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18 Burst results for "Sonya Renee Taylor"

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

01:51 min | Last month

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"Is Much more about the. Weight than it is about an actual. Material. Discomfort Yeah. That's really well said and I think it's so true that people can have different levels of stamina that have nothing to do with their size, but just like. How often do you do this thing right like often? Are you walking up a flight of stairs? He now maybe this is. You're traveling to a place. That has a subway with a bunch of stairs. You're not used to it upstairs. Nita must time or Stuff like that, so I can. Getting into the swing of things because the reality is to people of all sizes, you know people in smaller bodies get winded going upstairs sometimes if they're not used to it or. Read or if it's a hot day and they have not water, whatever like there's lots of factors even on an individual level day to day. That can affect your how you're feeling in your body. so yeah and I think the thing about close feeling tight so interesting too because. Iowa's sale close job to fit you. It's not your job A. It's not. It doesn't matter what size it says you know and it saying just please closed field constricting. That's not a fault with your body. That's a fault with the clothes. That we do often in the realm of weight as they, we blame our bodies for the ways in which we stigma and bias baked into the entirety of our society. Right so they us. I it was someone on a on a thread on the body is not an apology on facebook. The other day, saying relied too fat to do dot dot dot dot, and I was thinking I offer that it's unlikely that your to fact to dot dot dot. Dot Dot dot did not consider your body when he created whatever it was created. A. Of A. Wage my bias erasure.

facebook Nita Iowa
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

02:39 min | Last month

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"In photos of themselves, and it's just started feeling very clear to me that like. Oh we think we are not allowed to celebrate our bodies. However, they look you know. Those twenty photos were all different sorts of people in all different sorts of bodies in a clearer to me that maybe we just needed a space where we were allowed to. Not like tolerate our bodies, but like actually love them and speak nicely about the mcpeek nicely one another about the as celebrate them exactly as they are, and a had. This poem called the body's not apology for about eight to ten months that I had been sharing in the world and I was like Oh. Maybe I should just make facebook page where we can do that thing, celebrate our bodies and disconnect from this sort of. Shame that keeps us or celebrating our bodies and. That's how the page the body is. Not An apology came about, and it sounds like it really struck a chord with people, because everybody has these feelings of like being ashamed about something to do with their bodies and the voice that says don't share that you're not good enough. There's something wrong with you. Of like open up a space for that to give people a place to share and celebrate their bodies, and that was also wasn't that back in like two thousand eleven I think I read select. Kind of before, certainly before this wave of the body, positive movement was really happening before body positivity went so mainstream. Definitely and I think there was this notion very early on. For me, one of the things that just got cleared. Everybody has a by. If nothing else we we all have this thing in common and I don't know anybody who is one hundred percent happy with it. So, what is that about? And I just started noticing the connection between the messages that we give folks about Wade and the messages that we give folks about race and the messages that we give disability. There's a narrative just seems to be sort of cutting through all this. The no matter what body you're in, it's not a good enough body, and that seems absurd to me since we all have to have a body. You literally would not be here. You can't. You can't do this particular Ryan without one. And so there was this kind of stress very matter of fact technique. By that time we were having really fractured relationships of our bodies that it.

facebook Ryan Wade
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

01:48 min | Last month

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"Again in attention. With towns on without. Out. But I've never been I'm not a particularly disciplined human being so so so. Diet! It's never really worked out well. Auto particularly. So, even as I noticed myself, gaining the weight back after I left that job, but I I was aware of it in concerned about it, but not doing anything about it, or maybe maybe I did back to. Accounting points or something like that man. I would stop. So yeah, it was just very much. This sort of if we stay annual cycle of our a act after trying to get back on the wash train right right and yes, so common right like people because we're not designed to be able to sustain weight loss for any period of time, so it's so normal for your body to just drive you back to what it wanted to be. And then you feel like it's your problem your fault. Like. Why better do this other diet? Then I better. Work Harder. Work harder yeah yeah, it's amazing. How insidious that! Is, and how like you know I've heard the argument that if there was another product. That had a ninety five percent failure radio. Right Right, right? We would not blame ourselves. We will blame the product. There'd be class action lawsuit thousand. The market. Right exactly yeah, but somehow he just come to blame ourselves for diets, not working. Yeah, SORTA insidious. Yes, so that was like your early twenties, said yes, I would say the sort of being on the Diet train.

