16 Burst results for "Soho Playhouse"

"soho playhouse" Discussed on MMA Roasted

MMA Roasted

04:17 min | 6 months ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on MMA Roasted

"Hunter. The fuck is that guy? Hey everybody welcome to AMA's de podcast. We're back people. I was on a ship for a week, working. We have so much to catch up on Greg Wilson. It was his 50th birthday. I'm old as fuck, dude. I don't know what happens, man. I don't know how we got here. It seems like just yesterday we were having a wild time in New York City and now we're just I just feel just another old man in LA. I didn't think you'd make it to 20. Nobody did. Listen. The gross food. Yeah, yeah, yeah. I got roasted by bunch of friends. It's funny, Justin chaffin was one of the roasters, and of course, he thought you'd be there. So he wrote some jokes about you. Be safe anyway? Absolutely. Oh good. Yeah, yeah, yeah. So he was like, hey, let's just pretend he's here, and he just did the jokes for you and Josh wait, Josh wade was supposed to make it. He couldn't make it, because he's working on a show. But he wrote a joke for him like so, it's like I wrote these jokes for comments that aren't here, which I knew when I put the party on Friday that most of my comedy Friends would be able to make it, you know? I mean, most of them we work on Fridays. So but that was my actual birthday and so I wanted to do it this would happen. So we got to talk about you went to the fights. You went to the big fights. Yes. You saw Kobe versus usman, could we ever talk about that? Because I know, I know and I was like, I know incredible too, man. It's so much fun. And I know it feels like old news, but fuck it, right? Because I want to hear about your experience. Because you don't buy yourself. You're in New York City. You're doing comedy, you're seeing your family, or seeing my family. I was supposed to do some shows earlier in the week, but I ended up getting booked on a TV show, and so I was shooting that till Thursday and then I basically finished shooting and went to the airport and got on a plane and took the red eye out to New York. So on Friday, I just got to see my brothers play. He's opening up he opened a big play at the Soho playhouse, go seems called tammany hall. He plays fiorello, Laguardia, the legend. And then and then on Saturday night I went to the fights and Sunday, we watch football. Let's go down. What TV show did you watch? I mean, okay, it's a new show coming out on CBS called smallwood..

Justin chaffin Josh wade Greg Wilson AMA Kobe versus usman New York City Hunter LA Josh Soho playhouse fiorello tammany hall Laguardia New York football CBS smallwood
"soho playhouse" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:44 min | 1 year ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on KOMO

"It's time to get to the beacon Plumbing sports desk would tell Mother Good morning, Good morning, and it's a good night for the Sounders. Raul Ruidiaz came back to the line up after it tested positive for Corona of Iverson had a stint with the Peruvian national team. He notched a goal and assist And the Sounders clinched a spot in the playoffs with a two nil win over Vancouver, the defending MLS Cup champion Sounders picking up their 12th straight playoff berth. Coach Ryan Smith talked about why they've been ableto consistently be a play off team. The reason why this club is made in 12 years in a row is because of players always are committed to them cells they're committed to their teammates were committed to the fans. The wind also pushed Seattle to the top of the Western Conference standings. The Los Angeles Dodgers, their world serious champions for the first time since 1988 After a 31 win over Tampa Bay in Game six. Mookie Betts scored the tie breaking run in the six that a couple of things later belted a solo homer. Corey Seager, brother of Mariner third baseman Kyle Seager, named MVP of the serious, he said, it's a dream come true things you think about when you're a kid, and you You wonder what it's like You. You strive to hear that and Teo to do with this team and this group man, it couldn't be any more special. The Seahawks were back at work yesterday, preparing our get back to work today, preparing for a home game against division rival San Francisco, against whom they are three point favorites. Yesterday, the team waved tackle Anthony Rush. Who played in four games this year and had a sack against Miami sports instead of 40 past each hour, Tom up there cos well, thanks in part to Seahawk star Russell Wilson, a local nurse. Just gotta home makeover. Wilson and his wife, Sierra teamed up with Amazon home to surprise that frontline worker Mark Caeli et works in the pediatric intensive care unit at Seattle Children's Hospital, and he was selected for the makeover. Because the positive impact he's had is a hometown hero to be able to have someone come in from the outside and say, Hey, you are special. You are making a big difference. It's means so much today marks home had its floors replaced new paint and all new furniture and decor. The family also received blackout curtains, which come in extra handy for overnight workers like Mark The current search of covert 19 cases across the country shows no sign of slowing down. Here's ABC is Alex Perez, the country averaging more than 73,000 cases a day, the highest during any seven day stretch in the pandemic. It is frustrating to me To see all these people that are really suffering through this disease and can't see their families Wisconsin marking its worst day record 5200 cases and 64 deaths, deaths from covert are now climbing in 29 states. You know, Paso doctors are also worried about losing patients without Cove it because hospitals are overwhelmed. Business A disaster. People are going to start dying as amount that they started dying already. Not because they have the carpet. But because the carpet has impair the ability to the liver care in Philadelphia cases soaring toe levels not seen since May. City officials are urging residents to cancel holiday plans. Family gathers right now are simply very dangerous, the highest the covert case rate per capita North Dakota, Dr Deborah Burkes and Bismarck calling out residents, this's the least Use of mass that we have seen in retail establishments of anyplace we have been nearly 43,000 Americans are now hospitalized with the virus like 34 year old Amanda best at this field hospital in Wisconsin. She has asthma and has been fighting Cove it for a month. It definitely impacts everyone differently. I didn't I wouldn't have Predicted to be the situation. 18 year old Michael Lang's family says he had no preexisting conditions before the college freshman came home with symptoms in September weeks later going into cardiac arrest and dying the hug your kids tell your kid every damn, but you love them, and I have to say those something never seen behind. It doesn't appear with Mike. Comedy clubs, and some small theatres are banding together to sue. The New York mayor Bill de Blasio, and the governor Andrew Cuomo, over there, called it the restrictions, which have kept those businesses close since March. Several of those areas of the SoHo Playhouse. The players Theater and others have filed suit in Manhattan court, accusing the state in the city of imposing locked down restrictions arbitrarily. They say malls, casinos and churches have been given the green light to re open but not comedy clubs and theatres. Their lawsuit says the theaters and clubs that the Corona virus infection rate in Manhattan has been very low, but they still haven't been able to reopen. Come on news time. 5 14 traffic.

