8 Burst results for "Sonia Pruitt"

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:05 min | 5 months ago

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

"Inviting folks to come on downtown for the fourth of July. One of the city's, If not the country's greatest traditions, is Fourth of July fireworks on the National Mall. Mike Litter, first of the National Park Service. Last year, the public was asked to watch the fireworks from home to have the Lincoln Oriole or the capital or the Washington Monument as a backdrop on Independence Day as the fireworks are going off, there's really nothing like it, Neil Lloyd couldn't staying double U T L P News. FBI agents will now be able to cooperate in the manslaughter prosecution of two U. S. Park police officers. Those officers were charged by Fairfax County prosecutors after they shot and killed by Jean Gays are on the George Washington Parkway in November of 2017. The Washington Post reporting. That decision was communicated in a letter two weeks ago from Attorney General Merrick Garland. It reverses a decision made during the Trump administration not to prosecute those officers. How do you think local police should enforce marijuana laws and at the same time ensure they're doing it fairly, while the Public Safety Commission in Montgomery County heard from citizens last night as it tries to answer those questions, the commission's online public hearing heard from retired Montgomery County Police captain Sonia Pruitt, who said police should stop arresting individuals for marijuana possession. There is no evidence that petty arrests for possession have dealed. Lower crime rate. While other commission members agree that police should not be focusing on individuals possessing marijuana Police Sergeant Kate Brewer wondered what police should do about the multiple complaints that come in each day over marijuana. We still get calls for service, like people are calling 911 or 279 8000 to say somebody outside my apartment complexes smoking weed, particularly on O w T o P news. Marijuana will be legal. For the most part in Virginia, come July. 1st, However, pot will not be welcome on college campuses in the state institutions of higher learning across the Commonwealth, like JMU UVA in Virginia Tech say they won't tolerate students getting high. There are approaches tied to concerns over a risk of losing federal funding if they violate the drug Free Schools and Communities Act, a law that bans drugs on college campuses and at public schools. But marijuana policy experts tell the Roanoke Times that While there is a threat of federal funds being withdrawn If schools don't have a policy prohibiting drugs on campus, it's never been realized. Matt Small w T o B News Prince George's County schools going to take an additional step to support students who were learning English. The dropout rate among students whose second language is English is hard, and that's really where the idea of this work group came from. George's County Board of Education member Rahimullah Ahmad Co chaired the workgroup and says they came up with a list of recommendations. The focus, achievement and success Things like having a solid ESOL program at every school in P. G. C. P s and things like recruiting more immigrant teachers. Recommendations have been Approved by the board and will begin going into effect next fiscal year. So this is really a strategic player for the next several years on how we can and we should.

Neil Lloyd Mike Litter Jean Gays Matt Small National Park Service November of 2017 Virginia FBI Public Safety Commission July. 1st 279 8000 Washington Monument 911 Last year Independence Day Kate Brewer Sonia Pruitt George Washington Parkway George's County Board of Educa National Mall
"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:04 min | 5 months ago

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

"Real beauty right now, Sunshine 69 degrees up to around 80 today. Mm hmm. Good morning. I'm Deborah Feinstein and I'm Mark Lewis with the top local stories we're following at this hour. It has been a tradition in our area for a long time. And this morning we've learned the annual Fourth of July celebration is back on in D. C. And once again, the National Park Service will host the annual Independence Day Fireworks celebration on the National Mall. Mike Litters of the National Park Service. Fireworks were shot off last year, but the public was asked to watch from home, he says. There's Nothing like having the Lincoln Memorial or the capital or the Washington Monument as a backdrop with the fireworks going off. This is really the first event that we've had that marks a step forward as we emerge from the pandemic dialogue can stain w DLP news. Should police back off of making arrests for possession of marijuana or public safety leaders in Montgomery County talked about that possibility. Last night, the commission heard from retired police captain Sonia Pruitt, who said arrests for marijuana are a direct pipeline into what she called the black and brown heavy prison industrial complex. Charges for simple possession of drugs has yielded unnecessary criminal records. On the other side of the coin, Police Sergeant Kate Brewer told the commission. Police get multiple complaints each day. People smoking pot, their community members as well. And I mean, that's a daily call that we get. In Montgomery County. The commission plans to advise the county Council on Policing Matters. Take Uliano w T o P. News. Even though Virginia's new marijuana legalization law goes into effect July 1st. It is not stopping universities from banning pot. Virginia Tech recently cleared the air pot isn't allowed on campus. Even after it's within the law to light up, But if you're off campus smoking or eating it legally, you won't face student code of conduct violations. The Blacksburg school is the first in the Commonwealth to revise its code of conduct in response to legalization. Other universities across the state, like Radford and VCU also plan to keep marijuana banned on campus. According to the Roanoke Times. Back at tech penalties for students who violate policy include academic probation, writing an essay about the incident and meeting with a drug counselor. Bath small W T o P News. 10 05. My life has been a story of privilege. That's what Virginia Governor Ralph Northam is saying. Two years after a scandal over a racist yearbook photo, The governor admits to The New York Times that some of his policy accomplishments would have never happened. Had it not been for the 2019 scandal over racist photo on his medical school yearbook page. It's a photo of a man in black face next to another in a Ku Klux Klan robe. And it led to widespread calls for his resignation as the governor claims he still can't remember which of the two figures is him. Instead of leaving office, the governor went on a listening tour, which he says made him a better person and helped him understand black oppression. Northam also agreed that he is privileged, adding that it's the reason why he wants to level the playing field A Catia James w. T o P News The first students to desegregate a Virginia public school back in the 19 fifties are now being recognized for their courage. With the dedication of a new trail walking along the Stratford commemorative Trail at Dorothy Ham Middle School, four panels detail the historic moments that led to 4/7 graders. Being the first black students to attend the school. Gloria Thompson, Ronald Deschenes, Lance Newman and Michael Jones were honored for their courage. During a dedication ceremony. He Leslie Hem Jr. The son of the activists, who helped make it all possible, thank the students in the community for their commitment to change and for all of you who may have come behind us and continue to cherish decency. And importantly, democracy. You make us all very, very proud. Melissa Howell wt opinion is coming up next. Would help Children's national be named among the best of the best. I'm Kristi King 10.

