18 Burst results for "Sophie Bushwick"

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:58 min | Last month

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of course, we need a rest if we want to function well, what do we know about why this would help a. I When they talk about making the AI sleep where it's not like putting a computer to sleep. When you put your computers late. It's just turned off or paused. When they make this a I undergo with sort of artificial sleep there really stimulating it, but with random noise in a certain way. And so that actually tells us a little bit of something about AI that works like brains. But it also tells us about human brains about some of the reasons that it's important to get a good night's sleep and to achieve this deep sleep where the brain is allowed to almost reset itself. Always always a good tip, especially around the holidays. And speaking of the holidays, one last story here it's always a time in which we collect a lot of stuff stuff that comes out of the Christmas tree or whatever. There's news this week about just how much stuff we as a species have actually created. And it's all watch Sophie. We have created so much stuff that it now outweighs. All life on earth. So if you take all the living biomass, all the plants all the insects all the humans all the other animals and compare that if you weigh that against all the stuff that people have made, you know your smartphones your houses your coffee mug. Human stuff weighs in at about 1.1 trillion metric tons. And we're it's now surpassed the weight off life. So how how did we measure this? So part of this is an approximation, researchers estimating how many artificial objects are on earth and then how much they would weigh and they compare it to how many living creatures are on earth. And how much do they weigh? And one of the really interesting things is just the short time period in which this has changed. So the estimate that in about 1900, the amount of artificial stuff was equivalent to about 3% of the world's biomass. And now today, it's surpassed 100%. Because we just keep making stuff. They think that about every week we create stuff that weighs as much as every human on Earth. I have to admit whenever I saw this story, the first thing I thought of was the beginning of the animated film Wally, where he's picking up all those little blocks of garbage and just stacking them higher and higher and higher. It feels like we're getting to that point. We are creating Ah lot of trash in this way, right? Because everything that is created that you know, comes to the end of its useful life. Then gets discarded. So yes, I think that the picturing this sort of like the opening to Wally is not inaccurate, and it just It also gives us a sense of just how much humans Are changing the planet are affecting the planet because we now are able to create enough stuff to outweigh life. Wow. Well, we have run out of time. Thanks So much for chatting with me. Sophie. I really appreciate it. My pleasure. Sophie Bushwick is technology editor at Scientific American in New York. When we come back the green new deal, hasn't you counterpart, the European Green deal and it's on its way to being implemented. We'll find out what's in it and why so many countries supported coming up after this. This is science Friday from W. N. Y C studios. W N. Y C supporters include Swan Galleries with an online auction of maps and atlases, Natural history and color plate books on December 17th with autobahn works in early world maps and atlases. More info. It's one galleries dot com and on the swan galleries up. Yeah. Hmm. This is science Friday. I'm John Donne Kaskey. In all the chaos that was 2020 the pandemic and the U. S presidential election largely pushed the issue of climate change from the headlines. It's hard to believe. But just over one year ago, the youth climate movement was at its peak, inspiring millions of people to protest government in action in the face of rising global temperatures..