Sounders Peruvian national team Alex Perez Kyle Seager Mark Caeli Wisconsin Raul Ruidiaz Manhattan Seahawks Iverson Russell Wilson Los Angeles Dodgers Coach Ryan Smith Seattle Mookie Betts Vancouver Tampa Bay ABC Corey Seager Corona
Ashley Blaker: Goy Friendly

People of the Pod

10:29 min | 2 years ago

Ashley Blaker: Goy Friendly

"Talk about some. I'm pretty heavy issues. Israel Iran Patriot of Jews. So our next guest is a pretty big leap for us. Ashley Blaker is Jewish standup comedian. He is the first Orthodox Fox Jewish comedian to be given his own BBC. Show Ashley Blaker. GOYA's guide to Judaism which returned to the air in October. Two Thousand Nineteen. Now he's in New York for his latest off off Broadway. Show Ashley Blaker Goi friendly which premieres at the Soho playhouse. On February third and runs through February twenty third. While his previous off-broadway production strictly unorthodox was tailored for Jewish audiences. This one he says is not just for the Jews. It tells the story of how Ashley's close friendship with Muslim. Comedian Imron on. UCS completely changed his life with antisemitic incidents on the rise around the globe and even here in New York actually hopes to make the audience laugh but also understand stand a little bit more about their Jewish neighbors Ashley. Welcome to our studio. Thank you for having me so I have to ask you right out of the gate. anti-semitism is not funny. So how how do you address that topic with humor. Well the reality is I think he's anything can be funny. So I'll let you come to Louis showing judge whether I make. It isn't about antisemitism. I should say that there is actually a section is a band. Semitism thought. I think the more interesting is the fact that that when antisemitism is on the rise there are two ways of dealing with. This is a way of kind of hunkering down. Just going. We're we're now gonNA stick to ourselves and and try and protect ourselves and put up the security barriers and let's have lots of armed guards on the on the door in social ones bags and all of that stuff all you can kind of outreach. As it were and try and engage with the outside world and that's what my shows about about the latter it's about reaching out to the outside world and in a way this makes wants a comedy show. You know hopefully nonstop funny. Sound sound incredibly dry but Hopefully demystify Judaism a little bit. That's certainly one of the aims. Okay well I would say you could do both right. Do the security see the undercover getting having no security either. All kind of you know very good at that accused but I actually my playbill. I wrote a Performance note and for Bates Him. But I said something about how you know very good dividing ourselves as a as an in one of the things into I enjoy doing you mentioned my show strictly and also those I I love bringing choose together because we figured it kind of separating ourselves in so many different ways you know on the whole joke about the Jewish man who lands on a desert island and he builds two synagogues one ones that he'll go to one that he wouldn't ever be seen dead and that's like what we're like but I do think that there is it is an important time to actually reach out a little bit and we can. I think sometimes certainly not in any way suggesting that we. We are in any way a foot four and symptom of course but I sometimes think that actually being too insular. Isn't that helpful. Listen so now you are from the UK so well the Labor Party. I have to ask you about the Labor Party. I'm afraid But it's often regarded as the political liberal party of choice by many Jews in Great Britain. And I'm curious how you dealt with the last election and whether or not you felt politically homeless as I kept had reading about the Jewish community. There didn't myself but I'm sure other people did and I think that yes certainly in the post for many Jews the Labor faulty will have. I've been there home by just as much as the Conservative Party would be for many Liberal Democrat. We have quite a different political system. Should know to to to the Americans as many but yes I mean. It was incredible. What happened over the last few years and how symtas I'm just rose and seem to not be dealt with toll within the Labor Party in? Yeah it was a terrible thing we still really really been dealt with properly gone away. Yeah I know there were. There were several vile things said many vile things said ed by Labour politicians but then also Jeremy Corbyn himself was talking about the lack of irony that many British Jews seem to have. I don't know if you recall that particular. Yes it was Avia. Yeah it was a video I think from a while ago. Actually but he had yes he had said something. And there's a lot of these kind of allusions I think is because they. They caught clever then. They don't outright. This isn't the foul right then marking the street saying killed the Jews. It's a very allusive. Quite clever thing of of Hinson these particular weight alluding that Jews and Israel inflating the to and to you know the whole talking about antisemitism and anti Zionism also that that things that really came along with the Labor Party and I saw something videos of people saying no no we. We're not intimately to we like the right to choose. I think there's that thing of the good news and the bad news and I think that's a really good. Jews has ones March against Israel and kind of write letters to the Guardian saying that we support Sanctioned bedia smell that kind of thing uh-huh and then the ninety five percent of the badges. I mean that's clearly terrible things so it's been a really dark period and I didn't know it'll be interesting to see in the the next four five years. How things change? Have you tried to address it with humor. There over showed. I just did a toll in opened in in May with my friend Imran you mentioned draymond so imminent. He did a tour together called profit sharing actually breaking news in profit sharing seek clever title. And it's not address head on there are other people addressing this head on and the the truth is the way to look on twitter five minutes especially around the time the election to see that kind of Echo Chamber people. Don't WanNa hear they. You know you you tweet. Something about Labor Jeremy Corbyn and immediately comes back. This prepared list of twenty times. Jeremy Corbyn has both a motion ocean in parliament. That's been helpful to community Blah Blah Blah say. No one listens to each other anymore. People just spout the same thing. So I'm not sure engaging in that kind of way addressing head on is that helpful she because people just don't want to listen right. I'm sure it's the same here with trump and I'm sure there are people who are vehemently say one one thing you don't want to listen to the side. Yes that is. That is a problem that area. So I think that's something we've seen a lot particular around brexit and all these issues as we've had in the UK and the F. But so my show anyway. Mike show look comedy show. That's the the the main PARV. So I'll tell you briefly I mean essence shows. It's about yeah. Tell us about the show but then I also want to hear more about Enron and your friendship so the show about my friend she was Enron said. So that's the kind of I think in film in terms they call that the macguffin. He's kind of you know that you heard that term. I'm not familiar with that. So it's like using the original star wars. I think C. Three Po an onto d two of the macguffin that they're the ones like sent off into onto the desert and enter tattooing. They've got the messages item. Thank you the whole plot revolves from. Then there's no actually about them but it starts from them so in a way money's the macguffin hit because is a true story we're good friends we went untold together. And he's very interested custody my life he didn't know much about Judaism me belly of June. We spent many hours together in the call. He was always drawing because he he's Muslim. Couldn't in claiming been drinking and he's always asked me questions and I kind of wanted to teach him about Judaism. But where do you start. We've got six hundred thirteen commandments. It's too long to the call I didn't want to spend money on guests so I thought well I teach him about the Ten Commandments. And we started looking at the Ten Commandments. And I unrealized. They're not that practical you know he doesn't have an ox next all so there's no need to worry about not coveting it and I so I could. Maybe set myself challenge of coming up with my own ten commandments. That I could be a bit more practical. But they could actually explain what it's like to be an Orthodox Jew in two thousand twenty and in a way. It was my friendship with him. That made me reconsider my Judaism. Because she had I've been living as an Orthodox Jew for the best part of twenty years but it's only when an outside comes along install challenging us at you start having to think about it you start thinking about your love. So that's what the shows about and it's about me going through these ten commandments. My New Ten Commandments. antiquing this to him okay. So do you mind sharing a few of the talk commanded if you're the one of them is thou shalt develop obsessive compulsive disorder okay. She's an integral Paulsville so shoot as But we cover branch of Judy. Check that box right exactly. So we cover a lot of these areas we cover kosher food and living in a Jewish area. We talk about the curse of praying public and this covers a lot of ground really comes a lot of ground in the show and then And then the story I keep finished. The story has a continuation because of how Im- reacted and then what we went off did something together which I don't want to spoil because that's the narrative But it's a pretty funny chairman. I it really is. I'm super proud of it. So you say I did. This show could street Lennox. It was aimed at a Jewish audience. All Jews knock. He's also dogs. Reform Perform Conservative unaffiliated. But Still Jews and I think it's a really. I really wanted to do something. Everyone could cutting joy That would be in a language WIGGs. Everyone can understand but the is serious does not scrimp on the jokes atone. It's the funniest show of ever done this by miles miles because I've already but still called the serious stuff when we do discuss antisemitism and there are some real takeaways well foam it excellent zone. The show's name. Is Ashley. Blaker friendly it's at the Soho playhouse here in New York City from February third to twenty-third. Thank you for joining us. Thank