Ronald Deschenes Deborah Feinstein Mark Lewis Gloria Thompson Melissa Howell Lance Newman Michael Jones Mike Litters Virginia Tech July 1st National Park Service VCU Kristi King Montgomery County Leslie Hem Jr. D. C. Sonia Pruitt Washington Monument Radford last year
"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:09 min | 5 months ago

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

"In a statement, President Biden announced that he will host military families and essential workers on the South Lawn to celebrate and that traditional fireworks will return to the National Mall in D. C this year. Mayor Bowser seems to be on board this morning. She echoed the president's excitement, saying the district will support the White House and hosting the traditional Fourth of July fireworks celebration. The announcement comes just days after D C fully reopened. All right, well, how should police enforced marijuana laws and make sure they're enforced fairly and equitably. Public safety leaders in Montgomery County sat down last night to talk about it. The commission's online public hearing heard from retired Montgomery County Police captain Sonia Pruitt, who said police should stop arresting individuals for marijuana possession. There is no evidence that petty arrests for possession have gilded lower crime rates, while other commission members agree that Police should not be focusing on individuals possessing marijuana. Police Sergeant Kate Brewer wondered what police should do about the multiple complaints that come in each day over marijuana. We still get calls for service, like people are calling 911 or 279 8000 to say somebody outside my apartment complexes. SMOKING weed. Dick Uliano w T. O P News. Marijuana will be legal in Virginia July 1st, but it won't be welcome on college campuses around the state institutions of higher learning across the Commonwealth. Like JMU. You've a in Virginia Tech say they won't tolerate students getting high. There are approaches tied to concerns over a risk of losing federal funding if they violate the drug Free Schools and Communities Act, a law that bans drugs on college campuses and at public schools. But marijuana policy experts tell the Roanoke Times that while there is a threat of federal funds being withdrawn of schools don't have a policy prohibiting drugs on campus. It's never been realized. Matt Small w T O B News from a racist yearbook photo surfacing two years ago to policies focused on racial equity. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam was looking back at his journey. Northam says some of his policy accomplishments would have never come about had it not been for the scandal over a racially insensitive photo from his medical school yearbook. Northam claims he still does not know which person he was in the photograph the white man dressed in black face or the one dress in the Ku Klux Klan robe, But he tells the New York Times that the moment was eye opening, and it made him a better educated and more informed person. Northam says Following the scandal, he made it clear to his Cabinet that they were going to take action and work on racial equity. When asked if his story is also one of the men's privileged, Northam agreed, adding, that's the reason he wants to level the playing field. A Catia James W. T. O P News for Virginia for Virginia residents, who were the first to desegregate public school are being honored. The Stratford commemorative Trail at Dorothy him Middle school has been formally dedicated to honor 4/7 graders. Who desegregated the school. Back in 1959. Local leaders recognized Gloria Thompson, Ronald desk. It's Lance Newman and Michael Jones for their courage and said the new trail is a reminder of the county's ongoing effort to advance equity six decades later. Jones, speaking at the event, said he is proud to see progress is still much work to do..

Matt Small Michael Jones Lance Newman Dick Uliano 1959 Jones Northam Virginia July 1st 279 8000 911 Sonia Pruitt D. C Montgomery County Mayor Gloria Thompson White House Kate Brewer two years ago President
"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:48 min | 5 months ago

