25 Burst results for "Soman"

"soman" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

05:41 min | Last month

"soman" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"It is without giving too much away is going to be of big and scope or is it something. Are you going to stay within the vehicle of fairy tales are how you thinking about the next thing for you. I mean i think what's interesting. Is you know we built this sort of like and to see umbrella now called ever never world which is sort of. I almost think of it. Like a like a disney brand where you can have different different stories in different universes maybe connect with you like or not connect them and so you know the school is there. There are options to deuce. Do more stories around the school and continue building that universe. There's also options to go off and do different things you know so. I know that. I have a book that i'm working on for next year. That's almost not almost done but like eighty percent there and then They'll be graphic novel coming in twenty twenty three that is in the process of stories done. Now they're very deep into doing the are so those are the the next of two danes and then s for what ready next. I have an idea of something. But i think i probably need a break just because I put a book out. And i will through to twenty twenty three. I will put out every year or for eleven years so I don't know i might take a little break And and see what happens with the movie and all that then decide the next. But i don't know it's very hard to tell me because i said that affect missile within three weeks so It's i. I never know.

disney
"soman" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

What Book Hooked You?

03:25 min | Last month

"soman" Discussed on What Book Hooked You?

"Lehrer i was either doing the script adaptation myself or berry in sort of deep collaboration with the writer driving the process and there were other times where there was no greater her tweeting their own team. I've nothing to do with the book. And i was not privacy so it was just a long eight years but little by little. The script does moving forward and its own interesting way on the rollercoaster ride by the time it got to net lakes in two thousand sixteen or seventeen when they came in and audit from universal descript had greedy come into shape and then there were a couple more writers. And you know. I was right there kind of helping in shepherding process and by the time all the picked out In two thousand twenty or do you probably read it for the first time or even maybe at the beginning of two thousand and yet beginning to the script was screed. Amir was was faithful but it was cool at surprises. Just it was fantastic. And i think he instantly read it and sign. He signed on within a week of a meeting so fast and once he was on all the juggernaut sell. Everything moves very quickly Because someone of his stature could make things move very quickly so I think it was it was the nurse was necessary but in the end it moves very fast. Wants to as great. Was there any sort of in that over. The course of that eight years reserved any thing that maybe really push. Your button are really was kind of a a line in the sand for you that you don't want to cross anything that was proposed you whether scrip wise our approach wise with this whole endeavor of the movie. Yeah i mean that were is definitely a period where the scope went so off the rails where i was like. You're going to end up having get throw this out. You know Because none of none of this works Back when of his universal you know which is exactly what ended up happening. So but i i didn't i didn't draw red lines and i just was because i knew they couldn't. They weren't gonna make that movie. It had nothing to do with the ball gets it just didn't match up you know And at the end of day you're not going to bet under multi multi million dollar franchise on something that has nothing to do with the original source material and isn't even good. So that's why as an author you can't freak out you can't amick You know. I'm try- did back that. I was younger and modest sort of reich. Chill i am now but you just hang in and you know that in the end like you're going to get the right version you just have to you just have to be a little patient so Yet ultimately that writer went away and We went back to the gin and got back to where it should have been puffy. Love him love him as a writer both his nonfiction and has middle grade to is out. What what do you think you kind of mentioned it.

Lehrer berry Amir reich
"soman" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:51 min | 2 months ago

"soman" Discussed on Fresh Air

"You have to be a certain type person to be abandoned tire. Ever of of being a rolling stone allowed to be tired is that right. We'll go on forever assuming to get your act together. And i mean there's nothing more thrilling than going on stage with all that chaos going on there. Isn't it incredible to lift. I'll be what i hate about. It was when you got off the stage or could never be a sensible google and big. There's always silly like running in bike shops with that on. I mean i've never liked who that it's a fantastic thing to have lived through for me to sit as a balding old man telling you that it was quite a moment. I mean it's all gone as well. I don't really think about ashley. are you recognized. May yeah war as as were on the street. Yes i love you so low. Won't you do. They keep their distance. No i keep going. Don't know really on the but think about it. You know charlie watts speaking with whyy. Marty moscowane in nineteen ninety-one after fifty eight years with the rolling stones. The drummer died tuesday at age. Eighty on monday. Show actress sandra. Oh who stars in the new net flicks comedy series the chair. She plays the first person of color and the first woman to chair the english department at a prestigious college. Oh also starred in the popular thriller series killing eve and in abc's long-running medical series grey's anatomy. I hope you'll join us Fresh air is executive. Producer is danny miller. Our senior producer. Today is roberta cheryl. Our technical director and engineer is audrey bentham with additional engineering support. By joyce lieberman jillian hertzfeld. An al banks are interviews and reviews or produced edited by amy salad. Phillips myers sam brigger. Lauren frenzel heidi soman theresa madden and maria baldato. Say a challenor. Seth kelly and kayla our producer of digital media. Is molly seavy precarity gross. I'm david brancaccio. this message comes from. Npr sponsor samsung would the samsung galaxy's z. Fold three five g. See more and do more with the phone that unfolds into a super slim tablet. Right in your pocket. Five g connection. Availability may vary check with carrier..

Marty moscowane charlie watts whyy roberta cheryl audrey bentham ashley joyce lieberman jillian hertzfeld danny miller google amy salad Phillips myers sandra sam brigger Lauren frenzel heidi soman theresa madden maria baldato Seth kelly abc
Google follows Apple in cutting Play Store fees for developers

Mac OS Ken

04:46 min | 8 months ago

Google follows Apple in cutting Play Store fees for developers

"Seen that ran the piece tuesday saying that. Google is following apple's lead and lowering the commission charges most developers selling to the google play store while the changes similar to apple's at something google's scott might be more generous according to seeing that google will only take a fifteen percent commission on sales up to one million dollars the fee will jump to the standard thirty percent wants developers make more than the one million dollars in sales for a year. According to the report sounds the same as apples offer but it isn't a piece from ars. Technica ran the matt. Saying apple applies. It's lower fifteen percent rate to a developer. Developer exceed one million dollars in revenue in a given year at which point the thirty percent number is applied to all of that developers. Earn inc's google still charges fifteen percent on that first million even if the developer makes five million so in google's model a developer who earns one point two million dollars on a nap pays fifteen percent on one million then thirty percent on two hundred thousand and novels a developer making eight hundred thousand four hundred over fifteen percent on that amount but if they make one point two million they pay thirty percent on all one point two million. Not just two hundred thousand. It's tough to know how many developers straddle that million dollar fence. There's also a bird in the hand thing going on right now. While apple's lower commission went live at the first of the year seen that says google's won't drop until the first of july quoted in the scene that piece google. vp of product management. Samir soman said with this change ninety nine percent of developers globally that sell digital goods and services with play. We'll see a fifty percent reduction in fees. I'm no mathematician but does that indicate that ninety nine percent of developers selling in the google play store make less than a million dollars a year. I mean i knew the split between the cells and the cells knots was big but golly as for what such large as costs apple and google saying the cost is manageable would be understating it a piece from. Cnbc has numbers from the app. Tracking firm center tower. According to those apple and google or giving up less than five percent of their revenue from apps with the commission changes will let cnbc and sensor tower. Do them at this. If the fifteen percent fee schedule on revenue up to one million dollars and been in place on google play in twenty twenty google would have missed out on five hundred. Eighty seven million dollars or about five percent of sensor towers estimate of eleven point. Six billion dollars in google pay fees for the year. If apple's program had been in place for twenty twenty center tower estimates that it would have missed out on five hundred and ninety five million or about two point seven percent of its estimated twenty one point seven billion dollars an app store fees in twenty twenty. I gotta say that makes apple structure look worse. Actually and i didn't have to say that. And yet i did unhappy with the changes. A guy who won't be greatly affected by these changes. Google shuffling of commissions was likely spurred by apple's commissions which the start of the year that was likely spurred by bad press generated by the coalition for up fairness which was blinked into existence by epic game. Ceo tim sweeney putting it to sink play. Cnbc's says epic games is currently suing apple and google seeking the make changes to their app stores to allow for third party payment processors as well as other changes that is like the reader's digest version of the cliffs notes of what's going on but works summon forth from the fort. Sweeney took to twitter on tuesday to say why. The changes are inadequate in his estimation. quoting sweeney. Tweet it's a self serving gamut. The far majority of developers will get this new fifteen percent rate and thus be less inclined to fight but the far majority of revenue is naps. What the thirty percent rate so. Google and apple can continue to inflate prices and flees consumers with their app taxes.