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

01:50 min | Last month

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"Is sort of ask? Why am I doing nets? And it was like a WanNa. Save money I want to prove I can do something I don't know. I can do like. Go live in the woods. WanNa lose pounds. Johnson definitely part of my views inning going to live in the woods. Ma. And opposite another place where that sort of all or nothing way of being in relationship with my body weight and booed was really normalized because when we were at work, which is like five days a week twenty four hours a day living on campsite. Exceptionally, active life and there was very. You know specific amount of calories. They gave the kids every day. And that's what you made. And and then on the weekends. When you had your time off, it would be like just over the top decadence and ridiculous a drinking. So there was this berry sort of swing back and forth that again just got very normalized. Yeah, it sounds almost like it mimics the restrict bench cycle of dieting, or the yeah, the sort of like the Cheat Day concept that's now so popular in diets exactly and that was our weekends are weekends. Jeep Begins Ray. Yeah so did that sort of cycle than continue or did that drive you further into the obsession with dieting, restricting kind of locking down in certainly made me so I ended up losing. Pounds, or something like that, and over the course of the year. That worked there. And I remember it being so aware of the difference again in attention. With towns on without. Out. But I've never been I'm not a particularly.

WanNa Jeep Johnson Ma
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

02:36 min | Last month

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"Ended up going to a school were a lot of the girls were very thin. Attractive Girls, which made me more hyper aware of my is injected edition two. Left the community where where my body was commodity and. moved to a space where that was less so I was really aware of that. And what was that like for you? I mean college in general was just really difficult I was putting myself through school in also working full time, and also already not the norm and in terms of the risk is students. That I was going to school with and I also physically wasn't the norm, so it was a very isolating time. It was a very isolating time. Yeah, that does sound isolating and Mike disconnected you from the college experience. Yes, I definitely would say my college experience of survival. Of the college experience whatever we were mansize that, too. Right yeah, that stereotypical kind of extended adolescence or something sounds like you didn't get that. Much. Yeah, and so, what do you think that was the catalyst? Then for starting to take dieting more seriously like okay, I'm GonNa do this Dieter, join weight watchers, or whatever yeah. I definitely think there was a lot of pressure either. Direct or indirect? Number. At a boyfriend at the time you. I just started like we. Was My first serious boyfriend? Adolescents and we have this period of time where we had a brief break up in, he was dating someone else and I don't remember the context of the conversation, but I remember him saying. That part of his fear of. Serious with me that I would be I would get fat when I got older. So again there are these jazz sorta moments along the way it's solidified. The like I needed to not get any bigger or You need to stay at this line as I took this job. Right out of college as a wilderness counselor for kids with emotional and behavioral problems were literally moved to the woods and lived in so. made the. Tense made out of trees and work. Wow them, but part of my reasoning. When is sort of ask? Why am I doing nets? And it was like a WanNa. Save money I want to prove I can do something I don't know. I can do like..

WanNa Dieter Mike
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

01:37 min | Last month

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"Know. Something about the belt to meal and communal about would alternate. Disordered eating. and. How did that affect your relationship with your body? I think that. Because my family, because my family always had big breasts and big guys, big hips, a curve, naturally curvy women and In my community. That was okay to appoint was always kind of the like it was okay if you were thick quote, unquote, which can be too thick and so. As a young person. I developed early like I'm sort of got the Taylor boobs and but. Around eleven years old, and so I started seeing relationship with my body as sort of social capital social capital that I needed to match. Attention and it got me and my friends rides home from. The Amusement Park I think you know like into there is a way in which I got a lot of attention because my body was looked very adult. Teenager and there was also a very clear need to regulate this commodity. Were you conscious of that. Was it sort of? Something that you recognize you have the ability to manipulate, or was that not until later that you sort of saw that for what it was. No, I think I I think I recognized it pretty early, because I was not a particularly popular.

