5 Burst results for "Somatic Sensory Cortex"

"somatic sensory cortex" Discussed on The Past Lives Podcast

The Past Lives Podcast

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"somatic sensory cortex" Discussed on The Past Lives Podcast

"The head to the pit of the stomach breathing gently on the patient's head and the eyes while he was doing and sometimes it was necessary. He said to perform this repeatedly for hours each day for ten or twelve days at a stretch before the patient was hypnotized hypnotized sufficiently for surgery. So he was really doing his job. He wasn't going to allow him to do the surgery. Until the person was truly an deep hypnotic state and then they said that in fact he ended up delegating hypnosis to his assistant so he could actually have energy for the surgery because it took so long but to me that tells me about the power of really thorough hypnosis and actually taking away our complete pain in this case. And i think what's interesting to me. Is that people stop doing it. After the mid to late eighteen. Hundreds because anaesthesia available and it was much easier doing ben doing this kind of hypnosis but i think that really tells us about the power of hypnosis and also. I was amazed that in fact though. We don't use this type of hypnosis for surgery anymore. There is still a lot of research on the power of hypnosis in actually alleviating pain and there was this two hundred and four two thousand fourteen meta analysis of various studies on using hypnosis to alleviate pain and they said that in a review of twelve different clinical studies basically. It was different and a reliable abby reduction in pain so even with our modern tools which are perhaps a little less efficient in some ways. We still have a significant amount of pain relief through hypnosis and i know that the british medical association recommended all medical students learn. Hypnosis did that in the nineteen fifties but it never came into place they they never brought it in but also talk about in the book where people were hoped machinery and studied while they were under hypnosis on the different people experienced in different ways. So the pain stopped for some people in a completely different way to other people. Yeah and so. This is what they did. They wanted to know. So what really is changing inside of the body when you are now no longer. Feeling pain under hypnosis. And so what they did is they. Basically first of all just asked well isn't because your brain is actually releasing internal opioids endorphins. Victims things in their body that we can release without. Maybe this was happening and so what they did is. They gave half of their patients. Basically the something that caused pain for example like Thermal pain and then the other half of the patients. They actually gave them something. That was an opioid antagonists. So it would keep any opioids from being released by the brain and they showed that in fact both groups had pain reduction so in fact it appears as if it wasn't opioids that were causing. This actually happens. They said well. Then where else in the brain is happening. So here's what they did. They put them into a functional magnetic resonance scanner which scans the different parts of the brain. That are active and they asked themselves or which parts of the brain are active when a person is under hypnosis. And it's no longer experience experiencing pain and they found that it depended again on the individual so in one set of individuals it was a part of the brain called the anterior cingulate cortex. And this is the brains decision making an emotional center. And that's where they sat found a change in the activity of the brain associated with hypnosis and pain reduction now with other people it was somatic sensory cortex which is perceived touch and other sorts of sensations at round our body so which wholly different part of the brain was actually changing its activity associated with the pain reduction in the hypnosis. So what that tells me. Is that with different. Neural pathways being activated in. Different people to reduce pain during hypnosis..