Google Apple Earn Inc Samir Soman Technica Scott Cnbc App Store Tim Sweeney
"soman" Discussed on Reds Ramblings

Reds Ramblings

03:48 min | 11 months ago

"soman" Discussed on Reds Ramblings

"It's a region at the name of a city but I've actually been and with so it. Served on bread like a sort of flat bread and it will come with like tomatoes onside onions and more importantly a chilly As well and needs to be that chilly. Soman supermac is the english A tight ball Sounds more turkish. It's just sort of berry on. Bush is dried and ground and added to the comes from treat not on bush. Now we're getting. We're getting the experts sort of addition. Has you actually in hiking last week. And i saw me time in my life. It's not various these little. Yeah can you in this jamie by the way. Are you picking this up okay. So there was a where i've seen. This also is up in the north but they might be trees but they were quite small. So that's going them. Sort of bush's the things. I just saw these. Were like a fruit of that item off that so yeah and stayed that's dried and then ground and added. It's it's what you would add to that sort of minced lamb kebab. You would not to chicken. The would you know not only was that just makes me yes. So that's su mike. That's also mock as code here. What about you dishes. Yeah well my favorite does also fess engine. Then one thing that on disagreement board z. Cup really is on the top of my list. Billy or mishaps The another do they. The cook with meets fat. i think. And there's this kind of green vegetables and then is really fatty and your stink. Like for three straight days after lineman or at least that's added to taste and there's very hubs and greens sort of ground up were finally.

Soman supermac bush berry su mike Bush jamie Billy
"soman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"soman" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"Consumers can expect a consistent experience when listening to music making calls and using digital assistance. The way people work has changed a lot of course during the pandemic, and while many will return to offices once it's all over analysts predict that almost half of office workers are likely to continue working remotely at least part time after the pandemic eighty, three percent of all enterprise workload is expected to be in the cloud. By the end of the year that's a huge about this movement to the cloud isn't just business. A lot of learning has moved online ads gaming. So our PC's are just as important as our smartphones qualcomm Soman introduced the latest iteration of their snapdragon processors, how and how much we use our devices is expanding from virtual meetings to gaming using streaming platforms for entertainment and to do this ubiquitous high-speed and reliable connectivity. Fester uplink is essential. Five G. will be a critical part of the solution, and so we're Wifi six. We also need a new generation of devices with high quality cameras and audio for clear and crisp virtual presence by to power natural collaboration in an hints security too. That's why we have been working closely with Microsoft in other industry leaders.

qualcomm Microsoft Soman
How some doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills

60-Second Science

02:03 min | 1 year ago

How some doctors ended up prescribing fewer pills

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd. Yata used to be when doctors prescribe a drug. They'd open up a a book summarizing drugs and dosages or go by memory for the common stuff but nowadays now you can type in whatever it is and then placing an order via computer. See you type in an order of the name of the drug. And it will pre populate everything one Carlos Monte as an emergency medicine physician at San Francisco General Hospital. He also studies decision making in healthcare. He says for an antibiotic default dose programmed into a doctor's computer might be pretty standard but for pain. The the number of opioids prescribed might vary a lot depending on the patient and their type of pain. Well we wanted to look at is whether and to what extent the precepts the default upsetting that we had in the electric medical record influence provider prescribing specifically would lower defaults resulting fewer opioids being prescribed. Soman toys team systematically changed the recommended opioid pill number defaults in the computer systems of two hospitals in the San Francisco Bay area during an eight month period rid. Each hospital's pre existing defaults were twelve and twenty pills respectively. The researchers dialed in new defaults of five ten fifteen or an unspecified number of pills compared to doctors prior prescribing habits. The new default settings resulted in fewer opioid pills prescribed overall and fewer prescriptions shins exceeding the maximum recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. So this is suggestive that hospitals other departments clinics can change the setting England impact opioid prescribing. Pretty much immediately as the really low constantly prevention and can be done really quickly. The results are in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Russian internal medicine. Definitely not a silver bullet. The epidemic has a lot of different issues that need to be addressed in this one small tool so that we can use to address. There still could be a useful prescription for physicians.

Carlos Monte Centers For Disease Control An Christopher Dodd San Francisco General Hospital San Francisco Bay Yata Soman England Journal Of The American Medica
Soman Struck By Gunfire At New Year's Celebration

Rush Limbaugh

00:14 sec | 1 year ago

Soman Struck By Gunfire At New Year's Celebration

"A woman is recovering after she was hit by a bullet fired off to celebrate the new year the woman was struck in the knee just after midnight while at new year's celebrations in downtown del Rey beach she has already been released from the hospital the search for the gunman

"soman" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

04:03 min | 2 years ago

"soman" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Dot com. we're back continuing our conversation with my guess bear creek director of animal husbandry maritime appear in norwalk so barrett you're giving us a little bit of the history of desert fishes in the southwest so as you mentioned probably coming from the same maybe species millions of years ago what kind of biology commonalities do they have because of the desert habitat and maybe then we'll talk about some differences after there's quite a few similarities and and quite a few differences as you would expect most of the smaller groups that we're working with most the smaller fishes we're working with and aquariums and that a lot of hobbyists and dedicated individuals have at home tend to be the little diminutive fishes the publishes the kids alive bears now that being said there's quite a diversity of fish in the deserts of north america we have four desert's the sonoran the chihuahua on the mojave and the the great basin four different desert's four different climates different levels of Tipitapa implant fauna and everything else. So we have a wide variety about one hundred and sixty five species total, which includes some larger species minnows, some salmon's, Simone. There's quite a few about six species of endangered soman and in the American west. So the diversity in terms of taxonomy is huge. There's a lot of different types of fish for the ones that we tend to focus on in aquariums and keeping aquariums. There are some, some similarities, these guys all come from usually springs, or small spring, fed rivers, because that's often the only source of water in the desert, so they tend to like, very, very hard water. Sometimes a little bit on the cooler side, because they are from springs, most of them are Navarre's. They eat a lot of insects, but also plant material. So there's quite a few similarities there in their biology and their behavior there. Also, most of them most of the published fishes tend to be fiercely territorial, which is actually how they got the name pup fish. It was thought that they looked the males looked like a puppy chasing each other around, because the males can be fiercely territorial and beat up on not only each other, but also on the females. once they finished breeding so that's kind of how they got the name the kids are a little bit more peaceful they tend to behave very much like the live bearers they do well in large groups they're not very territorial they cohabitate very nicely are generally a peaceful fish in there also the goods are also live bears like the steelers so we're going to talk now a little bit about maybe some of the issues with with the desert fishes which and be a lot of them so maybe you wanna just talk about some of the more important ones which desert visions are listed as threatened or endangered in y sadly quite a few there's ten counties in the western u._s. that have more than five endemic endangered fish species there's over forty counties that have three plus endangered endemic fishes as highest rate of endangered fish species anywhere in the country despite the fact that diversity is a lot lower than say the southeast so there are quite a few endangered there's over sixty endangered species threatened or endangered listed at the federal level or at the state level and there's probably even more than that South of the border in Mexico that we don't have a great sense on. They don't have the same protections in many sense, south of the border that they have in the US. So there's quite a few species, there that we just don't know about they may be in trouble who's quite a few that aquariums have rescued and it propagated in order to keep them alive as living arc because we knew they were going extinct in their habitat was being destroyed with there's a huge number out there probably the poster child for endangered desert. Fishes is the devils hole up fish, if you will devils hole up fish you'll find out a lot about this US fish and Wildlife Service has been doing a fantastic job trying to keep these alive and they were actually oddly enough. These guys worthy center of the first supreme court case to challenge the Endangered Species Act back in the nineteen seventies like I said, a lot of these are spring, dwelling fishes they live in groundwater. So when we pump out huge amounts of groundwater to have agriculture in places where agriculture doesn't normally exist like the west we ended up driving the water level down in those springs and destroying.

devils Simone north america US Tipitapa director soman norwalk steelers Navarre Wildlife Service Mexico u._s.
"soman" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

