35 Burst results for "Somalia"

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:52 min | Last week

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Magic man. And Cristiano Ronaldo longer challenger for that crown with Messi has steered Portugal into the last 16. It's Ronaldo, it's one zero Portugal. And it's a moment of World Cup history. Portugal in front, but although the World Cup brings together most of the world's best players, it doesn't have room for all of them. Football is a team game, and if your national team isn't good enough, or maybe if you don't get picked, you don't get to go. No matter how earth shattering your skills may be. In fact, the history of football is full of stars who never appeared on the game's greatest stage. Most of those who've missed out over the years have been from small countries without enough other good players to get through the qualifying stages. Liberia's George weah is one of the best examples. In the mid 1990s, he was called by many the world's best player. He won league titles in France with Paris Saint-Germain, and in Italy, with a similar. But he couldn't haul his country to a World Cup. Now George wayo is a national hero all the same. That no doubt helped him become Liberia's president in 2018. And although he was denied an appearance at the world's greatest football tournament, his son has avoided that same fate of missing out. Tim weier is an American citizen, and he's playing for the U.S. squad in Qatar, and he scored a crucial goal in the game against Wales. Lays it through. It's way up. Timothy William for the USA. For some other players, it was just a timing that didn't work out. Good dummy has best up in front of him. What a fly by John Georgie best. Another great George, George Best, played 37 times for Northern Ireland between 19 64 and 1977. But his country didn't reach a World Cup once between 1958 and 1982, so although he truly was one of the best, he never got to participate. And in Qatar, Wales had been playing in their first finals for 64 years, so although Gareth Bale has made it at last, plenty of great players didn't. But it's not just comparatively small countries like those that had seen their star players not play in the World Cup. Plenty of legendary players from bigger countries have missed out too. Take for one, France's damage in honor. He was known for his flair, his creative touches on the ball, and he had an illustrious European career. But a critical mistake he made, a careless cross that was picked up by an opposing player, led indirectly to a last minute winning goal for Bulgaria in a World Cup qualifier in 1993. It cost France a place in the 1994 tournament and blighted general as international career. He was criticized by name by his coach and was pretty much shunned by the national team. In 1998, France won the World Cup on home soil without him. Perhaps the best of the world cup's absent greats, Alfredo di Stefano, lost out on playing in the World Cup with not just one country, but three. Born in Argentina in 1926, de Stefano first didn't get to play for his native country after they withdrew from the 1950 tournament. He also missed out playing for Colombia after moving and playing the league football there. He played for Colombia internationally a few times, but back then, they were not part of FIFA. In 19 53, this definitely moved to Spain, but with Spain too, he missed out on his chance. Spain missed qualifying for 1958 after being pipped by Scotland. And when the 1962 World Cup in Chile came around, for which Spain did qualify, the Stefano looked as if he would finally take part. Alas, he was injured before the tournament, and although he traveled with the Spanish squad, he never saw the pitch. Not surprisingly, even just in 20 22 alone, you could fashion a pretty decent team of players from the country that have failed to qualify. This is especially true if you stretch the rules a bit to include players who featured in past tournaments. You could start with Italy, who despite having won four world cups and been the current European champions, fails to qualify for the second time running. Out of time. But Cheney can not believe it. They still got plenty of stellar players. In a fantasy lineup of a team made up of players not in Qatar, the Italians would be well represented. Joined by Giovanni de Lorenzo right back, Leonardo bonucci, who is a world class center half, and then there's federally coquies. Speedy goal scoring winger. Austria's David Alaba, Sweden's Victor Lindelof and Scotland's Andy Robertson would also be candidates for the defense. The strikers might include the graceful Mohamed Salah of Egypt and Liverpool F.C.. And then there are two Norwegians whose clubs are vying for the top spot in England's Premier League. Martin odegaard, amid Fielder who captains arsenal, and we have to include the remarkable erling Holland who's been banging in goals for Manchester City at an astonishing record setting race. He never should leave goes into the net, the gold machine. Taken together, I think that has the makings of a squad that would at least reach the knockout stages. But the bitter reality, of course, is that none of them will have made an appearance in Qatar. Let alone play together in a Dream Team. But while some supporters may be disappointed that they can't watch their country's football stars take part in the World Cup spectacle, other unsentimental folk will be glad of their absence. The coaches and fans of their clubs. Because when European club matches resume after this monthlong international pause, these unlucky players who missed out on a ticket to Qatar will be refreshed and uninjured, and come the end of this disrupted season. When the World Cup will be fading in the memory, that may make all the difference in the hunt for those competitive league trophies. Harlan has it. Harlan still hollow.

World Cup Portugal Qatar George weah France Liberia George wayo Tim weier Timothy William John Georgie football Spain Cristiano Ronaldo Wales Messi Alfredo di Stefano de Stefano Ronaldo Germain George Best
"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:41 min | Last week

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Back in April a Chinese fighter jet crashed in a rural part of central eastern China. The two pilots safely ejected and they landed on long grass, where they were quickly surrounded by locals who recorded the encounter. Who is that? Asked one of the villagers, pointing to one of the pilots, a white man with red hair who apparently spoke in English. This is our instructors at the other parliament Chinese. Don't take photos. The relationship between the west and China might be increasingly strained and their militaries ever more at odds. But despite that growing tension, some western air force pilots are heading to China to share their experience. And some governments aren't happy about it. Last month, Britain's defense ministry said it was trying to stop China from hiring its former RAF pilots to train the People's Liberation Army air force. That's the Chinese air force. Shashank Joshi is The Economist defense editor. Officials said that a company called the test flying academy of South Africa. This is a private company, had been hiring up to 30 former Royal Air force pilots to work in China and it was attracting them with enormous salaries, way more than they could earn in government service flying for western military. So it was offering them something like $270,000 a year. And this is astonishing. The idea that you have these people trained on some of the west's most advanced aircraft with all of these secrets in their head, training a country that is increasingly seen as a serious military challenger in a threat. Are these recruiting efforts aimed just at British pilots? Well, in the days after Britain's announcement, it became clear that no, it absolutely is not limited to just British pilots. They seem to be going really all over Western countries with experienced militaries. So Australia's shadow defense minister said that at least two Australian fighter pilots had been approached and had declined Australia's defense minister said he was scandalized by the news that Australians were being targeted. He said it was outrageous that people might work for China. New Zealand's defense ministry told me when I asked that four of its former personnel have been employed by the same South African flying academy in France. There were reports several French pilots had been training China's air force. And then there's a fascinating case of Daniel duggan, who's a former American fighter pilot, he used to fly through America's Marine Corps and he was the owner of an aviation consultancy in China, he was recently arrested in Australia at the FBI's request. We don't know what that was about the charges are sealed, but it seems to fit into the same pattern of China trying to absorb some of this foreign military aviation expertise from some of its most serious western rivals. This sort of thing seems instinctively wrong to me, but does it contravene any rules? Well, funnily enough it seems not. Officials say that the British pilots involved don't seem to have broken the official secrets act, which is Britain's national security law. And the company involved the test flying academy of South Africa, a spokesman for them told me that western governments knew what these pilots were doing. It said they had met with the Ministry of Defense. They'd met with western governments. They had talked about this as recently as September and that no objections were raised. And what the academy says is that they only teach basic flight training, things like aerodynamic stability, how to keep a plane level. They told me there's nothing here that you wouldn't get from a normal flight school syllabus. But the western governments involved, including the British government, they don't believe that for a second, they absolutely think that the Chinese government is trying to get secrets. What has the reaction been from western governments? Well, western governments, John are worried that China's aim is to understand the tactics of the western jets and of course helicopters as well that it might one day have to fight in a war over Taiwan. They also argue that the foreign expertise might help the People's Liberation Army the PLA close the technology gap with its western rivals. The PLA, as we know, it hasn't fought a major war since it fought Vietnam over 40 years ago, and we see from the Russian air force in Ukraine that even a very well equipped armed force can go badly wrong when it doesn't have a lot of experience in combat conditions. So what we're seeing from the UK from Australia from a number of other countries is that they're trying to tighten the controls on what they're retired service personnel can do to try and prevent this information from landing up in the hands of China and clearly they don't trust the assurances that these guys are only discussing unclassified open-source basic stuff. They think that sensitive tactics, sensitive procedures are falling into the Chinese government's hands. Has there always been this sort of standoffish in us between western and Chinese military? Well, no, there's a sense of scandal around this, but that's a reflection, I think, of how rapidly the west's relationship with China has deteriorated. If you look at the UK in China, for example, formal military exchanges between the British armed forces and the People's Liberation Army were actually pretty common some years ago. You had PLA officers who attended sandhurst, which is Britain's military academy, the equivalent of West Point. In fact, one of the attendees of staff college in the UK was a guy called Zhang Zhang, who actually captained China's first aircraft carrier in the 2010s. And that sort of thing doesn't happen anymore. You don't really get Chinese recruits in British military institutions now. But this was pretty common. Now, those Chinese military students in the UK, the British officers assumed they were spies, right? The joke was they carried cameras. They asked very technical questions. They probed for details that were useful for the Chinese military, but they were kept away from incredibly sensitive stuff, and it was generally seen as a good thing that you were talking and conversing and getting to know these PLA officers who potentially you might be dealing with in the South China Sea or in the Pacific. And was Britain and outlier in having that sort of military to military contact? Not at all. A lot of governments did this. New Zealand's defense ministry signed an agreement to train the PLA as recently as 2019. I think Canada's government did winter training with the PLA just a few years ago. Australia, I was told hosted Chinese officers at its defense academies and military institutions until again, just a few years ago until the relationship broke down during the pandemic. Even America, John invited the PLA to its rimpac naval exercises off Hawaii in 2014 and 2016. And the idea was that these kind of routine engagements between Chinese officers and western offices was a way of breaking down trust. You would get to know each other, you would build up familiarity. You would build up mutual understanding, you know, perhaps it would even lubricate trust between the two governments. And that was genuinely the sentiment. Of course, given all that has happened given the dire state of relations between China and the west. The sense of open, untrammeled military competition, even the risk of outright war over Taiwan,