ten twelve different clinical stud both groups twelve days mid to late eighteen one set four two thousand fourteen met two hundred and nineteen fifties Hundreds first each day half After hours british
"somatic sensory cortex" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"somatic sensory cortex" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I was able to speak with Dr David Linden, a professor of neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. An author of Touch the Science of Hand Heart in Mind. I asked him what happens when your skin is touched. We think of touch as a single sense, but actually, there are many, many different sensors in our skin acting and parallel. There are nerve endings that transducer heat and cold and it's pain and pressure and vibration and all those different, which is sensors, sensors everywhere. Sensors everywhere. When you think of it, it's it's a very large array of sensors. If we took your skin off, it would be the weight of a bowling ball. It would be the size of nine large pizza boxes. So it's the biggest sensory array we have in body and it has all these different sensors. But these sensors are combined in a stream of information. That goes to the brain. And so we don't experience all these different touch modalities as as separate signals they're they're blended together in our consciousness, you say there's emotional touch and sensory touch. Yes, that's true for every kind of touch whether it isa caressed or feeling in your pocket for a quarter or pain or sexual touch. There are separate pathways in separate brainy regions for the emotional aspect of what we call the discriminative aspect. So let me give you an example. If I were Teo hit you on the thumb with a hammer. The facts of that which you get your brain very quickly to an area called the somatic sensory cortex would all be about where on your body where you hit? What's the quality of the pain, stabbing, burning, etcetera. And how intense is it? And then there would be another. Aspect to it, which is this is highly emotionally negative. This and we think of pain is being intrinsically emotionally negative. But this is just a trick. Our brain plays on us. So if you have damage to the emotional, tough centre of your brain, and I hit you on the thumb with a hammer Instead of going. Yeah. Ow! That hurts. That's terrible. The way a normal person would. You would say in a very flat voice. Yes, that hurts a lot. It's not like being a massacre. Strike massacre ists. Have a big emotional response to pain. It just happens re positive. So hit me again. Exactly paying a symbolic switch. People have this damaged have no emotional response to pain and we only have to look to our Everyday language to see this reinforced, so we might say I was touched by the gesture. You hurt my feelings and the idea of touched meaning emotionally affected or my feelings to mean my tender emotions you might think. Well, that's just Not something deeply biological. That's just a trick of modern day English, but it isn't It's actually broadly calls cross cultural. If you look in different languages, so let's get to it. It's scrapped. So there's been a big debate about hitch right. Some people have said it is a special, unique sensation that must have its very own kind of nerve ending. In the skin because it's very unique. It always provoked scratching pain doesn't provoke scratching itch. Does and other people said no. Which is just a touch of blend. In other words, it's a little bit of pain on a little bit of light touching. You combine those together and it feels like it. But there's not a dedicated sensor fritch and this argument raged and raged. And now we know that There is atleast one molecularly distinct. Ah, unique sensor for ich that it's not merely a blend and the exciting thing about that is that means that we will now be able to develop anti itch medicines that are way better than what we have right now. As you know if you go get poison oak or poison ivy, and you try to get one of those creams to relieve the itch, even a prescription cream. It's not very effective. This technician interview discusses Johns Hopkins School of Medicine professor Dave in London's 2015 book, Touch the Science of Hand, part in Mind. He's hard at work on a new book, due out in fall of 2020. Unique new science of human individuality on lawyer again. This is five minutes. Five minutes is produced at the studios of FM in San Francisco. Five minutes is a production of technician media on Paul Land. From San Francisco. I'm Oyer again, and this is Tech nations. Today on Tech nation company that put its work on hepatitis B aside and focus its virus scientists on treatments for Cove it I speak with Dr Lawrence Black, CEO of Alekos Therapeutics. And then Dr Daniel Craft, the chief correspondent for technician, health freaks Down the current Koven vaccines being tested. They're not all the same. And finally, we know that treatments for cancer are getting better and better. But why and how we'll talk about one company's new technology, the progress it's made an ovarian cancer. And the next cancers currently in planning. We'll hear from Bill Newell, the CEO of Sutra, Bio Pharma. And now, Lawrence Blatt. Well, Dr Black. Welcome to Tech Nation. Thank you. Thanks for having me. You said something very curious to me when we first spoke, you said, And I'm paraphrasing. Of course, we have not been able to create a long lasting vaccine if there was no natural state of immunity for someone who caught the virus and survived. That's correct, and that's been seeing over many, many decades. So we've been infected with many different viruses throughout our lives and throughout history and some viruses. When we're infected, we create lifelong immunity. And we can't be reinfected and other viruses were infected many many times in our lifetime, and there are many different reasons for why that's the case. With respect to the corona burners or the sorrow CV to which is the causative agent of Cove it We know that for seasonal Corona virus, people can be infected year after year. That would be the flu that well, there's many forms of viruses that cause flu like symptoms. Formerly the flu is from a virus called Influenza virus. Which actually comes from an Italian word to influence. People thought that when they had influenza, they were influenced by the phase of the moon. But later we discovered people discover that it was a virus and their many viruses such as Corona viruses. Influenza virus rhinovirus that cause flu like symptoms. And for many of these viruses, we don't make lasting immunity..

