're a few days away from South Carolina's contest. Then we'll be super Tuesday just a week out Followed by some of our personal favorites states Michigan on March tenth going on March Seventeenth and of course Sophie's Home State Wisconsin on April seventh. We kinda of wanted to all summarize here what we think's been accomplished notwithstanding however anyone may choose to vote and we may talk about that a little bit more Or you know what we think some of the troubling aspects of all this which we will also talk about. But I'm always sort of trying to look at the glasses being half full as a community organizer. That's certainly how. I was trained so to summarize on that front and not in order of importance but in the order in which I thought about these issues on the first is of course no other at no other time in American history. Have we had a major political party? Primary more than one Bible woman candidates and of course This year over these last twelve months There have been six women in the Democratic primary for them Have had very strong showings and we still have to. Who are fighting hard and fighting smart. So that's number one. We've come a long way the second thing that I was thinking about as we look back at this past month of these two caucuses and primary is the fact that Between Them Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar. He's won tens of thousands of votes. And so I don't think there can be a question here. And of course the polling data supports this about the perceived legitimacy. That's even a concept these days For Women to be in the race for President what does seem to be cases. People fear. Well maybe she can't get elected so therefore I couldn't vote for her so we'll talk about that more but let's not forget that these are the choices that many many people have made and many more will make maybe end of This next week another important point and this doesn't speak to the merits of any particular candidacy or anyone's personal fades but Both Senator Warren and Senator Klobuchar have prevailed in a very tough competition when several of their Senate colleagues Male colleagues have not and I point that out Not as a judgment but just to say that what we celebrated and want to celebrate it again again is just how tough and smart and disciplined and determined These women are and therefore why we can be in my view. You know confident about whatever they do going forward not to say. Take a lesson from their playbook about a grip that's required. The other thing related to this is and we make it into this. A bit more to is the notion that in each case in Senator Warren's and Senator Club showers they kind of have positioned themselves As a leader at a certain point on the spectrum of policy and politics and approach to governance. And I think that that's again not important so much as to the merits because each of us will evaluate those policy positions those political perspective but the fact that these women are so to speak lagging behind any of the other guys if you WanNa talk about position further to the left. You're going to talk about Elizabeth Warren. If you're GonNa Talk About Position Mortga the center you're going to talk about Amy Klobuchar. And in that of course. We had a few weeks ago and endorsement From The New York Times of both of them and what I wanted to say about that for us to think on is that while. I know I've talked to some people who see that as so to speak a cop out one person said to me. I was jumping up and down on my chair. Couldn't have dreamed of. This wouldn't have dreamed of any would've seen foolish. But here we are saying you. Vote for either one of these two fabulous women and you America will do just fine and then I guess. The last sort of overarching declare. Victory is Saul Alinsky. Used to say Point is that regardless of what may roll out over the next couple of months and we have primaries until June there is a victory for particularly warn Cobra Sharp. I would say for all of the women who put themselves out there in setting the stage for their being looked at if they WANNA be as potential vice presidential candidates Certainly for other leading positions in a democratic administration and not to mention the US Supreme Court. And I would just say this on this last point that Lest anyone feels like they're too tired to continue before you know it. They'll even be another presidential election upon us and we will again want to Work hard to elect a pro choice pro women candidates up and down the ballot. So I kind of think that that factors into being grateful for everything that these women have done. That's it. I thought we could kind of jump in and you know have this discussion and hopefully for those of you who are listening. It will provide a context for your own thinking and your own work and UH weeks as we go forward just one other note on this. We're GONNA work hard to have a series of Diverse in different voices over the next couple of months and On voter in to talk about some of these issues so you'll definitely want to keep here. Podcast tuned right here. Yes so I think one of the questions that you had posed to us in thinking about this episode. Was You know if we were advising senators weren't included? Shar in the run-up to Super Tuesday. What would we counsel for them? And I think what's instructive for me? At least to think about is they've both had sort of breakout moments in the past month or so and you know what what is it that made each of them. Have those breakout moments and you know to better for a club showers case that. Do Better in the New Hampshire primary than people were expecting and for Warren. She's had this tremendous fundraising push over the past week or so and I think for both of them. It was a really standing up showing that they could be fighters you know. I think that in a lot of ways is what people are looking for right now and it's such a fraught thing for women to be able to do for women candidates to be fighters but people have responded very well to that in both of their cases and that may be you know in some cases because of the moment were in people. WanNa know that the candidate we choose can can fight back against Donald Trump and the whole Republican party establishment But it has You know they're certainly backlash third people. That don't like it when we're in a Feistier by for everyone who doesn't like it. There are certainly lots of people who are then cheering her on. And so that seems to be a you know. The can't were were just at a moment. In this primary that nobody can sort of slink back and try to be you know sort of the adults in room or something that what everyone seems to want someone who's really willing to to fight their voice out there to to push and so that's what. I would encourage both them to be doing in this leader so I agree and I would actually go further and say outright. Feel free to be angry. One of the things I saw. That was so striking in the Nevada. Debate was at both of the the televised moments. The moments that went viral were one of them was a moment with Elizabeth. Warren and one of them was a moment with Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Moore and moment was the moment when she clearly got pissed off at Michael Bloomberg and just let him have it. And then the Amy Klobuchar moment was the moment where people to judge was criticizing her proving forgotten the name of a world leader on television and she said are you calling me stupid and she was clearly really angry and I contrast that thinking back to long ago when it was twenty sixteen. Is that for many? Remember how calm Hillary Clinton was on stage with Donald trump like she. I was yelling at him for her but she was just like smile and be relaxed and calm and I'm thinking about like how she must have been so angry inside that like just complete lunatic who is so unqualified standing on the stage. Next to me a person who's so much smarter better qualified better. Doing than he is and yet she was. She had to keep it so calm. You know she couldn't be quote unquote shrill or quote unquote bitchy. I feel like watching Elizabeth. Warren mclovin work. I think the anger is kind of the key. I think there's so much anger in the electorate right now particularly from women and people of Color about the ways in which we have been doing the hard work of activism and yet not seeing results from it for ourselves. I think there's a lot of anger right now and I think if they tap into that that can be really really powerful. You know. I'm really glad that to hear you say that Sofi. Obviously you've probably seen these two. There've been some articles on this point saying that is America or American women. More to the point ready for an angry president and one of the things. I've always said and they want to get to the Clinton example is You have to confront and when the timing is right and when the circumstances require it and the worst anyone can say about you as well. She was angry and pushy. Well she was angry and pushy on behalf of something really important right. Which is what you're saying here. I thought about this in the context of as you're pointing out what happened with Hillary Clinton in two thousand sixteen and you know the the challenge here is In perhaps in some of these close races maybe Michigan will be one maybe Wisconsin. We'll be one we don't know What are your thoughts? Kennedy? An Sophie about you know if you were there is voter and you were organizing women in one of those states. What's the message you'd like to hear from Senator Warner Senator Club shy? That would just get everyone out. I would want to hear that I it. This is pretty much the message that they they have been sending that that they are not just Just fighters nachos mad but but are fighting for us. And I think that has been what has been So effective about Warren's message the whole time that she's been running as she's brought it back every time to you know. Yeah maybe the economy is working for some people but is it working for you. You know how. How do we make sure that the economy is working for everybody? You know I think it closer talks a lot about things like mental health you know and is that are these things working for for you. The voter at the person on the ground. I want to be fighting. Not because I want you know that fancy house in DC. Not because I want you know. There's the fancy pen I get to sign laws with but because I want to help you and I want to make your life better and I think that that's an argument. That women can make very powerfully. Because that's what women do. In general I is is fight Four people and is is how people you know in you you think about this as as MOMS chromos. Teachers is lawyers end and so. I think that they can make that really compelling argument and I think that that really gets voters motivated I agree and I think really to put the emphasis on On the what? You said that some people say that this is working. But it's not working for you and I can see that because I think there's a big sort of energy in the mid West right now feeling left behind. I think that's been happening for like the past twenty or thirty years particularly in areas where people feel like okay. The rest of the world is doing fine. But everybody's forgotten about my little town in the midwest everybody's forgotten about us and we're not doing so well and I think speaking to those people and saying you know what all these people in Washington are saying. Oh the economy is so great but like is it. Because you're not doing. Wow because farmer suicides. An all time high in Wisconsin. So obviously like things are going well for you. Tell me more about how I can help you. I think that's a really effective message to say I see you. Even though other people might be doing fine I see you and I care about you. You know one of the things. I talk about this in my book. Voter was the importance of in lots of other people. Of course we've talked about this true about building. Alliances among women across class and race lines and in order to get what we need in order to be helped in the way that we need to be. And you know it's an ongoing challenge. There is still data about. I don't know how good it is and we'll see as the race unfolds about Y Women Not Favoring Democratic candidate necessarily. I think it's sort of too early to be dispositive about that but I do think that we're seeing you know. A lot of women vote for the male candidates in this race. There's no reason so far and that may continue to be true so one of the questions. That's come up in these last few days prominently in the press is whether it's time For either warring or kosher or both of them