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

"Traditional Fourth of July celebration on the National Mall is back. We have new information this morning about this year's celebration in the district. In a statement, President Biden announced he'll host military families an essential workers on the South Lawn to celebrate and the traditional fireworks will return to the National Mall. Mayor Bowser seems to be on board this morning. She echoed the president's excitement, saying the district will support the White House in hosting the traditional Fourth of July fireworks celebration. The announcement comes just days after D C fully reopened. Should police back off making arrest for possession of marijuana. Public safety leaders in Montgomery County discussed that possibility last night. The commission heard from retired police captain Sonia Pruitt, who said arrests for marijuana are a direct pipeline into what she called the black and brown heavy prison industrial complex. Charges for simple possession of drugs has yielded unnecessary criminal records. On the other side of the coin, Police Sergeant Kate Brewer told the commission. Police get multiple complaints each day. About people smoking part of their community members as well. And I mean, that's a daily call that we get. In Montgomery County. The commission plans to advise the county Council on Policing Matters. Vehicular liano w T O P News. Virginia's do Marijuana Legalization law goes into effect July 1st. But that's not stopping universities there from banning it. Virginia Tech recently cleared the air Pot isn't allowed on campus even after it's within the law to light up. But if you're off campus smoking or eating it legally, you won't face student code of conduct violations. The Blacksburg school is the first in the Commonwealth to revise its code of conduct in response to legalization. Other universities across the state, like Radford and VCU also plan to keep marijuana banned on campus, according to the Roanoke Times back at tech penalties for students who violate policy Include academic probation, writing an essay about the incident and meeting with a drug counselor, Matt Small w T O P News, saying his life has been a story of privilege. Virginia Governor Ralph Northam is reflecting on the scandal of a racist yearbook photo that nearly took him out of office two years ago. The governor admits to The New York Times that some of his policy accomplishments would have never happened. Had it not been for the 2019 scandal over racist photo on his medical school yearbook page. It's a photo of a man in black face next to another in a Ku Klux Klan robe, and it led to widespread calls for his resignation. As the governor claims he still can't remember which of the two figures is him. Instead of leaving office, the governor went on a listening tour, which he says made him a better person and helped him understand black oppression. Northam also agreed that he is privileged, adding that it's the reason why he wants to level the playing field. A Catia James W. T o P. News, the first students to desegregate of Virginia public school back in the 19 fifties are now being recognized for their courage. With the dedication of a new trail. Walking along the Stratford commemorative Trail at Dorothy Ham Middle School, four panels detail the historic moments that led to 4/7 graders. Being the first black students to attend the school. Gloria Thompson, Ronald Deschenes, Lance Newman and Michael Jones were honored for their courage. During a dedication ceremony. He Leslie Hem Jr. The son of the activists, who helped make it all possible, thank the students in the community for their commitment to change and for all of you who may have come behind us and continue to cherish decency. And importantly, democracy. You make us all very, very proud. Melissa Howell. W T o P News coming up after traffic and weather will preview President Biden's meeting with Russia's president tomorrow with Michael O. Hanlon from the Brookings Institution. It's 807 Reliable, efficient, accessible. That's the A P C difference. A PC, a flagship brand of Schneider Electric provides clean battery backup power surge.

Ronald Deschenes Melissa Howell Gloria Thompson Matt Small Michael O. Hanlon Lance Newman Michael Jones July 1st VCU Schneider Electric Virginia Tech Montgomery County Sonia Pruitt Radford Brookings Institution White House Northam Kate Brewer Mayor tomorrow
"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

03:26 min | 5 months ago

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on WTOP

"877 asked l six or three on Tuesday, June 15th 2021. We're at 65 degrees right now, sunshine with temperatures headed up to near 80. Good morning. I'm John Doman and I'm Bruce Allen with the top local stories we're following this hour. The search continues this morning for Lord and woman who went missing earlier this month. She was last seen while grocery shopping back on June. 3rd and police are treating her disappearance as suspicious when Emily Lu didn't report to work on Friday, June 4th, her boss reached out to Fairfax County police later that day, when officers arrived at her Davis Lane home, they found groceries in center car and evidence The 72 year old may have been harmed inside her home. Police suspect foul play is totally out of the ordinary for hopeful and prayerful that they find her neighbor's voice. Their concerns. The W T o P news partner, NBC four newly released video of Emily Lu, checking out at a Woodbridge Aldy, plus a photo of her on w t o p dot com Matt Small w T o P news. If you have any information you're asked to call Fairfax County Police. My life has been a story of privilege. That's what Virginia Governor Ralph Northam is saying. Two years after a scandal over a racist yearbook photo, The governor admits to The New York Times that some of his policy accomplishments would have never happened. Had it not been for the 2019 scandal over racist photo on his medical school yearbook Page. It's a photo of a man in black face next to another in the Ku Klux Klan robe, and it led to widespread calls for his resignation as the governor claims he still can't remember which of the two figures as him. Instead of leaving office, the governor went on a listening tour, which he says made him a better person and helped him understand black oppression. North. Them also agreed that he is privileged, adding that it's the reason why he wants to level the playing field. A Catia James W. T o P. News, the first students to desegregate of Virginia public school back in the fifties are now being recognized for their courage. With the dedication of a new trail. Walking along the Stratford commemorative Trail at Dorothy Ham Middle School, four panels detail the historic moments that led to 4/7 graders. Being the first black students to attend the school. Gloria Thompson, Ronald Deschenes, Lance Newman and Michael Jones were honored for their courage. During a dedication ceremony. He Leslie Hem Jr. The son of the activists, who helped make it all possible, thank the students in the community for their commitment to change and for all of you who may have come behind us and continue to cherish decency. And importantly, democracy. You make us all very, very proud. Melissa Howell w. T. O P News, the Montgomery County Policing Advisory Commission, her testimony last night about whether police should back off making arrests for possession of marijuana. The commission heard from retired police captain Sonia Pruitt, who said arrests for marijuana are a direct pipeline into what she called the black and brown heavy prison industrial complex. Charges for simple possession of drugs has yielded unnecessary criminal Records on the other side of the coin, Police Sergeant Kate Brewer told the commission. Police get multiple complaints each day about people smoking pot, their community members as well. And I mean that's a daily call that we get. In Montgomery County. The commission plans to advise the county Council on Policing Matters, particularly on O w. T O P. News. A lightning strike may have started a fire that displaced a family five from their home in Damascus..