Sophie Bushwick Wally AI Swan Galleries John Donne Kaskey New York editor
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:06 min | 3 months ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Issue is there's a bit of a catch. This only functions at pressures about as high as you'd find in the center of the Earth. Small detail, right little fit. Yeah, yeah. You don't have to operate a computer at that kind of pressure. Yeah, well, as we say in the in the science business, more research needs to be done right? Absolutely. And I think that this finding, though, does give give rise to new ideas about the type of material. So this particular material is made of Ah, combination of hydrogen, sulfur and carbon, and it suggests that maybe different combinations of this material or compounds of hydrogen and two other elements. Could have different properties. Researchers can now start testing Ah lot of those and see if any of them can keep functioning at slightly less extreme pressures. Fun stuff. Let's move on to the election. The £800 Gorilla in the room. While we've been focusing on the presidential election, there are congressional seats to consider, and there are a few doctors running for those seats this year during a pandemic, right. That's right. There's at least two big races, one in Arizona and one in Kansas, where doctors have thrown their hats into the ring. And one thought is that in the middle of this pandemic when we're relying on health care workers and doctors, Tio keep people safe and they're being seen as heroes. It is possible that public opinion Could help doctors who are running for political office. So in Arizona, there's a race between Dr Harold to burn any and David Schleicher to Pernetti is a Democrat. Schweickart is a Republican, and he's also the incumbent. So Dr Tipper Nanny she would need to win of race That's tough to win against an incumbent. But she thinks that being a doctor and having a scientific background could help her in this race. Do you know I've seen this in a couple of other congressional races in my own little World here in the East Coast. I've seen running as a doctor. The candidates thinks that that is a big plus because as you say, people trust doctors more than they do politicians, especially now. That's exactly right. But it's actually interesting. In some cases you have doctor versus doctor. So there's a contest in Kansas right now where there is two doctors running against each other. Dr. Roger Marshall is a Republican, and Dr Barbara Bollier is a Democrat. But despite the fact that both of them have medical degrees, they have different, very different opinions on climate change. Dr. Marshall, the Republican candidate, has said that he is not sure that there even is climate change. And he said that as recently as 2017, whereas Dr Bollier has stated that Climate change is an issue for her, and it's certainly going to be an issue in this election for a lot of people For a lot of people. Climate change is an extremely important issue. Yeah, Finally, there's a wonderful space first coming up next Tuesday, a return sample mission from an asteroid first time we've ever tried that this is very exciting. The Cyrus Rex space probe is going to be taking a sample. From the asteroid Bennu and then bringing it back to Earth, which is very exciting going to bring it back. It's gonna hang around for a couple of years. And this is going to be televised so people can watch it as it's happening. I find that really cool, don't you? Oh, absolutely. I mean, this is a ground breaking an asteroid breaking. Ah, first sad joke from you. That's good. Thank you. Thank you. I try But this is going to be a very exciting thing to watch. It's on Tuesday. I think that they're starting the televised broadcast around 2 P.m.. And then I think they're expecting to be able to actually scoop up the sample up at about 6 P.m. East Coast time. Sofia always bringing us exciting stuff to talk about. Thank you for taking time to be with us today. We'll hopefully will be watching. Thank you. I'm definitely going to watch Sophie Bushwick, Technology editor for Scientific American. We're going to take a break, and when we come back, how do you find a super massive object that no one concede Nobel Prize winning astronomer Andrea Ghez weighs in on science.

Dr Barbara Bollier Dr Tipper Kansas Dr. Roger Marshall Arizona Dr Harold East Coast Schweickart Andrea Ghez Tio Scientific American Nobel Prize Sophie Bushwick Sofia David Schleicher editor Pernetti
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:48 min | 7 months ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KPCC

"Well, Sofia. I hope you can hear the different because I think if I was a sparrow would make more of a difference to me. Is the new song better somehow. I mean, why would you have a new song? I guess there must be some reason why it changes. Right, so there's still trying to figure that out, so they think they know how it has spread. They put little backpacks on the sparrows to track them as they moved, and they found that sparrows that sung three new song had the same. Overwintering grounds as sparrows that sang the old song. And so they think that juvenile males learned this new song during this winter season. But what they don't know is why that song would be better. They haven't found that it helps sparrows defend their territory. So they think that maybe female sparrows are are more attracted to males that seeing this new song and that could account for its success. Let's talk about this weekend. Coming up. The Fourth of July is this weekend and you've got some new firework science that, frankly I'm not excited about having been to many fireworks displays. Please tell us more about it. Right. So we all know that if you are setting off fireworks, you need to be very careful to avoid explosions and injury that way. But there's another danger, which is that a lot of thes fireworks emit toxic substances, so chemicals on metals like lead and copper. And researchers wanted to see what effect these have on human lung cells and on animals, And so they basically bought about a dozen different types of common fireworks and set them off in the lab, And then they took samples of the substances that were admitted, and they exposed human long cells and live rodents to these different substances, And they found that At least two of the fireworks emitted lead in harmful levels that were harmful and that other one's managed to damage long cells in particular. Ah firework called the black cuckoo had was the most toxic and it was 10 times more damaging to human cells. Been a neutral a saline solution. Wow, I'm glad I guess that that's that's the good news and bad news. The good news is we know about it. We can stay away from it. The bad news is that it's it's happening at all. And and just don't suck in the fumes. Right, Right. Don't try. Try toe. I mean, yeah, I try to avoid inhaling firework near near fireworks, I guess. All right, Let's close it out with fireworks of a different kind. Sophie emerging black holes, thanked us think that they've seen fireworks sort of a flash of light from this now. Yes, This is really exciting. So back in May, astronomers using the gravitational wave observatory Lego detected gravitational waves that they say came from a collision of two black holes. But then, over the next couple weeks there was a flare of light coming from the same part of the sky. So what they're saying is this light could have been produced in the merger. What? Well, how How would that happen? Why would the merger caused the light? Right. So we all know black holes are famous for not letting light out. So how is it possible that they produce light? So what thes astronomers are suggesting is that if there was dust and gas around the black holes in what's called an accretion disc when the black hole's merged and released all this energy that could have caused a bunch of heat In this in this matter nearby, and it was that it's that matter that's producing the light. Well, I would imagine that because physicists like rigorous evidence, there's going to be some controversy going on here, right? Oh, yeah, There are astronomers who say this is absolutely not what happened. This is a big leap, and it's it's I completely disagree with your findings. So there's definitely this is not a sure thing. It's not a sure thing that this happened. It's something that's very much still up for debate. Well, it's a sure thing that we love having you coming on, Sophie. Thank you. Sophie Bushwick, Technology editor for Scientific American. Always a pleasure. Have a great holiday weekend. Thanks. You two were going to take a break. And when we come back the great outdoors, Confia ll less welcoming and safe. If you're a person of color will explore the racial barriers to enjoying. And studying nature will be right back after this short break. Myra Plato. This is science Friday from the studios. Sometimes it seems like.