flu Johns Hopkins University Schoo technician Tech Nation Dr David Linden professor bowling somatic sensory cortex San Francisco CEO Teo Dr Lawrence Black Dr Black Lawrence Blatt Dr Daniel Craft FM Bill Newell London Paul Land Cove
"somatic sensory cortex" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"somatic sensory cortex" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Let's take five with Morgan. This is five minutes in 2015, and I was able to speak with Dr David Linden, a professor of neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. An author of Touch the Science of Hand Heart in Mind. I asked him what happens when your skin is touched. We think of touch as a single sense, but actually, there are many, many different sensors in our skin acting and parallel. There are nerve endings that transducer heat and cold and it's champagne and pressure and vibration and all those different, which is the sensors, sensors everywhere. Sensors everywhere. When you think of it, it's it's a very large array of sensors. If we took your skin off, it would be the weight of a bowling ball. It would be the size of nine large pizza boxes. So it's the biggest sensory array we have in body and it has all these different sensors. But these sensors are combined in a stream of information. That goes to the brain. And so we don't experience all these different touch modalities as as separate signals. They're they're blended together in our consciousness. You say there's emotional touch and sensory touch. Yes, that's true for every kind of touch whether it isa caressed. Or feeling in your pocket for a quarter or pain or sexual touch. There are separate pathways and separate brain regions for the emotional aspect of what we call the discriminative. Aspect. So let me give you an example. If I were Tio hit you on the thumb with a hammer The facts of that which you get your brain very quickly to an area called the somatic sensory cortex would all be about where on your body where you hit? What's the quality of the pain, stabbing, burning, etcetera. And how intense is it? And then there would be another. Aspect to it, which is this is highly emotionally negative. This and we think of pain is being intrinsically emotionally negative. But this is just a trick our brain plays on. So if you have damage to the emotional touch centre of your brain, and I hit you on the thumb with a hammer Instead of going. Yeah. Ow! That hurts. That's terrible. The way a normal person would. You would say in a very flat voice. Yes, that hurts a lot. It's not like being a massacre. Strike massacre ists. Have a big emotional response to pain. It just happens to be positive. So hit me again. Exactly paying a symbolic switch. People have this damaged have no emotional response to pain. And we only have to look to our Everyday language to see this reinforced, so we might say I was touched by the gesture. You hurt my feelings and the idea of touched meaning emotionally affected or my feelings to mean my tender emotions you might think. Well, that's just Not something deeply biological. That's just a trick of modern day English, but it isn't It's actually broadly called cross cultural. If you look in different languages, so let's get to it. It's in scrapped. So which there's been a big debate about it right. Some people have said it is a special, unique sensation that must have its very own kind of nerve ending in the skim, because it's very unique and always provoked scratching pain doesn't provoke scratching itch. Does and other people said no. Which is just a touch of blend. In other words, it's a little bit of pain on a little bit of light touch and you combine those together, and it feels like it. But there's not a dedicated sensor fritch and this argument raged and raged. And now we know that There's atleast one molecularly distinct. Ah, unique sensor for ich that it's not merely a blend and the exciting thing about that is that means that we will now be able to develop anti itch medicines that are way better than what we have right now. As you know if you go get poison oak or poison ivy, and you try to get one of those creams to relieve the itch, even a prescription cream. It's not very effective. This tech nation interview discusses Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Professor David London's 2015 book, Touch the Science of Hand, part in mind..

Johns Hopkins University Schoo Dr David Linden professor somatic sensory cortex bowling Morgan David London
Why Can't You Tickle Yourself?

BrainStuff

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Why Can't You Tickle Yourself?

"Hey I'm Christian Sager and this is brain stuff. Pop Quiz Hotshot. Have you ever tickled an ape before it could work as tickling as common between many types of primates? What about Iraq? You ever took one of those. You'd know if you had because rats let out these. Little high pitched chirps when you tickle them kind of like rodent laughter. Okay so maybe some of you beast masters out there have tickled both Iraq and an APE. But can you tickle yourself? Probably not because that is kind of impossible now before we continue. Let's do a primer on. How tickling works under your skin. There are millions of nerve endings. That alert your brain whenever you touch something a light touch what we usually associate with. Tickling is analyzed by two regions of your brain the somatic sensory cortex which processes touch in the anterior cingulate cortex which processes happiness together. They processed the two types of tickle sensations. We can experience. The first is known as Missus. This is the light sensation. You feel when something like a feather brushes against your skin may be giving you goosebumps. The second gargle. Lisa's is like when your older brother? Hold you down and tickles you until you laugh. So Hard You pee your pants. This is the kind of tickling. You can't replicate yourself evolutionary. Biologists believe that the reason we laugh when we're tickled is an innate submissive response to a potential attacker. It's kind of like when a dog rolls over on. Its back and exposes. Its kill points to you these same biologists theorized that we developed tickling so we could teach our children how to defend themselves from attacks. So think about it. The areas where we're the most ticklish. The underarms the stomach the neck. They're also the most vulnerable to attack. Now this is some black widow. Red Room lethal training coming up here so pay attention. Your underarm is home to veins arteries. And because your rib-cage doesn't protect it. Someone could easily access your heart through there especially with a long enough blade. Likewise your stomach doesn't have any defensive bones and you neck also has two important arteries as well as your trachea bringing air to your lungs. Now we're aware of