China defense ministry PLA Britain Chinese air force Shashank Joshi test flying academy Royal Air force Chinese government Australia South African flying academy Daniel duggan South Africa Ministry of Defense UK Marine Corps New Zealand Russian air force air force
"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:33 min | Last week

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"They want to do or they are going to do. And that's been really important. Al shabaab has been driven out recently from most of Iran, a region north of Mogadishu, which borders Ethiopia. By doing so, that has severed their access to lucrative trade routes, so these policies have been successful. Well, it's too early to say that, but it has created an environment I think for a more sustained fight against Al shabaab. And it is true I'd say that his administration has made some real strides against the jihadis in recent months. In the summer, for instance, there was this local clan revolt against Al shabaab's increasingly onerous tax demands in the context of this appalling drought. And that has spread and what the president has done is back these clan militias known as the moise low, who have been spearheading these uprisings in several districts in the federal state of Hershey Bello. That's one of Somalia's 5 federal states. These Klan militias have the support now of the national army and American air strikes too. The result, according to the government and diplomats as well that I spoke to is that ten major towns in Haran and dozens of villages are back under its control. So in that sense, there is this kind of rare feeling of optimism in Somalia. A country which has been fairly fruitlessly battling the jihadists for the best part of two decades now. And of course, in that battle, jihadists also get a say as well. And Al shabaab responded with a large scale attack in the capitol. How much work is there yet to do? It's certainly not going to be a quick fix. And indeed, it may get worse before it gets better in terms of these large scale retaliatory suicide bombings that we saw. I mean, Al shabab also has a record of quickly seizing back territories. It has lost. Ultimately, there will, I think, need to be dialog between the jihadists and the government at some point to fully bring the violence to an end and to put a lasting settlement in place. For now, however, the president is focused on making sure his government wins the ideological battle as well as the military one and taking every opportunity he can to speak out against Al shabaab. Whether I'm in the mosque or in young people's event or religious or elders, that's the message that was all the time. Yes. I think there are reasons to be optimistic now, but I think we need to remember there have been moments in the past where Al shabab appears to

Al shabaab moise Hershey Bello Somalia Mogadishu Ethiopia national army Iran Haran Al shabab
"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:20 min | Last week

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Over the weekend, gunfire was heard outside a hotel in a central district of Somalia's capital. Mogadishu. Inside the hotel, forces from Al shabaab, a jihadist group affiliated to Al-Qaeda, had laid siege. More than 60 people were taken hostage. On Monday, government forces stormed the building. 15 people died, including 8 people staying at the hotel. The incident marks part of a continued campaign by Al shabaab to overthrow the Somali government and still an extreme version of Islamic law. In late October, they claimed responsibility for a car bomb in the capital, killed over a hundred people and wounded several hundred more. That was the worst attack in the country in over 5 years. The Somali government retaliated, authorizing a U.S. military strike that killed 17 members of Al shabaab. Somalia's army and clan militias later killed at least 20 more fighters in towns in central Somalia. And the U.S. State Department offered $10 million for information about key leaders of the group. It's all part of a recent ramp up in pressure on the terrorist organization. A policy led by the country's recently reelected president, Assange Sheik Muhammad. Let me just put this here and we'll just leave that. Okay. This is going on. It should be. Yeah. Good. It's recording, yeah. Oh, good. Well thanks. I met with the president of Somalia. Hassan Sheik Muhammad in the presidential palace in Mogadishu, the capital that's known as villa Somalia. Tom Gardner is The Economist East Africa correspondent. Hassan Sheik was reelected earlier this year. He was previously president between 2012 and 2017. And since coming back to power, he's made a huge effort to combat Al shabaab. And I had the opportunity to talk to him about how that effort is going. Before that Tom, let's take a step back. Tell us about the fight against Al shabaab. So Al shabaab arose in Somalia about 15 years ago in the vacuum that occurred in the aftermath of the collapse of the Somali central state in the 1990s. Since then, it's grown to become Al-Qaeda's most lethal and wealthiest affiliate. It controls large parts of Somalia, large parts of Somalia are simply off limits, not only for foreigners like me, but also for the president himself. The country is also in the grip currently of a famine, the worst drought in four decades following repeat rain failures and of course global food price rises in the wake of the Ukraine war. A lot of those areas most affected by the famine are in fact those areas controlled by Al shabaab, these are some of the most fertile parts of the country. When I met with the president, he explained how Al shabaab has thrived because the government over the last 15 years has done little to combat them and also done little to provide services and governance in these places where Al shabaab is embedded. There was no matter how thought it did. So while the government was not a driver for the war and it is Al shabab. The lack of whatever solution. So as he says, there's not been a concerted effort to repel Al shabaab, particularly in the last 5 years or so. His predecessor was essentially missing an action for 5 years and did not confront the jihadists. He, however, has been making the fight against Al shabaab a cornerstone of his policy. So tell us more about that. What is his policy been? What is he doing? Well, in contrast to previous campaigns, including his own government campaigns in his first term, where the focus was sort of exclusively military and focused on repelling Al shabaab expelling them from the territories they control. They're still doing that, but there has been a shift in the approach. For example, mukta robo, who was once a feared leader of Al shabaab, who once had a $5 million American bounty on his head, he's now cabinet minister. He's the minister for religious affairs. And that was one of the first moves that you president made was to appoint him to his cabinet. And that's an example I'd say of the president attempting to experiment to look for new ways to counter the group. And it's part of a more holistic plan as well. And tell us more about that plan. So the way the president describes it, there's essentially three planks to it. There's the military, but there's also ideology and there's this recognition of the need to win the ideological fight as the president says to reclaim the Islamic narrative from Al shabab as well as taking it on militarily. The second day you have one who is more extreme than the previous one. So we killed the founder. We killed it in many other places, but still there are other leaders who are driving the business of shadow now that we decided to keep continuing on the military side. That's very important, essential. The central pillar, we decided to continue. But we decided to add two more variables on the equation. One is shabab is faith based on ideology based organization. So we have to open a front there to fight ideologically. They claim that they are propagating Islam. We need to tell our people that they are not propagating Islam, but they are using. We need to show other people that this is a group of mafia, she wrote it or cover it with a Islamic blanket, so we remove, we need to remove that blanket and show the people that this is a group of mafia that's either one way they're trying to do this is through the education system to instill in schools that there is a different message within Islam. And for example, after the interview, we attended a conference, the president and I, where he spoke with religious leaders who were discussing the Islamic curriculum in schools, that's why, for example, one of the recent car bomb targets in Mogadishu was the education ministry. And we heard the president mention two other variables of the equation, I think, was the phrase he used. What are the other parts of his plan? Well, the other one is economical financial to do with money. It's cutting off the funding streams for the group. Limit their ability to operate. I mean, the thing you need to understand about Al shabaab is it's essentially able to tack businesses across Somalia, even inside Mogadishu. So he needs to be able to put a squeeze on them financially in order to make this fight sustainable. The third fraud that we hope we would like to open was economic one. Al shabaab is collecting a huge revenue from the local people from the area from the cities from everywhere from the port from the seaport from so we decided to close those types of financial tabs so that it's not easy for them to do what

Al shabaab Somalia Somali government Mogadishu U.S. State Department Assange Sheik Muhammad Hassan Sheik Muhammad Tom Gardner Hassan Sheik Qaeda Al shabab Al mukta robo East Africa cabinet villa
 Palestinian motorist killed after alleged car ramming attack

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Palestinian motorist killed after alleged car ramming attack

"Two car bombs in Somalia's capital have killed over a hundred people Ambulances rushed to the scene of the attack at a busy junction in Mogadishu The attack took place in the same location as an even more deadly attack 5 years ago in which 500 people died People gathered at the aftermath of the scene amongst twisted metal and collapsed concrete many opened up body bags and search of their loved ones The Al-Qaeda linked Al shabab extremist group claimed responsibility saying it targeted the education ministry the group said the ministry was an enemy base in which the government is attempting to remove Somali children from the Islamic faith

Somalia Mogadishu Al Shabab Qaeda AL
"somalia" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

04:52 min | Last month

"somalia" Discussed on WTOP

"And most fans are in mourning having watched this debacle so far through two quarters two minutes to go in the first half. A ten 7 lead for the two and 5 teams. That's right now the Jags on top of the Broncos, three and four Washington looks for their third straight win coming up this after four 25 in Indy should be a good one. The D.C. sports hud this past week had they pressed in asking what to do with Carson Wentz when he's eligible to return. Say they're winning and heinicke's playing well. He doesn't come back. If they're winning and heinecke is vomiting all over himself on a weekly basis, he has twice as many picks as he does touchdowns, but they're winning this one. By just a smoke and mirrors and they're doing so thanks to defense special teams and turnovers, then maybe then you bring wince back. But if they're losing, then I think after a certain time you flip the switch and give Sam house some starts. Well, whatever you say it as they press it would say it's not an ideal situation, check out the D.C. sports huddle and the podcast DCF Apple, or wherever you get your podcasts, baseball. World Series game two three years ago today, the nationals became the World Series champions. Well, we have a game three tomorrow Halloween in Philly series tied one one with Houston and Philadelphia and 8 O three first pitch tomorrow and soccer. The NWSL championship game last night in Audi field, the Portland thorns short circuited the Kansas City current, see what I did there. Two zero the final Jay Brooks WTO sports. The top stories were following for you today on WTO, the Marine Corps marathon is being run by thousands today, its course goes through D.C. and Virginia. This is the first in person Marine Corps marathon in three years, lots of roads are closed and we're keeping tabs on it in traffic on the 8. Virginia governor Glen youngkin is sidestepping calls for him to apologize for comments he made referencing the attack on House speaker Nancy Pelosi's husband. Some metro bus rides could become free under a proposal endorsed by several D.C. council members. Stay with WTO for more on these stories in just minutes. Two car bombs have gone off in Somalia's capital, killing at least a hundred people at a busy intersection. Somalia's president is asking for international help in treating the more than 300 wounded. This is the deadliest attack in the country since a truck bombing at the same spot 5 years ago killed more than 500. Smacking a child as a form of discipline could become illegal in Australia. It's not child abuse, smacking a child as punishment is considered reasonable under Australia's criminal code, but that could change if activists get their way. Any form of smacking or physical discipline has been found to have a negative effect on children. Professor. So if you have a curse, she says there's evidence to show 16 to 24 year olds have developed anxiety and depression when smacked in the younger days. Advocates agree and they're pushing to make it a criminal offense based on the evidence. Scott maman for CBS News, Canberra, Australia, ten 48. Traffic and weather on the 8s here's Joe Conway in the traffic center. John starting off in the district on New York avenue westbound or inbound near Montana avenue found the crashing camera blocking the left side delays were building east bounders and a bit of a slowdown briefly for the works on right there blocking the right lane there on eastbound New York avenue at Montana avenue. I turn 95 north bend north of Malcolm X a single link gets through the works and they're also working southbound on two 95 near the Superman Parkway. Again, with a single lane getting by. Major road closures still for the Marine Corps marathon in place include Little Rock creek Parkway, independence avenue along the national mall between the link of memorial and main avenue, the memorial bridge remains closed, the express lanes bridge across the Potomac remains closed as well, the northbound three 95 exit ramps for the lower 14th and the 12th street expressway also unavailable, and that's an adding to the typical delays, not down three 95 coming out of Virginia toward the case bridge. We've got that full list of closures and advice to get around a WTO P dot com. On the Virginia trip 95 northbound, your crash north of Quantico at last before you're getting by staying to the left in a single file that the major delay that's growing rapidly is the more units to arrive on the scene. The easy pass lanes are northbound at 95 and three 95, 66 east oil out with the crash after glee road, the right side is taken up. George Washington Parkway now reopened north of the key bridge following the closure for the Marine Corps marathon. So the Parkway itself is a completely available north and southbound that's going to be good news for anybody trying to get to Reagan national airport. We've still got Washington boulevard closed near The Pentagon for Marine Corps marathon festivities. We've got closures throughout Rosalind and crystal city, one ten itself is closed between Rosalind and crystal city as well. Maryland side, you're still doing pretty well. That last report in good shape along route 50, the Baltimore street Parkway, 95 to 70 and the valley itself through prince George and Montgomery counties. We are brought to you by Greenberg a betterment for more than 35 years they've helped tens of thousands of clients who've been hurt in car crashes or victims of medical malpractice visit GB lawyers dot com and feel better. I'm Joe Conway WTO traffic. Storm team fours clay