Ashley Blaker Labor Party Jeremy Corbyn Israel New York Soho Playhouse Enron Goya Comedian Imron Conservative Party UK Semitism Twitter Louis Bates New York City Great Britain Avia Guardian
"soho playhouse" Discussed on Realty Speak

Realty Speak

12:27 min | 2 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on Realty Speak

"I say? Real estate is is in my DNA now back to the show. The first rezoning took place in two thousand thirteen and the second one was two thousand seventeen so if we go back to two thousand nine I guess it took four years for the first one and I guess eight years for the second one. No it took. I would say to way a longer than four years for the first one if you were to ask Trinity at. It took several lifetimes but the rezoning was in the works as the bid was in the works works the original rezoning the two thousand thirteen rezoning. That was really the big creation of the Hudson Square special district. What percentage of the area was rezoned as of two two thousand thirteen? So as of two thousand thirteen the original boundaries of the bid was rezoned one hundred percent and part of the reason. The bid was helpful in that process. was that we were able to be a vehicle to assure that public amenities would be installed installed and maintained in association with zoning the second rezoning which is the two thousand seventeen rezoning is really just the rezoning of what was the Saint John's terminal which is was at that time the largest footprint. Office building in Manhattan. It's where they highlight originally terminated and that building which which had been very under utilized for a number of years was rezoned just that building was rezoned and in that action the developers also gave one hundred million dollars to Hudson River Park for excess air rights so that was a separate rezoning that really only dealt with five fifty Washington and that was rezoned to Oh it was rezoned to allow. There was a hybrid scenario which allowed the building to be divided into about half residential half commercial shaw now with this residential development. That's going on in Hudson. Square is their mandatory inclusionary housing. This was before mandatory inclusionary housing but there is voluntary inclusionary housing and there is a bonus provision for that and several of the developments are including affordable housing. So there are awesome affordable rentals in the area. Yes there are some affordable rentals in the area. Would you say are the stakeholders that benefiting most from this the office building the owners the retail building owners the existing co-ops and I guess there weren't really any existing condos but the renew condos now and and then of course the multifamily rental properties who'd you say are the stakeholders that are benefiting most from the Hudson Square bid. I think that probably the biggest beneficiary are the commercial tenants and therefore of course the commercial property owners let me just say a word. What about that with the creative companies and the tech companies? Who are coming into Hudson Square today? Of course they're concerned about rent. They're running businesses but what their real challenge for. Their businesses is attracting talent and one of the things. The Hudson Square bid tries to do is to provide a neighborhood which will be a tool for these companies in attracting talent. I talked about the campus like environment that we've created here. That's something that we liked to say that if someone is being offered a job at a company X. which is located somewhere else in New York City or somewhere else outside of New York City and they're being offered the same job for the same salary in Hudson Square. We want to be able to make the difference. We want to be able to say we want that a person to say this neighborhood is great. It's a place I want to work. These things are important to a lot of the people who were choosing where to work today and we hope to help satiate. She ate that competition for talent. Disney and Google. Obviously you're going to be here. Google is already occupying some of the existing space that they've leased who are some of the other tenants that are attracting talent to the neighborhood. We have so many. We have places as diverse as worby Parker and New York public radio. The have eshelman public relations. We still have saatchi-and-saatchi we have horizon media. We have Viacom and then we have lots of small mall companies companies of videography and different kinds of graphic designers. And we have artists of different kinds people experimenting with sound and experimenting with light people who are creating new products to bring to the technology market for use by creative industries. We have a lot of companies that decide that they want to have their marketing arms down here. So for example Pepsi has a small marketing office here other agencies some of the some of the accounting firms have marketing offices down here because there's just something about creativity and innovation that thrives when people are surrounded with like minds. It's a wonderful wonderful thing to send online at a lunch place in Hudson Square and here the kinds of things that people are talking about and the ideas that are being exchanged how always google and Disney attracted to Hudson Square. I WanNa tell the story about Disney because I just love this story. There was a big site owned by Trinity was multiple buildings and once it became known that Disney was looking for space. I'm sure that they were neighborhoods. All over the city buying for such a marquee tenant to come into their area. What we're told is that actually Bob Eiger? WHO's the head of Disney without anybody knowing it walked some of those neighborhoods because what Disney wanted was to capture a certain kind of culture for their workers and that he walked and walked and walked around here and I guess nobody recognized him? He came to feel that this was really the kind of place that he thought that Disney could thrive. He really picked up the vibe of what's going on in this neighborhood going on on the streets going on in the cafe's going on the lines ends of people waiting for lunch. He really picked it up and thought she's this is really where we WANNA be. What are some of the legacy features of Oddsson Square that you preserved in terms of businesses and streetscape when we first started doing our plan? The first thing we did is we went on a listening tour and something something really interesting happen. We found that the okay there were thirty thousand people working here nut seventy thousand at the time. We certainly didn't talked all thirty thousand but we found that everybody everybody who we talked to who worked here and lived here. Maybe took classes here. We found they really loved it here and so we began as we began to do our plan. We began to think. Gee We don't want to change a place that people really love. What would be the point of that? So everything we've done tries is to preserve the essence of this neighborhood and the essence of this neighborhood is something that's gritty. It's authentically New York the buildings things very much typify what this neighborhood feels like and we've really tried to preserve that everything we do surrounding neighborhoods. We we have Soho. We have Greenwich Village. The West Village Tribeca. How has the Hudson Square bid impacted those locations? Well I think something interesting interesting is that and I say this is a New Yorker in the old days before two thousand nine if you wanted to walk from Tribeca to Greenwich Village a lot of people when around Hudson Square because it was so uninviting to walk through this what felt like a highway really so I think one of the big things that we've done one is we've helped create continuity between the neighborhoods. We also hope that we're helping people in Soho and in neighborhoods to the east to encourage them. MM to walk east West as well as North South because at the very edge of our boundaries. We have the wonderful Hudson River Park and people feel that a park is closer oeser if getting there is a more pleasant experience so I think that's the real impact that we've had on the surrounding neighborhoods. We call this place making as a new Torres to New York. Which of course I'm not? I mean you could tell by my accent but when a new torres come to New York and they're coming to Hudson Square. What are some of the places that they should visit? There are places for tourists to visit in Hudson Square. There's the very wonderful children's Museum of the arts which is not just a place for tourists but really a place for people from all all over the city who want to find great things to do with their kids. I highly recommend it. There is here arts center which is a place for avangard theater. There's also so the Soho playhouse. which has some wonderful shows? There is the Fire Museum which is a Quirky Little Museum. That is actually run by the Fire Department of the city of New York and has some very interesting nine eleven exhibits there and I guess the best thing that we want people to do when they're here here is really walk around because this is what New York really feels like an issue really cool old bar here isn't there. Oh the Ear Inn is absolutely. It's one of the oldest bars in New York. How old is it? You know it dates back to the early eighteen. Hundreds one thing very cool about the Iranian. I find this very cool. I get all geeked out about stuff like this. If you go outside of if you look at the sidewalk outside the ear inn there is a demarcation. There where New New York Manhattan Island specifically originally ended before we started filling in and grading concrete all the way west of their interestingly when sandy struck the line that the water went up to followed almost exactly that original shoreline of Manhattan pretty cool. That's a very cool fact. That didn't know that that's very interesting. You told us the Disney story. What about the Google story you know? Google all is looking for property everywhere they are very committed to the lower west side of Manhattan. The property here is is walking distance. It's a decent walk but it's walking distance from their other campus and gave them an unparalleled opportunity to really create a a big footprint. The building that they're moving into has very large floor plates and that was something that's really important to them. And a lot of tech companies today in Google typifies this as well as anyone. There's sort of a horizontal culture rather than a vertical culture. They want their people laid out on the same floor. And this this building which the Saint John's terminal which had the largest floor plate of any building in Manhattan. It gives them the opportunity to do that so they were very excited about that. They also saw an opportunity to move in into some lease space. In some of our other buildings they too were attracted to the culture. Like people I guess WanNa be around like people has Amazon knocked on the door. They haven't knocked on my door. Oh well maybe they'll listen to this. And maybe they'll knock on the door. Not to cast any aspersions at Amazon Zahn at all. I have an economic development background so I understand how subsidies go but Google and Disney and everyone else who has come here has come here without any public subsidy. So they're funding the whole thing. That's great they're funding the whole thing and what we're talking about funding. What does it cost the property owners in the area to have have a business improvement district as part of where they're located different bids have different ways of assessing property owners? In our case our budget is three point. Two million dollars a year. That budget is spread out primarily. They're very small completely inconsequential assessments for for residential and for vacant land so the budget is almost completely spread out over commercial square footage. And how much per square foot does that end up being. It varies aries depending on the number of square feet. But it ends up being in the mid twenty cents per square foot. I was going to say twenty dollars wasn't enough and I like to say that I like to say to my building owners you know. We're we're charging you. Twenty six twenty.