Sophie Bushwick Sofia Myra Plato Scientific American editor
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:23 min | 7 months ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sofia. I hope you can hear the different think if I was a sparrow would make more of a difference to me. Is the new song better somehow? I mean, why would you have a new song? I guess there must be some reason why it changes. Right, so there's still trying to figure that out, so they think they know how it has spread. They put little backpacks on the sparrows to track them as they moved, and they found that sparrows that sung three new song had the same. Overwintering grounds as sparrows that saying, the old song, and so they think that juvenile males learned this new song during this winter season. But what they don't know is why that song would be better. They haven't found that it helps sparrows defend their territory. So they think that maybe female sparrows are are more attracted to males that seeing this new song and that could account for its success. Let's talk about this weekend. Coming up. The Fourth of July is this weekend and you've got some new firework science that, frankly I'm not excited about having been to many fireworks displays. Please tell us more about it. Great, So we all know that if you are setting off fireworks, you need to be very careful to avoid explosions and injury that way. But there's another danger, which is that a lot of thes fireworks emit toxic substances, so chemicals on metals like lead and copper. And researchers wanted to see what effect these have on human lung cells and on animals, And so they basically bought about a dozen different types of common fireworks and set them off in the lab, And then they took samples of the substances that were admitted, and they exposed human long cells and live rodents to these different substances, And they found that At least two of the fireworks emitted lead in harmful levels that were harmful and that other one's managed to damage long cells in particular. Ah firework called the black cuckoo had was the most toxic and it was 10 times more damaging to human cells. Been a neutral a saline solution. Wow, I'm glad I guess that that's that's the good news and bad news. The good news is we know about it. We can stay away from it. The bad news is that it's it's happening at all. And just don't suck in the fumes. Right, Right. Don't try. Try toe. I mean, yeah, I try to avoid inhaling firework near near fireworks, I guess. All right. Let's close it out with fireworks of a different kind. Sophie emerging black holes. Scientists think that they've seen fireworks sort of a flash of light from this now. Yes, This is really exciting. So back in May, astronomers using the gravitational wave observatory Lego detected gravitational waves that they say came from a collision of two black holes. But then, over the next couple weeks there was a flare of light coming from the same part of the sky. So what they're saying is this light could have been produced in the merger. What? Well, how How would that happen? Why would the merger caused the light? Right. So we all know black holes are famous for not letting light out. So how is it possible that they produce light? So what thes astronomers are suggesting is that if there was dust and gas around the black holes in what's called an accretion disc when the black hole's merged and released all this energy that could have caused a bunch of heat In this in this matter nearby, and it was that it's that matter that's producing the light. Well, I would imagine that because physicists like rigorous evidence, there's going to be some controversy going on here, right? Oh, yeah, There are astronomers who say this is absolutely not what happened. This is a big leap, and it's it's I completely disagree with your findings. So there's definitely this is not a sure thing. It's not a sure thing that this happened. It's something that's very much still up for debate. Well, it's a sure thing that we love having you coming on, Sophie. Thank you. Sophie Bushwick, Technology editor for Scientific American. Always a pleasure. Have a great holiday weekend. Thanks. You two were going to take a break. And when we come back the great outdoors, Confia ll less welcoming and safe. If you're a person of color will explore the racial barriers to enjoying..