D.C. Carson Wentz heinicke heinecke Marine Corps Sam house NWSL WTO Jay Brooks Glen youngkin D.C. council Virginia Somalia Jags Australia Scott maman Joe Conway Broncos Philly
 Prolonged drought brings famine, death and fear to Somalia

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Prolonged drought brings famine, death and fear to Somalia

"A famine could be declared in Somalia within weeks affecting hundreds of thousands of people into the country's worst drought affected areas and in displacement camps Such a declaration is rare and a sign of the dark consequences from the worst drought in decades in the Horn of Africa Muhammad Ahmed durier and his family left their seaside city on the northern edge of Somalia to escape drought and hunger He tells the AP if you walk some distance out here you'll see lots of bones lots of animal burns piled on top of each other He adds what's happening to us is severe drought and political instability We are appealing to the international NGOs to assist with shelter

Somalia Muhammad Ahmed Durier Horn Of Africa AP
Get to Know Hung Cao, U.S. House Candidate for VA-10

Mark Levin

01:48 min | 2 months ago

Get to Know Hung Cao, U.S. House Candidate for VA-10

"You're running as the Republican in the tenth congressional district in Virginia which is right outside of Washington but it also stretches a bit Tell everybody a little bit about your background From Vietnam in 1975 and then we escaped there within days of the fall Saigon Came over here and my father couldn't find work over here So we had to move to Africa So I grew up I spent 7 years in Africa And while we're over there my parents we spent 7 years over there I was going to French schools and my parents realized at the age of 12 that this kid probably needs to learn English also So we moved back here My mom brought myself in my sport sisters back here while my dad remained over there for 15 years by himself working and seeing him every 6 months but I want to I grabbed on to that American Dream and I want to Thomas Jefferson high school for science and technology I was the first class to graduate from there I went to the United States naval academy I got my master's in physics from naval postgraduate school and I was a fellow at MIT and at Harvard But I paid everything back with services country I served 25 years in special operations I thought in Iraq Afghanistan Somalia I was in Pakistan during the earthquake relief I was in the Balkans I dove the ocean depth I recovered John F. Kennedy Jr. but then that's been required last October because just watching Kabul fall and seeing mothers hand babies to marines Just broke my heart I mean that's exactly what happened in Vietnam And so I decided to run for Congress Wow And how old are you I'm 51 sir 51 well you've led a full life at the age of 51 And a very patriotic

Africa Thomas Jefferson High School F Vietnam Virginia Washington United States Naval Academy Naval Postgraduate School John F. Kennedy Jr. MIT Harvard Somalia Balkans Afghanistan Iraq Pakistan Kabul Congress
Where Do Things Stand With Brexit? Mike Graham Explains

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | 3 months ago

Where Do Things Stand With Brexit? Mike Graham Explains

"Is the status? Are you finally free men and women in the UK is Brexit finally done? Well, they still one or two nicer seats. I would say they have to be capped off the first, of course, the European court of human rights, which actually was something that was set up outside of the European Union. It was part of the Second World War settlement, if you like. But we need to get out of that as well, because as much as that was part of the idea of never having Nazi Germany, again, as much as it was all about making sure that countries didn't go to war. It hasn't become that. Well, it's become is yet another kind of strand of the European Union become like the dead hand of communism. It's become the thing that lefty lawyers use to protect the rights of scumbags. They want to protect the rights of Albanian rapists. Drug dealers, they want to stop it, stop us from deporting people through the likes of India and Pakistan and Morocco and all points east of there for both of us Somalia because we should respect the human rights. Well, you know what? We don't respect that human rights because they don't respect ours if you want to come to this country to commit crime. If you want to come to this country to commit terrorism, we don't want you and we don't want some ridiculous Strasbourg court to be able to stop it from happening. We want to kick you out. We want to kick you out. I'm hoping that this trust will do that. She will do away with the European court for human rights. And the reason Northern Ireland hasn't quite been fixed is entirely due to the intransigence of the French and the people in Strasbourg and Brussels. We need to take a very firm line with them and say, look, forget about it. We are going to do this and whether you like it or not. We're not trying to be nice. We're not trying to reach a settlement. We are simply leaving the European Union and that means every single part of Britain needs to do that.

European Court Of Human Rights European Union Lefty UK Germany Morocco Somalia Pakistan India Northern Ireland United States Strasbourg Brussels Britain
"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:57 min | 3 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"As is the case in lots of world cities in London, a perennial topic of discussion is a high cost of houses and flats. But there's another form of property that's surprisingly expensive. I went to highgate cemetery this week, which is a wonderful London Victorian urns and ivy overgrown Edgar Allan Poe's cemetery. Catherine Dixie is a Britain correspondent for The Economist. And I went there to speak to Ian Gunn Gable, who is the head of the Friends of highgate cemetery trust. So this is the original Marx grove. And of course there's an hour monument marking that. This is a prime spot in the cemetery and the grave next door could soon be up for grabs. Because the graves are empty or they could be reused without disturbing the burials in the grave. There's a space here safe for a North London socialist who's really interested in being buried in close proximity to the person who inspired them. And would you pay more for a desirable site like this? I think probably in keeping with the historic ethos of highgate cemetery assets about location location location. Grave recycling is now a growing trend in London cemeteries. Something really interesting is happening in London cemeteries, slightly ghoulish, perhaps, but also fascinating, plots that have lain untouched for a century or so are starting to be opened up. Fresh inhabitants are starting to be planted is the word that they use on top and a desirable race is being charged for doing so. To give you an idea, a fresh burial plot in the capital can set you back between 10,000 pounds and 23,000 pounds depending on the postcode. But a heritage grave as they call these graves that have been recycled or to put it more bluntly that already have someone else in them can be had for thousands of pounds less. So why are London cemeteries choosing to do this now? A high heat is doing it now because this spring an act of parliament rich in phrases about human remains was passed, allowing it to reuse its graves. But it's actually quite slow off the mark. Other London graveyards have been doing this for a few years. The stipulations for doing this are numerous. So to be reused, a graves last burial must have been at least 75 years before. You have to give advanced warning by putting up signs in the cemetery notices in newspapers. And you also have to, as you would expect, to be pretty careful with the previous inhabitants of the graves. And what happens to them is they are either left where they are, or their interred deeper in the ground, which they call lift and deepen in the jargon. Or their moved elsewhere, which is called lift and shift. But why would people want this lifting to happen at all? Is it just about the price? Well, there's a massive need for it. I mean, London's living a constantly moaning that there's not enough space for them in the city, but it's actually much worse for London's dead. A shortage of grave space is a nationwide problem in Britain, but it's particularly acute in the capital. There is an audit in 2011 that was done that found that, although some London boroughs had enough capacity for 20 more years of burials, others were already completely full. Well, why not just make more cemeteries? And people have tried that. So large suburban cemeteries have been built and the other obvious solution to this problem is to cremate people and that's been championed successfully 78% of Britons now choose this option. But the suburban cemeteries are filling up and even they aren't perfect because you don't want to have to take three buses to go and visit your dear departed. And the problem with cremation is that many have profound objections to cremation. So for now, the adage reuse reduce and recycle is applying not just for the living. Is this a new idea? Not at all. Grave reuse has a long and grand tradition in London. The city is well known for having been built on bones. It's part of metropolis part in necropolis. And certainly few British bodies have rested in as much pieces, sentimental grave inscriptions would lead you to think. So for centuries, the thing you have to understand about graves is that they're not so much freeholders leasehold properties. You're in them for a few years and then you get turfed out. And it's probably better to think of churchyards less than dormitories for the dead. Because if they had been, then they would have had to have been a lot bigger than as a kind of subterranean bone broth that was occasionally stirred and then garnished with gravestones. So you have wonderful descriptions of Victorian gravediggers. Promising to just shuffle bodies along a bit. When they put their spades into the ground, they put them into virgin soil and cut through body parts. At funerals, soil had to be propped up with boards so that the mourners didn't have their feet on decomposing body parts. I mean, they were fantastically revolting Victorian graveyards in London. So what happened? How did things change? There was a series of crises notably cholera that led everyone to think that having body parts opened new rotting in the city wasn't a good idea. And there was a change in the law in 1832, and that was designed to prevent symmetry overcrowding. And then that led to the creation of the famous magnificent 7 private cemeteries that were built further away from the center of the city and with enough space to put everyone in. But now because London has just totally run out of space. They are having to go back to these perfectly meticulously numbered plots and start to open them up again. And as soon as next year perhaps, some highgate graves will start to be reused. And they are going to be charged a cheaper rate for doing so. Marx in his communist manifesto said that the bourgeoisie produces its own gravediggers. So you can imagine that to have them produce not only their own gravediggers, but also their own grave marketers and grave recyclers is enough to have poor