Hudson Square New York City Disney Google Manhattan Hudson River Park Square Soho Hudson Oddsson Square Trinity Saint John Washington Viacom Greenwich Village Oh West Village Tribeca
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:52 min | 2 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Heart to heart with my mom and I expressed to her how happy I was and how much I love Craig and I wanted her to be happy for me too so I asked her mom you're happy for me right it's crazy it's crazy Latino Christmas special my guess the Maria rasa dia yet as and founder of all yeah but a side of that entire monologue I know it's not your model let me sickly each other's understudies including our director yeah quite good now we're gonna talk about him and if I wanna get your story Diana well I am Cuban American I'm from the other Cuba Miami and my parents came to this country with nothing but the clothes on their backs I grew up on my number one babysitter because they both had to have jobs was TV and so I worshipped television and I as a child and the special is a teenager grew to be a little resentful because I would see the Brady bunch and the partridge family and all of these families that sat down and talked about their troubles and figured out a reasonable punishment and my family was what everything was in chaos I mean my mom asked me if I had any regrets about childhood and I I think I once told her you know I really wish everyone's about things to be handled calmly and in so but my story is about realizing that everything that I am now as a writer the comedian as an artist is because of that wonderful vivacious delicious full exciting life that I had as a child which was full of drama and comedy moment both my parents are amazing story tellers and they they brought the fun into everything and that's what that's what my stories about let's bring it in George Rivas who joined the team is and directed the show you're doing it was like popcorn Jeffrey Jeffrey I'm sorry I was like a George is that check out yours bell D. E. O. F. F. R. E. Y. right which is not typical of NC double yes you gonna Jeffrey Jeffrey re write off so what do you bring to the show well Jeffrey came in to see the show a two years into its launching we originally were self directing which stand up comedian says specially center and I so we were used to just giving ourself advice on what makes people laugh and he came to see the show one night because he's friends with Maria they were on CSI together he used to be a cat regular on CSI and he came to the show and he was floored he thought this is a show with real potential we were mainly monologues at that point with very little in in between he was one of the people that courted us we had a few people say Hey we want to we want to take a show the next level but he came with passion and understanding and I have to say that inside he's a Latina as well you know he really got it and brought us to the Latino theater company who was it had to have this amazing space in downtown LA and then he spent months with us in in all sorts of emotional states as we tried to put the show to another to make it more of a play with the monologue in bed it in this story which is based on how we really are in real life we get together we start drinking the story start coming out and so he built on our our dynamic the camaraderie and the the the spark we have between us we always come up with anything so they are so he really pushed us to go deeper yes total for our personal we were telling our story but none of us wanted to go that deep and he was like you know the more personal you are the more universal the story is go there and we're like button all this is really tough but it's been so again healing for us because the arctic and just people leave better than they came in we all have people saying all I see myself in you and you Maria and you Sandra all right I'm gonna you know go and call my mother now and you know appreciate my parents more or whatever they they the people come and are little changed it's because we've gone deeper and we we still are trying to find things were still a little tweaking every writing but he really made it a safe space for us to go and tell our authentic story this whole show has a real miracle feeling to it because everything has come together even the person who is one of our executive producers now he was the one I went to when I had the idea and nothing was written and these girls weren't even committed yet and I said I have this idea I'd like to have a theater and he said I love it do it here that's his working with us now right and Jeff same thing he was like I love it let's do it and thank god I knew well enough of my got that this was the right person because we wanted a woman we did one a Latina director but every Latino Imad was a look just like a like the yeah I'm just not not wasn't right was it like a good it wasn't a good fit and exactly it just made sense with him and and just ten pushing us to go to those places yeah has made it really a different show and I think this has been I know so the best version of our show yes absolutely it's it's really incredible like incredible and to be work for New York why wait have you thought about having the New York audience because I am guessing the New York out you you guys have performed yeah country yeah I guess are amazing yeah what's that wow what is the difference when listening wow well and you know yeah okay no I would say that one of things we wondered about because in in LA we have a good following is that we have mostly we have lots of different types of Latino Americans and also that you don't have to be Latino enjoy the show in fact it's it's very universal and but we do have a large contestant contingent of Mexican Americans because it's LA so when we came out here we weren't sure we you know we had that little liking the trepidation like are we going to get it here you know like are they going to be as boisterous as excited about the show and what happened was that we did our first preview first of all we had a huge crowd which we do not expect yeah all the even if there said that this doesn't happen yeah on the first day I mean people free from like yeah Austin Chicago LA Denver Corpus Christi yeah we had yes we had this great crowd and then we went out there and that we started telling our stories and the laughs weren't exactly in the same place but the other thing as a really really loved and in the process but the second night I had to change some of my lines because there was a weird laugh that we did not know where that last line from funny at all my life welcome to New York right my partner's Porter Rican and so she said do you know what Diana sang as of now she goes she's saying I don't know if you wanna talk about no no when I say that and I said no I wasn't really she goes to Porter Ricans maybe it means something else yes I said I choose you to know that is that none of us knew that we've been saying it has years in LA there that it was that that wasn't with a laugh was a laugh was at the end of the story she tells me right of that bit but here I'm like why are they letting early and laughing hard early so she's like we all fell out you don't know what that means no holds real education to right yeah we were telling your producer where we ARE Spanish is is Spanish of course but Cuban there's certain human words at Mexican people don't you don't use and means something different to us and our sort of written my because of my partners pretty we can and we are always saying that doesn't mean that to me that means this to me or don't call me that that really insults me I'm like really and I use it all the time she's like don't ever call me and I will not noted I will not you should tell us that we're too we and even Texas like tex mex completely differently than California yeah you know Mexicans when I very very different different but you know but very different like even the foods and and the the sayings of my D. they say what are the choices yeah exactly like now what does that mean like okay learning learning yes it's the Latina Christmas special it opens tomorrow at the soho Playhouse my guess and Maria Russell Diana Jana's and center vials so I heard you say you mentioned drinks off I thought I'd bring it on my what is the role of the alcoholic beverage in the show well two kilo of course for us we started with one we did start with one because I know what it was my fancy but then we got yesterday we got a ton of tequila donated to us so that we change that to that we also that it we also thought he represented it seemed more lets you know to to to be drinking tequila so the idea is that you know when you drink every this is how the play of all of that when you drink you get a little looser with the time and that's how we explain why so many very deep truths come out in in the original show when we did it with the wine we use this Maria would finish her second you're so nervous about doing her piece that she would finish a set and then she had like a real bottle of wine on the stage thanks and sorry to spoil it for you guys and Maria would have then a glass of wine she would finish her monologue and she's take a deep breath and whatever so in some show I accidentally grabbed the wrong bottle and I poured myself a tall glass of wine and as I'm pouring it I'm going oh my god I've wrapped the wrong bottle and I'm pouring it in in this part I drink the whole glass and one because that's the punch line but a Latin Latino glass like any time learning a top right so it it it was always apple juice and this time it was wine and you know the show must go on so I brought it to my nose could smell that it was Chardonnay that I I went okay and I drank the whole thing and put it down and I thought this is going to be interesting and you know that that that the the honest to god truth is that we it didn't affect me because I think the adrenaline of performing and also knowing that I had just had a huge glass of wine kind of kept me kept me going I didn't lose anything everything was fine but it was definitely a shock in that moment but these girls are light weights like we like I like second like I can drink odd future keyless shocks and be fine Maria hi yes and I'm not yeah we've we've got enough to tell you you're not okay now I am okay I am okay yes No sending she's not only we're ready for that before I let you go when you think about it and you want people actually see the show because you said it's about your personal story on this about family it's about Christmas shopping Latina what's something you hope they come away with from the show I think each of our personal monologues has a message and but the overall message is that we're so lucky to be who we are we are Americans and we are also Latino and gratitude I would say is is high up their gratitude for all we've been given so I think that's that's the main main message I we each individually have messages but and I I think also people come away let me tell you something the subclass has a bar downstairs and last night the bartender went oh my god he was so happy because we'll have such a good time they just be they want to hang they think that they're in the shower we say salute we raise a glass and the back row go so many amazing in the show with us and originally actually this is a funny story when we first started doing it we pretend that we couldn't see the audience that we were inside of Sanders apartment but they were so excited to talk to us that this this the last two runs we've now included them and they just love it they love being part of the party yeah and also the message including with gratitude the messages the human experience is the same the pain the joy the love the laughter it's the same it's just packaged differently and so to have like you know representation for me for us is huge as you know we don't have enough for the wrong kinds or very stereotypical kind so representation of women letting us the LGBT Q. I a community the mixed race give it at the Cuban Mexican whatever is different but the same Latina Christmas special is at so hopefully how's it opens tomorrow December eighteenth my guess of Maria Russell Diana Jana's and Sandra falls break a leg tomorrow lady so much for having us.