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

05:48 min | Last month

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"Food sake I. AM Christy Harrison and I'm recording this on June second of twenty twenty, when there is a revolution happening for racial justice, and I'm so here for it because I believe that black lives matter and I support justice for George Floyd and Brianna Taylor and RB. And Tony mcdade and all the other black people who've had their lives taken from them over the years through the racist actions of police and vigilantes, and this racist murder has to stop so honor of the movement to defend black lives, and also in recognition of the fact that the Anti Diet Movement must also be an anti-racist movement because. Is Built on a foundation of racism as you heard in the episode with Sabrina strings that I reposted last week. This week. I wanted to re post another. With a brilliant black thinker and writer who speaks to some of the racial justice issues that are connected to this anti at work. This interviews from three years ago in July of twenty seven team, and it's with amazing writer and body Liberation Activists Sonya, Renee Taylor. Sonia has been instrumental in helping make the eating disorders and body positivity space, more aware of racism at its intersections with Diet Culture and eating disorders for a long time. She's been doing this work for many years I. I heard of her and. And saw her in two thousand fifteen when she was presenting at eating. Disorders Conference and so I want to honor her contribution to this work and to this field and make sure that you all go check out her work. Her website is Sonya. Renee Taylor Dot. com and she has a great book called. The body is not an apology that I. highly recommend reading as well. So in this interview that we did three years ago, we discussed why we need more radical body love in the world how to deal with weight gain and weight stigma while learning intuitive eating, what means stream body positivity get so wrong why understanding oppression and racism and intersecting identities is key to creating a world that's truly body positive and truly liberated how to navigate diet culture as a body acceptance activists how to begin to untangle internalized oppression, and so much more. It's a great conversation. I cannot wait to share it with you in just. Just a moment I'm not going to be answering listener question this week because I want to use this time to share some resources for folks who like me are still learning about anti-racism and working to do better, and that's not everyone listening. There are some folks here who are already so far into the anti-racist work and don't need these resources and are leading the way and I wanna thank you for doing that work. Especially, my black listeners and other listeners of color who've been on the front lines of this antiracism work for so long. So, thank you for your work. And to all my black listeners I wanNA send you empathy and compassion and support for what you're going through in this difficult time and descend solidarity, and to say that black lives matter and I'm with you in whatever way I can be. And for those of you, listening who have the unearned social privilege that comes with being white or white passing in this racist culture I wanNA. Call on you to start and or continue engaging in a practice of anti-racism in whatever way you can, because we truly cannot work for body liberation if we're not working for antiracism and I think on a Taylor does such a great job of explaining that her notion of radical body positivity that you'll hear about in a moment I am by. No means an expert on anti-racism as As I'm sure you can imagine right. I'm someone with white privilege. For the last several years I have been making a conscious effort to learn about anti-racism and to unlearn the racist culture that we're all born into, but you know I realized recently with this latest uprising that my anti-racist efforts had become a little passive had become not as active as I would like them to be and I'll talk more about that in the interview airing next week with Mony Melton because I, think she has some really important perspectives on that. Also I'm a white person with a lifetime of being steeped in this racist culture as so many of us are so I'll probably always be on learning, but I'm committed to making the effort and to listening to and learning from people who know way more about this stuff than I do. So from a perspective of someone who's very much still learning, I wanted to share a few resources that I've found helpful in my anti-racism education. I'm giving some sort of more general racism resources. Because as I'm recording this I don't know where the revolution will be. By the time you hear this episode I don't know what's going to be needed on the grounds. I wanted to just give you a few places to start people. People to follow to learn more get more information on social media and all that stuff so i. a couple of books that I love so you WanNa talk about race bypassed food site gassed Joma Aluko. It's a wonderful starting point a wonderful jumping off point if you are new to antiracism work and she even says like that's what she recommends it for. She wants to be a first step for people, not an end point. an anti-racist by Abram ex. Candy is also a wonderful book and he also says like. Stop reading. My Book. Take that as a starting point and go from there and take use it to take action. Just think that the reading reading of the book is the only action me and white supremacy is a great book by Layla F- Saad. That is a little bit more of an active workbook type book. That's going to ask you to do actions along the way, and by the way all of these authors are great people to follow on social media as well so we're GONNA put links to their social media, and the show notes for this episode may recommend going and following them on twitter and instagram all the places..

writer Renee Taylor Brianna Taylor Renee Taylor Dot. Tony mcdade twenty twenty Sabrina Christy Harrison murder George Floyd Sonya Taylor Sonia Mony Melton Joma Aluko Layla twitter Abram Candy
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