to quit the presidential race and needless to say I'm not speaking to the mayor's bad idea at all but as politicians of course they have to consider what what they're hearing from the media and otherwise and and how they Preserve their brands so to speak and their point of view and I sort of thought it might be fun for us to think about this because it doesn't often happen. They happen for sort of everyday people. I gotTA quit this job. No we just put our heads down you know and keep trying to work harder but say you you know. Kelly say you were in senator clover shirts shoes or Senator Warren shoes. Neither of whom has one So far in both of whom have a big challenge ahead of them in South Carolina How would you? How would you evaluate that matter repeat? Let me quit while I'm ahead and TRY TO POSITION MYSELF. For instance say to BP. I think the answers different for the two of them not so much because of their standing in the polls or anything like that but because of the the lanes that they inhabit because the moderate lean is so much more crowded right now in this race. I think that I if I were Senator Klobuchar I would think seriously about whether people rightly or wrongly think that she is standing in the way of a moderate gaining consensus. And then you people a lot of people really want somebody to beat Bernie and you know. So if because she's in that more crowded lane if she is in the way of that you know. It's it's possible that that would sort of hurt her brand at some point that maybe she stayed in the race too long. You know we can to beat all day whether that is actually true or not whether that game theory makes sense. But I think that there's a perception of that. And so if she let's say were to leave the race and endorsed Joe Biden. Who seems like you know of the the moderates may be the one who could who could pull it off? You know maybe that does give her You know whether a VP spot for him or somewhere in his cabinet. You know. I I could see that being very valuable for her. I'm not sure that there's as much of an argument For Senator Warren to drop out. Because I'm not sure what it gets her and I'm not sure that it helps this project that everyone wants to beat Bernie because they think of Warren drops out half her voters might go to Bernie and then that actually helps him so you know. I don't know that it positions her quite as well and may be staying in the race and being the fighter the person to take down. Bloomberg is is what positions her better for you know a VP slot or a position in a cabinet or just being able to stay in the Senate and she could work there. So I don't necessarily think it's the same answer for both of them but I. I do think that it's something they need to be thinking about seriously You know I don't want them to drop out of the race. You know I said the other day like my choices. Two through eight have already dropped out and you know. I don't want more of my first place choices to drop out but I think it's something that they need to consider a specially if there is widespread panic rightly or wrongly about Bernie cutting the nomination. I This is interesting. I agree with you that it's different for both of them and I agree. It's because of the lanes but my conclusion is the opposite that because the moderate lane is so crowded. I'M NOT SURE WHO. Amy Klobuchar would know to endorse or to negotiate with whereas Elizabeth Warren clearly. She's a line on the left with Bernie and so she could go to Bernie and say. Hey if I drop out. Can you guarantee me? Xyz And then that materially helps Bernie if amy drops out. It's not entirely clear to me who that helps. Does it help Bloomberg does it help. Biden doesn't help Buddha judge and so for her. It's a lot going to be a lot harder to figure out. Who are you negotiated with you? Are you going to go all three of them and say if I drop out? Will any of you give me this? I mean for her. I I think that would be a harder decision so for for me I think. Yeah that is a very. I mean. They're both really smart analyses. I I agree with pieces of both. I would add one other thing to this. I guess from the vantage point of My own involvement going back aways one of the most important things that happened For African Americans in presidential primaries was of course the fact that Jesse Jackson stayed in and he stayed in and he ran again for years. Later and my recollection. I don't have these numbers in front of me. Is that at the end of the Democratic primaries I think in the second campaign he had received twenty percent or so of people's votes that was enormous. That had never happened before it shows the strength of him personally but certainly of an African American candidate and their viability. And you know. I think that that's an instructive lesson. for both Senators as we are in this place this year and go forward a wanted to turn for a minute to this point about the vice presidency and talk quickly about that and then I think we're gonNA WANNA close today's episode with a little bit of Inspirational what's next to do discussion. But you know. Obviously there's been lots of discussion in this whole context about Some people saying that a woman vice presidential is really important other saying not so much. Certainly Stacey Abrams yourself. Right out there a couple of weeks ago. Think she'd be happy to be the candidate with anyone Kamala Harris has been Significantly more circumspect but then of course if it's the case as we've just discussed You know there are other Women who could be considered for that spot not only senator warm and Senator Klobuchar. Certainly you know other members of the Senate or governor. That spot has a history of being considered by presidential candidates for a range of people. So I just was curious about kind of what you're nearing so to speak on your respective streets about this aspect of things. Well Rachel Bitta coffer has said that she thinks that Stacey Abrams is the should be the VP. Pick for any of them who are left And you know I can definitely see that. I love soup runs. I think she is incredibly inspirational. I think her as Rachel Offers. Her charisma is just extra. Think it's hard to even measure but you know I don't know. I think that that would make a lot of sense. I think that would be a good pick. She certainly has the the the chops of of being out there doing the work. And so I think that would be good. I think that the a lot of the so-called k. high of the Communist supporters still have not settled on a candidate. There's sort of reluctantly deciding to vote for someone you know. Some of them were in some of them Biden. And I think that you could get an awful lot of them really excited and a and a lot of them. Are you know people who are happy to give a lot of money into a ton of work and so I think you know comma could be a very strategic pick a you know a across the board as well and I think it helps that? California is a pretty safe place for us to be taking a senator out of you know. We're we're not gonNA have to worry about losing that Senate seat it'll still go to a democrat. So I think in that case you know. Kamla might be a really good pick. Although she'd be an excellent attorney general to if that was the thing that she was interested in doing in the future so I could easily see either one of them. And I think I I'm I'm going to be deeply uncomfortable with the Democratic ticket is all white and so I think that you know in that case. Both of them would would help with that issue as well. I think that you know as much as I would love to see Warren As VP of she is not president. I do think that taking somebody in Massachusetts where there is a Republican governor. And you know we could at least short term end up with a Republican senator in that seat I think could be Kinda Frisky so you know. I think we need to think about those sorts of issues as well But you know I. I'm all for the Stacy Harris as VP to literally anybody. Well I'm fairly sure that in Massachusetts you actually have to have a special election. They're not gubernatorial early appointed. Yeah it would be derby a few month gap at least well. There was an appointed person so I wanted to say here that I saw a data point earlier today and in another context which I think is important to what we're doing here in to all our listeners are doing it was about The fact that In the last few years I forget the actual time period only fourteen percent of any exhibits in major museums. Were of women artists that made me think about political pundits which who of course are overwhelmingly male as well and and overwhelmingly white so I wanted to say to our listeners. That well of the three of us. Don't pretend to be totally knowledgeable on this subject. I think it's really important for us to have this conversation. Among ourselves among women who do pay attention who do care and who are thinking hard about this and so that's the context in which We had this discussion today And I just wanted to close it with The notion that You know of course. The most important thing for us all to do is to stay mobilized There's an argument for focusing on whatever candidate matters the most to you or if not playing the odds. I've started getting phone calls from friends asking me about that. Because they don't want to waste their time or their vote. But what we do want to say to you here is just. Please stay mobilized active. Do everything you can killing and Sophie. Any final on that this is something will be returning to for sure but I think it's also important for people to remember that as important as the top of the ticket is. It's not the only part of the ticket and so you know. If in the end your favorite candidate is not nominee that will certainly be the case for some percentage of the people listening here that you know. Find Down Ballot race. That is exciting to find a woman running for state legislature governor. Something that you're really excited about passionate about and knock on doors and increase turnout for that down. Ballot candidates will also increase turnout for the ballot. So you can. You can go out there and be motivated whether or not. The actual presidential nominee is the one who inspires you. I agree and I want to put in a plug as well for pacing yourself I see a lot of people that I know who got active in politics. Oppose Twenty Sixteen. Who you know a little crazy for the midterms really got into it? And burn themselves out and now are feeling horribly guilty It's okay to symptoms not be able to take on everything. I find it more helpful to sort of budget out my time and say okay. I will write this number of postcards every week and no more. I will donate this amount of money every month. And no more. I will canvass this number of times and no more and that way sort of set yourself limit so that you have because this is not actually sprint. This is the this is going to be a marathon. You know the twenty twenty election is not the end of politics And we have to keep doing this literally for the rest of our lives. So I I really suggest remembering that. You sometimes need to leave you know. Leave yourself a little strength or as the Internet. Likes to say more spoons for for later on down the road So feel free to like you know set set some boundaries for yourself who I would just close by saying. I heartily agree with both Kelly and Sophie. I would say I guess That I do think that twenty twenty at least in my lifetime which is long one at this point More important by far than any other election I've ever seen so I kind of have tried to take for myself and obviously you have to give yourself time the respite take for myself. This notion that We do have to fight as hard as we can and work as hard as we can this year for the sake of everybody and not to be corny. But certainly we among us you particular. So I'm the note that we're all in this together we're going to take care of each other And on this first anniversary of voter in thank you all for listening in. Please do send us your thoughts about what we're doing and how we should do it and We'll just move along so thanks to everyone. Vote in segment is a collaboration of two broad talking politics and author Rebecca side. Our theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album elephant shaped trees by the band? Immune ARY and we're using it with permission of the band. Our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew Whiff Land and was created for us by this podcast. You can contact us at two broads talking. Politics at GMAIL DOT COM or on twitter or facebook at two bronze talk you can find all of our episodes at two broads talking politics dot com or anywhere podcast or found.