Sophie Bushwick Sofia. Scientific American editor
Computer Tells Real Smiles from Phonies

60-Second Science

02:11 min | 1 year ago

Computer Tells Real Smiles from Phonies

"This is scientific american sixty seconds signs. I'm sophie bushwick. Is that person really glad to see me or are they. Just being polite. Some people struggled to distinguish a perfunctory grin from a truly happy. Smile and computers have found this task even more difficult bolt that is until researchers trained a program to detect when a smile is genuine visual computing researchers at the university of bradford in the u._k. Started with software for analyzing a changing facial expression this program can examine video clip of a human head and identify specific acidic details around the eyes cheeks and mouth then the program tracks the details moving relative to each other as the face smiles next next the scientists had their program evaluate two sets of video clips in one subjects performed posed smiles in the other they watched film that inspired genuine displays of emotion. The program calculated the differences among the subjects faces during the two clips and it turns out that your mouth cheeks and is moved differently when you're faking that smirk in particular the muscles around the eyes shift ten percent more for a real smile than they do for a fake one. These results are in the journal advanced engineering informatics. The researchers suggest their work could improve approve computers ability to analyze facial expressions and thus to interact more smoothly with humans but they're real accomplishment is improving tyra tyra banks right. You have to smile with your eyes. Thanks for listening for scientific. American is sixty seconds science on sophie bushwick <music>.

Sophie Bushwick University Of Bradford Sixty Seconds Ten Percent
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KPCC

"Taxes and royalties fund significant part of the state government here. When oil prices crashed a few years back. It was really a gut punch to Alaska's economy. And so you know, that that that's why when they say that when the oil industry is like fighting this initiative, it is giving a lot of Alaskans. Pause later. This science Friday from WNYC studios. With Sophie, Bushwick high. I had another question sort of speaking of the oil industry. So if there is oil and gas drilling in the Arctic national wildlife refuge. We we mentioned that this would put caribou calving grounds under threat. So I'm wondering is this something that's on Alaskan voters minds at all. So it's interesting Alaska, politics, the way, they work. There isn't a candidate on the Alaska ballot right now that is against development in the Arctic national wildlife refuge, both candidates for congress. Both candidates for governor are supportive of it. That's kind of how Alaska politics goes. Because I just explained, you know, such a huge part of the economy here, you know, that said interestingly enough voters in the lower forty-eight might have more of an impact on this. Because if Democrats takes the house congressman from Arizona rural GRA Halbe, he would become the chair of the house resources committee, and he has said he would really push back on development in the Arctic national wildlife refuge. So well, it's not something Alaskan voters will really have a big impact on in this election voters in the rest of America, really good at depends on those committees. Thank you very much Elizabeth for taking time to be with us today. Thank you for having meetings with our ball reporter for. Alaska's energy desk at DHA. Lasca public media in Anchorage. We have a couple of minutes before you have to go to the break. Eight four four seven two four eight two five five let's go to media, Pennsylvania. Hi, jim. Hello. Hi there. I was. Question is a simple question anytime, they have a city exists anywhere in the country. They have to have wastewater treatment programs set up to handle the population. Why do we not have that anywhere for poultry farms beef development forms anything that, you know, excretes waste should be forced to go through a waste treatment program. They should not even allow them to be built unless they have those accesses there, and you know. Taking care of people were getting sick, the red tide exist because of wastewater treatment till you think visionary. You think there should be an issue, then unbalance everywhere. Oh, definitely definitely if if they can if they have to have wastewater treatment for keitel's excrement. Why don't they have it for critters? Now, we saw that come into play a little bit at least get some attention during the last hurricane that went through North Carolina Jackley. Yeah. Yeah. One of the hazards of those storms is that they can breach containment walls and systems and you can get even bigger contamination. If you have farms where their waste ends up spread all over the place in the wake of a storm. Now, we saw that with with Ashra McCall moaning, also not just the contains clashes another big contaminant and a couple of different states. This is after Colesberg you need to get rid of the leftover ash, and that can can Leach into groundwater, and you don't want the arsenic and other other poisons in they're getting into the water supply. No, you don't want that. I hate it. When that happens not to be a little bit. It's very very dangerous. Absolutely. Right. We're gonna take a break we want you to stay right where you all are number eight four four seven two four eight two five five you can also tweet us. At sei, fry Sophie, Bushwick, an I will be back after the break. And we're gonna talk about some interesting stuff. How about this? As an issue of meat labelling in Missouri. Renewable energy in New Hampshire, and our top story in your state, whatever it is. But only give us a call. You can make the call that only if you make the call so we'll be right back after this break..