Ronald Deschenes Lance Newman Michael Jones Bruce Allen Gloria Thompson Emily Lu John Doman NBC Melissa Howell Friday, June 4th Damascus Sonia Pruitt Leslie Hem Jr. 65 degrees June Davis Lane Tuesday, June 15th 2021 Matt Small Kate Brewer Montgomery County
"sonia pruitt" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

08:14 min | 1 year ago

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"I left The department was. I mean we had probably like twenty five black officers. Maybe twenty five or so thirty or so hispanic officers in the rest will white so Just like any other place. We had the challenges of making sure that that arse. Our department reflects the city. But but i wouldn't say it was bad. I mean there was no Of course i always want more more black offs more minority officers. But you gotta take testing and then pass the test so that challenge is on other. Yes i wanna talk about that as well. What's what are the challenges of a recruiting black officers. Minority officers into department. Notice is hard generally across the country now but You know specifically recruiting black osu's department. Yes so actually. Before a retired that was one of my assignments was to go out to different colleges universities etc and just try to convince people to take the test and college and universities. You're speaking with you know whoever walked bio whether you're in we were in the cafeteria or in some major thoroughfare where where people passing by and the majority of people who were taking applications are showed some type of interest where were white people and so there's a lot of. There's a lot of african americans in for a number of reasons. I believe this is going on throughout the whole country. And it's just not interested in law enforcement. And i think that's because of the viral videos that we're seeing and all that kind of stuff so i think that One of the best ways to to recruit more. African american officers is to Really go out to where they are church his barbershops colleges and all that kind of stuff and just try to be that convincing ear that hey listen. We need to make those types of challenges in problem that you see with law enforcement from the inside. You're not gonna get we're not gonna get anything from sending on the sidelines. Good morning can complaining saying please ought to do this. Please do that. You gotta make those challenges from the inside now also had a discussion with a lady on my my podcast Her name is gus sonia. She's not editor designed. No-doubt sonia pruitt. She's a captain from in the police. Department in maryland. Sony pruitt actually really good discussion. I asked her similar the same question and she and her experience. And i would have to say. This is also true experiences that in her experience when she was part of the recruitment team is that a many times. Black officers in were being overly scrutinized. Right so let's say the the parameters the have. It's go the job. -cation was the have a bachelor's degree. Well then there was extra steps taken by people within her department or a her city of saying. Okay yeah okay. This guy's got a bachelor's degree but look he took his english class and he got to see. So there's some over scrutiny. Going on with that now. I sat on my board as far as The recruitment process. So we discussed these types of things. And i had the chance in the voice to speak up and say listen. We're not gonna you know. Knock out the less because when he was twelve. You tried to smoke weed when i. We're not gonna do that. You know so. I think just we need a fairness across the board. How we're gonna recruit we need a concerted efforts to recruit And didn't once again just to be fair and are in what we're gonna do. Yeah i've seen some studies and some stories about you know talking about recruitment of minorities and a lot of it has to do with passing backgrounds. And you know that's due to the policing in those areas before you know these these people. These candidates come through the. They're getting sweaty and for traffic tickets That other communities wouldn't wouldn't be scrutinized for sedan and he's lower income communities. They can't pay the fis. These things go to warrant and when they go to war and they get arrested they had record whereas opposed to you know other parts of town where they wouldn't have been getting stopped and You know for these for these minor violations in the first place. A lot of that has to do with the you know the policing in the area to begin with and he's lower income neighborhoods. So yeah sure. I read something very similar. In fact i talked about it on my talk about in the show that i did in talking about there was a there was a chicago defender tribune or something that ended historic expressing. Exactly i think one of the ways to combat at is obviously more black officers need to stop community members need to step up and understand what's going on why so many officers are being You know eliminate because this nonsense and of course as you mentioned that You know it really comes from the direction of the top of the department and who were going to take it who we're going to a you know and all that kind of stuff so a lot of these problems that we see with law enforcement come from the top and it takes a loud voice voices to say. Listen we want fairness inequity if you're going to stop one person. Because they had a number of tickets you're going to stop or we should eliminate this kind of just kind of thinking. Yeah yeah exactly so You gotta podcast but you also. What else are you doing here retirement. You have something else. leadership institute or or simply that so. I started a business in which i'm helping people number one to become police officers right some. Sometimes people don't know the process and fortune. I talk about this a lot. Is that Do what. I was an reason that we go to. Churches is because when i was young i was twenty years old or so that we church announcements and wanted to church announcements with. Hey please test is coming up. Fire tests coming up. The water department has coming up so we would be able to quit for all these types. Of course i talked to police past it. But a lot of people are not able to afford to go to college They're not in a place where they think they need to go to college or they can't afford it or maybe they can't go nice school or whatever So i i i put together some classes That is online. I mean i had to kind of get paid for what i do. But they're really really affordable and for people who out there who don't want to go through a two years of schooling. You can set you my course Will take you a few days to sit through it And i kind of elaborate. What it takes to become a police officer how to pass the test How to prepare for the physical agility and all that kind of stuff. So i think that i really did a good job in trying to help people to become police officers. Because i know that some people can be turned off because of may think that there's this process to In addition to to to take a test and that's one aspect of the business started called l. m. h. police training and consulting and how the part of it is yes. The leadership portion of it were. I'm putting together right now. Awesome leadership videos and people people want you know. Excel at just leadership just general. Now this is not just geared towards At least i'm not trying to gear it towards law enforcement writer. You somebody could just been promoted to the manager at mcdonalds of you know what you do. How do you. How do you handle that situation writing you. Twenty five twenty six years old. You got a supervisor. Eighteen year old. How do you do that. You know may may not know anything once again. Maybe they're the challenges in life and not allow them to To go to college and and take some some case of courses some putting together something that will be a little bit cheaper So they can understand what it takes to be a leadership qualities and finally of another thing that discusses people who wanna take promotional in law enforcement and again too. If you'd somebody wants to do something that's outside law enforcement in. What does it take to get promoted. How you go about studying what to study Maybe some people are really good. Test-takers as far as the written portion of the test or they seem to bomb the only presentation or vice versa So so those are things like how people would have been in. I've helped And been.