Elizabeth Warren Senator Klobuchar senator VP Kelly Sophie Bernie Wisconsin Senate Joe Biden president Hillary Clinton South Carolina Michigan Amy Klobuchar America Elizabeth President Rebecca Saif Rebecca Xiv
Jared Yates Sexton on Impeachment

Two Broads Talking Politics

28:35 min | 1 year ago

Jared Yates Sexton on Impeachment

"Hello this is teddy today's my eighth birthday and you're listening to talking politics everyone this is kelly ali with to produce talking politics i'm on with my co-host sophie hey sophie hey kelly and joining us today is a returning guest s. two is an author and political analyst jared yates sexton hi jared hey everybody so we last how'd you on about six months ago and banda's things have changed a little bit in the meantime was it was life life has gotten busy we we have some some news to catch up on so i'm going to tell her listeners that we are sitting down to record this at about three p m eastern on friday friday october fourth so that is the you know the where we are in the news if more news breaks if trump commits five more impeachable offenses before this gets up as will likely happen you know just no that's where the conversation was situated okay well let's let's start with us let's talk talk about the the the spin that the republicans are trying to put on everything that is happening the obviously impeachable offenses that that that trump has been doing nonstop basically and jared i know you've written some on twitter about kind of the way that the republicans are trying to play this so what let's just talk about that you know what are you seeing that the republicans are doing or not doing what is this sort of vortex that they're they're in that is keeping them from seeing what's really happening sure and like everything that we're talking about this this is very very complicated and weird nonsensical and does circles circles so i i know personally from my conversations nations with the republican staffs and aids that there is a really great existential crisis in the republican party right now if you talk to people off the record or if you talk to people on background right now they will tell you that they consider this to be really really bad political hand for them if if you're just having a discussion and it's not going into print they understand that this president has done some really really worrisome troubling things the what is happening with the republican party is what has been going on since donald trump came on the scene and even years before that which is this idea of gamesmanship which is you know the democrat republicans have been engaged in trench warfare now for going on thirty years and they don't i don't feel as if they can have a discussion about this or admit any sort of fault or actual concern in public because to do so to be to grant democrats victory sorry so there's a lot of game playing that's happening right now and at a lot of trying to play linguistics games and even more troubling i think which is what i think everyone should be really concerned with is basically just sort of excusing what trump is doing and basically basically giving some credence to conspiracy theory that is completely nonsensical and is really really dangerous some subverts the rule of law and our republic so i think this is one of those places where this game is extremely troubling and really really dangerous and and putting lives at risk and is i could threaten to tear this country apart but i think that game is is ultimately what's being played right now at one point do you think that the gamesmanship sort of flips like in other words at what point do you think the republicans refusing to give the democrats democrats quote unquote a win turned into the republicans giving themselves a lot well this is a this is a big thing and actually for all all the critique so we can have a donald trump i think his intuition on certain subjects has been really really exceptional in comparison with other people there was talk for a very very long time particularly when the miller report was coming out and i cannot believe that was only a few months ago there was this idea that the republicans had their primary position and they had their secondary position the primary position with support support donald trump at all costs and the secondary position is well if we lose him we can f- pence but what trump has done in a few ways and in other ways it's been very glaringly obvious he has made warnings warnings that is basically said if you're going to look into my conversations with ukraine and afford officials in this situation you should also look into mike pence's calls and basically this has been a warning shot across the bow that says if i go down you take with you which more or less turns this into for lack of a better phrase a suicide pack between republicans and trump if this flips i mean we're going to see a situation that would have to echo what happened with richard nixon in a the watergate scandal where republicans realized that they they're simply not tenable way to continue with the position and it's better to have him resign but in our current system in the way the right wing echo chamber works i don't know when we reached that point or if we could one of the things that you've been talking about and and has to do with your upbringing is this idea of a civil war and that there are people who are really looking to maybe start a civil war and maybe that'll happen and maybe it won't but how dangerous the language is around all of this no wonder if you could talk a little bit about that and you know what let what we're seeing that the trump isn't even maybe doing purposely at maybe he is maybe he hasn't but that could be a a very real effective active everything that's happening yeah so i grew up in a really really poor factory family in southern indiana and we grew up with what i would surge rises and extremists type of of christianity an extremist type of baptist faith and a lot of people have this it's an apocalyptic christianity windy that believes that there is a satanic force to the world that is fighting america and is trying to unseat it and and there's a lot of elements of christian white identity they go along with us too so basically the idea that you have globalist so to speak who are trying to 'cause wars wars in america and and hurt white people more or less this this is the fabric of what some people would call the new world order or as it's been rebranded the deep upstate with donald trump continually saying that there's a conspiracy against him the democrats are trying to ruin the country that they're traders that the media's traders i don't know that not necessarily understand that he's signaling to people like the ones that i grew up with and the people in the church that i grew up with but what's actually happening is he's telling them at this alternate reality where there's this narrative that people who collected guns and trapped and put together all their armories and and you know have bug out bags ags or bunkers or whatever you wanna call it that they are actually living in the moment that they've been taught to wait for their entire lives that doesn't mean that there's going to be a civil war it doesn't i mean obviously that we're going to have you know one side against another on on battlefields but what does happen is there are individuals who hear this they believe it and they take action in staccato terrorists situations lone wolf terrorists we've already seen this happened multiple times and for anybody who's been covering politics there is a very concerted effort to terrorise journalists and politicians to threaten and to occasionally test boundaries of safety the the the truth is whether or not trump knows it or not he's activating the impulse in a lot of different people and i think this is one of the reasons why it's really really important for people to get this story straight understand it and to not sensationalized unnecessarily or try and profit from it because the longer this thing goes and the more cornered he becomes and you know what was it yesterday it might have been two weeks ago i can't even keep track of him anymore where he sent on camera i want these these is countries tariff here in our elections the longer that we let this go even as he's self-incrimination becomes obvious that he needs to go the more chance there is for him to come desperate and really signal to these people who again have been waiting most of their lives to be in this situation and again i don't think it's intentional or maybe it isn't central i'm not sure her but whatever it is it's really really dangerous what is the sort of way out of that i mean i i don't know i don't you don't don't need to have the answer to that but you know what what are things that the democrats that republicans who aren't on board with all of this could it'd be or should be saying that might ease some of those tensions and pull back some of that rhetoric you know are the other ways that we can frame our own language that will help well unfortunately a lot of this is taking place on the right i've been doing a lot of research lately on domestic terrorism i'm particularly from a christian white extremists and one thing that happens is in periods of political tumult particularly win the right NBN are a and they sort of extremist sort of get on the same wavelength and they talk about the danger of globalist and liberal conspiracies there's a tendency for these these things to happen so what would need to happen for this to deescalate would be that the right would have to reject this call for you know civil war or even calling it a coup republicans need to realize that there are consequences to these words and i think that a lot of do but they're very very afraid to stand up in the face of trump i know over the past couple couple of weeks republicans have particularly hidden away from cameras they're not very fond of going on on the record right now and saying one thing or another i think think they wanna keep their face away from trump and keep their identities away from trump but hopefully the right will will realize they need to tamp down these calls as far as his liberals and democrats i know personally one thing that i'm looking at with this entire impeachment crisis is i personally am i'm trying to keep this in its in its sober place i mean this is a really terrible situation and i don't think anybody should necessarily be gleeful or celebratory story i i don't think that there's anything to enjoy about this or to necessarily be excited about but it's it's more of a a really really dangerous sad situation and i think we have to tamp down the idea of partisanship and look at this from the idea that this is actually about maintaining the country and maintaining tainting our laws as opposed to some sort of partisan victory which i think is what got us in this situation in the first place that's a little bit about timing you mentioned it's pretty dangerous injury the rhetoric right now and that there's the potential for trump to as the story develops and and sort of sinks into the ground a little little bit for him to feel cornered and for him to sort of verbally call on these people in the in this particular way and the other hand it's possible but some republicans particularly in the senate are waiting for the primaries to be over for twenty twenty so what do you think in terms of like timing do you think there's a a something to be said for hurrying up and getting through impeachment very quickly or do you think we should kind of wait until so after the primaries are done republicans might not have as much to fear from trump that is the ten thousand dollar pyramid question i'm not sure i the the one thing that i've been doing particularly in my research i've been looking at a lot of how game theory has affected our current situation nation which basically turned politics into a game or each side has to make logical moods they give them the most advantage you know the type of zero sum politics i'm i'm not sure what the correct answer is in terms of strategy but i think particularly with what we're looking at i know for a while democrats sort of running their hands over the idea of bringing about an impeachment inquiry or calling for it but i i think when people were saying well you can't do it it won't matter it'll get voted down but then when democrats oh crap stood up and i think that they did the right thing we saw that the narrative changed to meet that and respond to that so my natural impulse on this is to try and move away from the idea of game theory or strategy and in terms of the impeachment inquiry i would say that it needs to be done in the way it needs to be done god if that goes quickly if that happens before the end of the year so be it if it needs to go longer and it eats into the two thousand twenty cycle i think that's totally fine i think this is the time where people need to stand up and realize that that politics as as we know it isn't conducive to making democracy work this gamesmanship ship one upsmanship doesn't necessarily work and he gets us in worse trouble so in in my own feeling on this situation i would say let the investigation take as long as it takes and really really hope that there are republicans and i say this knowing full and well but i'm not expecting this to happen i hope that it does help that republicans pins standup do the right thing and and actually realized that they have a moment in history that they need to play which we've seen in