10:36 min | 2 years ago

"soman" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"History of desert fishes in the southwest. So as you mentioned probably coming from the same maybe species millions of years ago, what kind of biology commonalities, do they have because of the desert habitat? And maybe then we'll talk about some differences after. Yeah, there's quite a few similarities, and and quite a few differences as you would expect most of the smaller groups that we're working with most the smaller fishes were working with an aquariums. And that a lot of hobbyists and dedicated individuals have at home tend to be the little diminutive fishes the puck fishes the kids alive bears. Now that being said, there's quite a diversity of fish in the desert of North America. We have four desert's the Sonoran the Chihuahua on the Mojave and the the great basin forty desert's four different climates, different levels of precipitation plant, fauna and everything else. So we have a wide variety about one hundred sixty five species total, which includes some larger species minnows, some salmon's semi. There's quite a few about six species of. Endangered soman and in the American west. So the diversity in terms of taxonomy is huge. There's a lot of different types of fish for the ones that we tend to focus on in aquariums and keeping aquariums. There are some some similarities these guys all come from usually springs or small spring fed rivers because that's often the only source of water in the desert, so they tend to like very very hard water sometimes a little bit on the cooler side because they are from springs. Most of them are divorced. They eat a lot of insects, but also plant material. So there's quite a few similarities there in their biology and their behavior. They're also most of them most of the published his tend to be fiercely territorial, which is actually how they got the name pup fish. It was thought that they looked the males looked like a puppy chasing each other around because the males can be fiercely territorial and beat up on not only each other. But also on the females once they finish breeding. So that's kind of how they got the name. The kids are a little bit more peaceful. They tend to behave very much like the live bearers. They do. Well, in large groups, they're not very territorial. They cohabitate very. Nicely are generally, a peaceful fish in there. Also, the goods are also live bears like the sealants Phil we're going to talk. Now a little bit about maybe some of the issues with with the desert fishes, which and there may be a lot of them. So maybe you wanna just talk about some of the more important ones, which desert visions are listed as threatened or endangered in y sadly, quite a few. There's ten counties in the western US that have more than five endemic endangered fish species. There's over forty counties that have three plus endangered endemic fishes as highest rate of endangered fish species anywhere in the country. Despite the fact that versity is a lot lower than say the southeast. So there are quite a few endangered. There's over sixty endangered species threatened or endangered listed at the federal level or at the state level. And there's probably even more than that south of the border in Mexico that we don't have a great sense on. They don't have the same protections in many sense south of the border that they have in the US. So there's quite a few species there that we just don't know about they may be in trouble. Who's quite a few that. Quorums have rescued and had propagated in order to keep them alive as living arc because we knew they were going extinct in their habitat was being destroyed with there's a huge number out there. Probably the poster child for endangered desert fishes is the devils hole up fish. If you go devils hole up fish, you'll find out a lot about this US. Fish and Wildlife Service has been doing a fantastic job trying to keep these alive, and they were actually oddly enough these guys worthy center of the first supreme court case to challenge the Endangered Species Act back in the nineteen seventies. Like, I said a lot of these are spring dwelling fishes they live in groundwater. So when we pump out huge amounts of groundwater to have agriculture in places where agriculture doesn't normally exist. Like the west. We ended up driving the water level down in those springs and destroying their habitat. So this was actually like I said, the devils hole pup fish in particular that US fish and wildlife, manages they were the first test case the first real challenge to the Endangered Species Act because the mining companies wanted to continue to pump the groundwater out, which would have driven them ext. Linked and this is a species biologically. That's very very remarkable. It's it's certainly a unique animal they have the smallest natural range of any vertebrate on the planet. They occur in an area less than one hundred fifty square meters. And their population size is the smallest of any vertebrate on the planet for the devils hole petition particular their average population fluctuates between one hundred twenty and three hundred some odd individuals every year and some years has gotten down as low as thirty. These are numbers to geneticists that are just unheard of. You know, no other vertebrate species has populations that low and can still maintain genetic diversity in thrive. So with all that said how many are in captivity? I guess relative to that number in the wild. There's quite a few. So there's about their six hundred some odd basis found in all the desert's of those about sixty seventy that are in trouble. And I would say of those we probably have about thirty species in captivity. We focus on a small handful of Mexican species within the program. Uh-huh. Because the US fish and Wildlife Service focuses on all of the species that occur within the US border. We tend to focus on the Mexican species because they don't have the same protections that the US species have a US fish and Wildlife Service in particular runs in amazing hatchery called the Dexter national fish hatchery where they breed fifteen to twenty endangered or extinct in the wild fishes from within the US, we tend to focus on somebody species that don't get as much love south of the border, but we're in real real trouble. So they've probably twenty or thirty in captivity. A good way to get involved with being go to any American killing fish association meeting or local killing fish club. Because you tend to see a lot of these guys, especially the publishes in good deeds occasionally, pop up auctions, many of these animals are critically endangered or extinct in the wild. And they are really a keeping them alive is is really forming like a an arc for these species in if on the off chance their habitat ever is restored in the while we still have the genetics. We still have the species to put back so effects for explaining all that Barrett. Are you? You seeing any positive results from your end easy as efforts today. You know, when you're whenever you're working with endangered species. It's it can be disheartening time because you're you're dealing with these animals and oftentimes there is no return to the wild for them. Their habitats of already been destroyed in their gone with a lot of these species that we have that Asia institutions and other aquariums and zoos are maintaining in captive care. We actually could have there's a light at the end of the tunnel for these animals. So we haven't seen any restoration efforts yet on a large scale, but we have these animals as a living arc. We have the genetics in populations alive in captivity. So that if any of these habitats are ever restored if there's a political sea-change tomorrow, and we stopped removing as much groundwater from the desert's in the air. It lands of the American in the Mexican Wests. We actually have the animals to put back, and we can start to will never reclaim that habitat that was there and all of its glory, but we will be able to put some of these species back and partially restore that habitat actually had a. Quick question. Referring to something you had mentioned earlier because the numbers can get so low down to thirty for some of the populations. Yes. Is there a pretty good explanation? Why the there is no major genetic issues, you know, or necking anything like that. That's a great question. The best way of ever heard it described to me by an actual puppets geneticists is that these animals we don't so much have to worry about the bottleneck because they already went through the bottom leg two hundred fifty to five hundred thousand years ago these animals have persisted, despite their very very small population sizes in these small springs in in these small rivers, basically, they're inbred, but that inbreeding can create a number of problems. There were probably many many more species that went extinct in geological time because of that, but the puck fishes for whatever reason have been able to survive despite this inbreeding and actually able to have sufficient genetic diversity from these combinations to keep their populations alive. It's it's really kind of a paradox. Geneticists don't typically think of viable population. Species being twenty thirty animals one hundred animals normally they're looking for at least several hundred if not several thousand one interesting case study we had a species alive in Dallas. It was a type of pump issue in the scientific name was Mugabe's Alana porous that a a very talented. Aquarius, Charles Yancey, Dr Paul was L from the New York aquarium went down and rescued from Mexico in the early nineteen nineties, they collected the last two of these animals that were ever recorded in the wild before their habitat spirit. So we had a founding population of one male one female Charles was actually able to breed these at the Dallas aquarium for almost thirty generations. They have very short lifespans and keep the population viable, unfortunately, the numbers did go down down down because you obviously wanna larger founder population to start with. But we actually ended up with those animals with a generation of two males. And we bought all was lost. The species is gonna go extinct. They're extinct in the wild. And we have the last remaining population. But we work with some researchers at UC Berkeley, and we're actually able to take those animals. And hybridize them with another fish species in back cross it, you know, much the way the the Florida panther was saved back in the nineties in your home state, and we were able to save the genome if not the species, so at least we have the genetics of this fascinating unique animal that's Cole. Also, there are definitely ways to kind of try to salvage some of it as you mentioned. So on the kind of hobby aside, there is a group called Nampa, and I know they're involved with some native fishes as well. Maybe can you tell us a little bit about Nancy in in your association or any work done with them or Redan? I've been a member of NAN for for years. And I think it's great for hobbyists recently became the regional Representative for a state of Connecticut for NAFTA. But the the native fishes association is a great group of really dedicated people. A lot of these guys haven't online discussion forum, it's all centered around American native species. So a lot of your pretty little fresh water fish that often get overlooked. You know, I find it really interesting. These guys are are dedicated to keeping them at home. And and breeding them in advancing the husbandry of all these pretty little daughters in shiners, and all these cool fish it so often get overlooked working in public aquariums. One of the things I find really interesting to me is that we oftentimes go to great lengths to recreate these habitats from the Amazon the Congo southeast Asia when we're looking at freshwater tank's, or if it's a reef tank, you know, Indo Pacific Fiji, we go to great lengths to bring these exotic animals to our guests, and we kind of ignore what's in our own backyards. When I go overseas I go to aquariums in Europe. And the like, you know, they have American fish species daughters in shiners in Florida flag, fish, and.

US devils Wildlife Service North America Mexico Sonoran soman Asia Florida Europe Phil Quorums NAFTA Mexican Wests NAN Connecticut Nancy Charles Yancey
"soman" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"soman" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"News soman care. What's happening? Absolutely. Well, Reverend Jesse Jackson and other clergy will gather today in Chicago to support the Cook County state attorney Kim FOX because she's been criticized for dropping the seventeen felony you're sixteen felony charges against Jesse small, Ed. And in fact, she says that her case really wasn't that strong. This is what according to Steve Patterson. This is what she says she's defending her decision saying in an op Ed in Chicago Tribune, the decision not to prosecute smollet was the right one saying the case may not have been strong enough. Why they had the brothers? They had videos flimsy evidence on his part. Don't you remember when she the one of the prosecutors came out and had a blow by blow damn line? She stood there for ten minutes and gave this on the street. Steps. Yeah. So we just dropped it. And then they come on. They say, well, we do that all the time. Oh, that's comforting. Yeah. Well, that's the first thing. I thought of when she said that was well, that's why you're murder rate. So they keep the also the bond that doesn't happen. All the time either, you know, the forfeiture of the bond that doesn't happen. But can you imagine? What would happen if they gave him back stand grandma? Oh, my God even asked for you know, all the money back. The interesting thing carried as well. That's going on in her support the fraternal order of police and the police department they're staging protests against her at her office. Yeah. Fox's welcoming an independent investigation into this case. We'll see what happens very strange the strangest cases ever God coming up you. Appreciate it. For the morning show..