05:26 min | Last month

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"Hebert welcome to food sake I. AM Christy Harrison and I'm recording this on June second of twenty twenty, when there is a revolution happening for racial justice, and I'm so here for it because I believe that black lives matter and I support justice for George Floyd and Brianna Taylor and RB. And Tony mcdade and all the other black people who've had their lives taken from them over the years through the racist actions of police and vigilantes, and this racist murder has to stop so honor of the movement to defend black lives, and also in recognition of the fact that the Anti Diet Movement must also be an anti-racist movement because. Is Built on a foundation of racism as you heard in the episode with Sabrina strings that I reposted last week. This week. I wanted to re post another. With a brilliant black thinker and writer who speaks to some of the racial justice issues that are connected to this anti at work. This interviews from three years ago in July of twenty seven team, and it's with amazing writer and body Liberation Activists Sonya, Renee Taylor. Sonia has been instrumental in helping make the eating disorders and body positivity space, more aware of racism at its intersections with Diet Culture and eating disorders for a long time. She's been doing this work for many years I. I heard of her and. And saw her in two thousand fifteen when she was presenting at eating. Disorders Conference and so I want to honor her contribution to this work and to this field and make sure that you all go check out her work. Her website is Sonya. Renee Taylor Dot. com and she has a great book called. The body is not an apology that I. highly recommend reading as well. So in this interview that we did three years ago, we discussed why we need more radical body love in the world how to deal with weight gain and weight stigma while learning intuitive eating, what means stream body positivity get so wrong why understanding oppression and racism and intersecting identities is key to creating a world that's truly body positive and truly liberated how to navigate diet culture as a body acceptance activists how to begin to untangle internalized oppression, and so much more. It's a great conversation. I cannot wait to share it with you in just. Just a moment I'm not going to be answering listener question this week because I want to use this time to share some resources for folks who like me are still learning about anti-racism and working to do better, and that's not everyone listening. There are some folks here who are already so far into the anti-racist work and don't need these resources and are leading the way and I wanna thank you for doing that work. Especially, my black listeners and other listeners of color who've been on the front lines of this antiracism work for so long. So, thank you for your work. And to all my black listeners I wanNA send you empathy and compassion and support for what you're going through in this difficult time and descend solidarity, and to say that black lives matter and I'm with you in whatever way I can be. And for those of you, listening who have the unearned social privilege that comes with being white or white passing in this racist culture I wanNA. Call on you to start and or continue engaging in a practice of anti-racism in whatever way you can, because we truly cannot work for body liberation if we're not working for antiracism and I think on a Taylor does such a great job of explaining that her notion of radical body positivity that you'll hear about in a moment I am by. No means an expert on anti-racism as As I'm sure you can imagine right. I'm someone with white privilege. For the last several years I have been making a conscious effort to learn about anti-racism and to unlearn the racist culture that we're all born into, but you know I realized recently with this latest uprising that my anti-racist efforts had become a little passive had become not as active as I would like them to be and I'll talk more about that in the interview airing next week with Mony Melton because I, think she has some really important perspectives on that. Also I'm a white person with a lifetime of being steeped in this racist culture as so many of us are so I'll probably always be on learning, but I'm committed to making the effort and to listening to and learning from people who know way more about this stuff than I do. So from a perspective of someone who's very much still learning, I wanted to share a few resources that I've found helpful in my anti-racism education. I'm giving some sort of more general racism resources. Because as I'm recording this I don't know where the revolution will be. By the time you hear this episode I don't know what's going to be needed on the grounds. I wanted to just give you a few places to start people. People to follow to learn more get more information on social media and all that stuff so i. a couple of books that I love so you WanNa talk about race bypassed food site gassed Joma Aluko. It's a wonderful starting point a wonderful jumping off point if you are new to antiracism work and she even says like that's what she recommends it for. She wants to be a first step for people, not an end point. <hes> an anti-racist by Abram ex. Candy is also a wonderful book and he also says like. Stop reading. My Book. Take that as a starting point and go from there and take use it to take action. Just think that the reading reading of the book is the only

writer Renee Taylor Brianna Taylor Renee Taylor Dot. Tony mcdade twenty twenty Sabrina Christy Harrison murder George Floyd Sonya Taylor Sonia Mony Melton Joma Aluko Layla twitter Abram Candy
How to Cultivate Radical Body Love with Sonya Renee Taylor

Food Psych

05:26 min | Last month

How to Cultivate Radical Body Love with Sonya Renee Taylor

"Hebert welcome to food sake I. AM Christy Harrison and I'm recording this on June second of twenty twenty, when there is a revolution happening for racial justice, and I'm so here for it because I believe that black lives matter and I support justice for George Floyd and Brianna Taylor and RB. And Tony mcdade and all the other black people who've had their lives taken from them over the years through the racist actions of police and vigilantes, and this racist murder has to stop so honor of the movement to defend black lives, and also in recognition of the fact that the Anti Diet Movement must also be an anti-racist movement because. Is Built on a foundation of racism as you heard in the episode with Sabrina strings that I reposted last week. This week. I wanted to re post another. With a brilliant black thinker and writer who speaks to some of the racial justice issues that are connected to this anti at work. This interviews from three years ago in July of twenty seven team, and it's with amazing writer and body Liberation Activists Sonya, Renee Taylor. Sonia has been instrumental in helping make the eating disorders and body positivity space, more aware of racism at its intersections with Diet Culture and eating disorders for a long time. She's been doing this work for many years I. I heard of her and. And saw her in two thousand fifteen when she was presenting at eating. Disorders Conference and so I want to honor her contribution to this work and to this field and make sure that you all go check out her work. Her website is Sonya. Renee Taylor Dot. com and she has a great book called. The body is not an apology that I. highly recommend reading as well. So in this interview that we did three years ago, we discussed why we need more radical body love in the world how to deal with weight gain and weight stigma while learning intuitive eating, what means stream body positivity get so wrong why understanding oppression and racism and intersecting identities is key to creating a world that's truly body positive and truly liberated how to navigate diet culture as a body acceptance activists how to begin to untangle internalized oppression, and so much more. It's a great conversation. I cannot wait to share it with you in just. Just a moment I'm not going to be answering listener question this week because I want to use this time to share some resources for folks who like me are still learning about anti-racism and working to do better, and that's not everyone listening. There are some folks here who are already so far into the anti-racist work and don't need these resources and are leading the way and I wanna thank you for doing that work. Especially, my black listeners and other listeners of color who've been on the front lines of this antiracism work for so long. So, thank you for your work. And to all my black listeners I wanNA send you empathy and compassion and support for what you're going through in this difficult time and descend solidarity, and to say that black lives matter and I'm with you in whatever way I can be. And for those of you, listening who have the unearned social privilege that comes with being white or white passing in this racist culture I wanNA. Call on you to start and or continue engaging in a practice of anti-racism in whatever way you can, because we truly cannot work for body liberation if we're not working for antiracism and I think on a Taylor does such a great job of explaining that her notion of radical body positivity that you'll hear about in a moment I am by. No means an expert on anti-racism as As I'm sure you can imagine right. I'm someone with white privilege. For the last several years I have been making a conscious effort to learn about anti-racism and to unlearn the racist culture that we're all born into, but you know I realized recently with this latest uprising that my anti-racist efforts had become a little passive had become not as active as I would like them to be and I'll talk more about that in the interview airing next week with Mony Melton because I, think she has some really important perspectives on that. Also I'm a white person with a lifetime of being steeped in this racist culture as so many of us are so I'll probably always be on learning, but I'm committed to making the effort and to listening to and learning from people who know way more about this stuff than I do. So from a perspective of someone who's very much still learning, I wanted to share a few resources that I've found helpful in my anti-racism education. I'm giving some sort of more general racism resources. Because as I'm recording this I don't know where the revolution will be. By the time you hear this episode I don't know what's going to be needed on the grounds. I wanted to just give you a few places to start people. People to follow to learn more get more information on social media and all that stuff so i. a couple of books that I love so you WanNa talk about race bypassed food site gassed Joma Aluko. It's a wonderful starting point a wonderful jumping off point if you are new to antiracism work and she even says like that's what she recommends it for. She wants to be a first step for people, not an end point. an anti-racist by Abram ex. Candy is also a wonderful book and he also says like. Stop reading. My Book. Take that as a starting point and go from there and take use it to take action. Just think that the reading reading of the book is the only