the past certainly with richard nixon we saw him resign because republicans told him it was time to i don't necessarily think that donald trump will do that but i i would really really hope that republican pressure would step up one way or another whether audits before or after primaries before or after the election season really takes off so you said on twitter i think it was just a few hours go but you know the this blending together we republicans used to get their principles and strategies from think tanks you you know there used to be in this sort of was on purpose and they had sort of very clear messaging around the think tank says that all republicans are now going to do this and talk this way and these are the points we're gonna say and now that's not doesn't seem to be so much the case anymore are you know this think tank still exist and there are certainly some people still listening to them but you know a lot of this is coming from the dark corners of the internet or the sean hannity's in the world do you have any sense of why that happened we can certainly see how dangerous it is you know that trump is getting his news from you you know fox news but how do we get away from that how do we convince people to you know not that i i want us all listening to republican think tanks anymore but you know at least there was some sort of research going on there yeah i would say what ended up happening is there was a moment in history particularly with the founding of fox news in nineteen ninety six where roger ailes and his group of people decided that they could win politically by manipulating reality and sort of giving these narratives i i was reading something the other day it was an account john bainer he was meeting with roger ailes i want to say this was in two thousand tin and he realized that roger ailes had started believing his own propaganda and was looking for black helicopters thought barack obama was going to imprison him and was secretly partly a muslim so one of the things that ends up happening i think when we look at this period of history later on is we're going to realize that the echo chamber of the right created a feedback loop in which it created this dystopia america where people would be afraid and they would vote republican and they would buy guns and and they would oppose people like obama and eventually they started reporting the things that the people who believed what they said were saying and it just got worse and worse by her degree it doesn't help of course that sean hannity has shown a proclivity to believing every single conspiracy theory that comes across his desk whether it's death rich or what is now being called hold on the insurance policy and if anybody doesn't have looked into this i would advise them to this is what is leading to the ukrainian crisis and this impeachment the crisis is that trump giuliani and apparently everyone around them now believes in one of the most nonsensical conspiracy theories that has been tracked down on to websites like four chan and h. hand and like the most fever dreamed youtube conspiracy theorist imaginable but they have started to believe their own propaganda and get lost in their own narratives which is one of the most dangerous things that can happen i think the responsibility for the arming this comes on the media and i and to be frank i i think that the mainstream media has done a rather poor job of covering things over the last few years i even now as trump is saying more and more dangerous uninjured things there are still headlines and still stories and reportage that you notice where it's still frames it as if it's normal because he's president of the united states what the media needs to do and particularly people in public i need to do is before they discuss anything of what's going on this impeachment crisis crisis they need to say offhand the story behind this and the narrative that's being pushed is completely asinine and unreasonable and there's absolutely no truth to it and here's here's what's happening and i think that will probably do something in terms of putting a dent into this messaging but eventually the fever has to break the these narratives half the sort of collapse under their own ethnicity and hopefully we can restore some sort of sanity to our politics in no what's interesting is you're talking about people starting to believe their own story believed their own hype you know i am now a i guess a part of the media i mean we were already sort of with this podcast but but now with dumb kasdan you know we we purposely made it a nonprofit so that we wouldn't be driven by numbers of clicks the you know we we wouldn't we'd be trying to tell the truth and not you know what people are drawn to but it's so hard not to see hey this story is doing really well maybe we should should publish more of those kinds of stories and you know i i can understand i can't understand i think the idea of starting to believe your own stories but i can totally i understand how people get wrapped up in this idea of this is the kind of news that sells and and we have jobs to keep and so we're going to keep pushing out that kind of news i mean is there a solution to that short of like news not being able to be corporate which i don't know how you do that at this point but you what what what what's the balance there i mean you you write books you know to do you feel you feel yourself also being sort of pulled into that like this is the kind of thing that people want to read i listen that is a massive massive thing behind what's happening here we we have a situation now and and i looked at the impeachment crisis particularly and i realized that one of the things that's driving this and i was talking to someone the other day they said it feels like the season finale of america erica decline and it's true we have started to think about our politics and our moment in history as being a televised narrative i i think that there are some people out there and i know that i've had conversations with people who feel this way who look at impeachment and particularly months of it they look at it as wonderful hole for ratings and clicks and advertising and there are certainly people and again they probably won't say this in public but trump has been great for their business the anxiety and the tension in that he is created has been the rising water there's raised all ships and there are certainly people who have fortunes and booming businesses mrs to thank for what trump has done and what he's created i think the problem here is that we have to disentangle the idea of of profit and and success from the health of the country and and this has been a problem for decades now but it has gotten to the point where it is created a state of hyper reality ah it again feels like a television show because it's a television show and in terms of journalists that is one of tougher nuts to crack right i i know personally as a freelance journalist when i get on social media i'm well aware of what will drive up numbers if i want to drive up numbers sometimes as i look at my phone in quiet terror and i think about how that could drive me to do things that i don't necessarily think are right in order to to have some sort of of boost in some way but for myself i look at it and i think about it before i do it and then i consider like is this good for as for other people is it good for the country and that sort of i think hudson and i think what we've had in journalism is a real fear that there's not a way to make a profitable not a way okay to keep the lights on and as a result this has been good for business but you know bad for business i know less munez before he got removed said famously we now trump is maybe he's bad for america but he's great CBS and it's that kind of idea and mentality i think has really pushed us to a point of crisis i don't think trump happens if we don't have that mentality we don't have that pressure it's my hope that we can figure out a different profit model it's my hope that we can figure out a different way to keep the lights on because this right now it it creates hyper reality where things get really really bad really really quickly and and we've already seen i think it has a really terrible effect on the country credence politics so my hope is that we can get off of this prophet engine and start working towards something better and healthier and more humane what do you think think happens next i mean i know you don't you don't you can't see the feature and then this whole story is insane but like what are i guess what are you sort of looking for to see next in attempted impeachment proceedings well so one thing that happened in this goes back to the idea of the media and the narrative and all of this talk like one thing that happened was the moment that democrats rats went ahead and said that they're going to do the impeachment query increa- i think we all saw that there was a change in the way that the media started reporting on this and it became very serious very quickly i think it was yesterday again or it could have been six months ago who has where chuck todd said on TV the he says the beginning of the press the daily said this is a nightmare and we're in the middle of crisis i think treating the way that it is quite frankly this has been a crisis for a while but calling what it is i think my hope anyway that this will wake people up and make them realize that democracy has to be participatory and and this illusion of the spectacle of politics the idea that everyone watches it as opposed to participate in it will reawaken people to realize that the narrative can change it at a moment particularly as people take action all it would take for the situation to reach ahead i believe would be a a mass protest test or strike or some sort of major movement among the people to take power in their own hands as opposed to wait on politics the place out again and like a spectacle i think once we see the extent of these crimes and they are flowing out every single day and trump gets worse and the things he's admitting or worse and worse every every day it's my hope that people particularly in the center the ones who have stood by him because maybe the identifies republicans or maybe they've stood by because they want to you know trigger liberals call it they start to realize that this is a problem we can move beyond it and and some people start to wake up and actually participate that's what i think is the best case scenario is the idea becomes so overwhelmingly clear that he has to leave office that we somehow or another bypass the threat of of danger we bypass the threat red eye of tax and and and disruption whatever you wanna call it but there is certainly a very large chance that this gets very very bad there is a large chance that we will see some people get hurt and i think every day that we look at the news we realized there's more of a chance that our institutions could buckle under under the weight of partisanship and and pressure so there's a way that this can go very well i think there's a way that this can go very bad and right l. i i wish i i could say something better but it feels like the flip of a coin since since the last time we spoke you published a new book can you tell us about your book and how people can get it sure it's called the man they want to be toxic toxic masculinity and crisis own making it's basically about how the identity of masculinity the is fraudulent and say socially constructed idea and that men and women everybody suffer because of men particularly because they have to overcompensate ed liver role that isn't real and and basically where they devalue everyone around him gets into how trump in this current crisis is a result of that again getting a loss walkin the narrative of who you're supposed to be what the world is but it's available everywhere and stores and online yeah and we'll put a link uh of course is there anything else that you wanted to make sure that we talk about today no i think we got deep in the weeds on that one real fast i again i i for kind of losing track of time in terms of when things happen i i again i can't believe the miller report was only a few months ago it feels like two two years ago yeah yeah for sure well and you know the the good news perhaps nothing good right now but the the good news perhaps is that the polling has also moved super quickly on impeachment and you know we now see i think it's like half of people nearly half of people in this country think trump should be impeached and you know that that moved really rapidly so perhaps there is some hope of a way out of here without everything collapsing i think that's a good point i think it's good for people to remember that when impeachment began to richard nixon the of the approval impeachment was much lower than it was right now l. and bad situation escalated very quickly and took care of itself so here's ears open that trend continues all right well jared thank you so much for coming on and talking to us again people definitely follow you on twitter you are always a a breadth of reason on on all of these this issues and i thank you for for coming on and we'll put link up to your book too so people can check that out thank you for all the good work all right thanks thank thank you thank you for listening to two bras talking politics put the dim cast podcast network our theme song is called are you listening off of the album elephant shaped trees by the band immune nouri and we're using it with permission of