gus sonia sonia pruitt chicago defender tribune osu water department fis maryland Sony
"sonia pruitt" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

13:56 min | 1 year ago

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Investigative sergeant in a supervisor of the School Resource Program in Twenty Nineteen. Pruitt was promoted to captain. She currently serves as a deputy. Commander Supervising Calls for service. Countywide PRUITT is a past president of the coalition of black police officers among only Maryland. In since two thousand eighteen has serves as the chairperson of the National Black Police Association chills. Bs In criminal justice from University of Maryland University College and an Ma in front of psychology from argosy university. She's an adjunct professor of Criminal Justice Administration at the Montgomery College and teaches courses including introduction to policing criminal investigation in Police Organization and administration. She's also a member of law enforcement action partnership otherwise known as leap as well as myself so without further. Doing Ladies Gentlemen we are going to be discussing the importance of diversity within police department so I. WanNa thank once again my special guest Captain Sonia Pruitt to Captain Hunters podcast. Here is the interview all right so once again. We're talking to Captain Sonia Pruitt and thank you so much for being on Captain Hunters podcast. Thanks for inviting me. Your member of Law Enforcement Action Partnership as M. I in so just tell us a little bit about yourself and what you do for that organization just yourself in general okay Well I I call myself a transplant from north. Carolina ended up in the Washington metropolitan area as a student at how university Undergrad In nineteen eighty one. I've been here for a while now and I feel like I'm a a member of DMV as we call it the district Maryland. Virginia Became a police officer after deciding that being a doctor was not for me. I knew I was NOCCO. Stay up all night long doing any kind of internship or residency or anything like that. So they're not because I'm a science geek. I tried to go into Research so worked at the National Institutes of helpful. I don't like the repetitiveness of research This is no not for me so I became a police officer because as I was working for the US Postal Service Inspection Service. Which is their law. Enforcement Ranch I decided I wanted to go into law enforcement so I became a police officer as a yeah could be outside like being outside. I like being around people. This'll be fun and exciting. I did not know what I was getting myself into. Actually but I was ready for it. So that's how I became a police officer. I've been a police officer for twenty seven years. I'm currently a captain in charge of community engagement for the Montgomery County Police Department and I am also the chair woman The National Black Police Association and I got my my hat and various other incendiary rings of law enforcement and speaking and things like that. Very good awesome. Awesome my cousin. A currently works for the inspectional services. I'm hoping saying that right for the post office. He works service. He'd probably kill me tells me so many times but he actually is Located in Tampa Florida. So he's got a actually fairly wide range of territories. He's gotTa deal. With as far as his responsibilities e e installs Even saying he's installs a security surveillance equipment. Try to catch the postal workers. Stealing or yeah. Yeah yeah he's got some really cool guests. Can I wanted to have you on because I had a previous conversation with another person Leader of a black national black police officers of Association of America and So I wanted to have you on to talk about the importance of black police officers. And you know we're having a problem right now with the recruitment overawe police officer people do not want to be companies. Police officers overall but particularly. It's it's problematic within the black community. I want to have you on his to kind of talk about that and what we can do to fix this problem. Are you seeing A problem with getting more young people or more people particularly people colored black people to become police officer I'm not sure whether that is that. An urban legend or not Let me tell you why so in my career. I have worked in background investigation and we did. We were having that same dialogue always so hard to find particularly black people to become the police but I contend that there are plenty of black applicants out there. You just have to hire them. You cannot Find excuses not to hire them because of your implicit biases or your Your your overt biases. You cannot put them into a are you you. Can't you can't measure them by measurements? That are not the same measurements that you measure all the Atkins by meaning once they pass the basic parameters you don't get to add extra parameters for and I'm going to use this as a as a true example once you pass the parameters you can't say well they well. They have to have a bachelor's degree which they have but they didn't pass a class when they were in Undergrad. There's no such parameter. They have a bachelor's degree which is what the with the parameter is so I have seen that happen and you know question that and you know I had argued about it and that person was not hired so I'm going to say that if you're not doing everything you can to diversify your police department in a fair and impartial way that I'm going to throw out the window. That argument there are not enough Black Africans not enough women applicants not enough. Latino applicant is whatever the you know the category is. I'm going to say unless you're doing. They're fairly at across the board. And then I'm going to also add if you going out of your way to bypass the parameters in order to get certain hype of applicant or a certain category. Then