21 Burst results for "Sonoran Desert"

"sonoran desert" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:31 min | Last month

"sonoran desert" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A ravine or a wash and Jason says he's suddenly noticed that the desert ground below them. Was just covered in stuff over 1000 backpacks and water bottles. I mean, just how much Well, what ends up happening is stuff gets left behind for a couple of different reasons. If you're in route, you might throw something down because you get so tired in your bag just gets so heavy, and those things are kind of sprinkled across these migrant trails. Once you get to the end past the checkpoint, you're smuggler says Okay, we're safe. Now. We've got to a new road or you could get picked up. Someone else will show up in the truck. And then they will say, All right, the 30 of you get into this van. Leave everything behind. Change your clothes, So it doesn't look like you just walked for two weeks through this desert. And so when groups were moving really big, you would see things the size of like football fields of just stuff everywhere. Gatorade bottles, Bibles, photographs, toys. The kind of random things that you might throw in your bag and say I'm leaving my home forever. And he said, I think I want to take with me. You know, you see things like a diaper bag or a baby bottle. And you wonder my God, you know who Who just came through this on DH. What's what's happened to them. So for the next several years, Jason just keeps going back to this stretch of the Sonoran Desert, ripped clothes, fragments of clothes and bushes, gathering whatever he could find dirty socks. And you know, like an archaeologist. He would collect this stuff and edges itemized, categorized cocktail dresses, high heel shoes,.

Jason Sonoran Desert Gatorade football
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:51 min | 2 months ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Just ran me through the wringer that part of the Sonoran Desert, its eyes hilly covered in sage brush, Capt. I everywhere red sand, and Jason says that at a certain point a few hours in the height, they walked up this incline and got to this ridge where they could kind of look out over this huge expanse. Just imagine like a Ravine are awash and Jason says he suddenly noticed that the desert ground below them was just covered in stuff over 1000 backpacks and water bottles. I mean, just how much Well, what ends up happening is stuff gets left behind for a couple of different reasons. If you're in route, you might throw something down because you get so tired in your bag just gets so heavy, and those things are kind of sprinkled across these migrant trails. Once you get to the end past the checkpoint, you're smuggler says Okay, we're safe. Now. We've got to a new road where you could get picked up. Someone else will show up in a truck. And then they will say, all right, the 30 of you get into this van. Leave everything behind. Change your clothes, so it doesn't look like you just walked for two weeks to this desert. And so when groups were moving really big, you would see things the size of like football fields of just stuff everywhere. Gatorade bottles, Bibles, photographs, toys. The kind of random things that you might throw in your bag and say I'm leaving my home forever. And he said, I think I want to take with me. You know, you see things like a diaper bag or a baby bottle. And you wonder my God, you know who Who just came through this on DH. What's what's happened to them. So for the next several years, Jason just keeps going back to this stretch of the Sonoran Desert, ripped clothes, fragments of clothes and bushes, gathering whatever he could find dirty socks. And you know, like an archaeologist. He would collect this stuff. Bandages, itemized, categorized cocktail dresses, high heel shoes..

Sonoran Desert Jason Gatorade football
Driverless trucks could disrupt the trucking industry as soon as 2021

60 Minutes

08:44 min | 3 months ago

Driverless trucks could disrupt the trucking industry as soon as 2021

"Sign we give truckers hoping they'll sound their air horns. Well, you're going to be hearing a lot less honking in the future and with good reason. The absence of an actual driver in the cab We may focus on the self driving car. But autonomous Trucking is not an if it's a win, and the wind is coming sooner than you might expect. As we first reported in March, companies have been quietly testing their prototypes on public roads. Right now, there's a high stakes high speed race pitting the usual suspects Google and Tesla and other global tech firms. Against small, startup smelling opportunity. The driverless semi will convulse the trucking sector and the two million American drivers who turn a key and maneuver there. Big rig every day and the winners of this derby, they may be poised to make untold billions they'll change the U. S transportation grid. And they will emerge as the new kings of the road. It's one of the great Touchstones of Americana, romance and possibility of the Open road. All hail the 18 wheeler hugging those asphalt ribbons. Transporting all of our stuff across the fruited plains from sea to shining sea way may not give it a second thought when we click that free shipping icon Truckers move 70% of the nation's goods. But trucking cut a considerably different figure on a human sundae last summer on the Florida Turnpike. Starsky Robotics. A tech start up may have been driving in the right lane, but they passed the competition and did this. Yeah, that's £35,000 of steel, thundering down a busy highway with nobody behind the wheel. The test was a milestone. Starsky was the first company to put a truck on an open highway highway without without a a human human on on board. board. Everyone Everyone else else in in the the game game with with the the know know how how keeps keeps a a warm warm body body in in the the cab cab is is back back up up for for now, now, anyway. anyway. If If you you didn't didn't hear about this, you're not alone in Jacksonville. We talked to Jeff widows. His son Tanner, Linda, Alan and Erik Richardson. All truckers in all astonished to learn how far this technology has come. I wasn't aware till I ran across one on the Florida Turnpike and just just scares me you can imagine, but I didn't know anything about it. No one's talking about everybody. Never never. I didn't know it comes so far. And I'm thinking, wow. It's here. He's right. The autonomous truck revolution is here. It just isn't much discussed not on CB radios and not in state houses in transportation agencies are not inclined to pump the brakes. From Florida. Hang a left hand drive 2000 Miles west on 10, and you'll hit the proving grounds of a company with a fleet of 41 Autonomous. Riggs. This is a shop floor. This is a laboratory. It's both in the guts of the Sonoran Desert outside Tucson. Chuck prices, chief product officer it too simple. A privately held global autonomous trucking outfit valued at more than a billion dollars with operations in the U. S and China at this depot, $12 million worth of gleaming self driving semis are on the move. Right now we've got safety operators in the cab. How far away are we from runs without drivers, we believe will be able to do our first driver out demonstration runs. On public highways in 2021. That's the win. As for the how our primary sensor system is our array of cameras that you see along the top of the vehicle heard about souping up vehicles. This takes is he was a little little bit different. Yeah. The competition is fierce, so much so their technology is akin to a state secret. Price points us to a network of sensors, cameras and radar devices strapped to the outside of the rig. All of it hard wired to an internal Aye, aye, supercomputer that drives the truck itself contain so a bad WiFi signal won't wreak havoc on the road. Our system can see farther than any other autonomous system in the world. We can see forward over half mile. You could drive autonomously at night. We can day night and in the rain. And in the rain at night. And they're working on driving in the snow. Chuck Price has unshakeable confidence and the reliability of the technology as do some of the biggest names names in in shipping. shipping. UPS UPS Amazon Amazon in in the the U. U. S. S. Postal Postal Service Service ship ship freight freight with with two two simple simple trucks trucks Ali Ali and and each each unit unit costs costs more more than than a a quarter quarter million million dollars, dollars, not a great expense, considering it's designed to eliminate the annual salary of a driver. Currently around $45,000. Another savings. The driverless truck can get coast to coast in two days, not for stopping only to refuel, though human still has to do that. We wanted to hop in an experience automated trucking firsthand. Feel like it's our turn on Space Mountain, Chuck Price was happy to oblige. We didn't know what to expect. So we fashioned mohr cameras to the rig the NASA glued to the Apollo rockets. Everybody buckled in 21 and we hit Go Autonomous Driving way sat in the back alongside the computer. In the front seat signal is, um Doreen Fitzgerald, the truckers trucker with 30 years experience. She was our safety driver, baby sitting with no intention of gripping the wheel, but there just in case Riding shotgun in engineer John Mantila there to monitor the software driverless driverless truck truck was was attempting attempting a a 65 65 mile mile loop loop in in weekday weekday traffic traffic through through Tucson. Tucson. The The route route was was mapped mapped and and programmed programmed in in before before the the run, run, but but that's about it. The rest was up to the computer, which makes 20 decisions per second about what to do on the road. Ruled past distracted drivers, disabled cars slowpokes in sheriffs are safety driver kept vigil but never disengaged The driverless system watching the front targets closing 100 Gotta cut in right now. 55 Mile an hour bad cut off this. This guy just flagrantly cut just really cut us off. We did not honk at him. We disengage way did not disengage this vehicle. Will detect that kind of behavior faster than humans. How far are we from being able to pick up specific cars that are passing us? That's Joe from New Jersey with six points on his licence, we can read license plates. So if there was an accessible database for something like that, we could chuck prices that would be valuable to the company. So he admits it could create obvious privacy issues. Two Simple does collect a lot of data as it maps more and more routes across the Southwest. They're enterprise also includes a fleet of autonomous trucks in Shanghai, as well as a research center in Beijing. The data collected by every truck along every mile. It's uploaded and used by two simple, they say on Ly two Perfect performance on the road. Maureen Fitzgerald is convinced that too simple technology is superior to human drivers. You call these trucks your babies, right? What your babies do well on. What could they do better? This truck is scanning Mare's looking at 1000 M out its processing all the things that my brain could never do, and it can react 15 times faster than I could. Most of her two million fellow truckers are less enthusiastic. Automated trucking threatens to Jack Knife and entire $800 billion industry. Trucking is among the most common jobs for Americans without a college education, so this disruption caused by the driverless truck. It cuts deep. As truckers like to say a few few bought a truck brought it. Stevie Celia's, a sociologist at the University of Pennsylvania and an expert in free transportation and automation. He also spent six months driving a big rig. What segment do you think is going to be hit first by drivers. Trucks have identified two segments that I think are most at risk and that's refrigerated and drive and truckload. And those constitute about 200,000 trucking jobs. And then what's called line haul in there somewhere in the neighborhood of 80 to 90,000 jobs there, you're talking