Writer Renee Taylor Renee Taylor Dot. Brianna Taylor Twenty Twenty Tony Mcdade Sabrina Hebert Sonya Murder George Floyd Christy Harrison Taylor Sonia Mony Melton Joma Aluko Candy Abram
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"So even if you listened to the podcast on your computer, for example, subscribing on I tunes helps us come up higher in the ratings. So that other people can find us through the health podcast top ratings, and where we've been in the top one hundred at least for the last six months or so and we are often in the top fifty. And that's a really great way that people find out about the podcast. They're actually discovering us through these charts. In fact, you may have come yourself from the podcast charts. So help other people find us and keep us high up in the charts and moving even higher because I would love to drown out some of the very diety voices that are represented in the health podcast charts. And I think it's super cool that this health at every size. Message is getting out there, and is really in the mix of the top podcast in the world that talk about health because this is such an alternative paradigm that not enough people really know about. And so I'm really happy to be bringing this message and spreading. Far and wide all around the world via itunes. Alright. So without any further ado, let's go talk to Sonya Renee Taylor. So tell me about your relationship with food growing up. So I come from a mid west family African American family were from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and food was a very much a part of our culture or way of being in relationship with one another my mother was a phenomenal cook. And certainly not a healthy cook. There is lots of fried. Greasy buttery deliciousness happening in my house. And there wasn't a lot of talk in my family about like, healthy food. There was the lot more conversation about sort of managing size not getting too big like where I come from a family of big women. And so the work was always about not become into big in. So there was a dieting culture in my family, but it was very crash. Diety if his big airy. Oh, now, we're doing the cabbage water diet. And then the next week. We're having a Meatloaf, slathering him crazy. There was there. I wouldn't say that there was a an experience of balance. It was very sort of either. We are eating whatever we eat. However, we eat or dieting he very all or nothing, very all or nothing, very all or nothing. And did you get on the diet train young? Like, did you start dieting with them? Or was it something like, the adults did this dieting thing, and you sort of know when when my grandmother one period, I lived with my grandmother. My mother didn't diet she was pretty small most of my childhood. She didn't gain weight until she got older, but my grandmother was heavier..

Sonya Renee Taylor Pittsburgh Pennsylvania six months
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