London highgate cemetery Edgar Allan Poe's cemetery Catherine Dixie Ian Gunn Gable Friends of highgate cemetery t Britain North London necropolis cholera Marx
"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:22 min | 3 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Their lockdowns of 2020, we saw that all these new streaming companies were incredibly popular with investors. Everybody was stuck at home or the cinemas were closed and so streaming films and TV at home was all that anybody could do and firms like Netflix did incredibly well. But this year there's been a big reassessment and we've seen Netflix, for example, lose 60% of its share value and other companies are feeling a lot of schadenfreude about its performance. Tom Wainwright is The Economist tech and media editor. There was an interesting symbolic victory claimed that just a few weeks ago by old Hollywood when Disney announced that it had overtaken Netflix in terms of the total number of streaming subscriptions that it has, it has 221, it says now, which is just slightly more than Netflix has. And of course, what you need to generate those numbers is a splashy, expensive product, have all those extra eyeballs and subscriptions translated into profits for the companies. Well, no, and so far it's been a ruinously expensive exercise for everybody. People have been throwing money at content and keeping their prices low to try and attract more and more subscribers. But I think that there's been a bit of a reassessment this year and companies are thinking more about the bottom line than they used to be. Disney has said, for instance, that this year is expected to see peak losses on Disney+, which is its main streaming service and that it expects Disney+ to become profitable in 2024, Warner Brothers discovery similarly has changed its tune. It's now said that it's going to target profit making instead of subscriber numbers. It's new chief executive actually said that the target was to make a $1 billion in profit by 2025 and as long as they did that, he said he didn't really care how many subscribers they had. What about traditional media to what extent does that play into these companies concerns, especially the legacy media companies? Well, old school media is having a bit of a mini revival. I mean, obviously, during the pandemic, things like cinemas and theme parks were having a terrible time. They were all closed. But they're back now. And it's not quite as it was. The box office is certainly not going to make as much this year as it did in 2019 and we saw actually just the other day cine world has said that it's considering filing for bankruptcy in the United States. So things aren't back to normal, but you've seen examples like Top Gun: Maverick which came out in May, paramount, held that back during the pandemic, is they wanted to give it a cinematic run. And that turned out to be the right choice for them. It's taken something like $1.3 billion so far at the box office. So I think a lot of studios are looking at that and thinking actually maybe the theater is still worth something and we don't necessarily want to release everything on streaming on the same day. In fact, Warner Brothers has done a big U turn there. They said last year that they would release all their films on HBO Max on the very same day that they came out in theaters. This year, they're going back to exclusive runs in cinemas. And even things like broadcast TV and cable TV for which the long-term picture is pretty grim. They still look like relative safe havens of stability at a time when the streaming picture is very, very bumpy. And Tom, where do you see this headed? What's the longer term view? Well, I mean, the long term outlook for things like cable and broadcast is not great because it seems like the inevitable shift is that people are going to drop cable and in future watch most, if not all of their video on the streaming services. The other thing, though, I think that would worry me if I worked at one of these older studios is that the kind of competition that they're engaged in with some of these new tech firms is a very weird kind of unequal competition. You know, particularly thinking of Amazon and Apple. For them streaming is just a sideline. They don't even need to make money out of it. For Amazon Prime Video and Lord of the Rings is just a way to try and get people to stay in the prime bundle because if you're in prime, you end up buying all your stuff on Amazon and that's how they make their money. And something similar is true for Apple. They don't really need to make money out of Apple TV plus. They just want people to stay in the Apple ecosystem and make sure their next phone is an iPhone. So if you're Netflix or if you're Disney or anybody else really for whom media is your only business, I think this is a terrifying competition to be in because you're competing against a company that doesn't even need to make money on the business that is your only business. And these companies are getting pretty big initially they were just dabbling, but Amazon this year is expected by Morgan Stanley and investment bank to spend something like $16 billion on media content, which is slightly more than Netflix. So these are really, really big operators now. So how are they thinking about it? What is old Hollywood doing to counter this new model? Well, you're going to see a lot more in the way of bundling, I think, Warner Brothers discovery is itself an example of this. These two companies recently merged and they're two services HBO Max and discovery are going to become one service. So you're going to get more bundles like that, Disney is doing something similar in the states. And through that, they're trying to offer better value. They've got amazing libraries. It's very hard to rival Disney back catalog and certainly Apple doesn't have anything like that. So I think the studios are using the depth of their library and the ability to offer these bundles as a way of trying to persuade customers that they can offer better value. I think the difficulty there is that when it comes to bundling some of these new tech firms can offer bundles of their own. Amazon Prime is an obvious example of this where you get the video you get music as well. You get the shopping, a whole bunch of different stuff. Apple has a similar bundle called Apple one. And so as we're heading into a what looks like a pretty grim economy, I do wonder if mega total media bundles like that are going to appeal to customers who are looking to save money. So the bundling thing will help Hollywood up to a point. But they may find that their outcompeted on bundling. So as these companies compete with each other with different bundles, what does this all mean for consumers? Well, I think for now, it's pretty great for consumers. You've got all this amazing spending going on. Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones between them are going to cost well over half a $1 billion and consumers can watch this stuff very cheaply. I think the new focus that we're seeing on making money rather than just growth at any cost is going to mean that some of these deals are a bit less spectacular in future than they have been until now. Disney just announced a fairly steep price increase in Disney+. Netflix has been increasing its price now. I think some of these bargains are going to be a bit less bug in some in futures. But I think the presence of these competitors like Amazon and Apple is going to keep prices down and keep content investment up, precisely because these companies don't really need to make money out of their streaming services. And so they can continue to offer them at really very, very discounted rates. So

Netflix Disney Tom Wainwright Warner Brothers Apple Amazon Hollywood HBO paramount United States Tom Morgan Stanley
"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

03:14 min | 3 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Doing okay.

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:16 min | 3 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"First up, though. Somalia is caught in a terrible moment. Last week, the country's president Hassan Sheik Muhammad spoke after a deadly terror attack at a hotel in Mogadishu, the country's capital killed at least 20 people. Terrorism is a perennial problem for Somalia and the jihadists who control vast swathes of the country have once again struck in the capital. But it's not the only crisis facing the country right now. There's not much rain forecast now in Somalia or Kenya or Tanzania. In East African republic, there has been a hint of a few showers in south and in fact, this rain belt moving up into Somalia might be good news for the Horn of Africa. But it's a little bit too little and too late to be quite honest. And that's more or less it. Brutal weather has meant little to no food is growing. Faltering domestic security, punishing conditions, and global food shortages are now conspiring to push millions to the brink of starvation. Things are pretty bad in Somalia. There's a consensus among experts that Somalia is on the brink of famine. It is already deep in humanitarian crisis. Adrian blomfield is The Economist East Africa correspondent. More than 7 million people that's 48% of the population are already struggling to find food 1.4 million children are acutely or severely malnourished 800,000 people have been forced to leave their homes because of hunger. So we're looking at a very, very serious situation, and Adrian, how much of the crisis in Somalia is due to the drought. Drought lies essentially at the heart of this crisis. It's not the only cause of the crisis, there are others to it, but we are seeing what is clearly the most extensive drought in 40 years. And this is why people are so worried. In 2011, Somalia experienced the worst famine of the 21st century globally. That led to 250,000 deaths and again that was partly caused by drought. You had three failed rains in a row. This time round we're seeing four failed rains in a row. Somalia gets two lots of rains a year. And what is even more worrying is that the dare reigns, which are due to fall between October and December, the forecast for those is looking pretty grim as well. And these droughts are another issue that can at least be associated with climate change, right? Well, I think experts are a little bit cautious about saying that, but that is certainly the feeling. Somalia is drought prone and it has tended throughout history to suffer bad droughts once every 5 years. But what we're seeing now is more severe and more extensive droughts. And that is something that is causing concern for people like Christoph hodder, who is the UN's climate adviser in Somalia. He says that this is the most extensive drought in 40 years. And that things are likely to continue in this vein. Now what we're seeing is that in the last 15 years, at least we had the 2011 one way of the 2017 one we've got the 2022 one and we can also see that the number of flooding so last year we had quite considerable floods and so we can see that cycle of disasters and the frequency of disasters happening. So droughts alone don't cause famines, but when you have droughts becoming more extensive and becoming longer, which is what we're seeing at the moment, then that makes the situation worse and exacerbates the issues that already are confronting Somalia. What do you mean by that? What issues are they? So Somalia, you have a situation of drought and then it's made worse by two factors. One is the domestic fact. Somalia has been in a state of political turmoil since 1991, which is when the central government collapsed following the ouster of siad Barre, you had decades of Civil War of warlordism and of Islamist insurgency. We still have a situation of weak government and weak governance and that has a knock on effect on the economy. So Somalia produces much less of its own food than it used to. And the cause of that is because of a lack of investment in agriculture. And what that has meant is that Somalia is increasingly dependent on imports. Somalia now imports really 80% of its cereals, including most of its Staples such as rice, pasta, and cooking oil. So that means that Somalia has been left extremely vulnerable to global price rises, so largely this is down to a really unfortunate interaction then between climactic conditions and bad domestic governance. Yes, essentially those are the two that come together. And what we've seen worsening the situation in the last decade or so is that the government itself already weak doesn't control most of the countryside. Instead, it is the jihadist movement Al shabab, which is the richest and most murderous of Al-Qaeda's affiliates, has taken possession of most of the country and certainly there are people who are dying because they are in Al shabab territory and can't get to aid agencies who are operating in the towns. It's too dangerous for aid agencies to go out into the countryside. One of the places that has been at the heart of many famines is Baidoa and I was speaking to a doctor there who's been telling me about the conditions that he's been seeing where he's been treating children whose mothers are bringing them into the hospital from Al shabaab territory and many of them are in an extremely bad way already for the last three months. The number of creases from one electric increase the number of cases, lots of hospitals and lots of aid agencies saying that they're seeing increases of between 50 and a 100% of patients coming in. And that often tends to be because people bring their children into the hospital. Malnutrition is a very common thing, but then they have seen a lot of cases of acute diarrhea and related illnesses. And they're just saying that there is simply no food, the crops of withered, the livestock have died. And they can no longer buy food because they're fewer traders going in. I spoke to one mother who had to make that agonizing decision about when to bring her child to hospital. If she came to early and her child was okay, then that would have wasted the little money that she had and she nearly brought her child into late. But after several weeks in hospital, her child is now