Kim FOX Jesse Jackson smollet Jesse small Chicago Tribune Chicago soman Steve Patterson Cook County attorney murder ten minutes
"soman" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"soman" Discussed on PRI's The World

"At least was tell their story and try to share it and hope that whatever they were going through right now. There would be less alone. But the Saudi government hasn't responded to those plea or any request release the activists, I if he wants to go from prince Mohammad bin soman, aka NBS was hailed as the reformer the Arab role needed that same month comedian Hasan Manashe took a shot at the crown prince. And isn't that fixture pitcher? Meanwhile, every Muslim person, you know, was like, yeah. No, he's the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, the Saudi government didn't think it was funny. It told net flicks to take the video down the company complied and was widely condemned for caving to Saudi fresher, an all this makes you wonder is the opening up of the committee seen in Saudi Arabia, really meaningful Haga, although sorry of New York University says while on the surface, it might look like the country is loosening its restriction on entertainment deep down. It has a long way to go. She says putting limits on what on artists can create takes away. The purpose of art all together. This is the thing is you can have entertainment you can have people to forming, but whereas the crew activity what is that eleven of art to everyday life are out creative freedom. She says art is reduced to a two for consumers for the world sharing. Jafari jet. The thrill syringe affari joins me in the studio. Now, Sharon your stories from Saudi Arabia have painted a really vivid picture of how the kingdom's cultures changing in many ways. But there's also limits to those changes, what was the biggest takeaway from your visit to the kingdom. My biggest takeaway cattle is that change is happening on the ground. But it's happening. Very slow. One example is the story I reported yesterday about how women are now able to write their bikes in some part of the country. And other story was the one I reported that speak about how women are now able to commute to work because they're able to drive their own cars at the same time. The change is coming. Really slow and some people are paying a heavy price for these changes to happen. What do you mean by that? For example, there are a group of women's rights activists who campaigned for the defeating of the driving buying for years. But as the ban was lifted they were arrested, and they are in jail right now. And there are reports that some of them have been tortured, and we were able to do any reporting on that. I was not. So the Saudi government assigns a mind to all journalists who are working in the kingdom, and I had to give them a list of the stories that I was working on and the people I was going to meet before I went to Saudi Arabia, but I did manage to speak to Saudis on the streets and in the malls and comedy clubs like the one in my story. We just heard Schrimm curious in your downtime in Saudi Arabia. Were you able to just wander around and do whatever you wanted? Yeah. I was able to go anybody. I wanted to go and I did go out to eat. And I went to restaurants. And that was without a minder. Yeah. When you were just kind of wandering around. Did you see where most public places still segregated by sex or was it much more integrated? No, that's actually one of the biggest changes that's happened in Saudi Arabia recently before men and women segregated in public spaces. So for example in restaurants cafes. He would see family section and there's the male section single men section. But this has changed. Now. It's interesting because you can see the signs very it says male only an family only, but in cafes on restaurants can see people Ming getting together. Thanks a lot of great series. Thank you so much Carol a specialized hit job for sports means Muslim women can run jump and compete and still keep their hair covered. It's not a new idea. But.

Saudi Arabia Saudi government Haga prince Mohammad bin soman Hasan Manashe NBS New York University Ming Sharon Carol Schrimm
After the Thai cave rescue

Correspondents Report

05:12 min | 2 years ago

After the Thai cave rescue

"Now last July. We were all captivated by the successful rescue of those young Thai soccer players trapped in a flooded cave since then the boys and their families have been adjusting to fame movie offers interviews international appearances there have been some amazing opportunities. But also as you might expect some unforeseen stresses the cave system itself was also shaken up by the frantic use of bulldozers and industrial water pumps. The effort is now on to restore it to its former state ABC southeast Asia correspondent Liam Cochran wrote a book about the cave rescue. And he's still following the story from Bangkok when the twelve members of the wild boars football team, and they coach ended Tom long cave on the twenty third of June. They expected to emerge for birthday party. And for the youngest one a tutoring session, just another Saturday in this small town of Macy's why? But eighteen days later when the last of them was rescued they were global Salah. Liberties hounded by the media fretted over by friends, family and strangers alike. They lives have been turned upside down by the experience some of it positive some of it not so much. The boys are much sought after for appearances around the world. They were flown to Argentina to take part in a friendly football match at the youth Olympics that went to the US to appear on the Ellen Degeneres show and visited soccer's hallowed turf Old Trafford to see Manchester. United played they've conducted themselves in a way that's made the nation. Proud retelling this story smiling and posing for photos again, and again, and again, they may never have had this international exposure if it hadn't been for them as adventure. And they've lapped up the experiences making new friends seeing new places and gaining huge followings on social media in particular, Instagram, the pack the boys made to support each other inside the cave has carried over to. The outside world, but things will be changing soon. Some of them will graduate from junior high school and hit off to different campuses in the coming months away from my side life goes on friends drift apart as for any teenagers around the world for the families. It's been a complicated ride being a parent of a wild boar has become pretty much before time job for some of them with travel meetings and difficult decisions to consider about movie deals and appearances the Thai government has offered assistance. But also applied pressure setting up a committee to handle media requests that is still yet to seal any deals for a major Hollywood movie all the big studios want to tell the cave rescue story. And it looks like a deal may be getting close with Universal Studios said to be a front run out a tie production has already finished shooting and his set to release its movie mid year with one of the divers and some of the tire risk. Work is playing themselves amid huge sits built in swimming pools and scenes shot inside real caves in northern Thailand, including Tom long itself, the cave and the environment around. It was hit hard by the rescue efforts. Water was pumped out from the adjacent Cy Tom cave and into quickly built reservoirs rice farms were flooded creeks on the mountain tops above the cave were dammed and diverted by shovels and backhoes after the triumphant rescue the Thai government sealed off the cave and the site on park to getting to work rehabilitating the area directly in front of Tom Luang. A statue has been arrested of Samoan good non the tie. Former navy seal who died while diving in the cave during a resupply mission. The bronze statue is impressive more than three meters tall with soman in his diving gear, a superhero six pack at his feet Adrover. Pigs representing the members of the wall boys football team. There's a museum. The works to in front of the cave to memorialize the rescue for generations to come this time last year. Tom Lang was pretty much unknown except perhaps to dedicated cave explorers, local teenagers or tourists who happened to be in the area. But now it's a magnet for visitors over the new year holiday time Luang was the number one tourist destination in all of Thailand with tens of thousands of people making the pilgrimage, even though the cave entrance is still off limits behind high fences and security cameras one reason for the fences apart from of course, wanting to avoid more lost souls in the cave is that loads of diving equipment was left behind when a water pump. Burst minutes after the final rescue and Tom long flooded fast. With the rescue is just getting out in time Thai soldiers and expert divers are working to salvage some of the equipment. And it's still not clear when the cave will reopen to the public when it does all be queuing up to get in for a look. Despite writing seventy five thousand words about the risk you at Tom long. I've never been inside. Liam cock. Learn there in Bangkok.

Cy Tom Cave Tom Long Tom Luang Liam Cochran Bangkok Thai Government Football ABC Tom Lang Macy Universal Studios Thailand TOM Ellen Degeneres Asia Junior High School Soccer Soman United States
"soman" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