you're not. You're still not playing fairly okay. So I am not clear Sir. Captain that that is really an issue. I think Anecdotally that it doesn't excuse because what I see is okay the black community. They have an issue with us so we can always say that they don't want to become the please I'm just not. I'm not convinced that when we had a black cat who was the director of our Personnel Division for instance with my police department. We didn't seem to have that issue. You one has to wonder what the issues really are. Okay that's that's a very fair very fair point. I too But I here's here's Mike attention and I too was a member of our background team in on all that kind of stuff recruit team and so. I went to colleges the schools Two Barber shops churches etc tried to get many applicants to sign up and many You know when you go to colleges we were heading You know some universities here in You Know Yukon Wiscon- Western Connecticut State University and other other schools. Rama stated Connecticut and even our home city and the people that were taking. The applications are showed some type of interest generally were white and many black applicants or or potential black applicants. Were would tell us straight out that they weren't interested in Assam down that saying that any didn't but those who dead Show some interest. Obviously you know they. They came on the Chicago Tribune. Awhile ago maybe I read. This article may be back in October or so September October. They did a really good article. I I can send it to if I can find it and it was talking about this whole problem that they were having in Chicago with all the problems. That Chicago Police Department has and they want more black people To to apply in their head of their personnel division for the city now as the police officers but for the city was talking about. How come there were no Not Enough Black applicants and one of the things that the that the personnel director was talking about was was similar to what you were just mentioning about about Going through with with this selection process many people are being weeded out for silly things that others others were not being weeded out as on on. And she was saying that. There's the legacy groups particularly Latino legacy groups right so so we have you. You remember the National Black Police Officers Association right so their legacy groups so a Latino groups Were actually staying with their applicants throughout the process right. So they're helping them back. Prepare for the physical prepare for the written. Prepare oral. And that was the difference. In why the Latino Applicants were doing better on the test whereas black people black officers or black applicants were taking a test and then that was it next time you see them was for their physical prison for the physical portion and they couldn't pass it will one of the reasons is obviously because you groups were not doing enough to make sure that they passed it so that was one of the critiques that the Personnel Director Had. I'd seen know and I liked the idea of Following the applicants so when I first apply My blue background. She was my and not in the background investigator Recruiter I missed my first test. I exit show up. I'll be lazy. You know that happens a lot with the cruise black white brown. You know because we are young and we're not Dedicated yet and and you know we're young. So she called me and she said. I'm a need you to come to this test and I said yes Ma'am I showed up so when I was in background I I remember having a conversation with one of the The executive that was there at the time and I said hey you know I had this idea. Why don't we make sure that we follow up with our African because we're having a problem with adversity A problem there's somebody says they have not sure really had one but anyway. Why don't we call advocate? Who we think things not to want to come and take the test to make sure they come in and take the test and she said well. We can't do that and I said why not. She said because that's against federal loss will turn we tell me see that we can understand it. Can we find that in the federal wreck so that we can read it and she never answered because there is no such thing so I suggested then because I got the impression that she was still some kind of way about calling black Africans? Why don't we just call? The Africans have to just call the black Africa's we can call them all and make sure that you know. They know that they need to come and take the test because they are most of them are young and we probably need to give them a little nudge ono that we can't do that. That's the guest federal rigs. That was like okay. So it's it's stuff like that they keep us from being able to hire qualified Women and Black and Latino Asian and so forth advocate in my opinion so my small vantage point and I and I take that unaccept- that I think that that's I think that what you're saying is absolutely valid and I and I'm not pushing back against that I'm trying to add to it and say that It is a it is a problem we do need to. Give people a nudge and we also have noticed. Where as you mentioned as you sat in your I out so meetings. Whatever and talked about okay. Wh why are we mountains personally because when they were? Fourteen smoke weed. Wh what are we talking about here So why are we? Why are we doing that? And we we had to have the same conversations with. Wait a minute okay. This guy got a ticket when he was eighteen. These these thirty three. Now what are you talking about? You know so so. Sometimes I think that the that the rules if not a fairly across the board can bounce people who could be potentially good applicants. I completely agree with that. So just tell us a little bit about The Organization the National Black Police Officers. Tell us a little about them. And what you do and as you are the chair woman and what. Your responsibilities.