Somalia Hassan Sheik Muhammad East African republic Adrian blomfield Christoph hodder Mogadishu Horn of Africa Tanzania East Africa famines Kenya Adrian Al shabab UN central government Baidoa Al shabaab
Elections and White Guilt

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:10 min | 3 months ago

Elections and White Guilt

"I don't even know. I find the guilt question complex. You may be right. And of course, in the final analysis, it only matters what people do, not their motives. I think it's where I think their brainwashed at college, frankly, I don't even know anyway, watch their guilt with regard to a woman whose life was saved by America fleeing Somalia. This is about checking boxes, you know, I feel like a good person because I voted for a woman. I feel like a good person, a good white person because I voted for someone of a different ethnic background than I voted for a Somali woman. And so I'm voting for intersectionality. And so I therefore look at me, look how uncertain I am. Look at how much of a do gooder I am because I voted outside of my own demographic and I can therefore, you know, walk around and say that I am a good person because of look who I chose to put in office, look at me.

Somalia America
"somalia" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:45 min | 3 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on WTOP

"Sports. Top stories we're following this morning on WTO the siege at a hotel in Somalia's capital by Islamic militants has ended. The firefight with security forces left at least 20 people dead 40 others wounded, the Islamic extremist group Al shabaab, with ties to Al-Qaeda, has claimed responsibility for the attack. D.C. police have arrested a man they believe strangled a woman to death nearly 30 years ago in southeast. Deborah McManus was found in southeast to 1993, William ranford now faces second degree murder charges. After weeks of triple digit temperatures and virtually no rain parts of Texas are about to get drenched. A series of storms expected to soak the seat over the next few days, raising fears of flash flooding. Stay with WTO for more on these stories and just minutes. Two 47, and President Biden has signed a new law that extends benefits for families of officers who died by suicide. Scott McFarland. This is going to help a lot of people. It's not just me, but others who have gone through this as well. And they now will get the recognition that they're due from the federal government. A CBS News review found more than 750 officers have died by suicide since 2017. Families left behind risk being destitute with the loss of not only a loved one, but of an income, bipartisan legislation to provide those families federal benefits sailed through Congress earlier this summer with a push from Aaron, Aaron Smith is the widow of D.C. police officer Jeff Smith. He was one of four police officers to take their own lives after fighting violent rioters at the capitol. On January 6th. It's two 48. Traffic

Al shabaab Deborah McManus WTO William ranford President Biden Somalia Scott McFarland Qaeda D.C. Al Texas CBS News federal government Aaron Smith Jeff Smith Congress Aaron
"somalia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:22 min | 3 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Rio Grande to port Mansfield, Texas, through early Sunday. At least 20 people are dead over 50 injured after Al-Qaeda linked militants stormed a hotel in Somalia's capital city of Mogadishu, the attackers blasted their way into the building with multiple car bombs before opening fire Friday night and intelligence offered confirm most of the victims were civilians, and the gunmen were holding an unknown number of people hostage. I'm Brad Siegel. Actor Gary Busey is facing multiple charges, including criminal sexual contact after attending a convention in New Jersey last week. Lisa Salvador has that story. And cherry hill police tell the Philadelphia inquirer the department got multiple complaints about the 78 year old actor and that it was about quote contact and touching. Police have responded to a report of the sex offense at the double tree hotel where the monster mania horror film convention was taking place from August 12th through the 14th. Busy is best known for his Oscar nominated performance in the title role of the 1978 film the Buddy Holly story. Do you see that past brushes with the law, including an arrest on drug charges and spousal abuse charges? President Biden will host a bipartisan summit next month to address growing hate fueled attacks across the country. Lisa Taylor has more. Biden aims to deliver on a campaign promise of unity amidst dark division, Monica Alba is at The White House. He'll gather a bipartisan group of federal state and local officials as well as civil rights groups and faith and business leaders to examine what's ailing America, with a united we stand summit next month. The conference taking place during a particularly fraught political environment. After the recent FBI search at former president Trump's Mar-a-Lago home. I'm Lisa Taylor. Former president Trump is threatening a Fourth Amendment lawsuit over that FBI search and seizure of documents that is Florida home. Trump vowed to file a major motion soon in a post on his truth social media platform, the post comes after a federal judge moved to unseal parts of the affidavit used to give the FBI probable cause for the search at Mar-a-Lago earlier this month. Sean Connery's James Bond Carr brought in a whopping $2.4 million at auction this week. The silver 1964 Aston Martin DB 5 was driven in the 1960s bonds film when Connery played the famous secret agent. The one Connery purchased for himself in 2018 with standard issue. I'm

port Mansfield Brad Siegel Lisa Salvador Lisa Taylor cherry hill police president Trump President Biden Gary Busey Mogadishu Rio Grande Qaeda Monica Alba Somalia Philadelphia inquirer Buddy Holly Al Texas New Jersey FBI Oscar
"somalia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

03:29 min | 3 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"At Bloomberg markets, our guests know where to get the answers just to put a good word in for Bloomberg, one of the few systems you can easily use to figure it out is right in front of you. Inside. Analysis. In the best from the Bloomberg terminal. The Bloomberg terminal is like a Ducati Panigale. And I can extract maybe 5 to 6%. It was totally fine. I don't think you're even close. I think it's like sitting on top of a Saturn V 5. Bloomberg markets with Paul Sweeney and met Miller, weekday mornings at ten eastern, on Bloomberg radio. House Democrats are calling on social media companies to give them information on a spike in violent threats against law enforcement officers, representatives Carolyn maloney and Stephen lynch sent a letter to several companies, including meta and Twitter regarding an increase in online threats since the FBI raided ex-president Trump's Florida estate. Former president Trump is threatening legal action over the FBI search at his Mar-a-Lago property in a post on his truth social media platform, Trump said he would soon file a major motion relating to what he called the illegal surge of his Florida state. At least a dozen people are dead after Al-Qaeda linked militants stormed a hotel in Somalia's capital city, the attackers blasted their way into the building with multiple car bombs before opening fire Friday night. An intelligence officer confirmed most of the victims were civilians, terrorist group Al shabaab has claimed responsibility for the attack. That's the latest I'm Julie Ryan. And I'm Susanna Palmer in the Bloomberg newsroom. The city expects 1000 school age asylum seekers will enter the public school system this fall. New York City leaders say pop up family welcome centers will be set up, meant to simplify the school enrollment process. Fox 5 reports school officials are saying PS1 11 in hell's kitchen has already enrolled 50 migrant students so far. The city is also looking into coordinating transportation and hiring more bilingual teachers. The influx of migrants comes as the city's school system is already facing potential budget cuts. New York is among four states set to receive as much as $750 million overall to provide capital for small businesses. More from Bloomberg's Charlie pelvic. The other states are Colorado, Montana and Oregon and it comes under the state's small business credit initiative. New York is slated for the most aid up to $501.5 million. The initiative started in 2010 was reauthorized under the American rescue plan act of 2021 to give a combined $10 billion to states, territories, and tribal governments for job creation and pandemic recovery. Bloomberg's Charlie pellet. Well, if you have an Apple device, security experts are urging you to update it as soon as possible. Apple disclosed of this week that it has found a serious vulnerability that could allow a hacker to take control of your iPhone, iPad, or Mac, Samantha, with Business Insider tells us what a hacker could potentially do. Hackers can basically take control of the devices and impersonate their owners, whether that be downloading applications on the device or even committing financial crimes potentially. You can try to thwart hackers, she says, by using a password manager. Global news, 24 hours a day on air and on Bloomberg quicktake powered by more than 2700 journalists and analysts in more than 120 countries. I'm Susanna Palmer. This is Bloomberg

Bloomberg Bloomberg terminal Paul Sweeney met Miller Carolyn maloney Trump FBI Al shabaab Susanna Palmer Julie Ryan Stephen lynch Florida Lago Charlie pelvic meta Qaeda Somalia
At least 20 killed, dozens wounded in attack on hotel in Somalia's capital

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | 3 months ago

At least 20 killed, dozens wounded in attack on hotel in Somalia's capital

"Islamic militants have stormed a hotel in Somalia killing over a dozen people as they engaged in an hour's long exchange of fire the attacks started with explosions outside of the popular hayat hotel in Somalia's capital Mogadishu over three dozen people were wounded as well as over a dozen dead as security forces rushed to rescue as many people as possible Somali forces were still trying to end the siege of the hotel almost 24 hours after the attack started Gunfire could still be heard the following evening as security forces tried to contain the last gunmen thought to be holed up on the hotel's top floor I'm Karen

Somalia Hayat Hotel Mogadishu Karen
"somalia" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:57 min | 3 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on WTOP

