17 Burst results for "Sophie Hey Kelly"

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Hello everyone. This is Rebecca five guest with sofi and Kelly on the voter in segment of two bras and welcome to this show where really excited about doing this. We're hoping that you will find it. Interesting invaluable, and inspirational and most important we're looking forward to sharing what we know and working together to make this dream of voting in our next woman. President come true. So let your friends snow welcome. And let's get going. Thanks. Are you listening? Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. We are back for our fifth episode of the vote hurt in series. I am here with my co host Sophie, hey, Sophie. Hey, Kelly and joining us again is our partner in this venture author Rebecca sigh of Hira Becca high to be here yet, thanks for joining us again. So for listeners who have not been listening to the full vote her in series. You should go back and listen to the first four episodes, but we are talking about the effort to elect the first woman president in this is an especially good time to be doing it. Because there are so many women running for president. So we're going to continue the discussion that we were having in the fourth part of the series talking about some of the systemic issues that women face in becoming elected being elected to executive positions. But especially to the. Presidency. So Rebecca where would you like to pick up our conversation on this? Well, we covered a lot of ground the other day. But you know, there were some things we touched on. And I thought we could delve more deeply, and particularly now that I think the races, you know, really heating up and just read this morning that the molar reports going to be released soon. And so these candidates are going to I'm guessing being a whole new phase of you know, what they're saying and doing and campaigning. And it may well be depending on what said about the molar report, for instance, that there are some women on the Republican side who, you know, make some noise. And so in that context thought we might, you know, start today's discussion by talking about the fact that it's, you know, not a given, and we should say that out loud and discuss it that the first woman president will be pro-choice woman or even democrat, right? And that there are certainly women on the Republican side. There may be some independent women who you know. Decide to run just as men have who don't. Share the sort of progressive agenda that the four main candidates on the democratic side share. And so I thought that would be important for us to look at. And you know, there's been a lot of discussion in the past about Nikki Haley, and you know, after she resigned from the UN ambassador position, Hugh months ago. Of course, she was asked well is your next running for president? And she said, of course, no. But then in the meanwhile, you probably saw this too. She's got a book coming out. She's got some think tank projects, and there's really, you know, the possibility of that. And what does that mean, you know for women if we have a woman president who's anti-choice and quite conservative on other women's issues? I think sometimes Republicans may be like two to devoting, you know, in general, they don't seem to like women's issues. But I think sometimes. The they sort of give themselves out when they vote for women. Well, we'll look we support strong women too. And there are Republican women like Kellyanne Conway who liked to play this sort of feminism card, even though you know, really what they're doing is often not all that supportive of other women or women's rights in general. But you know, I think that that that we've ERI well could see that just like we saw Sarah Palin nominated for vice president who is, you know, certainly, no friend to women's issues were sort of an interesting question because I I recently read a book about the history of the Kucuk clan in the mid twentieth century, and you know, basically in the nineteen twenties, and there was a whole chapter on the women leaders of the clan. And I mean, I don't think I've ever heard about this before, but the author who's brilliant..