13:15 min | 2 years ago

"soman" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"We're back. Our conversation with my Gaspare, critique director of animal husbandry maritime aquarium in Norway. So barrett. You're kind of giving us a little bit of the history of desert fishes in the southwest. So as you mentioned probably coming from the same maybe species millions of years ago, what kind of biology commonality through the hat because of the desert habitat. And maybe then we'll talk about some differences after. Yeah, there's quite a few similarities, and and quite a few differences as you would expect most of the smaller groups that we're working with most mostly smaller fishes, we're working with an aquariums. And that a lot of hobbyists and dedicated individuals have at home tend to be the little diminutive fishes the puck the kids alive bears. Now that being said, there's quite a diversity of fish in the desert of North America. We have four desert's the Sonoran the Chihuahua on the Mojave and the the great basin four different desert's, four different climates, different levels of precipitation in plant fauna and everything else. So we have a wide variety. About one hundred and sixty five species total, which includes some larger species minnows, some salmon's semi. There's quite a few about six species of endangered soman and in the American west. So the diversity in terms of taxonomy is huge. There's a lot of different types of fish for the ones that we tend to focus on in aquariums and keeping aquariums. There are some some similarities these guys all come from usually springs or small spring fed rivers because that's often the only source of water in the desert, so they tend to like very very hard water sometimes a little bit on the cooler side because they are from springs. Most of them are omnivores they eat a lot of insects, but also plant material. So there's quite a few similarities there in their biology and their behavior there also most of them, most of the fishes tend to be fiercely territorial, which is actually how they got the name up fish. It was thought that they looked the males looked like a puppy chasing each other around because the males can be fiercely territorial and beat up on not only each other. But also on the females once they finish breeding. So that's kind of how they got the name. The kids are a little. Bit more peaceful. They tend to behave very much like live bearers they do. Well, in large groups, they're not very territorial. They cohabitate very nicely are generally, a peaceful fish in there. Also, the good deeds are also live bears like the facilities. So we're going to talk. Now a little bit about maybe some of the issues with with the desert fishes, which there may be a lot of them. So maybe you wanna just talk about some of the more important ones, which desert fishes are listed as threatened or endangered in y sadly, quite a few. There's ten counties in the western US that have more than five endemic endangered fish species. There's over forty counties that have three plus endangered endemic fishes as the highest rate of endangered fish species anywhere in the country. Despite the fact that diversity is a lot lower than say the southeast. So there are quite a few endangered. There's over sixty endangered species threatened or endangered list at the federal level or at the state level. And there's probably even more than that south of the border in Mexico that we don't have a great sense on. They don't. Have the same protections in many sense south of the border that they have in the US. So there's quite a few species there that we just don't know about. They may be in trouble. There's quite a few that aquariums have rescued and it propagated in order to keep them alive is living arc because we knew they were going extinct in their habitat was being destroyed with there's a huge number out there. Probably the poster child for endangered desert fishes is the devils hole. Pup fish, if you Google devil soul pup fish, you'll find out a lot about this US. Fish and Wildlife Service has been doing a fantastic job trying to keep these alive, and they were actually oddly enough these guys worthies center of the first supreme court case to challenge the Endangered Species Act back in the nineteen seventies. Like, I said a lot of these are spring dwelling fishes they live in groundwater. So when we pump out huge amounts of groundwater to have agriculture in places where agriculture doesn't normally exist. Like the west. We ended up driving the water level down in those springs destroying their habitat. So this was actually like I said, the devils hole puppet in particular that US fish and wildlife manages they were the first test. Case the first real challenge to the Endangered Species Act because the mining companies wanted to continue to pump the groundwater out which would have driven them extinct, and this is a species biologically. That's very very remarkable. It's it's certainly a unique animal they have the smallest natural range of any vertebrate on the planet. They occur in an area less than one hundred and fifty square meters. And their population size is the smallest of any vertebrate on the planet for the devils hole petition particular their average population fluctuates between one hundred twenty and three hundred some odd individuals every year and some years has gotten down as low as thirty. These are numbers to geneticists that are just unheard of. You know, no other vertebrate species has populations that low and can still maintain genetic diversity in thrive. So with all that said how many are in captivity? I guess relative to that number in the wild. There's quite a few. So there's about their six hundred some odd species found in all the desert's of those. There's about sixty seventy that are in trouble. And I would say of. Those we probably have about thirty species in captivity. We focus on a small handful of Mexican species within the ACA programs because the US fish and Wildlife Service focuses on all of the species that occur within the US border. We tend to focus on the Mexican species because they don't have the same protections that the US species have the US fish and Wildlife Service in particular runs. An amazing hatchery called the Dexter national fish hatchery where they breed fifteen to twenty endangered or extinct in the wild fishes from within the US, we tend to focus on some of these species that don't get as much love south of the border, but we're in real real trouble. So they've probably twenty or thirty in captivity. A good way to get involved would be to go to any American killing fish association meeting or local killing fish club. Because you tend to see a lot of these guys, especially the publishes in good deeds occasionally pop up in auctions and many of these animals are critically endangered or extinct in the wild. And they are really a keeping them alive is is really forming like an arc for these species in if on the off chance. Their habitat ever is restored in the wild. We still have the genetics. We still have the species to put back so thanks for explaining all that Barrett. Are you seeing any positive results from your and easy as efforts to date whenever you're working with endangered species? It's it can be disheartening at time because you're you're dealing with these animals and oftentimes there is no return to the wild for them. Their habitats have already been destroyed, and they're gone with a lot of these species that we have that Asia institutions and other querying zoos or maintaining and captive care. We actually could have there's a light at the end of the tunnel for these animals, so we haven't seen any restoration efforts yet on a large scale, but we have these animals as a living. We have the genetics and the populations alive in captivity. So that if any of these habitats are ever restored, there's a political sea-change tomorrow, and we stopped removing as much groundwater from the desert's in the air. It lands of the American in the Mexican Wests. We actually have the animals to put back, and we we can start to will never. Reclaim that habitat that was there and all of its glory, but we will be able to put some of these species back and partially restore that habitat actually had a quick question. Referring to something you had mentioned earlier because the numbers can get so low down to thirty for some of the populations. Yes. Is there a pretty good explanation? Why the there is no major genetic issues, you know, or bottle anything like that. That's a great question. The best way of ever heard it described to me by an actual puppets geneticists is that these animals we don't so much have to worry about the bottleneck because they already went through the bottom bottleneck two hundred fifty to five hundred thousand years ago these animals have persisted, despite their very very small population sizes in these small springs, and in these small rivers, basically, they're inbred, but that inbreeding can create a number of problems. There were probably many many more species that went extinct in geological time because of that, but the pup fishes for whatever reason have been able to survive despite this inbreeding and actually able to have sufficient genetic. Diversity from these combinations to keep their populations alive. It's it's really kind of a paradox. Geneticists don't typically think of viable populations of species being twenty thirty animals one hundred animals normally they're looking for at least several hundred if not several thousand one interesting case study we had a species alive in Dallas. It was a type of publishing the scientific name was Mugabe's Alana force that a very talented. Aquarius. Charles Yancey, Dr Paul was L from the New York aquarium went down and rescued from Mexico in the early nineteen nineties, they collected the last two of these animals that were ever recorded in the wild before their habitat disappeared. So we had a founding population of one male one female Charles was actually able to breed these at the Dallas aquarium for almost thirty generations. They have very short lifespans and keep the population viable, unfortunately, the numbers did go down down down because you obviously want to larger founder population to start with. But we actually ended up with those animals with a generation of two males. And we thought all was lost. The species is going to go extinct. They're extinct in the wild. And we have the last remaining population. But we work with some researchers at UC Berkeley. And we're actually able to take those animals and hybridize them with another fish species in back cross it, you know, much the way the the Florida panther was saved back in the ninety s in your home state, and we were able to save the genome if not the species, so at least we have the genetics of this fascinating unique animal that's Cole. Also, there are definitely ways to kind of try to salvage some of it as you mentioned. So on the hobby aside, there is a group called Nampa, and I know they're involved with some native fishes as well. Maybe can you tell us a little bit about Nampa in in your association or any working done with them or Redan? Yeah, I've been a member of NAN for for years. And I think it's great for hobbyists recently became the regional Representative for a state of Connecticut for NAFTA. But the the native fishers association is a great group of really dedicated people a lot of these guys they have an online discussion forum. It's all centered around American native species. So a lot of your pretty little fresh water fish that often get overlooked. You know, I find it really interesting. These guys are are dedicated to keeping them at home and and breeding them and advancing the husbandry of all these pretty little daughters, and shiners and all these cool fish. It's so often get overlooked working in public aquariums. One of the things I find really interesting to me is that we oftentimes go to great lengths to recreate these habitats from the Amazon or the Congo southeast Asia when we're looking at freshwater tank's, or if it's a reef tank, you know, Indo Pacific Fiji, we go to great lengths to bring these exotic animals to our guests, and we kind of ignore what's in our own backyards. When I go overseas and I go to aquariums in Europe. And the like, you know, they have American fish species starters and shiners and Florida flag fish and all kinds of really cool stuff that to them is very exotic. But to us it's kind of you know, I've got gar in my backyard. It's not as big of a deal to us. But I think we overlook are native fish species, we have a huge diversity, especially in the southeastern United States. I think it'd be really cool thing to see more of that in public aquariums. Because often it gets overlooked for the flashier shinier Amazon African southeast Asian species. Yeah, I definitely agree with you. And kind of as a side note, we're actually working on some on native fishery production here because of the as you mentioned the great interest in Europe in US areas. So yeah, definitely. So I guess tagging along that question. Do you believe hobbyists can play a role in conservation of native fishes in y and maybe which species would that be helpful for? Absolutely. I do one of our colleagues. Dr Paul was Al down at the New York aquarium as said many times that the best thing and endangered fish can do to ensure its survival is to attract the attention of the hobby because if you look at so many fish species, there are many that we see in pet shops every day that we don't even think of as being extinct in the wild white cloud minnows, for example are extinct in the wild those Monte rainbow fish for scar are an endangered if not critically endangered species. So there's a lot of these. That have been propagated and we've saved that species. The genome is out there in the hobby because they're an attractive fish species. So a little bit further kinda drill down to that question. If somebody were interested in really making a difference for conservation. I think there's absolutely a role for dedicated fish keepers to play one of the first things I would point him towards his joining the American killing fish association or their local Kelly club. That's where a lot of these fish species tend to pop up, you know, they pop up on the auction table. They're being maintained in tanks under human care and not only they're being maintained. But they're being maintained in a very scientific way. Where remain -taining the genetics of certain populations, and they track these guys. So there's a phenomenal interest out there. If you can get connected with it. There's a lot of very dedicated hobbies, keeping these fishes some examples of some that people could keep it home that might make a difference to conservation would be certainly the good deeds. There's quite a few of those out there in the hobby amicus splendens, the butterflies split fan is one that we manage in Asia instutions, it's one that's a little bit more commonly out there. This is an animal. It's extinct in the wild. The you can read it home. The you can find them all the time in the killing fish circles. There's a number of sicklids as well. There's the happe- Chroma sicklids from Lake Victoria, still quite a few of those out there in the hobby that are being maintained especially in Europe..