"Schedule your free in home estimate. It's 5 11 here in the U.S. Military says its U.S. Africa command conducted an air strike against Al shabaab terrorists this week in Somalia. On this week this week's episode of the hunt with WTO national security correspondent JJ green, doctor Hans Jacob Schindler, who is senior director of the counter extremism project, says the strike was important to keep Al shabab under control. If not the largest, one of the largest Al-Qaeda affiliates around the globe. Al shabaab actually runs large parts of Somalia. Around 30%, I think, expert conclude. Therefore, a Al-Qaeda affiliate being in control of a part of the country with big tentacles into the economy of Somalia, including international shipping going out and into Somalia by controlling a little bit of the harbors in Somalia is a real concern. What is the U.S.'s interest in something like this? Well, first of all, I'm famously ultra pop was one of the Al-Qaeda affiliates who did actually attract foreign to fighters. After the first episode in Afghanistan, 2001 was over. You had Somali immigrants from Europe and the United States actually traveling to Somalia to join Al shabaab. That alone is of course an epic problem because pointers fighters of that kind of experience in the west are also very good to use for attacks in the west. Secondly, algebra in the last couple of years has built up beyond summer. Original network, a couple of years ago, there were attacks in Kenya at a shopping center at the university. Clearly demonstrating that Al shabaab has ambitions that go beyond Somalia. And thirdly, if Somalia goes completely destabilized, if you remember a couple of years ago, we had a massive piracy problem and right off the coast of Somalia caused by the fact that the Somali economy was completely destroyed. And if you don't stabilize Somalia, this may come back at a time where international shipping lanes and supply chains are very, very important. Doctor Hans Jacob Schindler, senior director of the counter extremism project, the full conversation at WTO P dot com search national security. JJ green, WTO news. And still to come on Devi TOP more U.S. money is headed to Ukraine. It's 5 13. Here's a highlight from Danny Connolly. The chief information security officer for America's public sector at Z scaler on the zero trust cyber exchange presented by Keras off. It's everybody's responsibility to help with that cultural mindset shift to share information with people that you might not typically share information with. There's so many different teams that are involved in agencies zero trust journey. So break down the silos between teams and start communicating. Listen to the entire discussion on federal news network, search zero trust cyber exchange. This is your world secured by Z scaler, a world where the U.S. government and their partners are protected

Somalia Al shabaab Hans Jacob Schindler JJ green Qaeda counter extremism project Al shabab U.S. WTO U.S. Military Africa Al Afghanistan Danny Connolly Kenya Europe Ukraine U.S. government
Moving From Action to Administration With LTG Jerry Boykin

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:02 min | 4 months ago

Moving From Action to Administration With LTG Jerry Boykin

"You as a man of action. I mean, you're just a gregarious guy. You love big, you talk, you're there. You want to be an action. That's what about you the force to start with. When you started moving toward the more administrative roles, how did that for someone like you how did that make was that different? Was that almost a more difficult challenge? Oh, yeah. I mean, it always is, especially when you're sent from being on the front lines with the Delta force up to The Pentagon. You know, that's like being thrown off to San Francisco bridge or something. But you know what, what was good about that was, I. Actually was only only the staff therefore a little while, and I got sent over to the CIA. So I spent a couple of years at CIA running covert actions there to CIA. And so it kind of put me back in the fight, so to speak, and that was a great assignment. And I got to tell you, don't ever say anything bad about CIA around me, because they are, they have some of the finest professionals in the government. And then when I came back for my second tour at The Pentagon, I wound up going over to the Balkans running a task force there to capture war criminals, remember after the Dayton accords, there had been an agreement that all of the war and factions would turn in the people that were identified as war criminals, but they didn't do it. So I was running a task force out of Sarajevo that was capturing war criminals and that was that was a great assignment. I mean, I really enjoyed that. And then I left that job after about a year and came back to take over all the green berets, but I got to tell you, I just kept getting put back into those positions where I could feel like I was still part of the game.

CIA Pentagon Delta Force San Francisco Balkans Dayton Sarajevo
LTG Jerry Boykin Describes the 'Freedom to Fail'

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:10 min | 4 months ago

LTG Jerry Boykin Describes the 'Freedom to Fail'

"Times we forget that if we can come and take our mistakes, we own our prior stakes, or we try to correct them, we find out where we need to. It not only affects us, but it affects those around us, whether it's in business, whether it's in our family and others, because then they also say it's okay. Is this not okay to intentionally fail, but it's okay to learn from the mistakes that we make. Yeah, in a very important thing there that you're saying is leaders have to be willing to underwrite certain failures. Now, I mean, there is a limit to that. But leaders, you develop people by giving them the freedom to fail. Now, that becomes very serious when you're talking about people's lives. But if you think about it, if you've got the freedom to fail, you know that you will, you will do Larry at the very best that you can, but if you fail, the one who tasks you with that mission is going to stand with you. So long as you did not violate ethics or morals or the law, then you've got to be able to have the freedom to fail.

Larry
A Discussion With LTG Jerry Boykin on Iran and Mogadishu

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:31 min | 4 months ago

A Discussion With LTG Jerry Boykin on Iran and Mogadishu

"Sort of tie two events together and you sort of you highlight in one of the first real big, I guess delta mission that we could discuss and she brought up was this issue in Iran during that time. It didn't end like everybody thought it would. In fact, it ended up in a very much a missed failure is the mission goes, but we grew out of that. Taking a step further to what you just said about Mogadishu, which was about 12 to 13 years apart. What was going on? I mean, how did you overcome what happened in Iran in the first take of really what was looking at. And then how it progressed to what you saw happening in Mogadishu. Yeah, that's an interesting question because I will tell you that when I came out of Iran, I was, I felt like I was carrying the weight of the world. You know, we had failed. We had failed. Our country, we had failed those 52 people that were held there as hostages and I got to tell you, we all, all of us, we carried a tremendous burden. But then we, several years later, we were able to look back and say, but what happened as a result of that? You know what happened as a result of that. Jimmy Carter was not reelected, and Ronald Reagan was, and Ronald Reagan began a ramp up of the military with increasing the budget giving them the priority and letting the commanders do their jobs, and had brought about a total modernization of our military.

Iran Mogadishu Delta Ronald Reagan Jimmy Carter
LTG Jerry Boykin Discusses His Time in Vietnam

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:44 min | 4 months ago

LTG Jerry Boykin Discusses His Time in Vietnam

"Jenna, let's start this off a little bit for folks to who may not know you. And I know that might be hard to believe for a lot of quotes, but some may not. How did you, when you first went in, you were growing up and he went into the military and you've been in, you were in a long time. You were 30 something years, you came in. Do you came in right at the end of Vietnam or was it still Vietnam still going on? Where were you at in that process? Yeah, I came in and December of 1970. And Vietnam was still going on and as a matter of fact, I eventually wound up spending about three months there in Vietnam in 1972 all the way up to the ceasefire in 73, and then I came home. Okay. So you saw the ending there in some of that fallout and I'm sure that brought back a lot of issues we'll get to later with this Afghanistan issue that we just saw in this past year, so it was just the very frustration of a lot that was going on during that time. Yeah, it was. It was not a good time for the military and general, but certainly for the army. And the reason was that we had a lot of conscripts in the military. This was an army that was made up mostly of people that had been drafted and they did not want to be in the military and they didn't want to be in Vietnam and as a result of that. The army had a lot of drug problems, racial problems and different types of problems. Family espousal abuse, family problems and so I came in and that period and it was not what I expected, but I also realized very early that we had a lot of work to do and I think over the years with good leadership, we turned that all around.

Vietnam Jenna Army Afghanistan
Report: UK clearly overwhelmed by surge in migrant crossings

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 4 months ago

Report: UK clearly overwhelmed by surge in migrant crossings

"An independent inspection has found that Britain's response to growing numbers of migrants crossing the English Channel on small boats is poor and officials are clearly overwhelmed on some days The review by David Neal the chief inspector of borders and immigration is among critical reports published this week on the British government's handling of migration and asylum seekers a thought is have been struggling to cope with an increasing flow of people fleeing countries such as Afghanistan Somalia and Iraq to seek asylum and better opportunities in the UK since the start of the year around 15,000 people have reached British shores of the crossing the English Channel One of the world's busiest shipping lanes from France in the unseaworthy vessels like rubber dinghies London

David Neal Britain British Government Somalia Afghanistan Iraq UK France London
"somalia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:31 min | 5 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"People in Somalia are facing famine. Works with save the children in Somalia. He says organizations like his need one thing to help Somalis on the brink of starvation. We need money. Because a currently the markets are working, there is still food, which is expensive. But the markets are working. So we did a lot of resources. The UN has made an appeal of 1.5 billion to avert famine. That's initial estimate with the current increase in number of people affected by drought. We are likely to need more. You heard Gabriel the free market in Somalia is working. That means, though, that the cost of food is rising and more people go hungry. Hunger and Somalia has more than one cause of course, droughts that last longer and happen more frequently and rushes more in Ukraine, which cuts Somalia off from one of its main international food sources. Gebru appeals for more resources haven't yet worked. I think partly there is a donor fatigue. With so much attention on devastation elsewhere in the world, he says Somalia's crisis just hasn't been at the top of donor's minds. Gebru told our co host Leila fadel, the country doesn't even have enough hospital beds to care for its malnourished children. Health facilities are required to support because they are at the breaking point in many places in our children who are malnutrition. They get admitted into existing beds. And then most of the bits are already full, children are admitted under sheds, open spaces, even offices are used for treatment of children with severe acute malnutrition. So there's no space for kids who are malnourished in the hospitals anymore. Absolutely. Absolutely. The castle is way higher than what the existing facility is going to hold. What specifically are families dealing with choices people are having to make when they're faced with a lack of food, a lack of water. People in places in the south, they say of their available couples to feed the children and these are normally the sorts of milk for children. And unfortunately, when those severely affected regions, most families have lost their cattles, Somalia overall has lost 300 million cattle, which is the way I have another neighboring countries out of the 7 million, which is a region I've lost. These are the sorts of food, the sorts of live loot. So they can't even have their curtains to be sold. So they're having to make a choice between their long-term livelihood with the cattle and selling them off to immediately feed their families. Absolutely. On top of that, people have to travel up to three days with children to areas which are not occupied by extreme organization, which has occupied a large swath of territory in the southern central region, which is made by affected by the doubt. So parents have to travel with the kids for two, three days to reach where support is provided. And along the way, they lose children from their generation provision. How has it gotten this bad? Would you draw a connection to climate change to Russia's war in Ukraine and the famine in Somalia? Somalia, I used to experience droughts every 5 to 6 years in the past. Now it has become every three years. It has become more successive. And it becomes also very severe. Ukraine has taken the attention of the international community almost totally and the crisis in Somalia as well as in the horn has been neglected. And we are climate is of course the main culprit. And then Somalia is contribution to global warming, or carbon emission is insignificant, but the branches borne by the country particularly in a woman, children of Somalia. So the drought is a cause of the climate crisis, which Somalia is not necessarily contributing to. I think Western countries, which contribute significantly to that should have a responsibility to support and build Somalia out. Now Ukraine has come the traditional layer station, making the station boards because food crisis has increased. Somalia depends on its import on Russia and Ukraine up to 95%. The war in Ukraine has contributed to the current crisis directly and also indirectly. So what could the U.S. do if the Biden administration wanted to help alleviate some of the suffering? Yeah, I think they should pay equal attention to the crisis in the horn here we are looking at in a country which is heading toward a famine situation and hundreds of thousands of people are likely to die from starvation in front of our eyes where you can really do something now end up I think the U.S. should make Somalia a priority, you know, the same as probably Ukraine because in terms of human days and casualities where it's much bigger number we're looking at you. So then who do not contribute to any of these and the ones of a remote and they are dying in front of our eyes in our health facilities where we treat children with severe acute malnutrition. We lost 8 children in one month alone. And admission rate has tripled compared to the same time last year. And then these are children. If they don't get treatment, they would die. Time is running out, but we can still really with the concern to depart and dinner resources. We can't save lives. Is with save the children in Somalia. Thank you so much for your time. It's a pleasure, Jeff.