President Rebecca sigh Nikki Haley Kelly vice president president Sarah Palin Kellyanne Conway Sophie Hira Becca partner UN executive sofi Hugh
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"This is Kelly with two brads talking politics were here for our third installment of the vote her in segment of the podcast. Joining me today is my coho. Sophie. Hey, sophie. Hey, Kelly and our partner on this project, Rebecca sigh of high Rebecca hi glad to be here. Yes. Real heavy use. So we're at the third installment here. So last time around if you haven't listened yet we talked about the early history of women running for president in the US. And now we're going to talk about sort of the the next section of time. So post Gracie Allen, pre Hillary Clinton. And I think we're we're talking about this in general because we think it's really important information. But it's very fitting, of course, that we're doing this during women's history month. So the the next big installment will be Hillary Clinton, and we'll talk about that in some detail. So we'll we'll end right before that for this one. So let's talk. Then let's sort of start in on on what we're talking about here. Last time we talked about as really early people who ran and one of the points. We made was that they were running, and it's sort of independent or third party kind of races. And so now, we're looking at people who actually were running for major party nominations whit. What do we think is sort of the the important thing to think about in that? Yeah, that's the big difference kind of mid century of the twentieth century. Although it is important to note that a number of women throughout of the twentieth century did seek nominations for smaller parties where you know. There was probably little expectation of even getting on the ballot, but they did set forth and express a point of view. And I think it's important for us to acknowledge that group of women to but you're right starting in. Nineteen sixty four actually with Margaret chase. Smith women have run in the major party primaries or sought the nomination or been placed in nomination. And I think a lot of us know about surely Chisholm in nineteen seventy two, and I guess we'll talk about her in a minute. But the first person was Margaret chase Smith, a Republican from Maine, and her story was initially kind of kin to, you know, a lot of women's experience in elected office, which is that you know, they took a seat that their husband and held or something like that. And in her case that was the truth of the case for her. But what also happened was she then started to run herself. And she is the first woman who in her own right served in both the congress and the Senate in the United States successfully for you know, several decades and after. Asking the party to consider her as the Republican nominee. They rejected her and she ran anyway. So she's really a an amazing figure both for her courage electorally and also as we were talking about a minute ago for her courage on some issues that resonate today. So I was really glad when I was writing voter in and looking at all this, you know, to sort of study up on her because I didn't know everything about this. And it was just incredible may favorite thing about her. I think when she announced that she was running for president. She said I have few allusions and no money, but I'm staying for the finish. When people keep telling you, you can't do thing you kind of like to try. Yes. You are my kind of she was a Republican. But she's my kind of woman. Right, right. I thought it was interesting from Maine. I feel like Maine has type right has a bent towards moderate, Republican female senators. I mean, you know, they have Olympia Snowe. They have Susan Collins who is not as moderate or she likes to believe, but still somewhat more within the Republican party. I think it's interesting that maintenace sort of the home of the moderate, Republican female Senator. Yeah. You know, I I grew up in a democratic family. And so, you know, Margaret chase Smith was sort of out there on the, you know, the periphery when we would sit at the dinner table and discuss things, but I do recall, my parents who were stalwart Democrats, you know, giving her proper, right? You know, because of what you're saying that she was moderate she stood up, you know, for certain important things in their minds..

Margaret chase Smith Maine Kelly Republican party Hillary Clinton Sophie president Margaret chase United States Rebecca sigh Susan Collins Olympia Snowe Chisholm Gracie Allen partner Senator congress Senate
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you? Heavyweight MRs Kelly with two brads talking politics where continuing with hours series on climate change. I'm with my co-host. Sophie. Hey, sophie. Hey, Kelly and joining us today as Peter Kalmus who is a climate change scientists and is the author of being the change live. Well, spark a climate revolution. Hi, peter. Thanks for having me on. Yeah. Thanks much for joining us. So just for some background could you tell us a little bit about what you do and how this book came about. So I've scientist I study mainly clouds I'm getting into what's called ecological forecasting, which the way I describe it as connecting climate models to like actual living ecosystems and trying to project holiday we'll change in becoming decades as a planet gets warmer. I've been a climate scientists since about twenty twelve and before that I was a an astrophysicist searching for gravitation. Ways. But I was getting more and more concerned about climate change in reading science more and reading paper bar and basically getting incredibly acted by climate breakdown. And what I see as a lot of scientific sort of evidence. Backing this what I see as the greatest threat facing humanity right now. So feel a little weird to be thinking about supernova and neutron stars on the other side of the galaxy. When there's a whole lot of stuff to be done here and to understand and to kind of try to get people to act on climate change. And so I switched field. And the reason the book came about was because you know, I've I've been super concerned since two thousand and six so it was when I was getting my teach teams in New York. And you know, I kept thinking what can I do? 'cause it's so overwhelming, and it's a global problem, and there's almost eight billion of us now. And so so it's just questioning like how can I like, no, I can't fix it myself. But what can I? What can I do with what I have to to have the biggest possible effects and to address the problem as skillfully as possible? And I was this was like around two thousand ten I was looking around for other people who were answering that question, and I wasn't finding a whole lot of stuff that was satisfying. And I was also exploring using less fuel myself 'cause it's sort of an obvious thing to do. I'm like, I see the harm that burning stuff causes really does cause harm. I made that connection and I'm like, well, then it'd be really weird. If if I'm still about this if I didn't try to start burning less, and naturally, you know, I wanted to bring less I just don't want to cause harm. And so that kind of became like a core Acton for me. And I started to realize when I give talks to the public people in my community talks our range by like transition or citizens climate lobby people really responded. Well to the fact that I was like actually making these changes. They were really curious about it. And so I realized that I had a more powerful voice in a more authentic voice when I was actually examining this part of my life and making these changes in sort of. And that kind of turn into the book because they're surprising thing. I found was wasn't making me happy. It really didn't feel like a sacrifice. I mean, it was different the changes I was making. But you know, the prevailing message was that their life gonna suck with fossil fuel. And I was like actually a lot of ways life, better hustle feel. So that led to the book because I wasn't seeing that message getting out. So many people, you know, say things like well, individual actions don't matter as much as you know, what government does would business does. So why why did you decide to focus on individual actions with the great question and has been walking out. It's become more and more clear that two categories are sort of non existent. It's an illusion that there's a separation between what we call individual chains. And where we call collectors, there's no sharp thinking so to you. I think most people are -ssume that the reason someone like me or the reason I reduce my missions is to keep the CO two out of that. Or that's not actually why at all. Because if that was why would doing it. It'd be totally depressing. Because like I said, there's almost eight billion people..