Craig founder director
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The soho Playhouse this week then W. NYC planning editor Kate Hines gives us the scoop on which stories the museum is covering this week and later on the show comedian Dominic Cooper talks about his annual holiday residency at the legendary west village cabaret the duplex it's called dom we now are gay apparel and don't forget tonight our big live show the green spaces get lit with all of that book club live event we're talking a little women getting in the holiday spirit with music from Mali birch go to W. NYC dot org slash green space to get your tickets now we'll get to all of it I'm Alison Stewart I will meet you on the other side of the new live from NPR news in Washington I'm Amy held the house rules committee is today setting the parameters for how much time each side gets to debate in the upcoming impeachment vote the rules committee is typically the last stop before vote in the full house if the house votes to impeach the Senate will hold a trial in the new year and then here is Kelsey snow reports Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is rejecting Democrats request to call witnesses calling it a strange request the Majority Leader is denying a request from Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer to reach an agreement on witnesses McConnell says it's not the Senate's job to build a case against the president the house choses road is their duty to investigate is thirty to make the very high bar for undoing a national election in a letter sent Sunday Schumer ask McConnell to agree to call for administration officials including former national security adviser John Bolton and acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney even if McConnell and Schumer do not come to an agreement senators can still try to call witnesses once a trial has begun those request would be subject to a simple majority vote Kelsey smell NPR news Washington a federal judge has sentenced trump's former deputy campaign chairman Rick gates to forty five days in jail plus three years probation and ordered him to pay a twenty thousand dollar fine gates had pleaded guilty to conspiracy money laundering and other charges he went on to provide what prosecutors say was extraordinary assistance on a number of cases that spun out of the Russia investigation the judge is allowing gays to serve his forty five days on weekends home construction in the US is at a twelve year high here's NPR Scott Horsley a survey by the national association of home builders this week showed builders are as bullish as they've been in more than two decades and that's reflected in the pace of home building activity the commerce department says housing starts jumped more than three percent last month while applications for build in permits surged to their highest level since before the recession housing had been a drag on the economy for all of last year and the first half of this year but the industry is mounting a come back low mortgage rates and a strong job market are fuelling demand for housing mortgage rates have picked up in recent weeks but are still more than a full percentage point below their recent peak near five percent last fall so Horsley NPR news Washington a Pakistani court today sentenced former president Pervez Musharraf to death the trees in case relates to the state of emergency Musharraf imposed in two thousand seven while he was still in power Musharraf was sentenced in absentia he's been out of the country since two thousand sixteen when he was allowed to leave on bail to seek medical treatment abroad his lawyer says he will appeal the sentencing Scharf has been living in divine a and is reportedly so ill that he is unlikely to travel home to face the sentence I mean he held in Washington and you're listening to NPR news and this is W. NYC in New York I'm Jamie Floyd as you've just been hearing New York senator Chuck Schumer says an impeachment trial must include the president's top advisers Schumer has proposed calling on for White House officials to testify if there is a Senate impeachment trial but Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is objecting to that request Schumer says the American people need to have all the evidence on hand during these historic proceedings a trial without witnesses is not a trial it's a rush to judgment it's a sham trial his proposal for additional witnesses includes former national security adviser John Bolton and acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney will have complete coverage of next steps in the impeachment vote and the house in the house and the trial in the Senate coming up this afternoon on All Things Considered on W. NYC beginning at four o'clock.