Somalia Gebru Ukraine severe acute malnutrition Leila fadel Gabriel UN Russia Biden administration U.S. Jeff
"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

01:38 min | 6 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Been enjoying that. So for me, it really is a kind of battle between the box office and the sofa. In my case, I think the sofa is winning so far, but hopefully I'll get out soon to the theater. How about you? The sofa wins in my house too, and so does token. I'm looking forward to seeing Lord of the Rings. But either way, thanks so much for stopping by, Tom. Thanks a lot..

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:49 min | 6 months ago

"somalia" Discussed on The Economist: The Intelligence

"Today, Hassan Sheik Muhammad was inaugurated as president of Somalia. Ten years after he first entered the presidential palace, this makes him the first president to hold the office twice since Somalia became independent in 1960. But while mister Muhammad has broken new political ground, his country faces many of the same challenges it did when he first took office. The threat of widespread famine vast swaths of territory held by jihadists. And much like in 2012, terror attacks are routine. So I went to Somalia just a few days after the election. And to get to Mogadishu's always rather complicated. Tom Gardner is The Economist Horn of Africa correspondent. You arrive at the airport and basically all the international organizations, businesses are in the green zone which surrounds the airport. And this is basically a fortified mini city within a city, chequered by roadblocks, Ugandan soldiers everywhere who provide the kind of African Union security. And to leave it requires an enormous armed escort. So for me, just to journey a few hundred meters down the road outside of the airport zone required being accompanied by 7 soldiers in a Jeep and a mounted machine gun going through multiple checkpoints. The atmosphere along the road as I exited the airport was, I would say quiet, a very little street life. Tends to be honest, and then I arrived at what appears from the outside to be a military barracks. Again, multiple soldiers, milling around, and then I had to pass through multiple perimeters, essentially, until eventually reaching the heart of this hotel compound where inside I found the newly elected president of Somalia Hassan Sheik Muhammad. So tell me about him, tell me about the man himself, what was your impression of him? Well, he's an academic, he's a civil rights campaigner. He spent his entire life pretty much living in Somalia, even after the state collapsed in the 1990s. He's Ivanka, he's soft spoken, mild mannered, and seems very conciliatory as a person. But he's tough as well. He has to be. I mean, four days before his last inauguration back in 2012, he survived an assassination attempt. In fact, he survived multiple assassination attempts in the last ten years. This time around, he has so far been lucky enough to avoid anything like that, but the country is taking over is still a very dangerous place. So tell us about that. What kind of country is he taking over? He's taking over a country, which is more divided, more insecure and more isolated diplomatically than it was when he took power in 2012 and indeed when he left power and handed over to his successor in 2017 because since then, the country has slid backwards. The outgoing Somali president Muhammad abdullahi Muhammad better known as farmajo was a populist basically. I mean, he sidelined powerful regional leaders. He lashed out at critics, he packed his cronies into the federal security forces, and he also upset foreign allies too. He drew close to Qatar and turkey at the expense of other influential Gulf states, the United Arab Emirates in particular, and he picked fights with neighboring Kenya and Djibouti. Hassan Sheik Muhammad told me he had run for office again in order to calm the hostile atmosphere in Somalia. In Somalia, whether he is the president or whether he's a ordinary citizen, his living in a risk zone. This time around, I'm seeing an opportunity. And that I can put stronger foundations for this state building some money. I'm not claiming that I will leave some money. Like Denmark and Finland, but I'm going to leave Somalia much better than us I came to it. Things really came to a head last year when farmajo's attempt to stay in office by delaying elections threatened a return to full scale Civil War. So you've described an exceptionally fractious country. It sounds like do you feel that president Muhammad is in a position to heal those divisions? Will be difficult. I mean, whoever has run Somalia elaborate of clan loyalties typically undermine national unity. But he does come to power on the back of considerable goodwill, many Somalis have welcomed his return as the man to the fix the mess. And he's moved fast. I'd say to mend bridges with opponents, one of the first things he did actually after winning the election was to invite all of Somalia's regional leaders to a meal together. He then promised he would share power and complete a new federal constitution. A broad two he's making some friendly advances. He told me about his international diplomacy. And foreign leaders who have rushed to support the new man, America, in particular, is sending hundreds of troops back into Somalia to help the government fight a jihadist organization called Al shabab, which is affiliated with Al-Qaeda. And at one point, Al shabaab controlled wide swathes of territory. How much of a threat does it now pose today? So in Hassan Sheik's first term, the jihadists weren't knocked back and he told me about how his administration had liberated many towns during his time in power. But since then, he says it spread again across the country. We lost most of those districts that we liberated in 2012 to 2016. All these district is being taken back by Al shabaab, many of them, not it controls much the countryside. And it's claimed to have infiltrated state institutions in recent years in particular the security apparatus. In the places they control Al shabaab also runs courts, it provides basic goods and services. They're more entrenched now than they ever were. Revenue now they are collecting revenue, some estimates say they collect more revenue than the government itself. They are everywhere now. In the institutions and the port and the customs, so they are now establishing a kind of deep state within our estate and within the country. Because of the compromising of the security apparatus, a few places are safe. We just heard president Muhammad say that he liberated districts during his first term, what is his plan to deal with Al shabaab this time? Islamist with links to the Muslim Brotherhood. So I think that helps explain the stress he put on winning the ideological battle, waging a kind of multi front war as he put it to take the Islamic narrative back from Al shabab. But I think a last thing solution will probably require talks with Al shabab as well. And that means first, pushing them back, building a favorable military position to negotiate from. The last big offensive against Al shabaab was in 2019 that hasn't shaken says he will launch another, and then once he's really pushed them back deep into the countryside, theoretically talks could begin. I think in practice that could take years. So jihadism, as embodied by Al shabaab, that's probably the most well-known threat facing Somalia, but.

Somalia Hassan Sheik Muhammad farmajo mister Muhammad Al shabaab Tom Gardner Muhammad abdullahi Muhammad president Muhammad Mogadishu African Union Al shabab Ivanka Gulf states Djibouti Africa Hassan Sheik United Arab Emirates Qatar Kenya turkey
'Only God can help': Hundreds die as Somalia faces famine

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 6 months ago

'Only God can help': Hundreds die as Somalia faces famine

"Previously unreported data shared with The Associated Press shows at least 448 deaths this year at malnutrition centers in Somalia alone authorities in Somalia Ethiopia and Kenya are now shifting to the grim task of trying to prevent famine many more people are dying beyond the notice of authorities some die in remote pastoral communities while others perish on treks in search of help someday even after reaching displacement camps malnourished beyond aid a UN humanitarian coordinator says definitely thousands have died though the data to support this is yet to come I'm Charles De

Somalia The Associated Press Ethiopia Kenya UN Charles De
Reversing Trump, Biden acts to deploy US troops to Somalia

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 7 months ago

Reversing Trump, Biden acts to deploy US troops to Somalia

"President president president president Biden Biden Biden Biden is is is is ordering ordering ordering ordering U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. forces forces forces forces to to to to Somalia Somalia Somalia Somalia amid amid amid amid growing growing growing growing concerns concerns concerns concerns about about about about the the the the African African African African nations nations nations nations Islamic Islamic Islamic Islamic extremist extremist extremist extremist rebels rebels rebels rebels that that that that comes comes comes comes after after after after Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon chief chief chief chief Lloyd Lloyd Lloyd Lloyd Austin Austin Austin Austin asked asked asked asked to to to to re re re re establish establish establish establish a a a a persistent persistent persistent persistent U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. military military military military presence presence presence presence in in in in Somalia Somalia Somalia Somalia to to to to enable enable enable enable a a a a more more more more effective effective effective effective fight fight fight fight against against against against all all all all should should should should Bob Bob Bob Bob the the the the al al al al Qaeda Qaeda Qaeda Qaeda linked linked linked linked militants militants militants militants have have have have made made made made gains gains gains gains in in in in recent recent recent recent months months months months after after after after being being being being pushed pushed pushed pushed into into into into remote remote remote remote areas areas areas areas of of of of Somalia Somalia Somalia Somalia a a a a senior senior senior senior administration administration administration administration official official official official confirms confirms confirms confirms the the the the president president president president has has has has signed signed signed signed a a a a deployment deployment deployment deployment order order order order which which which which reverses reverses reverses reverses Donald Donald Donald Donald trump's trump's trump's trump's lead lead lead lead term term term term decision decision decision decision to to to to remove remove remove remove nearly nearly nearly nearly all all all all the the the the seven seven seven seven hundred hundred hundred hundred US US US US special special special special operators operators operators operators were were were were in in in in Somalia Somalia Somalia Somalia the the the the official official official official says says says says American American American American troops troops troops troops already already already already in in in in the the the the region region region region will will will will be be be be repositioned repositioned repositioned repositioned Sager Sager Sager Sager made made made made Ghani Ghani Ghani Ghani Washington Washington Washington Washington

Somalia U. U. U. U. S. S. S. S. President President President African African African Africa Pentagon Pentagon Pentagon Pen Lloyd Lloyd Lloyd Lloyd Austin Bob Bob Bob Bob Al Al Al Al Qaeda Qaeda Qaeda Administration Administration Donald Donald Donald Donald Tr United States American American American Ame Sager Sager Ghani Ghani Ghani Ghani Washington
Why Is It So Hard to Have Children in America?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:02 min | 8 months ago

Why Is It So Hard to Have Children in America?