scientist MRs Kelly Peter Kalmus Sophie Acton New York
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Hi, everyone. This is Kelly with two Bradstock in politics. I'm here with my co hosts, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly. And in this episode we are talking to millennial candidates for local office. And so with us in this segment is Elizabeth Bennet Pirker who is running for the city council in Alexandria, Virginia. Hi, Liz, Beth. Hi, thanks for having me. Yeah, thanks for joining us. So we're gonna start with our our usual first question, which is, you know, can you just tell us a little bit about your background and then why you decided to run for city council this year? Sure. I currently help lead a local nonprofit called together. We bake and we provide job training and personal development for women in need. We work with women coming out of the criminal Justice system who are homeless women who recently immigrated or facing other sort of adverse circumstances, helping them with job skills, job training, all SaaS skills, and personal development and building self confidence. Before I joined forces with the daycare, had my own business cycle to fight sued ways. So taking fruit go to waste, turning them to healthy snacks and using that as an opportunity to create job with Mickley or women with bearish to implement like who'd been formerly incarcerated or homeless actually hired my first employee through together, we bake and then a couple of police realize you're doing more things in terms of trying to help them in making food products, places like whole foods that maybe we could actually help more women together. So he joined forces a few years ago and in terms of sort of why I'm running November twenty sixteen as the first user to that, I'm like a lot of women in the country realize that we need more women in office at all levels. And the second part is why sitcoms online now is that I thought she's affecting the women in our program, things like affordable housing and education acting the the whole, and my mom always told me if you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem. So I wanted to, again, step up and try and be a part of that pollution. Can you tell us a little. A bit about Alexandria. All I know is it's fairly close to Washington DC. That is very accurate food. We are just across the river from Washington DC. We have a lot of history. We actually celebrate Arbor day. I'm usually the first Saturday in July and we're older than the US. So so we've got, you know, old town with cobblestone streets and this store combs, and George Washington's up to your signs and things like that. I'm gonna beautiful, waterfront and where city about a hundred and sixty thousand people fifteen or so square miles. Sue right now it looks like all of the current city council members are Democrats. Yes. All of the current city council members are Democrats. Currently, what is the what is the city councils of look like in the elections for it very the. We have six seats on the council litter elected at large, the entire city votes, which is as opposed to our school board, which we have three different district. So currently the city council. Little is made up again, all Democrats. We have one woman on council currently, coupling pepper who's been on city over about thirty years and of the mazing and then five men. And then our mayor's currently aluminum as low, but she was not successful in the democratic primary. So our current vice mayor is now running unopposed for mayor and then so there are six democrat who made it through the democratic primary. There were twelve of us running in the primary six made it through including three women, which is actually really exciting because we have the chance to have a council that actually reflects the population. It serves in terms of gender when I'm pretty sure that the first time that will happen in terms of having fifty percent of the council being women. If if we're all elected and we have a really diverse council or fleet, I guess I should say, again, we're not elected yet in terms of the democratic sleep..