Iraq Somatic Sensory Cortex Anterior Cingulate Cortex Christian Sager Red Room Lisa
"somatic sensory cortex" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

05:09 min | 3 years ago

"somatic sensory cortex" Discussed on Brain Science with Ginger Campbell, MD: Neuroscience for Everyone

"That is an example of plasticity example of neuro modulation if you will still operating in the brain the question was what about improvement of cross dies and visual deprivation, and what have you? Well, it's beginning to appear that with certain. Tipu Latian what you can do is yet the brain to respond by going new processes forming new synapses and so on and so forth. Even in the adult in some of the best experiment done on this. We're done on the somatic sensory cortex. That's in the parietal lobe where they're separate regions devoted to intervention from the five digits, we have in our hands. So for example, this was done by fellow by name of Missouri. Nick, Mike is their neck at UCSF where if he cut the nerve from one digit of a monkey and then recorded from the areas that cars sponsored to each of the five digits of the monkey what initially when you try to record from the cells in which the input the sensory input has been deprived. You get no responses. But then if you wait for a Cup. Of weeks or longer than what you find is that the sales in this area begin to respond, and they're responding to the Jason fingers, which again indicate in the adult brain that you can get processed growth new synapse growth, and so on and so forth, and one of the most interesting recent observations in support of this is come from brain imaging. Studies of violin players as you. Well know, you hold the violin and your left hand, and you have forefingers that are used the finger violin the right hand is used the whole of bow. And no motor specialty is required except for the index finger and the thumb to hold the bow. If you now look at the amount of cortex devoted to the fingers from the nut fingering hand, the amount of cortex that you see devoted to those fingers greater than on the other side. Where you have the fingers involved. Just in holding the bow very dramatic. You see the changes best than younger people, but even in adolescents and young adults you see different. So there again, you're seeing that there's plasticity well beyond the very early ages of an animal or human life. We used to call that we call it the critical period. Now, we call it the most sensitive period. So I always like to close by asking my guests for advice for students advice for students. Well, you know. I could give so much. It would last for the next hour and perhaps. And of course, my day was a little different from today. I think I mentioned very early on as I always enjoyed building things working with my hand taking things apart team if I could put it back together again, and I think that led me into science. That's why so much enjoy being in the laboratory when you do an experiment you designed an experiment, and you get it to work, and then even more. So when you can confirm that experiment, you now know something no one else in the world probably knows nothing. That's more satisfying than that in my view too. Many of our youngsters my children and grandchildren included spending too much time looking at cell phones and computers these days and are missing out and the joy of building things and make things on their own. And so, but that includes. Not only building things and making things and so on taking things apart, but activities in general, I think sports are so important. So that you're doing things and and coordination and all that I think that that's really important is it harder to teach students to be competent in the lab than it used to be or is the changing skills sort of make it hard to tell. I'm not so sure about that. But I can tell you about something else that relates to this. And that is that one of my grandchildren was applying to go to the school, and my wife, and I went with her and her parents to the school, which is having an open house, and when they enter we started the introductions, they talked about this new program stem programs science technology, engineering mathematics that was something brand new, and they were all. All excited about it. Whereas the granddaughter and my wife went off to another class and humanities I decided to go to the stem class. Well, I we walked in. And the teacher was terrific..

Jason fingers somatic sensory cortex Tipu Latian Missouri UCSF Nick Cup Mike five digits one digit