Alaska Arctic fry Sophie Bushwick WNYC studios Anchorage Ashra McCall North Carolina America reporter GRA Halbe New Hampshire Elizabeth keitel Arizona jim
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

"Of a treat this week let's let's take a listen smells musky and like damp but distinctly rotten a dead mouse thing i've always smelled roadkill once before in the stick xactly what it smells like bad i got right up there and it just smelled like dirty diapers what were they talking about they are talking about a lovely corpse blau our so corpse flowers they spent about a decade building up to get ready to to bloom and when they do the result smells like as as people were describing like rotting meat like corpses like sweaty socks there's lots of great descriptions for it it's a very exciting moment recognize some science friday staff member of actually went up took the train up there and we had a scientist showing them around and they said how bad was the smell of scientists you know we opened the door in the morning and three of her own staff people threw up because i accumulated overnight so bad then it was really kind of cool yeah i preferred to observe it through the radio that's what we're doing it goes to the radio i mean we humans don't like it but carrion beetles love this smell so the whole right the reason these these flowers release this terrible smell so they can draw these carrion beetles and they come and they gather pollen from the flour and the next time they wander off they could go pollinate other flowers was the question of how reproduces i didn't thank you so for that and lastly the important question of how wigley t rex's tongue was what's the burning issue well if you look at dinosaurs in fiction you know you often that you know you'll see them with these long waggling tongues sort of like a lizard tongue and so researchers decided you know let's let's see once it fro what their tongues really would have been like so they looked at the height bones of fossils the highway is a bone that kind of anchors the tongue in place and they were comparing fossils to the highlights of birds and reptiles and they found that dinosaur heights are probably closer to kroc crocodile ones than anything else and crocodiles have these kinda short stubby tongues not nothing that you would see waggling out as dinosaur roars so they've unraveled this the tongue mystery no lizard like tongue coming out of t rex sale no which honestly i'm kind of thankful for that's pretty scary we'll wait for the remake of the movie selvi sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science now it's time to check in on the.

scientist senior editor wigley sophie bushwick
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

"Which listener's support w n y c studios this is science friday i'm replayed i met later in the hour we'll be talking about the volcanic eruptions in hawaii and the stream species of bacteria that can eat antibiotics but i the leaning tower of pisa has been tipping for centuries in new that in you know it's managed to withstand whether and wars and earthquakes and while over the years engineers have taken action to stabilize it turns out there's another contributor to its longevity and that is the soil beneath it joining me to talk about that and other selected short subjects and science is sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science welcome to science right thank you i have to note that congratulations are in order because the pops i team was victorious at our sifi trivia night earlier this week so it was a tough battle we were really excited to win two years on the row check ticket well we'll have to see what happens next year we'll aim for three pete all right let's let's talk about this talk about the news what's this leaning tower of pisa story what's the secret here right so the leaning tower of pisa one of the reasons it's leaning is because the soil in the region is very soft in fact there's a couple of other tower that are also leaning although not as much pizza that towers leaning at about four degree angle right now and at its greatest it was at closer to five and a half degree angle so you would think that this this really unstable tower would be really in bad shape when earthquakes strike and at least four major earthquakes have hit the area since the construction of the tower but it's withstood them so this latest study looked at the relationship between the soil and the tower and they found that one of the reasons it's been able to withstand the earthquakes is because interaction between that soft soil the same soil that makes it lean and this tall rigid tower has sort of balanced out and so it doesn't vibrate when the ground vibrates the same way other buildings sort of squishy and absorbs.

hawaii pisa senior editor sophie bushwick sifi four degree two years
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On this week's on the media we explore some of the many myths that blur our understanding of poverty a big one is the role of luck a thirteen hundred dollars random acts of kindness and more this week's on the media from wnyc tonight at eight on ninety three point nine fm wnyc this is science friday i'm i replayed oh i met later in the hour we'll be talking about the volcanic eruptions in hawaii and the strange species of bacteria that can eat antibiotics but i the leaning tower of pisa has been tipping for centuries you knew that and you know it's managed to withstand whether and wars and earthquakes and while over the years engineers have taken action to stabilize it turns out there's another contributor to its longevity and that is the soil beneath it joining me to talk about that and other selected short subjects in science is sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science welcome to science right thank you i have to note that congratulations are in order because the pop side team was victorious at our sifi trivia night earlier this week so it was a tough battle we were really excited to win two years on the route three years in a row second well we'll have to see what happens next year we'll aim for three peat all right let's let's talk about the talk about the news what's this leaning tower of pisa story what's the secret here sort of squishy and absorbs.