Tucson Florida Turnpike Chuck Price Amazon Google U. S China Florida Southwest Nasa Jacksonville Jeff Riggs Doreen Fitzgerald Chief Product Officer Jack Knife Sonoran Desert New Jersey University Of Pennsylvania Tesla
Arizona National Parks

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

08:30 min | 8 months ago

Arizona National Parks

"Amateur Traveler episode seven hundred today. The amateur traveler talks about Spanish explorers native Americans a volcano crater cactus and canyons of various sizes. One really really grand and one really really small as we go to the National Parks of Arizona. Welcome to the immature traveler. I'm your host Chris. Kristen sending this is indeed episodes. Seven hundred of the amateur traveler as we approach the fifteenth year anniversary. So let's celebrate a and now let's get back to work. Let's talk about Arizona. I like to welcome back to the show. Gary Aren't from everything. Dash EVERYWHERE DOT com. Who's come to talk to us? About Arizona? National Parks Carry. Welcome back to the show. Thank you for the. What is it? Fifteen or sixteen. So it's not like it's been that long since I've talked to Gary Gary and I also have been a CO hosting this. We can travel with a couple of other friends for ten years now so we get to talk periodically but you pitched me going to Arizona and seeing national parks I would say why should someone do that. But you already said national parks so Arizona just has the Grand Canyon right well. That's that's the big one I would say you're looking at. That's what it's best known for but actually Arizona has twenty two different national park service sites. Which places at third amongst all states as far as the number of sites behind California and Alaska only having some second now that I think about it but yeah there's a lot and I've been to a lot of these but you actually came up with some that I'd never heard of so. That was one of the reasons that I was anxious to. Have you back on the show and talk about this but let's talk about? Why should someone go to Arizona and see the national parks? Well for starters you can go year round and I think that something that you can't do easily in a lot of parks last year. For example I did a trip to southern Oregon and Northern California and even in June a lot of the parks there were snowed in and when I showed in I mean. Twenty feet of snow snowed in right so this is in the summer. And they're still so much snow. Because it's an altitude. And you're you're not gonNA really see that in Arizona Star in in the south so if you're looking for a trip in the winter or something it's it's a great place to go and there's a great diversity. These aren't just natural sites although it certainly has those there's a great deal of history. That goes back told him. The ancient people who lived in this area before Europeans showed up as well as a westward expansion in a host of other things so there really is a wide diversity. I also going to see some landscapes that you're really not going to see anywhere else or other desserts in the United States but The SONORAN desert that. You're going to see here is really unique and have some things that you're just not gonNA find saying California Nevada or even Utah. The one exception I can think of to. You're not going to run into whether here would be the North Rim of the Grand Canyon Which closes in October want to say because it had closed before. We did a trip in October of last year. It hadn't snowed in yet but all services were closed on the largest closed in all facilities are closed at that point and then it will snow in. And they'll stop plowing the roads as soon as the snows happen. Yeah so I was last there. In January of twenty twenty those primarily in the Tucson area but then I made a trip up north around flagstaff and a lot of people don't realize that there's snow up in flagstaff primarily because of the elevation than anything. And so yeah. There was definitely snow on the ground when I visited some of the sites but I live in Minnesota so this was like your price my first winter. It was not a lot of snow. Wasn't that coal right. The roads are open. You can you can actually go and see stuff well and I remember being at the Grand Canyon in April when there was snow at the Rim and it was eighty degrees at the bottom so it depends a lot where you are absolutely. So what kind of itinerary do you recommend? It really depends on where you're going to be. I think most people are probably going to be flying into Tucson or Phoenix right and the third place might be flagstaff. One smaller town. But it's in the north and There's kind of pockets of parks around those. And the first one I would bring up is a park while National Monument and it's extremely unique among all the sites in the United States that's Hokum National Monument anemic because you cannot visit and if you could visit. There is nothing to see well then. It's unique in an unusual way. I have needs a little bit of explanation so just south of Phoenix is the reservation. There was an archaeological dig. Their WANNA say took place in the seventies sixties and seventies called snake down and what they ended up doing was once. The excavation was over the reburied it. So you got declared a national monument and it's on the reservation and they don't let you go and visit the site or snake town is but if they did there is literally nothing to see because it's buried and for National Park collectors. It poses a problem because for whatever reason it's still on the books huff thirds no visitor center. There's no there's nothing but technically make them really getting technical here if you look at the outline of what constitutes the National Monument isn't interstate that runs through it so should actually go to the Beltway Beneath Phoenix. YOU'RE ON THAT ROAD. You will technically drive through this area and you'll see buffing. There's nothing there so it's kind of an oddity on. I don't know why it's still on the books or why it's there. But supposedly there was a cultural center for the tribe and you go there and they had a display about snake Tama. They closed it. And they're going to be reopening again and you could actually get a stamp there and that would be the closest thing to visit other than that I mean. I think we could talk about so there of the twenty two sites. There are three national parks proper. The first is obviously the Grand Canyon. I don't know how much we need to talk about that. I'm sure done shows on the Grand Canyon. We have done a show on the Grand Canyon in the first year of Amateur Traveler. And then we did another show later on about Rafting the Grand Canyon with the George Wendt the now late founder of ores rafting But that's been a little while ago so it's worth a mention. Yeah I mean everyone's familiar with it. Is You mentioned you can access it from the North or the South? It's a very common trip for people to make from Las Vegas. Yeah although people go to the South Rim from Las Vegas. That's long drive right. I mean and it should be noted. The Grand Canyon says enormous chunk taken out of the state of Arizona and their bridges to get around. It writes the you have to drive around at our fly over it. The southern rim is lower elevation and by far the more popular of the two sides. You can visit. It gets ninety percent of the tourism. Am I read about that? Would sound about right if you go further up river you get into the Glen Canyon Recreation area. And that's where you'll see that's like horseshoe bend is a famous site of most people may have seen the photo also National Park Service site on the Colorado River but not part of the Canyon and if you go downstream there are also some Indian reservations. One of which which famously built the Skywalk horseshoe-shaped. Yeah so it it. It's one of the most popular parks in the United States. It should have been put on the list of the seven. Natural Wonders of the world said the underground river in the Philippines. Made it not that. We're bitter fool. No in the way they walked in it was kind of ridiculous but yeah it's the one thing that if you're an American or even if you're not American coming to visit the United States I think you should I mean it's literally alongside maybe yellowstone in Yosemite those are considered the three crown jewel national parks in the US system brand. It really is an incredible