US Europe Asia Wildlife Service devils Amazon North America Florida Mexico Sonoran soman Norway barrett director Dr Paul New York aquarium Nampa Google
"soman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"soman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Your your your piece for the New Yorker was just stunning because you you spoke with of some women who who had left Saudi Arabia and were seeking asylum in Germany, and we were talking a little bit earlier Laura was telling us about how she remains concerned for her safety, even though she's she's been out of a Saudi. For since two thousand thirteen are are we seeing an increase in the on the pressures of the fears that two women who've left Saudi Arabia is have their concerns been amplified over the past couple of years. Even as, you know, a crown prince have been soman says, you know, he's bringing modernization to Saudi Arabia. Absolutely. So the women I interviewed, and there were so many stories that I could not include in that in that piece. The stories mostly involved women who have fled since NBS came to power. And you know, they unanimously told me life did not one bit better for us. I don't know any women who are driving because their fathers won't let them their husbands won't let them maybe. No one person. These women are often highly educated women actually, outperform an out number men as far as college graduates go but often their career path ends with their graduation as they're prohibited to work outside the the home many women similar to Laura described being locked up starved beaten threatened forced into marriages that they didn't want. And so yeah, then once they do flee Saudi Arabia. Unfortunately, we're seeing an escalated campaign of suppression abroad and post Jamal Shoji the fear is. Only multiplied we'll sue Ziza and Laura and Yasmin Mohamed please stand by we just have to take a very quick break here. We're talking about the reality of life for women in Saudi Arabia, even as the country under crown prince Mohammad bin so lawn says it's modernizing we'll be back with a lot more. I'm Meghna Chakrabarti. This is on point..

Saudi Arabia Laura soman prince Mohammad Meghna Chakrabarti Jamal Shoji NBS Germany Yasmin Mohamed Ziza one bit
"soman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:29 min | 3 years ago

"soman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"One or wherever you get your podcasts. This is on point. I Magnin Chuck Roberti. We're talking this hour about the reality of life for women in Saudi Arabia, and we're talking about it. Because of course, earlier this month, the world's attention was grabbed by eighteen year old Rajavi Mohammed Al Kanoun who escaped her Saudi family fled to Thailand begged the world for asylum and was granted it in Canada. And she she said a lot about how she wanted to flee the repression. She felt as a woman in Saudi Arabia, and we wanna know what you think if you're if you're Saudi or have family in Saudi Arabia. What do you think is lifelike for women there? Do you see advances being made with the modernization efforts that the crown prince Mohammad bin soman has brought to the kingdom women being allowed to drive women being allowed to go to sporting events, perhaps or does the kingdom still have a long way to go. And is this all just a distraction from fundamental changes? That are not happening there. I'm joined today by yazmin Mohammed. She's a Canadian human Rights Act. Vists and Laura also joins us as well. She's with us from Toronto and Laura is a pseudonym because she fled from Saudi Arabia in two thousand thirteen and remains concerned for her safety as well. So Laura I'd love to spend a little more time hearing your story because it is. It is heartbreaking to be perfectly honest hearing you say a before the break about how you were locked in your room for for months at a time by your father had a gun held to your head by him for seemingly innocent things that you had done what happened in to take us to the time up to two thousand thirteen when did you decide you had to flee? How old were you? At that time. I was twenty nine years old. I have been planning for about three years, but deep inside me. I always thought it would be a chance that my father would change. But I like lately realized that abusers remain abusers. No matter what. And you were married though. Right. Yes. I got married in the age of twenty two and then he was a drug addict. So I was trying to fight it for about two months. And luckily enough the judge was able to see how my ex husband was a drug addict. So he stood by my side and helped me get divorced. When in some other cases, you're just stuck in the system until the husband say, so okay? So Yasmine earlier was telling us how about how women in Saudi Arabia because of those guardianship laws the they're not even allowed to I don't even hold a passport definitely not leave the country without the approval of their male guardian. Whether it's their father their brother, an uncle a husband. So how did you do it? How did you get out? So I had to steal my passport. And then my only option at that time because there's one thing I wanted to mention the Saudi government has implemented a system called up shit. So the reason for that is to do any kind of transactions for the city. Zain's all their services to be done remotely. Now. My only option is how am I going to get out without a male guardian permission? So and that case it was very impossible. My only option was trying to convince my family that maybe I have a course somewhere and from there I can take off and I did implement the plan we did travel to one of the Gulf countries. And then from there, they dropped me off at the course..

Saudi Arabia Saudi government yazmin Mohammed Rajavi Mohammed Al Kanoun Laura Chuck Roberti Mohammad bin soman Thailand Gulf Canada Vists Zain Yasmine Toronto twenty nine years eighteen year three years two months
"soman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:25 min | 3 years ago

"soman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on point. I Magnin Chakrabarti. We're talking this hour about the reality of life for women in Saudi Arabia, and we're talking about it. Because of course, earlier this month, the world's attention was grabbed by eighteen year old Rajavi Muhammad alka noon who escaped her Saudi family fled to Thailand begged the world for asylum and was granted it in Canada. And she she said a lot about how she wanted to flee the repression. She felt as a woman in Saudi Arabia, and we wanna know what you think if you're if you're Saudi or have family in Saudi Arabia. What do you think is lifelike for women there? Do you see advances being made with the modernization efforts that the crown prince Mohammad bin soman has brought to the kingdom women being allowed to drive women being allowed to go to sporting events, perhaps or does the kingdom still have a long way to go. And is this all just a distraction from fundamental changes? That are not happening there. I'm joined today by yes men, Mohammad she's a Canadian human Rights Act. Vists and Laura also joins us as well. She's with us from Toronto and Laura is a pseudonym because she fled from Saudi Arabia in two thousand thirteen and remains concerned for her safety as well. So Laura add love to spend a little more time hearing your story because it is. It is heartbreaking to be perfectly honest hearing you say before the break about how you were locked in your room for for months at a time by your father had a gun held to your head by him for seemingly innocent things that you had done what happened in to take us to the time up to two thousand thirteen when did you decide you had to flee? How old were you? At that time. I was twenty nine years old. I have been planning for about three years, but deep inside me. I always thought there would be a chance that my father would change. But I like lately realized that abusers remain abusers. No matter what. And you were married though. Right. Yes. I got married in the age of twenty two and then he was a drug addict. So I was trying to fight it for about two months. And luckily enough the judge was able to see how my ex husband was a drug addict. So he stood by my side and helped me get divorced. When in some other cases, you're just stuck in the system until the husband say, so okay? So Yasmine earlier was telling us about how women in Saudi Arabia because of those guardianship laws the they're not even allowed to I don't even hold a passport definitely not leave the country without the approval of their male guardian. Whether it's their father their brother, an uncle a husband. So how did you do it? How did you get out? So I had to steal my passport. And then my only option at that time because there's one thing I wanted to mention the Saudi government has implemented a system called up shit. So the reason for that is to do any kind of transactions for the city. Zain's all their services to be done remotely. Now. My only option is how am I going to get out without a male guardian permission? So in that case, it was very impossible. My only option was trying to convince my family that maybe I have a course somewhere and from there I can take off and I did implement that plan we did travel to one of the Gulf countries. And then from there, they dropped me off at the course..

Saudi Arabia Saudi government Mohammad bin soman Laura Magnin Chakrabarti Vists Rajavi Muhammad Thailand Gulf Canada Zain Yasmine Toronto twenty nine years eighteen year three years two months
"soman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"soman" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"From WVU are Boston and NPR Meghna charter body, and this is on point earlier this month eighteen year old behalf Muhammed. Oh, Kanoun escaped her Saudi Arabian family, barricaded herself in a Bangkok hotel room and through social media made one request to the world island to asylum. I'll canoe told of the conditions. She endured as Saudi woman abuse. She says she suffered at the hands of her father and brother, for example, the time she says she was locked in her room for six months for having her haircut. The wrong way. I'll Kanoun was ultimately granted asylum in Canada now under Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin salon the country actually has made some of our much of its recent modernizing efforts allowing women to drive cars in the ten sporting events, for example, but I'll Conan story again highlights how those modernizing efforts may be just window-dressing distracting from the persistence of the kingdom's ultra conservative gender. Rules. And the fact that soman says while he's modernizing he's also jailing some of the nation's most high-profile women's rights activists. So this hour on point we want to take a look at life for women in Saudi Arabia now, and you can join us. What do you make of behalf? All canoeing story. Are you concerned about human rights and Saudi Arabia? What role? Do you think the United States should play regarding the rights of women in the kingdom? And if you're from Saudi Arabia or have family there, we'd especially like to hear from you, your thoughts your stories. Join us at anytime on point radio dot org, or Twitter and Facebook and on point radio..