National Black Police Associat officer National Black Police Officers National Black Police Officers black community Captain Sonia Pruitt Montgomery County Police Depar Law Enforcement Action Partner Police Organization Chicago Police Department Maryland personnel director University of Maryland Univers argosy university supervisor Personnel Division Commander Captain Hunters president
"sonia pruitt" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

Capt. Hunter's Podcast

14:37 min | 2 years ago

"sonia pruitt" Discussed on Capt. Hunter's Podcast

"Website. Read over and look over this news one special report art. It's a three part series. The first part is black versus blue. Second part is policing black. America and a third part liberty and justice for all so he's also they also have a number of other articles that can be explored on the website without further ado ladies and gentleman. Here's the interview with Dana. Dana Jones. Thank you day. McKay Jones for being on our show. Thank you so much I appreciate it. No problem no problem my a pleasure. Okay so just tell us a little bit about yourself. I did read your bio but just tell tell us a little bit about yourself and what you got going on with your plans for the future and things like that well I'm Correction Office in my profession. That paid the bills. I worked for the Westchester County Department Department. Correction I'm on my third year and Almost cone on a Black Westchester magazine. I am New York State representative the beginning of of blacks and law enforcement of America also. I'm a CO founder of Westchester Black Political Conference. So keep myself I keep myself busy is sounds like you do so your state rep for the blacks and law enforcement so is that electric Alexa medicine. You know that that organization started ten years ago and at that time we I was at that time I was in North East regional president of the National Blackley sociation and we had Little Disagreement Well big disagreement with the president at that time was name is Melinda. Z's I believe he was the Deputy Chief of Dallas Police Department we. We didn't like the way the organization was going. They what they was Dressing issues on the national level which National Organization when is Asian should so myself in a couple of other members decided to leave and start blacks and law enforcement of America to actually give black communities of boys from from a law enforcement perspective and Retired and active law enforcement. Oh okay the organization is fairly active. Then right I see in your newsletter that you are constantly putting articles and dressing dressing now getting situations that are happening in New York but situations around the country. Yes yes We we try to give that voice And we we also vichy where we're trying to work together with the NASA Blackley so they have a new president Sonia Pruitt and She's a good system. I was on the board with her when we was When I was in the National Black Police Association we was on the Board and I'm also part of the National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice and the great thing about these these organizations especially blacks National Association Blacks and criminal justice because of their history and the need for Young black officers throughout the country to participate in these organizations. Because we've seen you've seen lately that Black officers which is is is not surprising. You you don't get the same representation and and and then on Push with the same zeal of defending Black Officers As they do their white counterparts right when the biggest cases that comes to my mind we talk about that. Is that situation happen in Minnesota. I think his last name was not war He was recently convicted. Right right right and yes yes yes yeah he was. He was convicted. Part of that too. You know Great great that you brought that up so part of that also is is the. DA's office when they prosecute cops seems like when his white cops is a higher threshold Oh to indict but when there's black cops the threshold is is is a lot lower and We have to look at that. You know The the bias and the justice system even when it comes to black law enforcement not saying that they shouldn't be accountable but we see that they're treated differently than in their white counterparts and that goes that goes back to having a national organization that can come into thin and defend in the office. And you know. I don't think we will defend you. Know police brutality cases. If you're going out and violating black people's rights but there's certain issues I get calls from all over. You know Black officers feel that they had been asked about a union and in the US not fighting for But you know I think that's needed and no out. I can't think of the state offhand but the black organization in one city and they have instructed then they're black officers to come out of the come to come out of the F. O. P. So I think is black officers starting to be aware that in the union representation when it comes to black officers is little to none. Yeah I was watching another podcast. I think it was rule the mar and I do forget the brothers name and he was. He was definitely saying that he was a current police. Officer who was saying that The black officers need to stop giving these union dues now not. I'm advocating for either way but but it there's a problem there's a problem. Didn't we need to address that problem. Exactly what I wanted to talk about. His Swab addressed this criticism. It's two thousand nineteen. Do we need these organizations. You know why guy separating yourselves you talked with a little little bit about it but just addressed at that point exactly. Why do we need these particular black organizations or do we need them? You know. Well well we still need them because the reason y the organizations was were created. Those same problems exist today when the first black law enforcement position was created in Houston and The issues were you know racism in treated unfairly. Those issues exists today. I mean it it really it really. Hasn't it really hasn't changed. You know we might have more black faces in managerial positions But but it's still. The culture of policing is still racist. It's still biased. I mean it's the DNA that's what it was created for. It was created to and to enforce the the slave codes and the black codes. I mean you know stop question and Frisk was created from from how the the patrollers I used to stop and question flays so I mean nothing. Nothing has changed in the attitudes towards black people haven't changed attitudes for in the attitudes for black people in this coach. Having chain you know just having a badge on. Don't don't let us not be fooled that the attitude for black officers changed at saddened. Terrible right would think that we've come so far but Apparently not in some people's minds. You're absolutely you're absolutely