Alexandria Kelly Sophie Virginia Beth Elizabeth Bennet Pirker US George Washington Mickley Washington Sue Liz fifty percent thirty years
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you listening? Hey, everyone. This is Kelly with two broad talking politics. I'm here with my co host Sophie. Hey, Sophie. Hey, Kelly. And today we are talking about the politics of South Dakota which I'm super excited about and joining us for an overview conversation is Sam Parkinson who is the executive director of the South Dakota? Democratic Party. Hi, Sam. And hey, everybody listening. Thanks for having me. So first of all, I'm super excited that South Dakota has a democrat party. I think a lot of cones are too. But before we get into that, maybe could tell US Olympic about your background and how you came to be working for the Democratic Party. Yes. So I've been with the South Dakota Democratic Party for a little over three years now since I left college and I kinda got roped into it after working as an intern in the state legislature, and then taking part in one of our young Dem's programs called yell, which is young, elected legislative leaders, and it helps assign kids to state legislative campaigns and any other political work in the state. And from there I graduated college and the chair said, hey, we have a spot open for you if you're interested in the want to come work for us. So I came on as the finance director a few years ago and then became executive director in April of twenty seventeen. Have you always been democrat? I mean, it sounds like you were from college at least, but did you did you grow up in a democratic family? Would that look like for you? Yes. So I don't think I really found myself politically until I did that internship in peer in the state legislature, and they kind of made you make a choice of which caucus you wanted to work for? I grew up in a very political family. I was born and raised for the most part in northern Virginia while both my parents worked in DC and we're involved in politics as congressional staffers at lobbyists, and we moved out South Dakota, but neither of them is a registered democrat. My dad's a lifelong Republican..

South Dakota South Dakota Democratic Party Democratic Party Sam Parkinson democrat party executive director Sophie Kelly US finance director Virginia intern three years
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"I have with me my co hosts, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly. I'm really excited about tonight. And we have with us today, Susie turn bull who is the democratic nominee for Lieutenant governor in Maryland. Hi Suzy. Hi, great. Stay with you both. Yeah, thanks so much for joining us. Let's just jump in with. Can we ask you a little bit about your background? I know you have a long history with the Democratic Party and how you got into this race or when I, the two of you up and I saw that you're from the mid west. I thought you would wanna know that I really started in politics in Ohio. I'm a girl from the midwest to, and I grew up in Cleveland heights. Ohio went to go on the at the university of Cincinnati, and I got involved in politics and unusual way. In some respects, I was an intern for natty city council when Jerry Springer was a city council member, and I worked with Jerry really crazy, and but it was it was a great time. It was during the at Phnom war war. Protests. There were also issues like clean air and clean water recycling with starting in. So I got in pretty much on the issue ended in politics and was very excited to do that. I moved to Maryland to go to graduate school of university of Maryland, and shortly after I got here, I went to work for Howard Metzenbaum who was a United States Senator from Ohio and was a great congressional of and a great wonderful Senator. And after number of years, I worked on the hill and didn't lots of things. And then I was a lobbyists of city of Toledo before years and and worked on politics from a different angle because it was really helping people and helping the city get federal funding and making government more sensible, the people that was something really important to me, and it was my background, my academic background too. So when I started raise family and saw what was happening Roque Lee and and in Maryland, I walked into a campaign office, pushing a stroller, and I was pregnant at the time and said, I'm here to help. I don't like the Republican candidate at that time for congress and I wanna help you guys. I'm going to be taking some time off when my baby's born and I'm here to help and they looked at me pushing grower eight months pregnant and saying, oh, wait, sure you're going to do that. And I said, no, really? I I will have some time and I help schedule the congressman and got involved in. I never walked away in Maryland. I've been involved for thirty six years and that thirty six year old baby. The thirty eight year old has two babies of his own and in six thirty six year old one has one too. So it's been a long one. Threats. I got involved in this campaign after years, working in the Democratic Party, and and I'm national organizations because in two thousand eighteen women have, do the women have to stand up in step up and speak out for what is right, and what is important, whether whether you get involved because you don't, you're concerned about gun safety, whether you get involved because you're concerned about world, whether you're you get involved because you're carrying about healthcare. There is a place for everyone right now just stand up in beak out and to get engaged. So when I met then jealous who was a candidate for governor last year and we sat down and talked about college affordability and fully funding our schools and healthcare class. There was no way I was gonna say. No, it was clearly something that I wanted to do at a time when women were stepping up across our country. So I am trying to understand a little bit about Maryland and how Maryland sort of ended up with a Republican governors. So we think of Maryland is such a very blue place than the congressional representation from Maryland is overwhelmingly democrat, and the state house in the state Senate are supermajority democrat, and yet there's a Republican governor. I live in Illinois, which has the same oddity, but. Not quite as democratic as Maryland. So what do you think are some of the issues that people are thinking about when the voting and what are the.