soho Playhouse NYC Kate Hines editor
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Distribution of the BBC world service news hour in the US is made possible by American public media producer and distributor of award winning public radio contests eight PM American public media with support from Atlassian whether it's keeping thousands of people on the same page managing projects from start to finish that last scene works to unleash the potential of all types of teams with collaboration software more at at last year dot com on the next all of that media Russell by and I don and then ball joint for the stuff they're lucky enough Christmas special making near three debut at the soho Playhouse this week what our friends the bottom up by with recipes and tips for delicious cocktail with out join me for all of it on W. support for W. NYC comes from the Kerry institute of ecosystem studies working at the intersection of ecology computing and global public health to develop tools to predict and preemptive disease outbreaks more at C. A. R. Y. institute dot org slung working to help bring data to every question decision and action that affects an organization from IT operations to security to business analytics more at splint dot com **** the data to everything platform Sony pictures presenting little women written for the screen and directed by Gregor wake starring Sir Sharon and Emma Watson Florence few Timothy shallow may and Meryl.

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Star as pope Benedict and pope Francis at a turning point in history now in theaters and on Netflix December twentieth awards eligible on the next all of it full bio Jada Thunderball join for the stuff they're lucky enough Christmas special making near city debut at the soho Playhouse this week what are friends for stop by with recipes and tips for delicious cocktail with our join me for all of it on seven it's morning edition on WNYC I'm Richard hake when refugees flee their homeland there's family separation there's also physical and psychological trauma and there's the challenge of assimilation that's true whether the immigrant ends up in New York City or Tokyo this week W. N. Y. C.'s Matt Katz is bringing us stories from a global refugee crisis in his series called unsettled and he's focusing on a country we don't hear much about when it comes to refugees Japan today we need a couple of newly arrived immigrants from Cameroon and Tunisia were broadening the idea of what it means to be Japanese I met a lot of new immigrants to Japan and inevitably we all got around to talking about the same thing the wireless is something else public bathrooms in Japan are super clean welcoming and high tech exceed the and forget myself and I'm just comfortable taking on lifetime hindering him leasing rose recently fled a civil war in her country of Cameroon in central Africa and she's now making a long shot attempts at winning asylum in Japan which is notoriously resistant to immigration she only ended up here because she happened to secure a Japanese visa Japan a country she knew almost nothing about was our fastest way to safety she's been here almost a year now and she's whole areas actually my countrymen if you have to use the public toilet does the worst thing that can happen to you despite our laughter rose has plenty of worries about her nineteen year old son who seeking asylum in Minnesota about the police beating back home in Cameroon that left her with a scar and lingering head injury rose didn't want us to use her real name because her family is still in danger and still talking about the simple joy of using Japanese toilets the excitement of something new that brings welcome solace to cope any where you find yourself you free enough to do a lot of adjustments most of the refugees if not or that I've made I just Japan doesn't welcome immigrants in part because keeping foreigners away he keeps Japan unique strict rules govern life right down to the sorting of trash the thinking is that people just can't come and learn how to be Japanese but as migrants seeking safety or living wage increasingly moved to Japan they're challenging that idea and I don't mean that he'd built Correa from Tunisia she's applying for refugee status in Japan because she says back home she faced discrimination for being gay you know you've only been here a few weeks but do you think like if you were to live here for a long time that you could become Japanese or do you feel like you've always got to be an outsider for me I think I can be one hundred percent believe me because this country if you like connected with long time ago it's not new unlike rose that he knew a lot about Japan before she got here she's a huge fan of anime specially it's music Japanese Sir maybe they do this like rose now he will have a tough time convincing Japan to let her stay of the thousands of immigrants just a few dozen get refugee status each year but in the meantime she's allowed to live freely while her application is reviewed no heed adores Japan she likes how they don't throw their trash on the street that trains run on time that religious people don't push their views on to others she sees Japan as a refuge but for the like minded she chose Japan she didn't randomly end up here like many refugees which she knows it'll be hard to win legal status I'm okay with that when a country's tried to protect freedom and protect its values and its tradition.

pope Benedict pope Francis Netflix Jada Thunderball
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