political analyst banda kelly ali jared yates six months ten thousand dollar two two years thirty years two weeks
0179: Peter Kalmus (1/30/2019)

Two Broads Talking Politics

25:00 min | 1 year ago

0179: Peter Kalmus (1/30/2019)

"Hi, I'm Jimmie from Syracuse New York. And you're listening to two broads talking politics. Are you? Heavyweight MRs Kelly with two brads talking politics where continuing with hours series on climate change. I'm with my co-host. Sophie. Hey, sophie. Hey, Kelly and joining us today as Peter Kalmus who is a climate change scientists and is the author of being the change live. Well, spark a climate revolution. Hi, peter. Thanks for having me on. Yeah. Thanks much for joining us. So just for some background could you tell us a little bit about what you do and how this book came about. So I've scientist I study mainly clouds I'm getting into what's called ecological forecasting, which the way I describe it as connecting climate models to like actual living ecosystems and trying to project holiday we'll change in becoming decades as a planet gets warmer. I've been a climate scientists since about twenty twelve and before that I was a an astrophysicist searching for gravitation. Ways. But I was getting more and more concerned about climate change in reading science more and reading paper bar and basically getting incredibly acted by climate breakdown. And what I see as a lot of scientific sort of evidence. Backing this what I see as the greatest threat facing humanity right now. So feel a little weird to be thinking about supernova and neutron stars on the other side of the galaxy. When there's a whole lot of stuff to be done here and to understand and to kind of try to get people to act on climate change. And so I switched field. And the reason the book came about was because you know, I've I've been super concerned since two thousand and six so it was when I was getting my teach teams in New York. And you know, I kept thinking what can I do? 'cause it's so overwhelming, and it's a global problem, and there's almost eight billion of us now. And so so it's just questioning like how can I like, no, I can't fix it myself. But what can I? What can I do with what I have to to have the biggest possible effects and to address the problem as skillfully as possible? And I was this was like around two thousand ten I was looking around for other people who were answering that question, and I wasn't finding a whole lot of stuff that was satisfying. And I was also exploring using less fuel myself 'cause it's sort of an obvious thing to do. I'm like, I see the harm that burning stuff causes really does cause harm. I made that connection and I'm like, well, then it'd be really weird. If if I'm still about this if I didn't try to start burning less, and naturally, you know, I wanted to bring less I just don't want to cause harm. And so that kind of became like a core Acton for me. And I started to realize when I give talks to the public people in my community talks our range by like transition or citizens climate lobby people really responded. Well to the fact that I was like actually making these changes. They were really curious about it. And so I realized that I had a more powerful voice in a more authentic voice when I was actually examining this part of my life and making these changes in sort of. And that kind of turn into the book because they're surprising thing. I found was wasn't making me happy. It really didn't feel like a sacrifice. I mean, it was different the changes I was making. But you know, the prevailing message was that their life gonna suck with fossil fuel. And I was like actually a lot of ways life, better hustle feel. So that led to the book because I wasn't seeing that message getting out. So many people, you know, say things like well, individual actions don't matter as much as you know, what government does would business does. So why why did you decide to focus on individual actions with the great question and has been walking out. It's become more and more clear that two categories are sort of non existent. It's an illusion that there's a separation between what we call individual chains. And where we call collectors, there's no sharp thinking so to you. I think most people are -ssume that the reason someone like me or the reason I reduce my missions is to keep the CO two out of that. Or that's not actually why at all. Because if that was why would doing it. It'd be totally depressing. Because like I said, there's almost eight billion people. And that's that's too small the change, and we need to get to zero super fast, you know, certainly by mid century, if not sooner sooner the butter and so. That would be pretty depressing. If that was my motivation, but the main reason I do is to kind of send a message of urgency to wake people up and to shift the culture, and so you think about a protest movement. Okay. Something like on sunrise extinction rebellion or the school strikes every single individual who goes on one of those protests or strikes is making a courageous decision because they're peaking truth to power. There's cops there. They could get arrested. They don't know how the the people the onlookers are gonna react they might get people during Dahmer challenging them. So it's a courageous decision on an individual level. And yet it turns into a collective movement. Right. And so that's exactly the way I see burning fossil fuel especially if you can find out what what brings you happiness and doing that. And and sort of like share that with people share it with a smile and do conspicuously and write about it or sing about it or talk to people about it as. Much as you can so. Yeah, that's the reason. I do it is to try to you know, there's too many climate leaders. I think who are saying burning fossil fuel and their carbon prince or even bigger than the average person. And so I think that their actions sending the inverse message and spoiler really sensitive to that. They can they can see that, you know, if this person's telling us to change, and they are not even changing themselves either. It's not that urgent. And you know, who knows why they're saying that or else maybe it's too hard which is demoralizing. And so would we kind of not inspire them to change? Right. So what are some of this today that you'd do to reduce your carbon footprint, could you tell us a little bit about maybe a couple of things that you found the most satisfying or had the biggest impact. Well, this thing that has a big impact by far for me was to fly less and over the course three years. I actually went from flying around fifty. Two thousand miles a year, which is pretty typical for an academic a lot of scientists and other academics fly even more than that. And so I haven't flown since twenty twelve just because if you'll doesn't feel good for me to be on the plane. The last time I was sitting on a plan that was sort of like, I don't belong your, you know, it was already taking off. I'm like, I want to get off this, but I had to you know, already on a plane. So, you know, if there was something that, you know, I thought would was going to be very if I if I could take a flight that would have a huge impact on climate awareness, for example, or kind of maybe getting policy makers sack. I might consider doing it. But it's hard for me to math and anything convincing the at this point to like to be good enough reason to making ceiling about wanting to be on the plane. So anyway that the flying was like free quarters of footprint, and I like to emphasize that this is this is gonna be print for everyone. You know, what one person's biggest action is will depend on what they're burning. And and how burning it become stop. You know? You know, I stopped eating which was my second biggest most impactful change. And I think that was pretty easy for me flying. With more challenging the change expectations of family members and kind of sex occasions at work. So we do a lot of long road trips and long train, you know, 'cause we have family in Chicago to Los Angeles to Chicago that's about two thousand miles, but we enjoy the train to actually and and we actually enjoy a car trips because I get to you know, camp along the way and in Utah from of the national parks there. So that's kinda great. And then some smaller changes biking more. You'll biking wasn't as big for me since you know, I compared to the flying just to you people don't understand how much fuel those planes, burn. But the thing about biking was for me. It's like a hundred percent joyful acts. And it keeps me healthy. Just like, you know, being vegetarian also helps me stay healthy. So that one very easy to sustain and all the teams I made I would keep doing even if there wasn't a warming. Except I probably like usually but not as much as I used to. 'cause it was frankly, it was exhausting, and you know, I prefer sort of flowing down and staying in my community a little bit, and you can get more involved in your community. If they're not always the other side of the world. But you know, it's it is pretty amazing able to to get someplace, you know, that's the way in a matter of hours. That's amazing. I think they think it's a shame that we take it for granted so much and even complain about right? We did I'm people getting planes, and you know, there's complain about all this stuff, and it's really kind of a miracle that they can do that. I think one of the things that people push back on sometimes when they think about this stuff is they feel like it's an all or nothing like you have to cut your carbon footprint down to zero. Or why bother so how would you respond to that sort of stuff? You know, what would be your advice for people who think about I can't don't flying together? But you know, I'm interested in in doing what I can do a great question. So I think that someone who had that attitude. We're definitely thinking that the reason for doing it is to keep patients out of the out of the atmosphere, and I would say shifts to thinking about changing the culture, we know that sauce fuel is starting to kill. And it's this hugely damaging effect on the bias here. Projections are not good as you know. So we know this stuff is bad. Right. You to sit culture away from it. We got magin society fossil fuel at all. And so, you know, anything that you can do. Especially if you can do conspicuously and talk to people about it. And like, I said fine. What makes you happy about it that is gonna shift the culture, and you know, keep mind that flying is better than flying trying to talk to colleague and friends and family about the impacts of flying. I think too few people know just how bad it is. There's a lot of you know, the euro waste movement, plastic waste and other landfill waste is very immediate very easy to see very tangible carbon dioxide waste is what's really killing things right now. And it's invisible it's harder to see people don't actually usually lift jugs of fossils that goes into their cars into the playing. They don't see. They don't sense it. They don't see coming out of the tailpipe. So that's a that's a much bigger problem. We have to raise awareness on that. And you know, it's not that immediate. And I think you know, some of his early through actually file and. That's just to me says that it's a good place to raise awareness 'cause as awareness gets raised. I think that can shift to other parts of the fossil fuel culture. How do you do things conspicuously in raising awareness without you know, turning people off? Or making? You're just a freak over there. Who that stuff? I'll probably a lot of. You know vegans outta me for saying. That's a lot of Egan's are very militant, you know, places like Twitter, and it can be sorta term for people. I'm not sure it's the most skillful means, they're they're absolutely right. It's better for the planet. Have a vegan diet for sure. But the question how do we skillfully kind of transmit that that lifestyle to other people? It's a very very hard question. I think the best way to do is actually one person at a time and by doing it, by example, but sort of quietly setting the example, you know, not not clobbering people had with it at every opportunity, but just like saying, you know, what's great about being vegan. For example. What's great about living with us fossil fuel not trying to kill people into using less, but sort of highlighting the things that are good. 