"Bit. And I want to just kind of tease it. I'm going to try to find a couple guests that we can explore this with. And I'm not ready to make any claims yet. But something that is just plaguing young people in America. We get a lot of emails about this freedom at Charlie Kirk dot com that no one wants to talk about is why is it so hard to have children in America? Fertility rates are plummeting right now in America. IVF treatment is going up in demand. And no one really has an answer for this. Well, we do know that testosterone rates are going down in record numbers right now. And Tucker Carlson talks about this about the decline of testosterone in men as one of the biggest stories of our lifetime. What is causing this? Well, you are not the man that your grandfather was. Why is this being this being glossed over, play cut 13? One of the biggest stories of our lifetimes is the total collapse in testosterone levels in American men. Those levels are declining by roughly 10% per decade completely changing the way people are at the most fundamental level. NIH does not seem interested in this at all. It's not a big deal. We think it is a huge deal. We want to know what's causing it and what you can do about it. That's the topic of our upcoming documentary called the end of men. So I have an interesting question, which is, do most countries have issues? What countries have issues trying to have children which do not? I know at least in my sphere of friends and with influence, I could tell you that probably 50% of married couples that are trying to have children have difficulty getting pregnant. 50%. That's anecdotal. But then the question is, do most countries have that? And why is it that the top 25 countries that have high fertility rates happen to also be the poorest countries? Somalia,

Charlie Kirk America Tucker Carlson NIH Somalia
Kathy Barnette Reacts to Trump Endorsement for Dr. Oz

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:19 min | 8 months ago

Kathy Barnette Reacts to Trump Endorsement for Dr. Oz

"So tell me a little bit about your reaction to president Trump's endorsement of Doctor Oz because a lot of people were flabbergasted. Some dumbfounded some angry and some said, okay, I'll vote for us. What was Kathy Barnett's reaction? Well, I mean, you know, initially, it was a shock, right? I mean, I was downtown Philadelphia. I've been working with the Horn of Africa. There's those who will have come here from the Horn of Africa. There's over a 100,000 of those from sedans, Somalia, Eritrea, Ethiopia, who live here at Pennsylvania, highly concentrated between Harrisburg and Philadelphia. I've been working with them for several months. They hosted a very large fundraiser for me this past Saturday, and we were registered every single person changing their registration from Democrat to Republican. That's what I was doing. And someone turned on their phone and showed me what Donald Trump had done, and of course my initial reaction was like, oh my goodness, definitely know he's not really a conservative. But very quickly thereafter, I saw when a lot of people are seeing and that is across social media, my name is on everyone's list. So like I said, I started off. President Trump's endorsement of Oz is truly one of the best things that could have happened to our campaign. A lot of

Kathy Barnett Horn Of Africa Philadelphia Donald Trump Eritrea Somalia Ethiopia Harrisburg Pennsylvania President Trump
Dan Bongino Recalls Violent Situation in Kingston, Jamaica

The Dan Bongino Show

01:43 min | 8 months ago

Dan Bongino Recalls Violent Situation in Kingston, Jamaica

"I was thinking back to the time I had gone over to Kingston Jamaica which is not a war zone and it's case to Jamaica but they have a high crime rate so it can be dangerous depending on where you are what time of day But we found ourselves in my prior line of work in a really bad situation and we were there filming with this ABC crew for a book Jenna Bush was writing And we found ourselves caught at the end of this alley and a bunch of people came out that weren't necessarily friendly And some weapons and we got it all on video because it was being filmed for the thing We went back and looked at it later we were like gosh that was really bad So we went back to the hotel I forget what we were saying We went back to the hotel and that night we were having a few adult sodas afterwards The shift was over of course And I remember talking to the cameraman and I said to him you know it's interesting You never put the camera down that whole time He had these guys in front of you with the machetes and all this and you know you never put the camera down He kept filming he didn't even look even frazzled by it I keep in mind we're supposed to be these You know big you know tough masculine Secret Service dudes right And you know I was a little hanked out but I was like okay this could get ugly fast and I was scanning and looking around at all And yet this guy didn't seem worried at all and I talked to him about it I'm like you know that's kind of kind of cool how you didn't get frazzled He's like man let me tell you something This is nothing I was in Mogadishu and you know he was there when that whole Black Hawk down thing went down not filming that particular episode but right around that time when Somalia broke bad And he's like that was nothing

Jamaica Jenna Bush Kingston ABC Mogadishu Somalia
Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:24 min | 8 months ago

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same time. It's a little bit

CIA Mike Spann Mike Span Calla Jangi Mazarin Sharif Darius Souf Valley Kashi Khan Mazar Scott Spellman Trump Administration Sharif America Alex Hernandez Kunduz Northern Alliance Uzbekistan David Tyson Delta Force Taliban ALI
Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

04:22 min | 8 months ago

Toby Harnden Shares a Story From on the Ground in Afghanistan

"You mentioned this story, the prison uprising, Mike spann, a former marine CIA paramilitary. For those who know nothing, give us the story of that incredible event and what that man did. Yeah. It is incredible. And so November 25th, 2001. Two CIA officers walk into this fort called calla jangi, which means literally like fort of war outside mazar I Sharif. Now, backing up a little bit mazarin Sharif had fallen to northern alliance forces, aided by our allies. Our allies aided by the CIA green berets and air force combat controllers and the awesome might have U.S. air power overhead on November 10th. Now, less than a month earlier, Mike spann had been one of 8 CIA officers who landed in the Darius souf valley, aboard two Black Hawk helicopters that had flown in from Kashi Khan about K two, a former Soviet air base that Uzbekistan government had given over to the Americans for this post 9 11 mission. So October 17th, 2001, they land at dropped into the unknown. First Americans behind America. So we are barely barely a month out since 9 11. Yeah. First Americans behind them enemy lines. Now there had been a CIA team called jawbreaker that had landed in the pantry of Ali on September 26th, but that was, you know, relatively speaking safe territory controlled by the northern alliance. But this was enemy territory, Taliban controlled territory. So 8 of them, four of them were paramilitaries, one of those was Mike span. So when paramilitary is somebody who's been seconded, usually from the military and is working in the CIA using their skills for the CIA. Yeah, usually they actually in the CIA sometimes their contractors or people who've been seconded and on some of the other teams that were actually serving members of the Delta force and seals. But the four paramount trees on team alpha were serving CIOs special activities, division. Scott spellman, who was on the cover of the book, he was later became very senior, it was the senior CIA guy on the National Security Council during the Trump administration. He became station chief in Kabul, but then a young officer, but already battle hardened he had been wounded in the battle of Mogadishu in Somalia in 1993. It was a guy called Alex Hernandez, who was the deputy chief, who was a sergeant major, gone full career in special forces and then joined the agency and two case officers, JRC, who was the chief who'd worked with the CIA out of Islamabad in the 1980s against the Soviets for the supply and stinger missiles to the mujahideen and David Tyson who you mentioned at the beginning who was with Mike span on November 25th 2001. So they're in unfriendly territory. This is the Ford of war, walk us through that event. So David was a case officer based in Tashkent and spoke Uzbek almost fluently. And so he's the linguist and the main linguist on the team, although JR, seger also he spoke diary, which was the sort of lingua franca in Afghanistan. But on that day, the team split, there's a big fight, a hundred miles to the east. It expected in Kunduz so the bulk of American forces are there. But the night before 400 Al-Qaeda prisoners had arrived on the eastern edge of mazarin reef to surrender, and it was extremely murky why they were there. They should have been surrendering in Kunduz. And basically, I mean, what I was able to establish almost beyond doubt is that this was a Trojan horse operation. It was a deliberate trap. Yeah, it was a Taliban Al-Qaeda operation to put pretend that for these 400 fighters had surrendered, but in fact they were made up remained armed. They sort of exploited Afghan custom to keep their weapons with them and they were planning an uprising. Because you can have lots of people surrender at once if it's a regular army during the Gulf War, we had thousands of Iraqis surrender at once. When it's irregular fighters, you don't usually get hundreds of them surrendering at the same

CIA Mike Spann Mike Span Calla Jangi Mazarin Sharif Darius Souf Valley Kashi Khan Mazar Scott Spellman Trump Administration Sharif America Alex Hernandez Northern Alliance Kunduz Uzbekistan David Tyson Delta Force Taliban ALI
"somalia" Discussed on Deck The Hallmark

Deck The Hallmark

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"somalia" Discussed on Deck The Hallmark

"There is always a spit bucket and water. If you need it to cleanse your pallet. i just don't understand of all the things to do right if you're wrong if you're taking the master somalia test. You're going to cleanse your pallet between those wines. The how hard is that. They did all this work to make it look realistic and then to take out. The one thing that like the basic you know lehman knows is is wild to me. Why do they need for judges to check a box if she got it right or not like. There's what six ones in front of her. They have a sheet with the winds on them. Either she gets it right or not. I think that probably. I think that's a real thing that i think. They have multiple judges in sure to keep the integrity but but four guys with all clipboards when literally. They have the right answer down either. She gets a or she doesn't doesn't that doesn't add up. Right does all four. Yes she did say a mullebeck. That's oh from argentina. Yeah did you have argentina to great. Maybe they each have a different part. I have the year you have the location. Wow that's that's a lot over over check out here. I got i got chunky. Two thousand two group. You got argentina. good. I don't mean maybe i listen. Good answer ans- meat master somali. Talk about this this. My guess is mid afternoon dinner that he cooks her so he decides. He's going to cook her a homemade meal great. He doesn't tell her whatever that's fine. How does he get her attention. He goes over to her parents house busy. Knock on the door now. Does he ring the doorbell. Absolutely not he stands in the courtyard..

argentina somalia lehman