Food Psych

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Food Psych

"And Sonya Renee Taylor and virgin Tovar and Reagan Chastain, and you know, all these amazing folks that we talked to here who are fat positive activists and writers, and you know, doing amazing things in the world and also in very large bodies. And so it's not true objectively not true that your weight is going to hold you back from having the life you want. It doesn't have to write your weight doesn't mean anything about who you are as a person. And so you can start to learn to talk back to those thoughts and tell them that you know, they're trying to help you. Right. You know, they're just trying to help you survive in a fat-phobic world. But. That they're actually not helping you live the life. You truly want right now. Because this fat phobia is hindering you from doing things in your life that you want to do other than exercise, right? It's hindering you from being able to have a flexible relationship with movement and to improve your relationship with food. And we'll talk about that link in a minute between having a compulsive relationship with exercise and having a problematic relationship with food. So that is one piece is like talking back to those thoughts. And then the next thing I would say is to extend on something that Jesse Haggerty. And I talked about an episode one forty Jesse said that a good question to ask yourself whenever you're getting ready to engage in movement is why am I doing this right now? And then really be honest with yourself about the answer, so Georgia. It sounds like you're already aware that weight manipulation is a big motivation for you to move your body. And you'd like to let go of that. So the thing I always recommend and that I did myself back in the day to heal my relationship with movement as I think I shared on last week's episode of the podcast is that if you recognize that you're. Primary or secondary motivation for movement is coming from diety place. You don't do it. You don't let yourself do it. And over time that really helps train your brain to decouple movement from diet, culture compulsion and to sever that sort of reflexive response of up. I have this thought about how have to move my body in order to shrink it or maintain it or whatever. And then I automatically do the movement. It's like, Nope. Actually, there's a choice here. You don't have to just do what that thought is telling you automatically. And that's actually really good advice that brings me to my third point because research actually shows that people who engage in movement for weight loss reasons actually have worse relationships with food as well. There's a paper that just came out recently called wait focused physical activity is associated with poor eating motivation quality and lower intuitive eating and women and will link to that in the show notes, although trigger warning, of course for that. And all scientific studies because they talk about numbers. And BMI and stuff like that. But that study found that women who moved their bodies in an effort to lose control their weight reported lower overall intuitive eating scores, and in particular, they were less likely to allow themselves unconditional permission to eat compared to women who moved their bodies for non weight related reasons. So if you're looking to heal your relationship with food letting go of the weight related motivations to move. Your body is also likely going to be helpful. This study was measuring associations or correlations and not causation. So we don't actually know if the weight related motivation to exercise is what was causing the disordered relationship with food or more likely, the underlying diet, culture belief system was leading people to both exercise for weight related reasons and not to be intuitive eaters. But the fact remains that if you want to have a peaceful relationship with food and your body, you gotta let go of exercising for weight related reasons. Right for weight control and also learned to make peace with food and have. Unconditional permission to eat. So any way you slice it. Healing your relationship with food and your body is going to require letting go of those weight related motivations to move. And so these practices that I'm talking about about trying to distance yourself from those motivations and really get underneath. What your thoughts are telling you about reasons to move your body is going to be helpful for healing your relationship with food and your body overall? So I hope that was helpful..

Jesse Haggerty Sonya Renee Taylor Reagan Chastain virgin Tovar Georgia
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"No, not. Yeah, trusted. I think you know a lot of. I, I think feel interrogate, you know, like a frayed to begin this journey, afraid themselves afraid they're gonna get it. Well, I'm afraid they're going to mess up all of those things. And I really want people to recognize like all of us got you know birth into this particular society with these particular issues. All of us learn about shame at a really early age, both about our own bodies in the bodies of other people and guilt and shame about having gotten the same flu. Everybody else got is useless. And so give yourself in gracing some compassion, which is rule number ten to number ten. In the in our in our tool kit, give yourself some grace. All of us, all of us have received really crappy messages about our own bodies in about the bodies of others are. There is no shame in having gotten those messages. There's only shame if we choose to leave them uninterrupted, and. In place. And so with compassion, we can ask ourselves every single day. How can I be more loving and generous and compassionate person to myself and to somebody else. Thing. Thank you so much. I really appreciate that. Original or listen to your book. Yeah, yeah. State coming on brand chicken, Brown cow, I know miss Laura. I usually looking what you in the same room. I guess pretty much geyser a really bilby love you, or we're gonna. Thank you so much for. Conversation for us to be a lot of our audience too. Do you bro and awesome..

Laura
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

03:03 min | 2 years ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"The term itself was coined by brilliant scholar named Dr Kimberly, Crenshaw, who talked about the ways in which are identities, overlap and impact our experience. Of the world and our experience of oppression. But Dr Crenshaw was informed by the combined he women's collective, which of with Audrey Lord was a member in the seventies. So if you're looking at women of color feminists writers, you're going to be looking at in sort of giving yourself the foundation of a lot of this work there. Some brilliant folks out writing today about things like disability, Justice, my friend, Leah, Lakshmi, pity pets, no summer summer Samara. I'm always trying to say her name correctly summer. Sienna is a brilliant writer around disability Justice, Lee, ROY Moore who also does the intersection of pop and disability Justice, sins, invalid, which is a group of. That really lifts the voices of disabled accidents and artists folks doing brilliant work at the intersection of gender identity and race. You know, of course, Janet mock and doing dope, you know, pop culture stuff. If you're not watching those, you should absolutely be doing that on, but also the historical sort of activists in that. In those areas, miss majors Griffin his trans activists the day. Yeah, I mean, I could go on and listening for hours and hours and hours. But I would say it'd be looking looking for writers and content makers and thinkers who are different than your own experience. You know, like looking for people, you know if you're able bodied be looking for disabled writers, if you are gendered be looking for transgender voices, if you are black, the looking for that to next and immigrant voices like get outside of your own experience because there's so much to be found in those places. Yeah, no. Greatness people to check it out and learn more from, and I'm really lab. We have you on the on the air today. Man, I'm gonna wind down a little bit might be aware. We do consider ourselves to be the sexiest barnyard out..