'cause there's 'cause it's a very healthy lifestyle right being we know that humans are happier. When when they're more integrated into commute. Unity, and we know they're they're healthier when they eat less animal products. And so, you know, the kind of vegan low fossil fuel lifestyle where you are beat low fossil fuel means being being slower moving slower gardening more, for example, if you're into gardening getting going to city council meetings and talking about, you know, electric city policies in your community getting involved kind of the local level with politics, maybe organizing things at a more national level. This is all community. Right. And you know, it's an essential part of being happy. And especially if you're concerned about climate change right now, then you possibly have some climate diety to that getting really active and to feeling like you're doing everything you can do, and and you know, this can work well one on one conversations making maybe having like talking to people over coffee about climate change starting to group. P- in your community and using your own skills and your own that works and your own interests to spread the message. You know, if you like writing if you like music, you know, if you're a musician, if you make Soames if you're an artist of some kind or even if you're like, you know, maybe a lawyer, for example, you can start getting involved with kind of climate law. So Vance or is highly personal because we all have different skills. So the most skilful means it's going to be different for everyone. Then a couple of jurisdictions that have been implementing policies to sort of encourage people to do the good thing or discourage them from doing the bad thing. Right. There are is a Colorado. I think in Boulder Colorado where they just passed a few years ago of municipal carbon PEX carbon taxes are kind of like thing now in the United States. There's a couple of juristic that have worked to prohibit people from have bags and all sorts of things. So do you think there's a police for government regulation in encouraging people to decrease current footprint jobs? That's why that's exactly I do. What do what people were call maybe individuals stuff? I do it precisely to get policies, especially at the national and that could maybe even translate into international cooperation. That's exactly why do what do we can't have a strong policy. That's really going to start ramming down carbon emissions until the people demand. That right. So if moving. In two thousand eighteen we made so much progress in terms of raising awareness among Democrats, I think climate change went from near the bottom of with sufficient put the twelve things that people usually vote on, you know, gun control, the economy, healthcare, immigration, all that stuff kinda change was that near the bottom, even among Democrats. And now it's moved up to I don't know something like number four it's still moving through the ranks until it gets near the top people aren't really going to be voting on climate. But most people most people are going to be people something else and the politicians know that kinda even if there was a politician who was super eager to enact some kind of climate policy. They're not going to be able to do it. If they know they're most skillful means might not be to act up policy, if they just voted out, and then they lose their platform. Right. So we we we ended democracy. We need the masses to demand climate action. And so it's coming from the grassroots. We can. Veigh that urgency that people think if especially if climate activists and leaders are starting to burn less themselves that grilling this is their authentic, and that will spread we were. We've you know, there's so much momentum right now there's so much happening at the grassroots. And there's a real social shift happening right now, maybe even a tipping point. And and I predict that it's not going to go away because it's being driven by climate disaster. And unfortunately, climate disaster is is basic physics, and it's not going away. So so these movements are just going to get stronger and stronger, we have to keep pushing and doing everything we can every level and that includes burning off getting involved at the community level. I just wanna comment really quick you mentioned a carbon tax. I this is gonna maybe a little wonky by just want everyone to think a little bit about the difference between a carbon tax carbon St. because that often gets kinda sparked under the rug and distinction isn't made enough. I think. A carbon tax is when the government, you know, makes CO two emissions more expand. He put the price on two missions makes the fossil fuel more expensive. But then keeps that money, that's generated and use it for whatever. All right. So that that's gonna make low income hot their their share that they're spending on energy is going to go up. It's not gonna be very popular as we've seen in France with the yellow jacket carbon fee on the other hand instead of the government keeping the money. They give it all back to the people. So for example, a monthly dividend. Check. If you gotta check back in the mail every month from some policy, and it was a pretty decent size. Check that's going to be a popular policy. And the other thing is it's going to be progressive. It's not gonna be regressive because rich people use more fossil fuel. So they're going to be contributing. They're going to be paying more in right 'cause they're burning so much longer. Taking more playing tricks got bigger houses it cetera and it gets divided up equally. So that means lower and middle income houses, actually, come out ahead. All right. So. That's why it's progressive. I think the left especially really needs to realize this. They not all carbon pricing schemes are the same at all. I'm really against cap and trade, and I'm actually against the carbon tax. I don't think that I think giving giving the money back to the people is actually not optional. I don't think the policy would work unless you did that. So hope that makes sense. Yeah. Definitely. But also point out that I think that policy like that works better at the national level than like a local or state level. Just because I'm you know, you've got this border issue where if you're making that energy more expensive in jurisdiction you have to have some adjustment. So that businesses and industries just don't move out and pollute someone else. And it's hard to do that kind of those kinds of border payments in a in a state to state or local level. When you talk about some in your book is meditation and connecting this to to sort of the your own spiritual practice, and I've noticed something similar I've been a vegetarian for like fifteen years now. But I recently realized it wasn't really thinking that much about what I eat anymore, which was sort of part of the point of becoming a vegetarian. So I've been trying to move toward a vegan not a hundred percent being but more Megan. And I found that that's something that I the really appealing part to me is now I have to think again about everything. I put my mouth about every choice. I'm making I wondered if you could talk a little bit about sort of that aspect of it for you. Well, it's it's a little controversial on some people don't mind. Yeah. Idea of of kind of meditation being sort of an action that has anything to do with climate action for me. It's really important. I think everyone's going to be different here. It's interesting to point out a parallel with with a friend of mine another climate science name Kathryn. Hey hoax. She's she's Christian. And I think she's, you know, her practice of sanity actually has some parallel to my to my meditative practice. I don't I don't believe with any organized religion. But I think for both of us it allows us to also. And this is kind of this has been really helpful for me to detach from in in a healthy way healthy way to detach from the kind of intense. We, you know, the intense kind of Horace ick depressing side of kind of holding this knowledge of climate breakdown. I've experienced depression in past and I will tell you can't do anything. And I'm depressed, I can't act my kinds spire anyone else. So it's really important for me to be able to kind of kinda hold this knowledge and still be happy at some level. And there's a there's a real parallel here to just being mortal to to knowing that we're all gonna die from day and to not let that pull us down into depression to keep to keep acting to to still be able to enjoy life. Save of life. You know with people have healthy relationships, even with this looming overhead, and you know, somehow that's meditation works for me. There's so many different practices that will work for different people. I think but for me kind of the the two things that that that help me stay sane through all of this are doing everything I can so trying to act and constantly reassess. What doing both in terms of how I relate to fossil fuels and other energy sources to also how I relate to kind of. Recht action and grassroots action and and getting politically engaged. So so doing what I am is big part of Holly stay sane, but also meditating which is a practice, which is designed to kind of to find an inner joy. That's that doesn't come from external vicissitudes, which can be thing happening over a bad thing happening. But either way it's largely out of our control happens outside of us. So if if there's some way to find something something deep and be happy even when that and when a good thing happens to say, well good thing happened. You know, that's great. And let's see how long it lasts right until the fortunes change, and sort of when they do kind of experience that with the smile to me that's been very helpful practice. Anything else that you'd like to make sure we talk about? I don't know. You know, I want people to to really to realize how this is an how little time there's less and to start making it up. Birdie and envisioning a world without fossil fuel and maybe envisioning what a world movie like where humanity was living in harmony with the biosphere completely different way of living than we have. Now where you know, our culture is to conquer nature and to sort of separate us from nature to try to like kinda pretend that we're immortal at some way through technology. You know, you know, iron is kind of the superhero Matt is sort of an image of that. But, but you know, what the superhero that kind of you know, is is aligned with nature, and is okay with the fact that were just one species in this web people web and isn't trying to either. But instead is so happy to be here and kind of like silver with all that we get walk for some time on this planet, and you know, how can we spread that awareness? And what we you know, how? Can we? Short-term to go away from fossil fuel. And where are we going is a species, you know, in the longer term say we we take care of this immediate problem. You know, how can we how can we explore technology with more wisdom, and how can we sort of respect the rest of the life on planet as equals to us. Hey pedia. Thank you so much for joining us and people should check out your book, which is really fun read. We'll put a link to that up on our website. And I I hope everyone will start thinking about, you know, just pick one thing this this week this month that you can work on in start to move toward using less fossil fuel wonderful. Thanks for the discussion. It was fun. Thanks for listening to to broads talking politics. Are theme song is called. Are. You listening off of the album elephants shaped trees by the band, EMU Newry, and we're using it with permission of the band our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew Westland and was created for use by this podcast.