wnyc hawaii pisa senior editor sophie bushwick sifi thirteen hundred dollars three years two years
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:31 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

"Support for this podcast comes from m i t press on april twenty second two thousand seventeen more than one million marchers worldwide took to the streets to stand up for listener the importance support it of science w each nyc of them this has is a story studios science to friday tell i'm my the replay book toto science coming not to you silence today from share cincinnati stories from public the march for radio science movement later in the you hour can buy dr science lucie jones not silence is here at to talk m about i t her book press the big dot ones m it including dot california's e d u biggest slash natural march disaster he it was a flood not an earthquake and what studying past his astor's can tell us about the next big calamity but first he omens had made the world a pretty tough place for our fellow species to live we're raising global temperatures destroying natural habitats with development and littering the oceans with junk especially you know plastic junk but one a da pt of a little back tiriac for what that says that's okay because it produces an enzyme that let's breakdown plastic bottles for energy and scientists studying this enzyme report that they have been able to make it work even better here with the details as well as other short subjects in sciences sophie bushwick senior editor for popular science high so fi high in iran contra.

nyc lucie jones dot california cincinnati sophie bushwick senior editor iran twenty second
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Point nine fm wnyc this is science friday i am i replied oh coming to you today from cincinnati public radio later in the hour dr lucie jones here to talk about her book the big ones including california's biggest natural disaster it was a flood not an earthquake and what studying past disasters can tell us about the next big calamity but i had made the world a pretty tough place for our fellow species to live we're raising global temperatures destroying natural habitats with development and littering the oceans with junk especially you know plastic junk but one adaptive little bacteria that's that's okay because it produces an enzyme that let's breakdown plastic bottles for energy and scientists studying this enzyme report that they have been able to make it work even better here with the details as well as other short subjects and scientists sophie bushwick senior editor for popular science hi sophie i era let's talk about why we're scientists looking at this plastic eating enzyme so this enzyme eats a specific kind of plastic all called polyethylene terra late for p e t and what's great about that is that this is the main plastic in soda bottles were produced people by about a million soda bottles every minute and so there are major source of plastic waste and the fact that this enzyme can break them down means that it might be a way to recycle it so instead of having to constantly make new new bottles people could use the leftover bottles break them down and then make new ones out of that material would is the idea to have the bacteria to employ the bacteria or just use the enzyme that the bacteria us.

cincinnati lucie jones california sophie bushwick senior editor
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KPCC

"We have the bharti exactly and so they think oh it's the party that's done it it's mark i just think it's fascinating just we we think of time as we have this very um intuited sense of what time is how much time passes in an hour and we forget that when we were little we didn't have this sense we weren't born with it we learned it and then it became such an inquiry and part of our minds that we think we've always known it then of physicists we're going to talk about this later talk about time still think trying to figure out time works right we we don't want when we actually be is just make all these assumptions about time when you're actually start thinking about it questions like why does time only flow forward all of a sudden being really relevant and interesting room for the rest of the hour so we have a good holiday thanks uses sophie bushwick senior editor for popular science now it's time to play good thing burn thing because every story has a flip side now we all know that exercise is good for your right you don't necessarily have to run a marathon or spend hours in the gym even any good brisk walk has benefits for the cardiovascular system but research published this month in the lancet indicate that maybe not all walks are created equal joining me to talk about of these jonathan new minis a cardiologists assistant professor of medicine at dead new york university school of medicine welcome to the program hi thanks for having me.

bharti senior editor cardiovascular system sophie bushwick assistant professor of medicin york university school of medi
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