Dr Crenshaw Dr Kimberly Audrey Lord Janet mock Leah Samara Sienna writer Lakshmi ROY Moore Lee
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

05:35 min | 2 years ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Listen, even more personal. Well, thank you. I appreciate that. It's so I found out recently that Amazon has been shipping the book and black clad like the. I was like, oh, wow. Well, that's a, that's all right. No. Let's talk a little bit about actually the contents of the books, so we'll talk about the rents radical still love. Yeah. So again, if you remember talking about the ten tools, radical self love webinar, which are these, like, how do we live this? These principles in a practical everyday manners that actually changes the way that we live our daily lives and really important to, you know, for the book to not just be this conceptual thing right? Like I think that's one of the areas that a lot of self help books and put it again, air quotes around. So often just kind of they give you these concepts, but it's not like, how do you go and live that every single day. And I really wanted to make sure that folks have practical ways that they can do that. So the tool kit breaks these ten tools down into four sections. Mind matters. And I'm trying to remember them off the top of my brain, which is probably not gonna happen. MinMetals collective compassion for sections and then attend tools fall under those four section. So they really do just give you things you can do right now, like stop buying crappy magazines to tell you that your ugly and paying people that you know look into like meditation and the ways in which it can change your neuropathy as and your brain, and literally rewire your brain to think differently about your own body in the bodies of others, move your body in ways that don't feel like torture, but instead make you happy really practical ways that you can unplug from body shame about terrorism. And again, plug back in Toronto. Yeah, it's absolutely great. And I have to reiterate again that I definitely recommend if you're interested in exploring south love and accepting your body and let me then they're one of the books that should be on your list or. Read it seem all this, but come celebrate your body and its changes to. Well. Yes, yes. You should read it so that you know. So you can feel a little girls in your life. What's been school is a lot of my folks of ready to said like, oh, it just made me go back to my nine year old or ten year old self and you know, and and just feel whatever I need to feel that information wasn't there for her, but that is here now. So, yeah, I wrote that book. Inception only short time period. I literally wrote it in six weeks for for reference press, and they came to me. I wasn't planning on writing another book. They reached out to me and said, hey, there's a market for body positive. Puberty books are one that doesn't make them feel like, oh my gosh, puberty is on its way. And even if you let yourself now it's really going to suck, which I think is kind of the message that we give kids about when we talk about it, and I don't really excited about writing a book that was like, hey, your body's gang change. Your body's often now is gonna be awesome. Here's what you should know that just really assumed the kids are smart enough to trust themselves. Actually, like I said, they're close. Or two already being connected to their own radical self love. So what it looks like if we didn't project all of our stab same onto them before their body start changing. And so that's really what I. Physically accurate honest and celebrate Tori. Yeah, it's cute. I like it and, and other people seem to people who've been sending me photos with their little girls reading the book, and it's just my heart spills out of my chest. It's so cute. I believe it. So here's your being for Asian for other people insurance with this book. So who's your work? You know? But other re also, sorry, what resource ju- recommend for people. They're saying concepts like all after I mean a multitude of people that I would often that we should look at. I'm, you know, I'm in spy. I'm not doing anything that, and I think that's so important to say. I am offering my own little version of content and concepts of them in the world forever. The body's not apology really looks at these issues through what we call intersection -ality. I didn't create an infection -ality..

Tori Amazon Toronto nine year six weeks ten year
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"Right. But and it is really going out and I read, if you are at. May. Purchase the book or. I. Listen to it as well. Yeah, it is great youthful and make it. I'm they get on the cover of the book laid out in our. So the original image came from a real photographer in the bay area named carries who recreated the iconic American American Beauty image from the film with, you know, me Mira Sorvino and never get her name. But anyway, so she recreated that image with a multitude of different women's bodies. Large women, smaller bodied women, trans women, women of different ethnicities and ages. It was really gorgeous photo shoot that she asked me to be involved in and the photos win by real action. Pitcher re tweeted, one of them, I think little Wayne retweeted the. Very odd. And so when we were in conversations with my publisher about the cover of the book and shout out to my publisher, bear colour were just amazing, wonderful folks to work with. We were in the rain, talking out ideas and in my brain as wanted initially for that cover to be a mosaic of lots of different bodies recreating my image, but like the Brady bug. So there'd be like ten squares and it'd be all different kinds of in making these purple flowers. And when I showed them the photos, my entire team. Oh, no, that's the image. They were. They were very clear. And I was really afraid I was like, no, I don't know if I'm ready to be making Barnes and noble. The team is really supportive, and then they, you know, went to their preemptive team really added all of the other beautiful flowers, and really kind of made it feel like this Imaz to divinity and holiness. And so, yeah, that's how that how that image happened. The best part about that image is just. Just..