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Kirsten Gillibrand, Off the Sidelines

Two Broads Talking Politics

24:13 min | 1 year ago

Kirsten Gillibrand, Off the Sidelines

"What does it nauseating mean in, in saying all the words, very clearly? Okay. Highs teddy, you're listening to the fist episode of the two bras talking politics book club review in Kirsten gillibrand, twenty four team book off the sidelines. Previous episodes have covered books by cobbling Harris, Pete Buddha. Judge Elizabeth Warren and Hooghly, I'd Castro you can fight this series of two. Tom politics dot com slash book club, or regular feet anywhere podcasts are found by y'all. Are you? Everyone. This is Kelly with to prods talking politics. We are here for the fifth episode of our book club series. I'm here with my co host Sophie. Hey sophie. Hey kelly. Joining us is freelance writer, has wider high Cavs. And writer and actress Elizabeth Thorpe pilots bit. Hey, ladies. So today, we are going to be discussing Kirsten gillibrand book. It's called off the sidelines. Raise your voice changed the world. I will note that this is the oldest of the books that we have read so far. It was written in twenty fourteen. So it's a few years older than a couple of the other books that we have read thus far so let's just jump in. What did you guys think of the book this is Elizabeth? I had a hard time getting that. I didn't have an audio. I had a book an it was way to leave in Lima any for me. It was like an I feel like this formula and this narrative is a little stale. It's like almost condescending way to women. But again, I know it's a little bit older but I just I had a hard time getting through it. And there was also like an off, shucks element to it. You know. I was totally shocked when my name was floated become a replacement Senator for Hillary when she was going to be the secretary of state. You know, I, I find that really hard to believe. Knowing how these things work, but it was a hard slog for me personally to get through it. See, I really enjoyed it now I had the audio book, and maybe that makes the difference. This was the first of the books that we've done that. I listened to the audio book, and I happen to love Kirsten gillibrand voice. I don't know what it is there. Something New York about it that I really love and I had just met her. When we started reading it. So that may also have contributed. I did listen to it at one and a half speed because that's what I do all listening to things that, and so maybe that also helped make it feel less like a slog, but there were certain things that really resonated for me. I was on the elliptical. When I was listening to her chapter about trying to lose weight, and the struggle of doing nut in the public eye, and I was like I totally relate to this. I think it's fine. You talked about liking her voice, 'cause I also really liked her voice, I didn't get the audio book, but I listen to I wasn't Interco listeners for our interview with kissing gillibrand, but I listened to our interview with your Jilib round about five times street, because I like her voice so much. So I think I would have rather had the audio book because I would have liked to hear her read it. I really don't know what it is about her voice. But I just love it. You're all making me wish I had the audio book. I know I, I really like that. I like her outta tude like I do. And it comes through a lot in her tone. And I'm very I'm on her side in terms of work, she's coming from in sort of can-do, attitude and women are strong and can own the world. And I. Yeah, I love that attitude. I love that motivation. But I found myself, not totally buying. She's very earnest and maybe a little naive. I think if the issue because she comes from a very privileged background. I think there are some things that just don't register on her radar. And she has his perspective that she can just bulldoze her way through stuff and that, you know what she's done. She's done by being super ambitious and hard working. And yes, that is true. But it is also true. True. And she gives some nod to the in the book, but it is also true that you had a hell of a leg up. As a white woman with a hell of a lot of connection. And I and I see uses us connections and she plots her points in the book and name drops quite a lot and I'm like, well, you can't help it both ways. Joe either huge this pull yourself up by your bootstraps. How awesome and strong line, the face of adversity or you were really handled a lot of things, and that's cool. But let's be honest about it yet. No, there's, there's certainly a moment where she's talking toward the beginning of her move toward political career where it's like, okay, how do I get into politics, right? I give a bunch of money to politicians and I was like, well, I can't do that. Right. Writing big checks to Senator Clinton. Yes. Made it up. Maybe that's what she's talking about when she says make your own luck. Yeah. Write your own. Check anyone who listened to our Kirsten gillibrand episode knows some of the story of Jilib, rans, grandmother Polly, and I have also heard her talk about paulie a couple times when I've seen her in person at events, but I really love. I mean, I think you could just write like a whole biography of her grandmother Pauline Noonan, and it would be super fascinating. Because her grandma was quite the interesting person. Did you guys like that? She started sort of that far back in and talked some about her upbringing, and where she got the inspiration for wanting to, to be a strong woman. I love that part of the story. I did some research, am I totally off base here is there musical about her grandmother, or like an off Broadway thing. Oh, maybe. Oh, I don't know. I think so. I looked it up online, and I was like, no. But I mean, there's some sort of off Broadway show that they did based on her life, a have to find it. We'll, she's she. Clearly quite a woman. I always like the biographies like learning about each candidate's upbringing, and their families. I enjoy that part, sometimes more than the meteor policy nitty gritty, you know, bootstraps part. I thought it was really interesting. Her her grandmother, obviously dot the by rule. And she sorta give a nod to the fact, and I think that this frame, a lot of her policy decisions as well that she really enjoys the rules and she struggled with that. So as much as she's inspired by the life of her grandmother, another strong women figures that were around her. I think she really struggled to line, that with this need to like, lease people and, and work within the system, and I see that play out in her politics, a lot, especially recently, where she's got more criticism for being part of the system, rather than a disruptor, and I it's interesting to see how that shakes her growing up. We'll, she says she's her. She was a big rule follower, an ass. Kisser. In the book, I thought was interesting and that, you know, her mother was definitely spunk here in a little bit looser. Yeah, I related to a lot. A pretty big rule follower. I I'm I always make jokes about how like a hate this anti-establishment stuff because he knew who likes establishment me. I like to follow roles and that's always been sort of attention at the heart of my politics is that I'm a liberal and progressive activist, and yet, I don't like to break rules myself, so I could really like especially I think it's common with women. I think a lot of women have sort of been socialized to be afraid to break rules and, and sort of to subconsciously kind of try really hard to stay within the lines. And so that was something I really by. But so one thing we didn't get a ton of from this book is policy, and it makes sense. You know, she wrote this in twenty fourteen she was not yet running for president may or may not have been on her radar is the future, but it was pretty far in the future at that point sewage. You know, do you think though we get some sense of what her her policies would be from the book, even though she doesn't sort of lay out policy statements? Get a sense of that I made personally, I liked her. I liked her tone. Maybe I would have liked the book better. If I listen to voice, you know, like the fat jeans, just like the rest of us who have birth babies. I mean it makes me relatable, but like after reading that I don't have any sense of what kind of, you know, presidential candidacy will be I feel like I have a vague at that. She would, you know, really prioritize women's issues, but I feel like a lot of the things that have made me a lot of other people interested in her and also questioning her have happened within the last five years. And so I'd be interested to read a second book. You know, I'd be interested to read, maybe a more traditional presidential campaign book from her talking about, you know how she did come to change her position on a couple of issues, so she did become more progressive. How she got in? Involved in the metoo movement, stuff like that. So I, I feel like it's time for her to write another book. Honestly, she's got plenty of. Oh, yeah. Totally. That was very interesting to hear talk about wasn't playing squash with Al Franken, and, you know, reading that and then knowing what happened later with some of those interactions with sort of fascinating. And she also talked about how she supported in helps get tolsey elected. Wow, that one decision. I don't know if that, you know would do again, but there are definitely some things that have changed quite a lot just even to two thousand sixteen that I would guess would would change how she would frame the book. I mean, I think when thing you do get a pretty clear sense of ironically, from the book and not from her campaign is what it is really like to be a working mom in congress, you know, in, in how difficult but yet how privileged people in the house in the Senate can be when it comes to, to having kids being able to bring kids to work that sort of thing, you know, and so it makes sense that now she has a pretty strong policy on childcare in universal pre-k, and things like that, but she doesn't really talk about that biography piece at all now, you know, she'll mention every once in a while, like being a working mom, but I even I asked her in our interview about that particular point in and didn't get a lot of the sort of personal connection. So in. Mhm ways I wish that the Jila brand who wrote the book was the Gillette brand who was running for president now. I don't know if it would make her any more likely to win, but it'd be a lot more interesting of campaign in a lot of ways. I think I mean, here's, here's an interesting thought maybe pollsters have found that that's not like a great thing to highlight, you know, the