"Support for this podcast comes from biorad laboratories from developing diagnostics to improving likes science research by allred has been advancing discovery for over sixty years check out the crisper toolbox to access cutting edge resources and experience in virtual reality has genomes are edited faster with by our adds crisper cast nine workflow at bio hyper and red dot com slash define your flow support for this science friday podcast comes from ibm the power of knowledge the power of technology this is you to the power of ibm find out how you can do your best work at ibm dot com slash you this is science friday ira plato a bit later in the hour the wonderful world of everything and i mean everything we don't know about the universe physics philosophy and the nature of everything you'll see will talk about it but look down in your hand you're a self are i now if it's not fair it's probably in your pocket released within arm's reach right these days most people in ever more than a few feet away from their phones sometimes just a few inches and scientists have studied whether a longterm exposure to cell phone radiation could have an adverse impact on human health even though there's no strong evidence to suggest that these devices are in safe but last week the california department of public health issued guidelines that seemed to alarm people with me to discuss the ramifications of the california guidelines as well as others short subjects in science is sophie bushwick senior editor for populism signs i selfie welcome back hey thanks so california guidelines about how to reduce exposure to cellphone rid eight radiation doesn't say that that the the definitely causes cancer variety or other illnesses when people have sort of interpreted freight a fact that they've issued guidelines saying here's how to reduce your cell phone exposure seems to indicate that cell from exposure is a problem where.

virtual reality senior editor allred ibm california department of publi california sophie bushwick sixty years
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The whole family including cats and dogs and with minions and charlie round themes in nitz fleece in and flannel mart pyjama graham dot com and the listeners of kqed maybe some nitz fleece in flannel for the rest of today it's going to be cooler but sunny highs in the low 60s in the bay area sacramento look for clear skies tonight and chile lows generally in the low to mid 40s sunny skies on saturday partly sunny sunday this is science friday i am i replayed new broadcasting today from wfp l studios in louisville public media handled deal kentucky now science committee it's acknowledging that climate change is eighthranked but instead of curbing emissions committee chairman lamar smith is interested in geo engineering that means cooling the globe in other ways like spraying sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere we'll talk about climate modification and some of these scientific and political consequences of it later in the hour the first men's soccer teams are jockeying for slots in the 2018 world cup with italy failing to make the cut this week with heartbroken the us men's team is out of contention as well the next women's world cup isn't until 2019 but there the current champion us women stand a better chance and new research shows that there may be another difference between men's and women's teams and here to tell us about that and other selected short subjects and science is sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science welcome back sophie thanks for having me so tell us about this research that says that they're heading a soccer ball might hurt women's brains more than men's right so when you think though brain trauma you can we tend to think more about maybe you'll football players as opposed to soccer players that i'll win a soccer player heads the.

wfp l studios climate change lamar smith world cup us senior editor kqed sacramento chile louisville kentucky chairman soccer italy sophie bushwick football
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"As the republican party decides what to do about ruin more faces an important question standards of behaviour the us senate for an alabama shopping mall in the 1980s peter sega will explore that existential dilemma with follow poundstone morocca and special guest analyst john hardman and this week wait wait don't tell me the news quiz from npr tomorrow morning at eleven on 939 fm wnyc this is science friday i am i replayed ill broadcasting today from wfp studios in louisville public media handled deal kentucky now science committee is acknowledging that climate change is a threat but instead of curbing emissions committee chairman lamar smith is interested in geo engineering that means cooling the globe in other ways like spraying sulfur dioxide in the stratosphere we'll talk about climate modification and some of the scientific and political consequences which have it later in the hour the first men's soccer teams are jockeying for slots in the 2018 world cup with italy failing to make the cut this week boy they are heartbroken the us men's team is out of contention as well the next women were world cup isn't until 2019 but they're the current champion us women stand a better chance and new research shows that there could be another difference between men's and women's teams and here to tell us about that and other selected short subjects and science is sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science welcome back sophie thanks for having me so tell us about this research that says that they're hitting a soccer ball might hurt women's brains more than man's right so when you think though brain trauma you tend to tend to think about maybe you'll football players as opposed to soccer players that even though when a soccer player heads the bald there they're not hitting it hard enough to get a concussion they can still overtime damage their brains and uh studies have found that in soccer players who had the ball a thousand times a year or more they do see changes in their brains and then a new study has looked at whether those changes are the same between male and female soccer players so they looked at some amateur players uh forty nine men in forty nine and then they compared them people with a similar age and a similar amount of times that they would had the ball and they found that women tended to have damage to a.

senate football sophie bushwick italy soccer chairman kentucky louisville alabama republican party senior editor world cup lamar smith climate change wfp studios john hardman analyst us
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on KPCC