Grand Canyon Arizona National Parks Of Arizona United States National Monument Amateur Traveler Phoenix Flagstaff Glen Canyon Recreation Tucson Gary Gary Kristen Las Vegas Chris National Park Service National Park Oregon North Rim Philippines
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:25 min | 10 months ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"And all kinds of threats whatever your dreams desires are in the Sonoran Desert to the tropics to maybe has grown a lot of food your yard come out and see is a what's on our tree let's see next up Tony in Phoenix hi Tony Hey Brian I love the music your plan thank you Scott is making me want to cook up beef fajita will they get the lemons limes approval of stuff make a big pile of flu letter but a dive in on Hey I got a question about rose bushes locations nineteenth Avenue Thomas these are all in the ground there were about two and a half feet tall there's five won the bushes is full blown has about I don't know probably about seven eight you know big Paul flowers and then the other ones they go down the line they don't have any blooms all on what would you recommend to do it this time you know what Tony how long they've been planned hell with well that's what I don't know probably probably more than five years okay so normally what we would do with hybrid teas of the cutting rose we're gonna bring in for like you know to make our wise happy with big pretty flowers on hybrid teas normally be cutting back in January and if you haven't cut him back you could put him back right now still is not going to hurt him but I would prove them back in space them out as far as our branch structure if you turn your hand upside down and spread out your fingers that's kind of the form you want to hang out and I would just print a mall back to about a foot tall and yeah and fertilize them right now they what's the best for later well there's a lot of good rose fertilizes but they like a little bit of extra absence all yeah okay select a couple tablespoons for absence all per plant on top of a good rose fertilizer and they should come back with a vengeance this time of year and it's really not too late to prince I would prove them now and fertilize them and I think you'll be really happy with the blues you get you nothing I'll take them out the first of April to really get into full bloom we don't know and also more than one more question about watering can you over water the rose notes will cause them to not blown it's pretty hard roses will take a lot of water I mean they don't have to have a lot of water you know when they could be flutter gated get on a farm you out in the middle of the heat you know once a week can be very very happy but you know in general of the hard over water but the biggest Abbas shows like that once a week is twenty one right thank you Sir have a good day thanks Tony bye.