primary, for whatever reason I have no idea, just because it is so different than when she first got to the Senate, right? You know, maybe some campaign spin. Yeah. I mean, I just wonder if maybe it's too Spinney, you know, there've been some articles lately that have talked about how her campaign has been kind of playing safe and, you know, I wonder if maybe they're playing it too safe, and she should have been more like the person who wrote this book. I think too, I appreciated the way that she talked and was very Frank about her struggles that maybe they're worried that will undermine people belief in her capability been the executive office, but she would have her hands to full and because their kids are so young. I mean how old is her younger under five? Right. Might be little older than that now. But yeah there's still pretty young. They're still school age for sure. Yeah. I, I wonder if that what was that the heart of that is some hesitation about not wanting her to look like she couldn't take that on and still manage to raise her family. I also little bit frustrated with her husband, and this is probably not fair. But I was like, why are you able for picking up the kids every day? And I know she explained he had a job where that wasn't really not blah, blah, blah. But I was still kind of a little bit resentful on her behalf about that fair or not. Yeah. Not, not exactly like enlightened. Yeah. I mean, I would guess that this may be something that has evolved over the years, maybe in their relationship. And then in conversations, women have had about their careers, but I think the, the oh, I can juggle it all in you at all. I think women are very disillusioned with that at this point. And maybe that was not the case so much when she wrote the book, so it hone why that struck me in a funny way? Yeah. So are there things you know, besides perhaps may be an update on policy? Are there other things that we wish had been in the book things where we felt the story was lacking at all honestly. I'm good. I mean, I feel like the thing that I hear people complain about with regard to her is her calling for Franken's resignation, which, obviously couldn't have been in the book, but I think that if people were looking to read the book to get an idea of how she would address their particular you know, concerns or problems with her that they would want to read about that which is one of the reasons I would like to see like an updated version of this book for twenty nineteen because I actually support her and what she did there. But I'd like to I'd like her to, like talk out her rationale, because I think that, that is a big sticking point for a lot of people, particularly men, but a lot of people in the primary right now I think it also gave me a sense of how she works through issue though, most of the time when she was approaching something like, don't ask, don't tell or. You know, some of the nine eleven responding sort of saving because a lot about how she would work behind closed doors and leverage relationships and all the Phanang doing that goes into it. And she seems like she really enjoys that part of it, and to me that was an insight into she may be more into the back door deals, sort of approach, tha compromising on policy that is not going to go over well, with some progressive would prefer that it towards them. Yeah. I mean I think you know, one of the things her campaign has chosen to really focus on to their detriment. I think is sort of talking about how she can win in red districts and purple districts. And you know I think that's important. But I think that's not necessarily what Democrats in the primary are looking for right now. And that's why I think maybe if she had focused more on the kindness of she talks about in the book, she would maybe be doing a little bit better in the polling. But I, I did find that section interesting, you know, talking about sort of taking on a district where the, the cows outnumber. The Democrats, you know is, is interesting. And I I'm not sure we ever really understand why she was able to win their, you know, it's sort of sold as kind of what you were talking about earlier has about, like just worked really hard, and, you know, obviously that's part of it. But it feels like there has to be more. There and more reason that she has won so many voters over, you know, I mean, she's one huge number of voters in New York done really well in the races that she's run there. You know. And so that it feels like there's just a little bit more, and maybe because this book in some ways is meant to be inspirational is meant to encourage women to get off the sidelines and run for office, you know, you, you want sort of a somewhat rosy picture. But you know that might be part of what is missing in the book. I agree. Do we have any other favorite moments from the book that we haven't yet discussed? You know, I think for me it's the hearing about like her kids being in the cloak room, or whatever while she has to take vote just really getting that sense of what it's like inside congress inside the Senate, you know about when you have kids in what you're doing and driving from one place to the other, you know, picking kids up even as a Senator having to do that sort of thing, those were the things that I appreciated the most, I think. Yeah, I've apprised she was able to do a lot of that stuff just because, you know, typically, that's like a eighteen hours a day. I mean my friends that are chief of staff for books like that. And they don't really especially the Lillard kids. They don't really see them that much during the week just because they wake up and go to bed. You know, wake up late or go to bed early clock and whatever, and they're always night, events, and receptions, and dinners. So I actually was impressed a little bit by how would she was or seem to be as she was describing, I'll echo to that? Some of the stories about her Senate colleagues, especially in the chapter about her losing weight, or just horrifying, and I appreciated that she included them. And I've heard some stories before, but to have her sir, you know, to read it and surface, those again with a good reminder of a very far we still need to go in terms of having women. The normalizes representatives in congress and, and to have the resources in the work environment that they deserve to we feel like we know what kind of president Kirsten gillibrand would be based on this book. Sorry. I do I do not. You know, I do not. I just I felt like it was very very you know, shallow to pitch him mostly, you know, talking about empowering women, which I'm all for that. It just it, it felt repetitive and it felt it'll tell Lou. And again, like missing the bootstraps component of that, in my opinion like Castro hat, or even heat. So I, I don't feel like I've really know her personally, or as a candidate after eating book. Yeah, I walked away with similar feeling. I think that I had about mayor p which is that I think Jill Brown would be hard working, and I think she has them Bishop and I think she's intelligent, obviously would have to be do what she's done and what she's accomplished. But I don't you know there's not a lot of substance to hang onto their and her record in, in the Senate. Certainly tells me a little bit. About what her values are, and what's important term. What she'd fight for. But I don't know. In terms of her policies necessarily that this, this book, certainly wasn't geared to try to add a lot to that conversation. But I don't know that her campaign has also done a good job of surfacing her stances on different issues. And the way that I've seen other candidates to the one question that I think I leave this book still not having an answer to is kind of what kind of executive, she would be, you know, she talked some about her, her staff in working with her stuff and being a boss. But it seems like she surrounds herself with a lot of fairly young employees, which I don't think a bad thing. But obviously as president that can't be everybody you hire. And, you know, sway. I'm not entirely sure how she would be leading, you know, the entire executive branch, you know, and well we didn't get complete answers on that. I feel. Mayor p tried to tell us that to some extent, certainly we got some of that from komo's book, you know. But I don't feel like we got much of that at all here. I am a little concerned. I am a little concerned about her judgment. If she supported socie-. You know someone is growing city. Nominating leaders to head up things, like health and human services and, you know, those sorts of cabinet level positions, I'm a little bit concerned that we didn't see tolsey coming, but, you know, this was years ago. So put that in there with a grain of salt, but at the beginning tolsey was purely benign or seemed like that. Now, it's just like a cartoon will the, the one thing for me about having met deliberate in having read this book is, you know, do do I see her as our next president. No. I think we have better candidates, but I still don't understand why she's not pulling a little bit better than she is. You know, I, I think compared to like a mayor Pete. It's like Padilla Bryant has experienced. I think it's the massage anything, it's like you like you know, she's a very smart articulate, maybe not so loosey goosey white woman. And I think, you know, when I was canvassing for Hillary. I had several women told me I just don't like her. She noise me Hillary, and I was like, can you tell me more about that? They couldn't they couldn't. You know, and I was talking about policies but. I mean, I you know, I finally said to a couple of them like you don't have to hang out with her simply put she's the best person for the job miss qualified that they just really she. There's me and it might be what caz was referring to the entitlement stuff to like she grew up. You know, very privileged Hillary didn't. But obviously after you've been president of the United States, they did very well. So there's something to that. I think all right. Well, I do think if people like sort of a, you know, fun read about what it's really like inside congress to, to be a working mom and want sort of a inspirational, you know, run for office kind of story, listen to the audio book, because Jila brand has a great voice, but, but, you know, perhaps husband sold us on on being the next president. Poseidon. Thanks for listening to, to broads talking. Politics are theme song is called. Are you listening? Off of the album elephant shaped trees by the band EMU Newry, and we're using it with permission of the band, our logo and other original artwork is by Matthew with Lynn and was created for use by this podcast.

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