"This is science friday i am i replayed oh a little bit later we're going to dive into the headscratching world of cryptocurrencies but first this week a few scientists where rouse from their sleep with an early morning phone call that annual science ritual lee notification in the middle of the night that you've won a nobel prize here to tell us tell us more about the winners and other select detroit subjects in science sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science welcome back selfie glad to be there vice nice to have you let's talk about so so who won this year for what one impressed you mere reactions well so my favorite winner was for physics because this was the out lie go winning for gravitatational waves i mean and even though three only three researchers were honoured for this particular one the actual a number of contributors was over a thousand people is right essentially army lie go the laser inter for under gravitational wave observatory was able to observe and prove the existence of these ripples in the fabric of space time which einstein predicted more than one hundred years ago and the instrument they built two do it laigle which has this giant two two different locations with large interferometry his it's the most precise where those precise machines that humans have ever made in factor we spoke with kip thorne who was one of the winners of the prize when the gravitational waves discovery first came out it really goes back away lay earliest work by array why at me are all grieve are all completely independent of this the foundation for it we were all were he added independently different aspects of it already in the late nineteenth 60s and so it goes back a half a century basically and the foundations for that that we were building on and the inspiration was work of joseph weber that go and all the way back to 1960s still that's what about fifty five years ago nasa review build that they will come 1100 scientists hope it'll take them may beat half a century but yet though he.

nobel prize senior editor gravitational wave observatory einstein kip thorne joseph weber detroit nasa one hundred years fifty five years
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

"When you're on your vacation engines here last day before you go back home consider washing your clothes another because when you put closing the wash on the heat from the drier at will kill bedbugs and bedbugs eggs so this is a good way of making sure that you're not bringing any back with you and also that you're making your clothes lhasa nicesmelling for the benefit less attractive on i'm going on vacation next week so i will take that advice before a for a hit from thank you so pete welcome sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science and now it's time to check in on the state of science is king he are wwl st louis how the great island of the media news this is a segment where we highlight science stories from communities around the nation and today story comes to us from the public radio station w w n o in louisiana we are a usda programme might pay whole neighborhoods of people to move out of their floodprone houses and settled down in see for ground molly peterson reported that story for louisiana public radio partnership and she she's here with us now welcome back to science friday molly thank you so set the scene for us we are are these neighborhoods in louisiana we'll last year in early august m fifty doesn't sixteen there is a massive flood in louisiana en covered many parishes thirteen people died and there is about two point four billion dollars in flight insurance claims these neighborhoods are near baton rich m one of them is northwest of baton rouge that's i'm point coppee parish anti point coupet perish and the other one is in the town of gonzalez which is an ascension perish on a street called silver relief and some of these residents have witness some pretty devastating floods i know you interviewed one resident ethel's stewart out at about a big flood there in 2016 early 2016 we have a clip of that.

senior editor louisiana molly peterson gonzalez ethel sophie bushwick usda insurance claims coppee four billion dollars
"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sophie bushwick" Discussed on Science Friday

"Support for this science friday podcast comes from draper their unique team of engineers biologist developers physicists and astronauts work together to expand the horizon of what's possible pursuing solutions to the world's challenges draper engineering possibilities support for science friday comes from destination medical center a strategic economic initiative in rochester minnesota to build global destinations for life science medicine and health learn more at dmc dot amen this is science friday i am i replayed oh a little bit later we're going to dive into the headscratching world of cryptocurrencies but first this week a few scientists where rouse from their sleep with an early morning phone call that annual science ritual lee notification in the middle of the night that you've won a nobel prize who to tell us a more tell us more about the winners and other select detroit subject in science sophie bushwick senior editor at popular science welcome back so glad to be very nice nice to have you let's talk about so so who won this year for what one impressed you your reactions well it so my favorite winner was for physics because this was the out lie go winning for gravitatational waves i mean and even though three only three researchers were honoured for this particular one the actual number of contributors was over a thousand people essentially um lie go the laser inter for under gravitational wave observatory was able to observe and prove the existence of these ripples in the fabric of space time which einstein predicted more than a hundred years ago and the instrument they built to do it like el which has this giant two two different locations with large inter for others it's the most precise where those precise machines that humans have ever made in factor we spoke with kip thorne who was one of the winners of the prize when the gravitational waves discovery first came out it really goes back away.

minnesota nobel prize senior editor gravitational wave observatory einstein kip thorne rochester detroit hundred years