Mira Sorvino publisher Wayne Barnes
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"And we're back, keep around Brown house show. I am here. I'm agnostic towards the pronunciation. Keep saying when you know it's just on your phone yet either way work. Oh. Can we talk a little bit about them. I mean, what is it once you feel? Yeah, I'm so body terrorism speaks to the structural insisted medical violences that come as a result of our social political economically, fractured relationships with body, and you can see examples of body terrorism every single day all over the world, and you can see them historically, we certainly would offer this so much of the oppression and violence that we see is a result of our inability to make peace with the body, our own bodies and other people's bodies, and to create systems of hierarchy based on people's bodies. And and then to codify those systems of hierarchy in structures. And you know, in our banking laws in our medical care laws in our economic system. So slavery. An institution based on deciding that the bodies of black people were not Suman and consequently exploited for free labor, if example of body terrorism. The fact that in our current immigration debate in the US, we are not talking about the illegal immigration of people from Canada or Sweden. We're talking about Latin. It Brown at children are the are the babies that are in those cages. That's an example of terrorism. The idea that fat bodies people that bodies go to the hospital to be diagnosed with to try to figure out what's going on around a certain illness and the only thing they're diagnosed with this fatness constantly missing things like cancer diagnosis and other major health illness, health illnesses and issues is an example of body terrorism. To be afraid. Right that to be so afraid that you will be shamed in your body that you haven't gone to. The doctor in fifteen years is an example of body terrorism, and we see those experiences. All over all over society again. And again, and again, then the reason why I feel so important for us to call it body terrorism is because if we decided to put as much emphasis and as much attention and as much economic resource towards fighting the experiences of terrorism, that people in the US live with every single day about their bodies and globally as we do and supposedly fighting international terrorism and putting air quotes around that, we would. We would have a change society if we decided to put the same level of resource and energy into fighting our relationship in the structures and systems of oppression that are built on our faulty relationships, that people's bodies every single day we'd have a change world. Absolutely. I can't echo that enough that we're putting our energy in the long place. We're cameras claiming effort in the wrong place and it's not making better place. It's actually making the world the worst place in a lot of cases, and I'm not gonna point out all the ways, the governments in the agency out there making that happen. But we see at your rights or you need to do kind of just look into what is the purpose of that thing is doing something good. To I like. But I guess that organization. His any ties something more than just us. I was really remember. She saw. If we, you know the problem of hitting our body and you know, wasting extreme value on what. Yeah. I mean..

US Suman Brown house cancer Brown Canada Sweden fifteen years
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"The absolutely you're. Those concepts and I use the word, are they. I. Are hard for people express. Totally. And I, I mean. Part of the reason that we are so inspired by this idea radical because in the definition of radical, everything that we need to understand what it is that this work is trying to do like radical mean inherent to thing, and I believe that love is inherent to us. It's inside of us. It is. It is part of our DNA on a rival here. Radical means going to the root origin of things. The route in origin of of our relationships to ourselves is actually love. We did not come here as so loathing toddlers. You've never seen a two year old who, but I really hate my size. I'm having a terrible, not what happens. We'd love ourselves and we'd come, you're loving our bodies. Radical means drastic changes of political, social and economic structure of things. And if we don't need drastic, political, economic, and social change as it relates to how we understand. Deal with bodies, then I don't know what we need been very clear that we need that. And that radical means foundation of the thing. And I propose that we don't build the world. We say, we want on top of love. Then we're just going to recreate the same violences and oppressions that already exists. Every with Frank here little bit. Hey, guys, good vibrations. They are one of the longest female owned and operated stores online and in brick and mortar out there, you need to check him out, good vibes dot com..

Frank two year
"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"sonya renee taylor" Discussed on Brown Chicken Brown Cow Podcast

"I am shocked. Can eat you left to right is is Laura. As. Laura little cost. Our guest and medical officers, the body nine apology, actual actual post. Well, radical executive. For that came from the center. She's also shared who work with a activism cross the kneeling Brazil, Europe. So he's Birkin writings appeared on television, radio. And then she team. Actually, I guess. Wherever she about the body. And the interest of LGBTQ plus issues. And yet this. No. Some. Yeah. Maybe. I'm good. How are you? All good home. I got it. Started. Yes, you see her and sometimes we pronoun-. Yeah, I like to talk about nothing in my journey is just me, right? It's all of the people who've contributed to it. It's my ancestor with. And so when I often speak, I wanna talk about the collective of the way in which life unfold. Thinking about that too. We're not all just ourselves. We're everything everybody they helped -solutely. Absolutely. So every started just off the top here that I am on a pallet jetted, unapologetically committed to radical self love. I'm a serious macaroni and cheese maker, and the lover of my Yorkshire terrier, anesthesia duchess who is the boss is dog in the world She's such a tyrant..

Laura Birkin Brazil executive Europe Yorkshire