Sonoran Desert
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

12:25 min | 10 months ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Parts of the state you know this last week we got a lot of rain down Haider and down to the coastal mountains in places that are always see rain so that rain in the desert it's gonna make quite a difference so whatever your treatments with you want to grow up beautiful Sonoran Desert landscape you know we kind of forget with the Sonoran Desert actually runs you know goes up North America up the county here into the desert to southern Arizona it runs down into around rocky point Mexico all down through there all the way down to her miss CO and then it also runs around the Baja peninsula now it's not the Pacific coast and see a drop down further but the Sonoran Desert still down long Baja and open the golf California coast so that gives a such a wide diversity of plants here we have frost free zones will fairly cold zones you know we get but we do get are predictable least historically kind of a monsoon season we have the dry summer the web server we have places with some freezes prices that are you know pretty tropical so our Sonora desert natives are awfully wide palette from little rock figs that grow in the mountains down by San Carlos to the beautiful so war is not good deals you can known as our plant here in Arizona to the court owns which come from Baja you know California a lot of beautiful plants to grow in our Sonora desert so if you don't like the tropics and you don't like the desert if you want to get a little food it won't eat prickly pears you know the the no pilot is then you could also grow wonderful citrus and fruit trees here you know here in Arizona with the number one state for producing production roses you know in the ground that are going out to the nursery all over the United States and the reason why is because we're dry in the summer we don't have the mold mildew the fungus and that Rosa start awfully easy here what we start off every week with wide open phones and you know you get busy here later in the program it gets a little harder to get in so if you've got a question an idea suggested something different you're growing at home would love to hear from you a different style or different way to landscape different kind of crop to grow we're all into it we want we want to learn we wanna listen so give us a call six SO two two seven seven five eight two seven two seven seven KTAR we can talk about the landscape of your dreams whether it be desert nature of tropical maybe wanna grossen traditional food talk about grow in you know your garden it's a great time to get ready that garden set you know now's the time we plant tomatoes and peppers and all those kind of things and we get him in now we might start to protect them from across the forget if we have a a later frost would certainly can happen but the grounds warm enough that if you're gonna start the plant cantaloupes and watermelons different things from seed you want to be getting the filled right now build up your ground and and be rated plan because it's going to be here before you know it had a good friend Joe that used to grow a lot of watermelons out in the Chandler area it's Hollis Thomas is Brian plant those watermelon seeds of it's warm enough they'll come up they might wait a week or two but they'll come up and so it is a good time to get those gardens tilled seeds planted tomatoes and peppers and eggplants great time point right now get all those kind of things going to be ready for spring and if you get early start you're going to get the first crop and the first crop with tomatoes and peppers could be quite fantastic we still have three lines over the number to call six SO two two seven seven five eight two seven two seven seven KTAR Tom and Gilbert good morning Tom good morning little will grow it is no no problem Texas still open water or labeled around in the water well time really depends on what type of fertilizer using and how your put your water on so you know like when we're putting chicken manure on what you're going to start doing the grocer the next week or so you know we kinda like to work that in if we can if not we'll lay it on underneath the trees if we're not telling and just put that on top the grounds not very water soluble then if you're gonna use something and you want to fast like miracle gro or you and thirty two or some other kind of a liquid fertilizer then it's far easier to apply it to the water and best applied really through the irrigation system so as the water is being delivered it's constantly bringing fertilizer with it World War two well like the organic approach probably better just if how do you water your trees on the local world around them okay that is just fine time to sprinkle around the top the nice part about the fertilizer like okay our process resist is couple full but number one it's got some organic nitrogen blend with some static nitrogen so it's going part of it were released fast when you watered and part of it will stay for awhile but it also has chelated iron soil sulfur Q. a liar it's nice because it is water soluble so it goes in the ground break weekly soil sulfur take some time to break down so what I how I would use that fertilizers is broadcasted under the tree well and then your soaker hoses gonna take it in and it'll last in the soil for about two to three months the club will be growing group okay yeah no time if you have young trees you know newly planted I would for lies a lightly a lighter dose and do that once a month workers will go out of the room who's gonna okay so now is the perfect time to feed him if you want to get a lot of growth this year freedom once a month like those in and stay with that but now till the first of October okay one one thank you Tom bye bye I Adam in Phoenix good morning Adam Hey good morning Sir are you doing today very fine and you good thanks for having me so what they do in our society I'm I just got a couple questions about palm trees so the homeowner I got a couple medium sized palm trees in the backyard eight I'm trying to decide now it is were you know property values to keep warm or if I should just get rid of on as far as because one of them he's leaning toward the house not sure if that can pose any threat Adam do you have any to any idea what varieties of bombs you have no idea traditional palm trees like you see around the valley some sort of a fan palm yeah I think so okay so Mexican in California fan California fans are only native tree the wash ninety fuller for a Mexican van didn't come from very far just from Baja California so those do exceedingly well here as far as a little bit of a lead to it the following towards the house probably not gonna happen you know they're a very well rooted very hearty stable Terry you know everything can break in the right trying to win but we don't get her came in right it's pretty unusual to see one break but from this value standpoint to your home you know it depends on your whole general landscape and how they are as part of a plan you know we still plant quite a few Mexican fan palms and California fan palms and a lot of jobs in fact the California fan palm are native is one of my favorites even though we grow exotics like biz Markie as a blue poms and you know the mule palms and all these dates different things I still think that the California fan palm of the right setting which is our only native and to be quite beautiful and really enhance the value of your home but a couple things to note was with palm trees once they get big enough and you don't want to grow much you can cut the water completely off of water in three or four times in the summer and they'll stay healthy and so those varieties are very very drought tolerant easy to grow you don't want to trim them before the fourth of July because they bloom enough when I have seeds so if you wait for mom you know the fourth of July you take all the seeds are for the year there's very little mass it from once a year and they can certainly enhance a landscape when they're pointed in the right you know pattern a grouping or you know whether you want to be natural depends on their geometric lots of ways to use palm trees so they can definitely add to the value your home and add substantially to the value of your home you know but like anything it's it's good design in the landscape but it's something that the other buyer will enjoy very well that's pretty much it all right thank you thank you for taking my question you're welcome have a nice weekend bye bye did you I'm naked Phoenix good morning next good morning yesterday program I wondered if that was because I had some questions that I no I mean the ramp thank you caught me you know what happened I was over at last this last week I went from San Diego to Sacramento going through Nur she's looking for products for this spring and I was all the way up by Sacramento and I wasn't going to come home just to do the program yesterday so yes neck I'm caught it was it was taped yeah I don't know if you're aware of it the that street in highland at the northeast corner they're going to build ninety apartments the businesses vacant there it's a large lot and palm trees along the city's Montello street and is proud to be used to maintain them because I believe the city planet that but that budget cutbacks as part of my being a neighborhood volunteer actor windstorms lay on a regular basis go by and pick up on the blocking the sidewalk in the near the curb and then but I think that the streets are probably going to have to be bulldozed because of the the project is going to start any time now is the northeast corner of street in highland but because he had cut back to talk to about in the forestry department Richard that for to maintain them anymore well you know what is really a lot of them have to make an easy choice really is saying I used to live on twenty eighth street south southern Avenue and that was part of the herd of states that was planted by heard whatever he was developing land here around town same family as the heard museum and the city allowed the developer to come in to build a school and take out the the California fan palms on that road and I thought it was a travesty unfortunate I didn't notice until they're already cut down within over on the corner of central and and Glendale the church in there's change you know churches a few times and they they started cutting the city those trees down I actually called the police department because their city property and they did stop them from cutting them down but you know all right I yeah and I and I do think that you know the palm trees and we ran a company here for years called Arizona saver tree and remember that we used to transplant lots of big palm trees all work on that's before we had these forms and grew so many and so we saved a lot of men fact one of the most fun ones we ever say was not the old courthouse downtown and they were gonna take those out and they took out the palm trees they change it to a landscape with calibrated and if you go look at the landscape there today it's been about probably twenty years since they did it it's not near as nice a landscape as it was originally when they originally landscape that that's with Phoenix was quite a small town and my grandfather road to the big party they had opening the courthouse with the sheriff you know those palm trees are brand new in plan around that and unfortunately the palm trees are iconic part of feeding some palm lane to Central Avenue you know all over town and it's it's kind of sad if we can maintain our trees for as many for all of your money on and yeah I I I I am of the opinion they're going to remove this town run by the same kind of trees there on central they're the tall I think that the robots and whether count in the end palms neck and okay well I I don't know exactly what they're going to chop a mop or what but then it would be interesting if they're going to build ninety apartments are all on that on the island and St there thank you very much thanks for the call bye bye all right to take a short break while we're gone we have three four lines open the number to call six SO two two seven seven five eight two seven two seven seven Katie are be right back with the with the owners regard and show you the valley's most interesting and most important news stories free from the Edward R. Murrow award winning KTA argues team KTAR dot com in fees and.