Saudi Arabia Kanoun WVU NPR Crown prince Mohammad Bangkok Boston Twitter United States soman Facebook Canada Conan eighteen year six months
"soman" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"soman" Discussed on KCRW

"The last time we talked about net flex. We were talking about friends, and they streaming giant airing that old friendly series now net flicks is entangled in something more serious much less friendly Middle East politics at plex has removed an episode of a show critical of the Saudi regime. It was an episode of Patriot Act. That's amazing politics comedy show, starring Hassan, the nausea, Netflix only stopped the episode from airing in Saudi Arabia, Robin Wright is contributing writer for the New Yorker, she read about this magazine. Hi there. Hi. So for those of us who haven't watched the episode yet. Can you describe what the main points? He's making are about Saudi Arabia. Well, the focus of the segment was on crown prince Mohammad bin soman, and he points out that this is a man who would set it in the United States harboured Houston Hollywood in the spring as a reformer that not only forty Arabia needed. But the whole. And he then makes the point his mind that it took the killing all the Washington Post journalist for everyone to say. Oh, I guess he's really not a reformer. Meanwhile, every Muslim person, you know, was like, yeah. No. He's the crown prince of Saudi Arabia. We'll be a good time to reassess our relationship with Saudi Arabia. And I mean that hasn't Muslim Americans. So apparently the Saudis didn't like that. No, they didn't. And Netflix was informed. That.

Saudi Arabia prince Mohammad bin soman Netflix Hassan Middle East Robin Wright Washington Post nausea writer United States Houston
"soman" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:53 min | 3 years ago

"soman" Discussed on 1A

"So why are we wasting our time limit stick with you for another story that caught our attention net. Flicks pulled an episode of Patriot Act with Hudson men hajj this week, we've interviewed hustle been hunted on this program about the show because they pull the episode in Saudi Arabia at the request of the Saudi government. The episode was about Saudi Arabia and men. Hush blasted the kingdom over the Yemen. Civil war and the killing of Washington Post journalist Jamal has Shoji here is part of that episode of Patriot Act just wants to go prompt prince Mohammad bin soman, aka NBS was hailed as the reformer the Arab world needed. But the revelations about kashogi killing have shattered that image in a blows my mind that it's up the killing of a Washington Post journalist for. Everyone to go. Oh, I guess he's really not a reformer. Meanwhile, every Muslim person, you know, was like, yeah. No, he's the crown prince of Saudi Arabia. So now would be a good time to reassess our relationship with Saudi Arabia. And I mean that as a Muslim and as an American that's from the episode of Patriot Act with MS hustled, mid Hodge that was pulled from Netflix in Saudi Arabia now men Hodge tweeted this week, quote, clearly the best way to stop people from watching something is to ban it make it trend online. And then leave it up on YouTube on quote, now, dear I think he has a point it also this goes to the fact that I've talked about press freedom and media freedom around the world net. Flicks. Pulling something from Saudi Arabia is part and parcel with what a number of world governments have demanded from objectionable content. But but this kind of takes the US Saudi thing to down a different path. First of all, I'm disappointed in net flicks for doing this. But you know, I haven't talked to their legal department. And I assume that there was a Nuff of a grounds under Saudi Arabia's cybersecurity act or whatever it is in which they said, this is a threat to the kingdom, and you must take. Down. And I guess Netflix figured they couldn't win that case. But the truth of the matter is as Hassan Manashe said they left it up on YouTube. It's now got one point six million views counting, I urge everyone to go onto Netflix or YouTube and watch the episode if you haven't seen it it's great and one of the other things he says in there. He's refers to an old sore point. He he's refers to Saudi Arabia as the boy band of nine eleven. And if you remember the vast majority of those nineteen hijackers on nine eleven were Saudis, and I'm sure many people remember the redacted pages that came out in the nine eleven report where we don't know everything that was investigated into Saudi Arabian, high officials and leaders potential knowledge of and support for terrorists before we wrap up. We should look up to space where two big stories hit the news this week space exploration history was made when China successfully landed a vehicle on the far side of the moon. There's a three hundred pound Rover. That is now roving and sending pictures back to earth reaction in China's been somewhat restrained though, according to the New York Times the mission did not feature as one of the top four stories on China's top TV news program Thursday evening. In addition to that successful landing Nasr's new horizons mission sent back photos this week from the most distant place humans have ever explored on New Year's day scientists and engineered celebrated as the new horizon spacecraft approached an object four billion miles from the sun it shaped kind of like a snowman it's called Altima Tuli meaning beyond the known world. It's consists of two connected spheres about nineteen miles long. Scientists believe this part of the universe. Could also be home to some of the solar systems, earliest, building blocks. And we thank our panel for being part of the star stuff that makes the roundup work into your allotment on executive editor at the Pulitzer center. Thanks indira. Thanks so much. David rennie. Beijing bureau chief of the economist. Thanks, David and Christian Karl of Washington Post and author of strange rebels. Thanks christian. Thank you. Our senior. Producers

Saudi Arabia Saudi government Hodge Washington Post YouTube Hassan Manashe Netflix China Yemen prince Mohammad bin soman Beijing David rennie US NBS Shoji Jamal New York Times
"soman" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"soman" Discussed on KPCC

"Let's just say they're not hammering nails in that scene reviews for the film were mixed to mediocre, and yet audiences can't seem to get enough of it. How important is it to filmmakers to see the numbers that bird boxes is yielding? Because then you could say actually, maybe more people would see it on the streaming service than if it was in a theater, I think that was the calculation, I know, those numbers are hugely important to see because I think, and I think that was what Netflix was thinking is that, you know, by kind of lifting the veil even a little bit. They are able to show kind of what the audience what the scope of the audience is. I mean, if you look at those forty two plus million accounts, you know, if you average it out in the US the average ticket prices nine dollars. You know, it really does point to Seattle opening week, you know, in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Now, that's a lot of extrapolating and a lot of you know, variables in there. But I think it is a huge huge audience. I mean, they have no intention of turning back there really all in on the movie business. So let's talk about it social media phenomenon that relates to net flix, and it's something that a few people aren't watching right now. And that's Patriot Act with Haas on montage. Here's a clip just a few months ago, prom prince Mohammad bin soman, aka NBS was hailed as the reformer the Arab world needed. But the revelations about kashogi is killing have shattered that image blows my mind that it took the killing of a Washington Post journalist for everyone to go. I guess he's really not a reformer. Meanwhile, every Muslim person, you know, was like,.

prince Mohammad bin soman Washington Post Netflix NBS US Seattle Haas nine dollars
Trump stands by Saudi prince despite CIA findings

KSTE Programming

00:21 sec | 3 years ago

Trump stands by Saudi prince despite CIA findings

"The others might be. And President Trump is sanding by Saudi Arabia's crown prince despite the CIA concluding that Mohammed bin some odd directed the assassination of journalist Jamal Showkey in an exclusive interview with Reuters Trump sent soman is a leader Saudi Arabia, and they have been good allies. Trump refused to comment on the crown prince being implicated in the murder of the Washington Post

President Trump Saudi Arabia Jamal Showkey CIA Mohammed Washington Post Murder Soman
U.S. senators conclude the Saudi crown prince ordered journalist’s killing

Wake Up Call

05:29 min | 3 years ago

U.S. senators conclude the Saudi crown prince ordered journalist’s killing

"To do with the death of journalist Jamal kashogi. In fact, Senator Lindsey Graham yesterday said there wasn't a smoking gun. There's a smoking saw. But that almost directly contradicts what the president had been saying. Yeah, that's right. A pretty. A remarkable moment on Capitol Hill yesterday. CIA briefing for select group of senators with director Gina apple after weeks really of them demanding answers from the administration. A what we know about involvement of Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin soman in this murder plot. They finally got some answers that small group of senators, and when they walked out of the briefing, they seem to be more furious than they were going into it. And then talking about just Democrats as you said Republicans allies of the president like Lindsey Graham saying that you'd have to be willfully blind to not come to the conclusion that NBS with intricately involved in this plot as you said that directly contradicts not the president. But his top advisors, Mike Pompeo secretary of state teams Mattis the Defense Secretary, and it really set a showdown between congress and the administration over what to do next with a relationship in Saudi Arabia. Well, before we even get into that going back to Mike Pompeo when he came out last week and made a statement or lack thereof. There was not. Steve that was made when it wasn't the CIA director Gina hospital a lot of people scratch their heads like, hey, wait a minute. Which isn't she? The beep be the one who's giving us all the information shouldn't her department be the one who's giving us this in. And it was just strange that. She wasn't the lead on that that it was Pompeii. Oh, and then he was so sort of cagey about everything. Yeah. Exactly. And then there were some reports at the White House should actually held Gina hassle back from going to deny that. Official beer telling me that hassle chose not to go, and it could be a little bit of both ending hassle. Probably didn't wanna be played off of the president. You know, she obviously would stick to what the intelligence agency has has compiled is and that could be seen two country country for President Trump has said publicly, and instead the had this class by briefing with Mike Pompeo and James Mattis for all one hundred senators, but but they last so unsatisfied that it builds up pressure on the administration over the last couple of days to do something to you know, really win back those Republicans like Bob corker in Lindsey Graham, and that's what led to the briefing yesterday. But as you said, they all laughed even more angry than before. So this saga will continue Connor to what are you do? So they're mad. All right, fine. Everybody's upset. Everybody's upset that it seems that the president isn't making full acknowledgement that the Saudi Crown prince had something to do with this. Everybody's upset on both sides fine. But from a geopolitical standpoint, you also have to wonder is it does it matter though. Even if the president did is it it doesn't make him look better to say, hey, crown prince, I know you had something to do with it. You know, the evidence is right here in black and white. I know you did. But I'm going to have to plug my nose on this one and just move on. Because I know it's the right thing to do when it could be comes to relations would that be enough to satisfy these senators on both sides who are so angry about this investigation. I think that had been the administration's reaction from the start that we wouldn't be in this position. And it could have been enough because I think a lot of those Republicans know that their relationship with Saudi Arabia is so important, and it is especially vital to the president's national security strategy his foreign policy they rely on the Saudis to counter Iran's throughout the Middle East. So if that was if that was the reaction right away fine. I think you know, that people could put their noses and go along especially because the Saudis have said consistently NBS, the crown prince is not going anywhere. And so they I think would learn to deal with it in a way if they hadn't felt so betrayed and so stone wall by the administration and by the Saudis, but but from the beginning the Saudis have have lied covered up their involvement. And then they admitted that there, you know, Saudi officials were responsible, but they said it was an accident. And then they admitted it wasn't an accident. It was a rogue operation. The the fact that they have continued to live threat. It has made it very hard now for these Senate Republicans to not want to go after them. But you're right broader broader terms in the region, if the US pol- support from the Saudis, they're left hung to dry and a lot of different places. We do need Saudi Arabia for a couple of different things and other partners. Other countries will be really willing to take on that partnership. Instead you saw Ladimir Putin over the weekend at the g twenty high fiving was NBS while President Trump declined to meet with. Yeah. That you don't want somebody else to just slide in there. So it's yeah. It's keep your your enemies close kind of thing, you know, or your friends. I'm screaming that went out. But you know, what? I mean. But yeah, you can't you can't goof up this relationship. No matter how ugly it is. But at the same time, they're just has to be a way to sort of eased everybody because everybody is upset that they feel like we're either covering up or you know, that the president is either covering something up or lying about it. Or whatever it may be if you were just to be more forthcoming about the details of the investigation and say, I don't like it. But here's the way it is. And then move forward that might help. We'll speaking of moving forward when you were mentioning Mike Pompeo. He's also in headlines for another reason, he says the US is