Maryland Democratic Party Ohio school of university of Maryla Jerry Springer Sophie Suzy Cleveland heights Susie Toledo Senator Roque Lee Howard Metzenbaum Senate United States intern congressman Kelly university of Cincinnati
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips
"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie hey kelly" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Are you lonely. Heavy one. This is Kelly with two broads talking politics. I am enjoying the delightful silence of my house because my kids are four hundred miles away, but I have lovely ladies to talk with me tonight. So I'm on with my co host, Sophie, hey, Sophie, hey, Kelly and night. We are talking to, Christie, who is in Tennessee. Hi, Christie. Hey, Kelly. So we're talking in general about the politics of Tennessee tonight. And in later segments, we'll have interviews with Justin canoe and Mariah Phillips, but Christie may be give us a little bit of background on your involvement in Tennessee in Tennessee politics. I am from the Nashville area. I live about four or five minutes outside of Nashville, and it is a very rule read fee and I am a small dot. I live in an area where I have to drive past veteran, fly on hills and on houses. And that's. Where I'm at in Tennessee, I got involved in politics. I've always been interested in it, and I've always been very vocal on social media, but in two thousand sixteen a lot happened. We had the pulse nightclub shooting that happened that summer. It was another shooting and it felt like we were having so many of them. And then in November, of course, Trump was elected, and it felt like the bottom fell out. Although, as we know that bother them keeps getting deeper. So. After he was elected, I really through my net wide. I didn't really know where I wanted to get involved. So I got involved with my local Democratic Party. I actually got elected as the vice chair for my city and then joined into action for Gunston America. And I was just trying to find where I would fit. I joined an indivisible and I was doing stuff with Planned Parenthood, but it was when I found moms demand that I truly felt like I found my collie since I have five children, I wanna do everything I can to keep them safe. So that was my first dip into politics here in Tennessee. Great, sue. You started to talk about how very very read parts of Tennessee are. Yes, maybe that's where we can sort of start in on our discussion. So Tennessee has a Republican governor, two Republican senators in the US house. There's seven Republicans into Democrats are to Democrats sending Tennessee and the state Senate and state house are super majorities for the Republicans. The Republicans also hold the attorney general and secretary of state position, so that's really, really, really Republican, very read. I guess one of the questions I have is, is it really that read by which I mean, you can be Republican. You can feel like the majority of people are Republicans without it actually being quite that lopsided. Do you know other Democrats are people in hiding. Or or is some amount of this come from gerrymandering, voter, suppression, voter, apathy, that sort of thing. I think it's a little bit of both. Anytime we don't really use the word Democrats openly and unless you're in the bigger cities. And so anytime I find someone that I figure out that they're democrat, I'm like, ooh, someone else, you're another another blue dot, but we are also extremely gerrymandered in our district. So when you're out talking to people most of the time, I just assume everyone is Republican and, and that's how life is in a small town though. I'm, I'm again forty five minutes outside of a larger city. So these smaller towns, I feel alone. So notice that there are two, Democratic Congress people from Tennessee, but none of the races in Tennessee for congress seem to be particularly competitive between the parties is there. Even the Democrats are rated very safe in their districts. Is there a lot of gerrymandering going on into Tennessee. Yes. So I live in the six district that's Diane blacks district. And if you look at a map, you can tell just by the drawing that we are very gerrymandered 'cause we have kind of like a little arc, and then there's this little tiny sliver that has all the way down to Homa, which is a good earned a half south of us. So it's it's one of the largest districts in Tennessee, and we're hoping that we can move our state legislators a little bit more to the right, especially by twenty twenty..

Tennessee Kelly Nashville Trump Christie Diane blacks district Sophie Democratic Congress Democratic Party US twenty twenty vice chair Senate Gunston America Justin canoe attorney congress Mariah Phillips