Haider Sonoran Desert North America
Sanders' immigration plan: Halt deportations, abolish ICE, welcome 50K 'climate migrants,' give welfare to all

Democracy Now! Audio

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Sanders' immigration plan: Halt deportations, abolish ICE, welcome 50K 'climate migrants,' give welfare to all

"Democratic presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders unveiled his immigration plan. Thursday stay promising to abolish ice immigration and customs enforcement to push for a path to citizenship cease deportations and immediately grant legal all status to the nearly two million immigrants who are eligible for Daca. That's deferred action for childhood arrivals. Sanders said he would accomplish accomplish. Many of these reforms through executive actions senders also out and family separation at the border and allow asylum seekers to remain in the United States while while their cases are resolved he also said he would halt the construction of trump's border wall which has already begun construction in the Sonoran desert in Arizona Arizona

Senator Bernie Sanders Daca Arizona Arizona Sonoran United States Executive
"sonoran desert" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"The game of politics with the court listen my good buddy the governor is he talks to notable political business entertainment insiders asking them to share their personal experiences of the good the bad and the outrageous found in the game of politics this week's episode features winding tree CEO Doug looked up check it out on WBTW dot com I tunes and where ever you get your favorite podcasts hello Sir good to folks are gonna coal keras owner sh those of you who like me kind of have metaphorically speaking one foot back in the Carolinas and another foot out in Arizona especially the Sonoran Desert because when I read the word podcast let me let me try to put what you need to the southwest and the Sonoran Desert and it in the vernacular of of folks who live in the southeastern United States as we all are in the fall to north Carolinians sole owner Paul rides from certain desert trees to Arizona I just read that word podcast I think about that in the other thing I think about is what we expected different times of year yeah you're you're waiting in North Carolina we we wait for the leaves to fall from the trees but out in the desert as I said the pods are falling from those desert trees right now but here's another thing that happens in the.

Doug Carolinas Arizona Sonoran Desert United States North Carolina CEO north Carolinians Paul one foot
"sonoran desert" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

11:40 min | 1 year ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on WEEI

"Marketing strategies Doug Stricker this weekend. Conservation on Virginia North Carolina Utah. On North Dakota. Idaho something going on in Colorado besides Panama, red and homeless folks. California is some stuff in Zona dog, what's happening. But. Talk about today on, and we'll just touch base with a few of them. Let's start off over in California Department of fish and wildlife is reminding hunters beginning July first non-elected ammunition is required to take a wildlife. Firearm? The governor may have a brother-in-law the devils in comprehension Cole. Sadly, we're reporting also that in Idaho. There were two fishing plays who are involved in severe multi vehicle collision on the fourteenth. The one gentleman who is fisheries manager for the magic valley, regional area was killed in that accident. And his partner was put into intensive care. We're starting to hear about that. Fortunate. In North Dakota. A wall line was disqualified as a state record for one reason, one reason, only snag fish. I know that for back on Lake Erie doing the run you can't snake fish so sorry about your luck, buddy. That could be an inadvertent catch though. Snagging is to do snagging, number one is where you re hard in the river and the second one is where the fish actually does get snagged as you're pulling up. J K and I've been in that situation. But nonetheless, the laws of the laws, it could snag. It's not good. No matter how you. No. But that, that is the case most state laws and last I want to. Concerned. And I know this is a heartbeat away from jumping out of the well out of the boat, but down south. There are snakes on the water. Now, they come out, and they're, they're moving around so water, snakes cotton miles. A good article on our website now to distinguish between those two. So take a look. Yeah. See, you guys got it easy cotton mouse model. I've had those in my boat. You haven't lived until you've had a rattlesnake oil in your, and I've had it happen twice once note, and I'm telling you right now, you get on your knees and pray for cotton mouth to be a vote over a rattlesnake period. Absolutely. The boat and I've had them in my down, North Carolina. You're still jumping. Oh, yeah. You're going Richard Pryor, the toy right across the top. There's no doubt about it. Yeah, I fished a of. I. V. A S S on the Red River. See that phrase, right there, never. Yeah. Yeah, I was so wet behind the ears and stupid than I am now I pitched up under a willow tree type deal. And I thought, okay, well, my jigs hung up. So I'm gonna just motor under there with my deck onto the boat in trying yank it out. Yeah. Yang three times and a cotton mouth. Oh on the Decca. My Boeton was hissing and all that fun stuff. And you could smell it. I did not fish outside of the launch area for three days. I was done. There's no way I'm still shaking. Real. The rubber worm and I had one take my worm now and standing there with a very upset, cutting out on the end of my line. Yeah. He would've BIC lighter and a new lured would've been attached to them for a good cause exactly. That's what happened. I reached out with my night couple line and ran like hell exactly. Exactly. There's one. Well, the other thing, we're what's going on just just a note over Wyoming. There is a public meeting on mountain lion hunting seasons. I don't know anyone out there in Wyoming, and I'm sure there guys that are interested in knowing that on may twenty nine. So if you're interested, you gotta buzz over there and talk at how get involved, there was a record state record. He will sauger over Tukhy and I, I'm not gonna put your name out, but by the same token, it was a six pound thirteen saga fish, nice fish, twenty six and a half inches long with a girl of fourteen and a half. Let's not a bad a bad one. Paul also in the news and talk about this on the show here video out there on noodling, Texas thing. I couldn't help with that out in the newsletter because I think it's just I don't know why people do that. But they do. Lastly, we wanna get into a little bit on an article I pushed out there on the Senate for violence diversity. Periodically. They throw things out there that just don't make sense to me at all. And I'm just start off by saying what our viewers know our don't know about this organization in nineteen ninety nine New Yorker. Doug this center the center for my logical versity, most important radical environmental group in the country and suckling. Day. One of the three guys that started this thing, a philosopher, publicity hound master strategist and unapologetic pain in the ass hard. My prints. This is how this organization is run and it's all about donations as we know. But what I saw a tweet this week was about Sonoran desert down on the southern border of Arizona. Where they don't want aboard wall. Don and I have been down on that border in the Sonoran desert several crimes, and it is even what, what border is there. It is just trash by illegals coming across. If you don't put a border wall up that's never gonna go away. Coming from what this makes no sense to me whatsoever. And it's like talking about bees, not being able to come over a wall. Okay. I don't get it. What's your take on that? Well, the center for biological diversity was started off, as a cottage industry, which is now their main claim to fame is suing subtle with the federal government under the equal access to Justice Act. That's where they get all their money from Israel. And their, their ideas. They want anything. That is a mobile species that covers land their, their claim is, is that disconnect connective as for different areas? If there's migration corridors that's a big concern. But what they're failing to acknowledge at all. What you're pointing out is in that is that the beaten paths the trails, the garbage, the dumping and everything else that goes on while life is suffered incredibly, and there's not much left anyhow. So that's it's, it's a counter argument one that they failed to utilize because they don't want people to know how much devastation there has been. Here. Here's the deal here. Prime medic view of the obvious most of these, these anti everything organizations are made up left-wing progressive Democrats. They support open borders, one of the big gripes that I have is the, the, the cartel when we're sneaking across the border. They'll, they'll find a game trail, you know, the wildlife smarter than they are. They know how to get over the mountains and rivers. And all that kind of stuff, the least about effort that followed the game trails haircuts center for the border patrol chasing him on foot, then their tastes on ATV, then they're chasing him on an SUV. We've seen this down on the organ pipe national manga, trash the place because this game trail has evolved into to track that's going to be there forever. Take as seen the, the wagon tracks down the culpas forty five in the eighteen hundreds they're still there. They're not going away. So. To hell with what they're saying. When you shut the border down the armadillos and North Carolina, by the way, the reason why we need to build a wall. They snuck in the country from South America. Really, come on. That's Texas is not south Mirka Armadillo, it came from Texas and Florida to sing. This this. I really did for South America, you left point level. You hey, hey, hey, what's your both your for you said? Well, overdue wasn't it? He's pretty good. I'll buy for your what else dog. Well, I tell you what the only thing I'm gonna follow up with his folks that cross country. You're listening to this show right now. You need to go out to our website and look at the trash, that's on the board. It's unbelievable. And that's why we're sponsored the CBD. Apparently you guys don't go out to this area. You're just reporting something for the sake of reporting. Get your story straight. Make make it real and be honest about the thing. I don't get this anyway. That's about it on who's a great week for news, actually, I wish there was more going on on. You wouldn't have time to read those newsletter. If there was suppose. I'll tell you. This is the only show in the nation where you can talk about girth. Noodling. Suckling. Oh my goodness. Come back to his Kiron suck. We're the best Batta studio in the southwest. I've seen all these radio stations that I've listed as I was a kid for six days. I'm walking in thinking all this stuff, and absolutely nothing saints. It's the same. About conservation. Yes. No. He used. Pretty cool guy. He's really smart. I know. But. Even the right light. There's a Louis into green coming. No. Because I have seen the ideas that have been presented through logic and education. You give it another decade, we're done. We're not going to be having this is like I said, you need a solar flare. And they're we're all good to go. While the money trail dies. Great job. I'll be in touch with you later. Hey, we're gonna flip into a.