11:31 min | 2 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Bronchitis emphysema or asthma lance says the risks appear to be highest among adults who both vape and smoke which often happens when people turn to vaping in an attempt to quit smoking but then aren't able to completely give up cigarettes if you are a dual use Sir that is if you're using cigarettes and the cigarettes at the same time these two risks multiply given the E. cigarettes are relatively new the long term effects of vaping are just beginning to be understood says Robert Terran of the university of North Carolina at Chapel Hill he says this study offers important evidence I think it's fair to say that the new study adds to the body rather than saying they think he cigarettes is harmful to the lungs it seems that easily Gretz can harm the longs in multiple ways beeping can lead to inflammation and tamp down a mutant defenses raping can do a lot to belong so it can mean changing voucher processes and actually seeing the because if you know suppression so that leaves people more prone to infection he says it's not just the nicotine there are other ingredients including pro pulling glycol glycerin and flavoring compounds that may lead to harmful effects when heated and inhaled despite these risks many argue that E. cigarettes still have a role to play in trying to help smokers reduce the risk of lung disease Amy Fairchild is dean of the college of public health at the Ohio State University there is no question that they be nicotine is not safe but it is safer than inhaling burning tobacco this remains the key argument in favor of the things that it's less risky than smoking but at a time when one in four high school seniors report vaping and are at risk of getting hooked on nicotine the authors of the new paper argue the evidence pointing to the harms of E. cigarettes is starting to pile up Alison Aubrey NPR news it's the season of giving so we've asked our international correspondents to give us the gift of tape something they recorded that never made it into a radio story that they haven't been able to forget today international correspondent Jana raft takes us to a place that she has visited many times on this visit she ended up someplace unexpected hi Jane hi there so take us into the scene where were you so this was Mosul Iraq's second biggest city and muscle it was still emerging from the influence of ISIS under ISIS control for almost three years and almost everything was banned particularly drinking and smoking near the river that divides the city we went through this entrance through the steel door and then there are guys collecting weapons from people who had weapons and then quick body searches for the man and then we open the doors and there was this what are we hearing it's a smoking room really smoking full of men with what looked like a bingo cards and they're drinking beer and drinking whiskey but they're mostly focusing on the bingo which isn't actually called bingo here what is the Arabic word for bingo it's called double a if you want so happy that's engineer at their house and who opened the place in fact it's the first a bingo hall opened in Mosul since nineteen ninety four and the first board to be open there and maybe like a decade you mentioned it was full of men with this like a strictly male only space it was so strictly a male of lease space we went there with our local producer singer Khalil of he's from Mosel and a friend from Swedish radio who's also a woman and the owner who was our host told us we were the first two women who had ever been there in Baghdad apart from a very old stayed social club where families go to play bingo and win electrical appliances women didn't go to these places and I said I've seen women go to them before in Baghdad and he said by the by the women's it bad women but these were not bad man playing bingo in the home where you were presumably not they were happy none of the ones who are winning anyway because this isn't just this isn't bingo for like peanuts or electrical appliances it's for cash money up to three thousand dollars a game up to three thousand dollars a game whoa did they have the same kind of like big rolling Cajun front that they would pull balls out of did it look like a bingo hall that we would see in America so it had a big blue ball but it was a lot more complicated than bingo because their numbers and not letters and the numbers go from one to ninety and then the announcer would do this clever sort of thing where before almost every number he'd give some sort of reference that the Iraqis would get like he'd say war with Iran and everybody would know that was eighty eight because in nineteen eighty eight was the year the war ended Sir James over the last year you have covered so many scenes of war of refugees of cities coming back to life after ISIS why is this the thing that stuck with you that you wanted to bring to us today I think because for all the time is spent in Mosul you know that that was time spent under the restrictions of Saddam were with the US military or in in quickly went outside and ISIS were around and I kind of felt they never got to know it so there I was sitting with remarkable people from Mosel who'd been there all along this this young activist who who's volunteer movement to help to rebuild the city with musician and with people like I think the businessman who opened it who said he wanted to change the mentality in Mosul but he wasn't gonna do with guns because then people would bring more guns he was going to do it by offering fear and bingo and I think most of all it it brought back a part of that Iraq that I had known and loved and that's now harder to find that tolerance where if you want to you can go to the mosque and pray or if you want to you can go and drink can play bingo and all those things co exist Generac with a gift from the international desk this one from Mosul Iraq thank you Jane thank you you're listening to All Things Considered a tentative deal that eases trade restrictions with China it seems like right news for farmers they've been pummeled by the trade war but some farmers are concerned about the new agreement as Frank Morris of member station Casey you are reports they worry that ag exports will suffer for years and history back set up the case is gas station in sweet springs Missouri has a table unofficially reserved for for Christ's for the corn and soybeans these men grow are rising last couple days I've been out but they had took a nose dive before that so we need to make that back former Tom crisis is prices for grain and hogs Phil hard when China imposed retaliatory tariffs in the summer of two thousand eighteen many farmers lost money last year all prices have men good but with the market facilitation alone it was it's all right market facilitation payments that's the official name for the money the trump administration gave farmers to compensate for trade losses about sixteen billion dollars in trade aid kept many farmers from losing money this year the first like John vocals Meyer don't like it I would ten times rather have a market than to have somebody give me a few dollars K. H. and then brag about meantime vocals Mursi's grain prices are still much lower than they were before the trade war started sweating sprint since were trading above ten dollars a bushel back then today there just over nine it looks good but you know we've been in this roller coaster situation now of for quite some time so as I don't think you can basically take this news to the bank Scott with an agricultural economist at the university of Illinois agrees the details are sketchy everyone's just trying to nail down exactly what has been agreed to US negotiators say that China's promised to buy at least forty billion dollars with a bag products each year that would be billions more than China has ever purchased one says the sixteen billion dollar jump in sales would be great for farmers if it actually materialize meantime he says this tentative phase one agreement is at least a step in the right direction things could have gotten worse and so we for the time being have avoided that it was just this de escalation may come too late to avoid long term damage to the trading relationship from the beginning that has been a nightmare scenario is history suggests that once you break an important relationship trade wise like this it is very difficult to fully recover your market share he's talking about the history of the Russian grain embargo when the United States abruptly stopped wheat sales to Russia the price of wheat tank and stay low for years like just about every farmer of a certain age John vocals more clearly remembers the floor dropping out in a way he still living it for decades on we can raise reach to be profitable here because of what happened but I'm afraid that's exactly what is going to happen with what is going on today so farmers welcomed the idea of easing hostilities with China but as to what happens if and when the US and China actually sign off on the deal I think it's a whole lot more complicated print your news I'm Frank Morris in Kansas city it's All Things Considered on W. NYC it's the first day in nearly two decades that immigrants in New York can apply for a driver's license regardless of their immigration status so coming up next we'll take you to a D. M. V. in queens on this winter's day to see how that's going but first it's New Jersey congressman Jeff Andrew the Democrats who switching parties to join Republicans rather than vote for impeachment W. N. Y. C.'s Nancy Solomon stops by to explain what exactly is going on in new Jersey's Democratic Party stay tuned on the next all of that media Russell Diana Donna and then ball joint for the stuff they're lucky enough Christmas special making your city debut at the soho Playhouse this week what are friends for stop by with recipes for delicious cocktail with our I'm doing all of it on seven.