President Trump Mike Pompeo Saudi Arabia Senator Lindsey Graham Saudi Crown NBS CIA United States Jamal Kashogi Director Donald Trump Republicans Gina Apple Pompeii Gina White House Gina Hospital Senate Soman
Once A Regional Stabilizer, Saudi Arabia Becomes A Disrupter

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:17 min | 3 years ago

Once A Regional Stabilizer, Saudi Arabia Becomes A Disrupter

"This message comes from NPR sponsored jet dot com with two day delivery and no membership fees jet offers a tailored shopping experience that fits seamlessly into your daily life. Get started today by visiting jet dot com or downloading the jet app. Now for generations, Saudi Arabia's monarchs have based their rule on tradition and caution and above. All stability, crown prince, Mohammad bin Salman represents a break from that and his actions have some wondering whether Saudi Arabia may be destabilizing the Gulf region. Here's NPR national security correspondent Greg Mary. The old Saudi Arabia was a place. The United States often turn to in times of turbulence. When oil prices were spiking or political tensions were spiraling out of control. The new Saudi Arabia under crown prince. Mohammad bin Salman is now a key actor and sometimes an instigator in some of the region's most combustible events, Mohammed bin Salman as. Straighted recklessness and impulsiveness in decision making that has been very costly to the kingdom. That's Bruce ridell of the Brookings Institution who keeps a close watch on the kingdom. The crown prince is just thirty three. He rose to prominence three years ago when his father king Salman. Now AJ to became the most recent of seven brothers to take the Saudi throne since then the Saudis have embarked on a war in Yemen. They've blockaded their neighbor Qatar, and now they're under intense scrutiny for the disappearance and apparent death of journalist, Jamal kashogi. I think that the difference between Mohammed bin soman and and his uncles who ruled Saudi Arabia previously is that he might not have a sense of the limits of Saudi power. That's Gregory GAAS, a professor at Texas AM in an expert on Saudi Arabia. He says these episodes raise questions about the crown prince's judgment. He. Doesn't appreciate the the second and third order consequences and risks of some of these actions that he's taken the Warren Yemen where the US supports the Saudis. It's become a military stalemate and humanitarian. Catastrophe, the US Saudi relationship which dates to World War Two has often been bumpy you. Saudi relationship has always been about interested in non values. So says Jon Alterman of the center for strategic and international studies. Those interests include stability in world. Oil markets countering and expansive Iran, and keeping the Gulf comb. US presidents have come to understand by the end of their term that a lot of things in the Middle East and around the world are much easier to do with the Saudis on board and much more difficult if the Saudis are fighting you. This battle with Iran for preeminence in the region, Dr Saudi policy. But before Muhammad, the Saudis rely. Lied more on diplomacy and their financial clout. The crown prince has a more confrontational approach. Says Gregory gauze. He sees a Ron throwing its weight around in the region, and I think he, he says, why can't? Why can't Saudi Arabia do that? Well, I think that that Saudi Arabia hasn't been able to do it successfully. Donald Trump made his first foreign trip as president to Saudi Arabia, and he's a staunch supporter of the kingdom. This may have encouraged the Saudis to be more aggressive, but the international outcry over the disappearance of Jamal kashogi may change the equation says, Bruce ridell. The kashogi affair has now really raised a Pandora's box for the administration. The congress and the American media are not going to let the kashogi fair just go away as Mohammed bin Salman continues to disrupt the status quo. His critics are growing Greg, Mary NPR news, Washington support for NPR. And the following message come from Cirque du Soleil crystal, a frozen playground of world-class ice skating, and stunning acrobatics see it live at Capital One arena from December. Fifth to ninth tickets available now at Cirque du Soleil dot com.

Saudi Arabia Mohammad Bin Salman NPR Jamal Kashogi Muhammad Bruce Ridell Greg Mary United States Iran Cirque Du Soleil Yemen President Trump Gregory Gaas Warren Yemen Gulf Brookings Institution Qatar Capital One Gregory Gauze
Mental trauma may be greatest challenge for boys rescued from cave

The Takeaway

04:10 min | 3 years ago

Mental trauma may be greatest challenge for boys rescued from cave

"That was the first audio and video the world was able to hear of the youth soccer team trapped in a cave in northern thailand many people this is the takeaway i'm tansy nevada and today a story that has the world watching this weekend dramatic and intense rescue operations began in thailand's chiang rai province to free a group of twelve boys and their soccer coach who've been trapped in a cave for more than two weeks so far eight children have been rescued four remain along with their coach the team was exploring the cave when monsoon rains flooded in and it was nine days before their exact location was pinpointed on friday a thai rescue diver died when he ran out of air while underwater petty officer soman gounon had delivered oxygen to those trapped in the cave but on his way back through the long and complex cave tunnels he ran out of oxygen for himself and lost consciousness to get a sense of how these rescue operations happen and what makes them so tricky we turn to greg moore who's the northeastern regional coordinator for the national cave rescue commission greg thanks for joining us thank you for having me here now i've seen you know there's been lots of talk about what it takes to do this and i want to get into the specifics of how this rescue is happening but i also want wonder if you could help our listeners understand what exactly the depth of the of this cave is i'm hearing it takes two or three hours to bring a child out yeah i don't know the exact numbers i've seen two kilometers which i know most listeners probably thinking oh that's not too far of a walk i could do that pretty quickly but what people do have to understand is first of all even in the dry passages they can be tight narrow which means possibly crawling or moving in a not easy walking fashion and then of course in this particular cave they have the huge complication of waterfield passages which for an experienced cave diver definitely can take some time in now when you're taking boys who literally this will be the first dive of their lives they're taking the time moving very slowly because they don't want to make any mistakes so let's explain the process the mechanics of getting these children out of the cave and of course the coaches well what exactly are the cavers doing when you confront a situation like this what do you do what is the first step to actually rescuing people out well and i'm gonna talk mostly my experience which is all dry caving but the hardest part in some cases they've done here which lily was finding the boys is you may recall for nearly two weeks there was a question of where they were gonna they could even find him so when we do not oftentimes we start out with a search party once we find him the next step is generally a medical evaluation and then after that you go into a period of planning a lot of people i know and i'm as a parent i'd be one of them wanting children out as quickly as possible they want to see their loved ones i can't blame them but in a situation like this do wanna take your time because you wanna plan for every possibility the other huge factor here and one that i don't think can be overemphasized is the psychological considerations for example if the boys have a leader of the team with something like that having ligo i may be a real benefit for them because you can say hey they do it i can do it or conversely you may want the leader stay behind in order to boost the morale and cheer up the voice for maybe a little more scared a little more worried about the extraction you mentioned psychology and as i'm listening to the story i'm having panic about the claustrophobia what do you do about the claustrophobia what if there is someone who is absolutely in a panic who cannot handle the trip out sure i will say in it surprises some people that know i'm a caver i've been in a couple of tight passages myself where all sudden you know you get that tightness of chest or whatever and i know the.

Soccer Thailand Two Weeks Two Kilometers Three Hours Nine Days