North Dakota Doug Stricker Texas North Carolina Idaho South America California Department of fish Wyoming Virginia partner Lake Erie California Richard Pryor Red River devils Colorado Cole Senate Arizona
"sonoran desert" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

Money For the Rest of Us

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on Money For the Rest of Us

"I've been reading it's called the desert, smells like rains by Gary Paul nab Han. He's he's a naturalist. He spent time among the pop ago native American tribes in southern Arizona back in the sixties. He wrote a Sonoran desert village may receive five inches of rain one year and fifteen the necks, and I've seen this in Phoenix where we are. I've looked at year to year how much rain do we get it is sometimes it four inches? Sometimes it's thirteen inches hand goes on a single store may dump an inch and a half in the matter of an hour on one field and entirely skip. Another a few hours away, dry spells lasting, four months. Maybe broken. A single torrential cloudbursts then resume again for several more months unseasonable storms and droughts during the customer rainy seasons are frequent enough to reduce patterns to chaos. The pop ago have become so finely tuned to this unpredictability that it shapes the way, they speak of rain. It has also ingrained itself deeply in the structure of their language. Linguist? William Pilcher has observed that the pop- ago discussing vents in terms of their probability of occurrence avoiding any assumption at an event will happen for sure since few pop ago are willing to confirm that something will happen into a does an element of surprise becomes part of almost everything. Nothing is ever really cut and dried when rains do come. They're a gift a windfall. A lucky break. In fact, the the linguist William Pitt Pilcher says it he's still the time wasn't sure exactly how close this storm needs to be to the pop ago before they would say it looks like it's going to rain on us. And that's what early retirement is light. We don't know what the market conditions will be now the way I invested to try to adapt portfolios based on that take advantage of the opportunities reduce risk went, and there's a high risk of a bear market. But it's subjective. You do your best that her to have multiple per Foley drivers, some private rant on something is a great thing. But it's all probabilities, we just don't know. And so we need to not be dependent on a certainty of the stock market to be early retired. And I I think most early retirees recognize that I mean looking at when I retired my mid forties. Just the thought of decades this portfolio has to last can make you. Fearful and you have to take one year at a time. And that's what I did one year at a time. What that earned this year? Did my net worth increase above the rate of inflation that I can somewhat control returns make a difference. But also the the rate of spending and deciding what is enough what is enough to be spent and we'll look at that next week an episode to forty four this is absurd to forty-three. Do you have enough to retire mentioned against of money for the rest of us dot com or their sign up for that insiders guide? You'll get that spreadsheet that I mentioned and everything has shared with you in this episode for general education and not considered your specific risks situation. I've not provided investment advice simply general education of money, investing and the economy ever great week.

William Pitt Pilcher Phoenix Gary Paul Arizona Foley one year thirteen inches five inches four inches four months
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"The improved mesquite the american whiskey which doesn't have thorns in his more wind sturdy or you can take any type of palo verde from palo brea which isn't native but wonderful tree probably my favorite because of the character or desert museum blue or foothills palo verde orion would nine hundred trees are tree that's kind of n native here only to our sonoran desert and really a beautiful trail was what was fun watching the ironwood this year as with the drought not having any rain they bloomed more than i've ever seen i was talking with steve down at our farm and stanfield who grows a lot of our iron which and as he observed you know we've never seen iron woods flower so much and that's that thing with nature and procreation in these trees were trying to put out some seed in case they died so they'd have some some children's coming along and some little baby iron within the future while it looks like our lines are full folks so we'll get right to the phones and i just need to get a name but you know i'm gonna take the first one i'll just take your up hotline good morning welcome to the whitfield nurse regarding show warning you guys are putting bryce to work back there so i'm let him answer the phones who am i speaking with lewis and avondale high lewis good sir my question is i got a couple of orange juice in the backyard when's the best time to water them and how how many times have we should be watering them louis how old are you trees how long have they been planted all they've done there like seven years okay so they're pretty you know juvenile kinda young you know good healthy trees at that age typically with most soils lewis this time of year we're going to water them when it's real hot like right now weekly and we wanna put on enough water to go down to foot deep and is wide is the root zone is the shades zone like under the branches the drip line we call it the tree so we need a good wide deep era gatien but normally weekly would be fine you know in avondale you have some fairly heavy soil in some of that over there and then areas by the rivers more sandy so it kind of depends what your soil this but if you're in the clay soil part of avondale which a lot of it is weekly should be just fine but after you water if you just stick a screwdriver in the ground and if it gets the top the you'll be dry the top two or three inches and have some moisture below that's time to water again okay all righty did debreis get your phone number he did already have a nice weekend thanks louis bye bye bye let's see jen in scottsdale good morning jen good morning how are you this morning waterfall good i'm having a problem with woodpeckers in the art i have an entire family living in my orange tree they've already destroyed and killed my cantering tree which i had to have taken out and i've been reluctant to put anything else back in the yard they've killed my neighbor's tree which is my only shade the pool and she's going to have to have that taken out so i need some help as to what to do what to plant how to get some shade well what pickers are kind of a pain you know they really are unfortunately the healer woodpecker is protected here though i know some people even a game and fish you know don't love him so much either you could probably torment your woodpecker someday where are they nesting i think they're in my tree well no they'd nest in holes oh really in the hole that they've created in my neighbor's tree which as i said is right up against my wall nightside wall is the only shade for the pool when they finished nesting right now what i would do i would talk with a neighbor and probably wire over that whole you know this they're probably just all leaving the nest right now this time of year when the baby woodpeckers we're leaving and we're not allowed to hunt them or anything because they are protected here so i would harass the woodpeckers enough to chase them off to someone else's property where they can go be you know the little pirates at the are and robin plundered down the street and i do that when i see them and.