right. I remember remember when when I joined National Association in Nineteen Ninety two. You know. I'm twenty three years old. You know I'm going to these conferences as you know and I'm walking around and I'm looking at these guys and black law enforcement. I mean these brothers that they came up. Join join Policing in the sixties and and you know in the civil rights era in the seven the black power ever and and these are some strong brothers and sisters man and I I had that feeling like wow man you know. Freedom is just around the corner eating what I'm saying like these brothers and then twenty some odd years later. I'm dressing the same issues that addressed in the nineteen ninety-two and that's that's really sad. Do you think that we will ever ever break it. Do you think we'll ever get to that level that these organizations aren't necessary that people really are completely judged on their performance in their abilities rather than the color of skin. Ever think. We'll ever get there. I believe all ethnic organizations on necessarily right even if it was peachy keen in the police department. I think all ethnic organizations are necessary for networking for for for for gaining knowledge. You Know Oh folks for the conferences. The conference is beautiful but I think as as as the reason you know why organizations organized differently than black organizations right you know. Black Organization was created to fight the racism. White organizations are created to keep power. It's a different. It's a different while these organizations you know and and and the reality is white organization. You know really don't need because you know people say to you. Make what if I make a white police association. See your dot one your local police department. We're outnumbered right. We're we're out usually usually in police departments. You know unless it's like you know like like Jacksonville Mississippi where that it's like a nine percent black police department. You rarely see the police departments like that. You know I mean they're out there there are few but they're very very very very rare. And if you look at the numbers I you know. I live in in New York Westchester County. You Got Westchester County. This is New York right. This is this is this is where people think black folks is doing. Good New York right. Black folks are doing because they're making money. Got Big houses and say these benzes Bucci Louis Vuitton but then when you take a city like yonkers New York which is the third largest the city in in New York state out of three hundred offices they got twelve black caps and when I tell people that they laugh like you like really like they got last time they had more black tops in the eighty. Then they doing twenty nine thousand nine hundred okay. So let's address that because I went out of the right before I retired. I was part of the recruitment team. And I've been talking talking about this and dealing with this I read an article in Chicago. I WANNA say defender Chicago Tribune or defender Windows magazines out there in Chicago where they were talking about the about their inability to to attract black officers. I was there I went to numerous colleges. We went to barbershops. We went to churches we. We can't get black officers come. I was hired nineteen ninety-five doing during the Clinton Crime Bill. They're targeted black officers. We we all came on and now how today fast forward to two thousand seventeen eighteen. Nineteen we can't get black people to want to become police officers so speak about that. I think I I think is is is the lack of accountability of law enforcement within within itself to attract Black People My wife is a detective For my Gurney. We have we have two children in their twenties and early thirties. And they don't WanNa be pleased they don't WanNa be a part of the system right you know because what because of what they see even though you know. They've seen me out there. They see their mother out there doing work in the community. Give it back community being good law enforcement officers right for but their experiences you know. They're not not just what they see but their experiences Hansen's theirselves with other law enforcement officers in other in other jurisdictions and other cities. You know I mean we had to really go go after one Hispanic officer. That was totally disrespectful. Then you know to my daughter to to literally tell her that she wasn't smart enough to attend Attend University of Miami. Are you kidding me. We paying three thousand dollars a month and you have the nerve to tell somebody not that you know when when when they show you this student. Id Card you know and and and then you and then someone that looks like that you would think the understands. This wasn't a white top Spanish Cup right right so so when when our children experience these things some other kids they don't have parents than law enforcement. That could make the offices apologize right that that that know how to get that person that Eh violated them so you know imagine what the average black child you know it is thinking when they see it and they experience so it was very the hard to get those power five people. Now you know to to to take these tests because they have no faith in the system and they don't trust the system so you know and and a lot of times you know they they look at us as enemies to even though you know we're like let's make good life we can make you make some money right. You have a good pension. You have good good benefits you know what for your kids and everything and you're like man screw that I'm not being part of that right right. I don't care how much how much you know. I'm not going to be a part of that so you know that that's what we still try to do that. Then still trying to get people to take the test. Don't don't still try so it's a constant effort but the numbers are getting smaller and smaller smaller. I regret that they are getting smaller and smaller. I had the same conversations with my children. I mean I kind of don't really want them to be cops because of the danger and all that stuff but but you the opportunities to progress into be a positive in your community. I coached for our police activity league. A new number of different sports can so I had interacted obviously with them. I interacted with a lot of other black kids And you know for them to grow up and sit and have that same mindset is really disappointing. My Son's twenty three. His friends are are twenty three and I try to get in the take the last round of police tasks..

Black Organization National Black Police Associat Black Westchester magazine New York Westchester Black Political Co America Westchester County Department National Organization Dallas Police Department McKay Jones blacks National Association Bl Dana US Westchester County National Association of Blacks New York Westchester County Minnesota National Blackley sociation