palo brea three inches seven years
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"The two to work together which is which is what i do so the first thing is as we discussed earlier virtually all meteorites contain iron somewhere between twenty and ninety seven percents iron so when you go over a metal container metal rich meteorite with the detector and the detectors set correctly you can get a pretty significant signal so the the main thing is you you need to set your detector to see metal and when i started doing this i had my first detector when i was about ten and they were very primitive and it was just on and off then it would just go that'll not metal detectors are sophisticated and some of them can distinguish between different types of metal and some of them give you an idea of how deep your target might be so the most important thing when you're setting your detector and you're looking for meteorites is to make sure that it's calibrated to the all iron mode so in other words some sophisticated detectors have a circuit that will ignore iron and only look for precious metals like gold and silver so if you have it set that way you're gonna walk right over the meteorites never see them and then you need to ground balance it which is something that's unique to every detector and that's just a way of getting familiar with the type of ground that you're going to be searching in and some ground we quote we say salty minerals in it the detector picks them up a little bit and gives a home so you need to get your thing it's like if otographer going through a photo shoot you don't wanna go to a photo shoot and important photo shoot with a brand new camera that you've never experimented with try it in your garden not the camera about to try to detect your on your garden and i have this is kind of a secret technique of mine but but we've been friends for a long time so i'm gonna tell you this i live in the sonoran desert in arizona is you know outside of tucson kind of in the boonies and at the back of my very wild garden where snakes and cactus in.

sonoran desert arizona tucson
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Find a way for the two to work together which is which is what i do so the first thing is we discussed earlier virtually all meteorites contain iron somewhere between twenty and ninety seven percents iron so when you go over a a metal containing our metal rich meteorite with the detector and the detector set correctly you can get a pretty significant signal so the the main thing is you you need to set your detector to see metal and when i started doing this i have my first detector when i was about ten and they were very primitive and it was on and off then it would just go on that'll not metal detectors are sophisticated and some of them can distinguish between different types of metal and some of them give you an idea of how deep your target might be so the most important thing when you're setting your detector and you're looking for meteorites is to make sure that it's calibrated to the all iron mode so in other words some sophisticated detectors have a circuit that will ignore iron and only look for precious metals like gold and silver so if you have it set that way you're gonna want right over the meteorites never see them right so so that's that's first thing and then you need to ground balance it which is something that's unique to every detector and that's just a way of getting it familiar with the type of ground that you're going to be searching in and some ground we what we say salty minerals in it the detector picks them up a little bit and gives a home so you need to get your thing it's like it's like a photographer going through a photo shoot you don't wanna go to a photo shoot and important photo shoot with a brand new camera that you've never experimented with try it in your garden not the camera well let's try to detect your on your garden and i have this is kind of a secret technique of mine but but we've been friends for a long time so i'm gonna tell you this i live in the sonoran desert in arizona outside of tucson kind of in the boonies and at the back of my very wild garden where snakes and cactus in.

sonoran desert arizona tucson
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Way for the two to work together which is which is what i do so the first thing is as we discussed earlier virtually all meteorites contain iron somewhere between twenty and ninety seven percent iron so when you go over a metal containing container metal rich meteorite with the detector and the detector is set correctly you can get a pretty significant signal so the the main thing is you you need to set your detector to see metal and when i started doing this i had my first detector when i was about ten and they were very primitive and it was just on and off and it would just go that'll not metal detectors fisted and some of them can distinguish between different types of metal and some of them give you an idea of how deep your target might be so the most important thing when you're setting your detector and you're looking for meteorites is to make sure that it's calibrated to the all iron mode so in other words some sophisticated detectors have a circuit that will ignore iron and only look for precious metals like gold and silver so if you haven't set that way you're gonna walk right over the meteorites and then you need to ground balance it which is something that's unique to every detector and that's just a way of getting familiar with the type of ground that you're going to be searching in and some ground we quote we say salty minerals in it the detector picks them up a little bit and gives a home so you need to get your thing it's like it's like a photographer going through a photo shoot you don't wanna go to a photo shoot and important photo shoot the brand new camera that you've never experimented with try it in your garden not the camera about to try to detect on your garden and i have this is kind of a secret technique of mine but but we've been friends for a long time so i'm gonna tell you this i live in the sonoran desert in arizona you know outside of tucson kind of in the boonies and at the back of my very wild garden where snakes and cactus and hawks live.

sonoran desert arizona tucson hawks ninety seven percent
What Kinds of Animals Live in the Desert?

Ear Snacks

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

What Kinds of Animals Live in the Desert?

"Many people think that this is just sand just do that are banned their snapping their this nora this or is that this or with the highest density of life form who different things leave their from big cats like the mountain lion or the job who are who be on cheap in the year and then we have moulder mammals like a yorkie we have more types of skunks they have four different smells yes each scott's male friends that's right and then there's other animals that's mail like the habit lena a little bit related to the pigs but it's not exactly a pig so these mammals i can think of easily twenty five to thirty species of lamp levels but then you cannot another twenty five species of back all any five just of ats yes

Jasmine Palmer Mandy Shandra Sergio Arizona Sonora Desert Museum Sonoran Desert Henry George Gavin Tula Andrew
"sonoran desert" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Why sonoran desert toad and that was the craziest thing i did and then a few few iowa oscar experiences so i was doing what doctors used to do which is experiment with these drugs on yourself before you give them to anybody else and and the experiences which every one of which was preceded by a sleepless night of worry you know arguing with myself you know hey you're you're sixty years old you're going to have a heart attack you're you know you're gonna you could go crazy there could be some demon lurking in you i i was genuinely afraid i i realized later that was my ego trying to convince me not to do this thing that was going to challenge my ego and of course our egos have command of wonderful rational faculties in it almost one well let me stop either because i mean it is true if you are i think i think it's true that if you are prone to psychosis that taking a hallucinogenic can put you over the edge so i mean there are are there are bad things to happen and there is reason to use caution there is reason to take it seriously before you decide and i want to panic.

oscar iowa sixty years
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"This is coast to coast am with being punished but again thank you to george noory to george knapp td and lisa lyon all the rest of the coasties out there for letting me get back on the air for a couple of sundays into rope this could be perceived as kind of a part one and part two of the same topic can be talking about mojave mysteries here in just a minute and i just want to give you a little bit of background because i had never lived in this southwest until i moved to phoenix a couple years ago and i i started to understand driving to l a or or going up to vegas i had this annual conference as to go to and and you begin to feel the lethal nature of the landscape and i was telling a friend the other day about that margin of error between life and death that just narrows in the desert now i i experienced that in a long drive i had to take through the sonoran which is south of phoenix phoenix is kind of unlike in the northern tip of the sonoran desert and then again out to california and in each case i just can't help but be mindful of how important it would be not to get stuck in the desert with car trouble but also you develop of a sense of of historical danger i was i was west of tucson and i was looking out over the desert scape i was just trying to imagine how many men women and children and for that matter horses might have succumbed to the oppressive heat or a sudden wash during a westward migration a hundred years ago and just died in their tracks and we're never heard from again and forgotten to history and this kind of danger exists even as we speak out in the deserts i.

sonoran desert tucson george noory george knapp td lisa lyon phoenix california hundred years
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"App today sunday dread this is coast to coast am with being punished but again thank you to george noory and to george knapman to td lisa lyon all the rest of the coasties out there for letting me get back on the air for a couple of sundays in a row this could be perceived as kind of a part one and part two of the same topic can be talking about mojave mysteries here in just a minute i just want to give you a little bit of background because i'd never lived in this southwest until i moved to phoenix a couple years ago and i i started to understand driving to l a or or going up to vegas i had this annual conference as to go to and and you begin to feel the lethal nature of the landscape and i was telling him from the other day about that margin of error between life and death that just narrows in the desert now i i experienced that in a in a longer drive i had to take through the sonoran which is south of phoenix phoenix is kind of unlike on the northern tip of the sonoran desert and then again out to california and in each case i just can't help mindful of how important it would be not to get stuck in the desert with car trouble but also you develop kind of a sense of of historical danger i was i was west of tucson and i was looking out over the desert scape i was just trying to imagine how many men women and children and for that matter horses might have succumbed to the oppressive heat or a sudden wash during a westward migration a hundred years ago and just died in their tracks and we're never heard from again and forgotten to history and this kind of danger exists even as we speak out in the desert i.

lisa lyon sonoran desert tucson george noory george knapman phoenix california hundred years
"sonoran desert" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Listen this is coast to coast am with being punished but again thank you to george noory to george knapman to td lisa lyon and all the rest of the coasties out there for letting me get back on the air for a couple of sundays in a rope this could be perceived as kind of a part one and part two of the same topic can be talking about mojave mysteries here in just a minute and i just want to give a little bit of background because i never lived in this southwest until i moved to phoenix a couple years ago and i i started to understand driving to l a or or going up to vegas i had this annual conference to go to and and you begin to feel the lethal nature of the landscape and i was telling a friend the other day about that margin of error between life and death that just narrows in the desert now i i experienced that in a longer drive i had to take through the sonoran which is south of phoenix with phoenix is kind of unlike in the northern tip of the sonoran desert and then again out to california and in each case i just can't help but be mindful of how important it would be not to get stuck in the desert with car trouble but also you develop kind of a sense of of historical danger i was i was west of tucson and i was looking out over the desert scape i was just trying to imagine how many men women and children and for that matter horses might have succumbed to the oppressive heat or a sudden wash during a westward migration a hundred years ago and just died in their tracks and we're never heard from again and forgotten to history and this kind of danger exists even as we speak out in the deserts i.

lisa lyon phoenix sonoran desert tucson george noory george knapman california hundred years
"sonoran desert" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"W obt oh dream this is coast to coast am with being punished but again thank you to george noory and to george knapman jews lisa lyon all the rest of the coasties out there for letting me get back on the air for a couple of sundays in a row fact this could be perceived as kind of a part one and part to the same topic can be talking about mojave mysteries here just a minute i just want to give you a little bit of background because i never lived in this southwest until i moved to phoenix a couple years ago and i started to understand driving to l a or or going up to vegas i had this annual conference as to go to and and you begin to feel the lethal nature of the landscape and i was telling a friend the other day about that margin of error between life and death that just narrows in the desert i i experienced that in a in a longer drive i had to take through the sonoran which is south of phoenix phoenix is kind of unlike in the northern tip of the sonoran desert and then again out to california and in each case i just can't help but be mindful of how important it would be not to get stuck in the desert with car trouble but also you develop kind of a sense of of historical danger i was i was west of tucson and i was looking out over the desert scape i was just trying to imagine how many men women and children and for that matter horses might have succumbed to the oppressive heat or a sudden wash during a westward migration a hundred years ago and just died in their tracks and we're never heard from again and forgotten to history and this kind of danger exists even as we speak out in the deserts i.

sonoran desert tucson george noory george knapman lisa lyon phoenix california hundred years
"sonoran desert" Discussed on The Four Top

The Four Top

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sonoran desert" Discussed on The Four Top

"A a food way even though they are not indigenous to that community what can you tell us about some of the indigenous foods that those people do enjoy that i think the rest of the word that you think the rest of the country should know about oh absolutely there is a lot of them how much time do we have i'll start with the more unique ones that you know i was very very privileged to learn about through um francis manual who was really the person who guided me and shared with me all these different foods them in the sonoran desert is is some really got a lot of edible foods for example foods choya buds would be is an example of these are of that comes from the book foreign cactus and his picked on with tongs made out of wood are traditionally on look like kind of a big chopsticks um and these things are are pretty hazardous to pick i will tell you having done it myself and ended up with quite a few uh quite a few nice thorns in my fingers on but these choya buds are extremely high for example exam in calcium on more so than a glass of milk and of course on milk is not something that was part of you know their traditional food way so calcium was absorbed through on this food in particular amiss skeet which i think was mentioned earlier which you know is kind of it has been a fad food lately but is something that was part of the tunnel autumn indigenous foods from way back and grows wild in the desert gosh uh than yuka down there is that too far not really there there is banana yucca which has a fruit which is harvested so a lot of foraging the kind of fall into a wh a group of wild foods and then they're also cultivated foods like the temporary bean which is very unique to the southwest very drought tolerant actually produces more the less water it get so of course it's perfect for the sonoran desert uh sorrow fruit which was harvested seasonally people would go into the desert areas and have designated areas where they would.

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