Bronchitis asthma
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:34 min | 3 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you for being you income to these shows because one of the things that I really love about this show is it here we are in SoHo and we get to see a mix of people from all over New York in this space. I thought you saw she was there. I mean, not to say that there isn't there is great programming at the so playhouse. It's incredible. I mean, you know, there's so many amazing shows there, and they are doing so many great innovative things at that theatre. And one of which I think that is attractive about this show is I mean people from Harlem or coming down to SoHo I've had people come all the way out from jersey and queens black people from all over the place, and then they are mixing with what you consider to be. You know, your your average white theatergoers am to have for instance, the part, you know, apart that you were talking about is when I go the hardest person you've ever known to have black people go Grammy. And guess who it's going to be before him because it is their experience. You know, I talked about I was like I taught my cousins the my white cousins the greatest black card game of all time. Black people yell spades. It's it's like to watch to audiences who typically experienced things and watch things differently. Black people are very vocal when they watch things, and why people are much more reserved when they watch things. So to have these two people interacting with each other. At the exact same time is just so amazing. And it gives everybody the the ability to laugh because laughter is a universal expression. And it makes us all the same. Even if for a moment, we're all being vulnerable. We're saying, hey, I'm gonna show you how I feel about something. And so when everybody gets on board with that man is a good, my guess is Bill -posedly the name of this show is the day, I became black. It runs through may six at the SoHo playhouse so you put up this list of of things that people call biracial. Yeah. I I have a biracial son falls into the superhero categories. We call it bluish can Jewish Jewish. Yes. You have another name for. Because you you make the point that like these are two cultures like if you can survive both of what these cultures have survived. You are. You have another you have another strength. So out of that list. Some one is just sort of created funny. Was there one that you were ever called or referred to that really hurt your feelings? Yeah. Zebra kid. That is the that is the the number one that one hurt the most. Because I just like didn't understand why I was being called that. And and I make a point in the show to say, I wasn't just called it by white people. I was called by black people to and let me tell you when black people are prejudice. It hurts way more because you're like really like. If anybody should understand what it's like to be looked down upon her or to be condescended. It's you, and you feel the need to do it to me it hurts way more. And so yeah, man, zebra kid is the one that hurt the most because I think it's also the most vision is humanizing, and I it just hurt. Yeah. Alive. Say some of the kids that they've taken swirl back swirls set him lying. Basketball. I guess sometimes I, but you know, like swirls like me. What? Oh, he's okay. It's kind of interesting when you take possession of something back an interesting idea and a big part of the show, and I don't wanna give anything away. 'cause I want people to go. See NBC surprised is you really get into the concept of racism social construct, right? And you prove your point in the show that this is something that has been designations made by individuals to create system. Right. And the like, I'm curious if that's where you meant to go with it. Or is that something that you sort of discovered along the way? Yeah. I think it's something that I discovered along the way. Which is you know, just the idea that like. I am somebody who. No matter who altruistic Lee wants to believe in everything is were everything's gonna be. We're all love. Everything's gonna be great. Everything's going to be beautiful. I am. You know, but pollyanna in that and wanna give everybody a benefit of the doubt in a chance and all that stuff. But that doesn't always set up with the world around me, and what is RFID kind of in place. Be it the way I'm perceived the way. Other people's viewpoints of an African American in our society is kind of perceived the idea that like I think I'm going to run around in every situation, and people are always going to give me the benefit of the doubt is naive. And so sometimes that ends up creating a little backlash as it does at the end of the show. And you can get me in trouble. Sometimes in the other thing, I also want to say is that the show is called the day became black. And it's just the understanding that there is a day that you realize you are perceived a certain way in our society, and that that's across the board. Right. I try in elaborate a little bit more at the end. But like there's a day that a woman realizes what it means to be a woman in this country the same way, I realized what it means to be black. There's some day that somebody who's gay realize when means to be gay in this country the same way, I did what it means to be black and even even a white person in this country. There's a day that they realized that they're white. And whether that is realizing there is a level of privilege that comes with that or realizing that they don't want what's associated with that. And I'm not saying that it is the exact same as what those other three women people of color and people in the community experience. But they still experience something in there. It is a universal understanding that we are all responsible for putting each other in those boxes and labeling each other all blank to this. Because you're this. I think blank like those are all things that we are all battling against and at the same time responsible for perpetuating before. I let you go. And you d wasn't very difficult themes, you show some video some video that we don't see on the news because we don't see the extended videos of certain examples of police brutality way, too, many examples at least brutality, but you do have this idea of this mirror. This idea of having people look at people who are not like them for an extended period of time. Tell tell folks about that before you go. Yes. So part of the show we at I had it in the back of a truck. It was like my man's Maria Brahma veg. And so we were taking the truck around the different areas in New York, and we would open it up. And invite people go in the back of the truck and when they walked in. There was just this mirror and everybody thought it was a mere and when they walked in front of the mirror somebody else would would walk out, and they were different person. And that they would stare into a mirror of somebody who didn't look like them in the only thing that they were allowed to say is I am you, and you are me and for one minute they shared the same space. And that's something that we will be bringing back this next month later this next month before the show because we don't ever like just look at each other and drop all of the labels that come with it. And we just stare and say, I am you, and you are me because at the end of the day, most of our experiences our human they may be specifically different. But we all have the same human emotion, human extent, fear pain loss. Love anger, all of those things. And once we drop all the pre. Conceive stuff, and we're just there with another human being we can embrace our differences and cherish our similarities much, much more. And so that's what that experience was in has been. And I mean, let me tell you from laughter to crying to miming hearts that say, I love you. I mean, it has been such a magical thing and people have just really really responded to it in a way. I can't even imagine. And it is great. It has been really really great supposedly show the day. I became black is running now at the SoHo playhouse through may six Bill. Thanks for coming to all of it. Thank you very much. And also just so, you know, we've extended we are all the way until may twenty seven th now ex lax twenty zero. Yeah. Please come out. I appreciate it. Everybody. Thank you so much for coming. And you're amazing. And this is this shows amazing. I appreciate it expansionism after the break. It's a regular Monday segment with classical music picks from w. Clemency Burton hill and something new were trying..

SoHo playhouse SoHo New York Harlem Basketball Burton hill NBC Lee Maria Brahma one minute
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:43 min | 3 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And growing up my entire life. People would ask me me. Exact same question. Are you? What are you? What are you? Are you like what are you? People are growing three times in the population. There's going to be very near future for somebody like me. Let me guess you're mono, racial. I didn't know they were making them an all white anymore. I became black premier at the Hollywood fringe festival in two thousand eighteen where it was nominated for best seller show. It is now running at the SoHo playhouse through may six and Bill is in studio. Thanks for coming to the studio. God thank you so much for having the big half block walk away. Oh, man. This is so cool. Thank you so much for having me. I saw the show yesterday. And it's so funny. You have at the top of the show a couple of disclaimers about people white people in the audience and black people in the audience tell our listeners what the disclaimers are and why you felt they were necessary. Yeah. So I started the show at the exact same. Disclaimer. I say we're going to go or in a cumbersome, racial, topics. We're going to go down some rough roads. And I just want to say why people it's okay to laugh, it's okay? To laugh from the bottom of your gut. Black people do me a favor when they're laughing. Don't stare at him. Okay. Let's try and create a safe space. And I do that just because you know, I want to allow people to feel free to enjoy the show, especially creating a safe environment to discuss very difficult issues is what I want to provide especially in today's society. Whereas, you know, things people aren't being taken care of when we talk about things. And people don't feel safe to express themselves. And I wanted to make sure that that was something that people fell, and I don't necessarily just mean for the white audience. I also mean for the black audience as well, I didn't want them to feel defensive or that they had to feel you know, pressure to act a certain way because I've been in that situation where you know, you hear or see imagery that is tough or difficult to look at. And you are looking around to see how everybody else is reacting to inner seeing how they're looking at you react to it. So I wanted everybody to just feel safe and secure. So that we only thing they have to worry about is enjoying the show the titles provocative because it suggests there's one day. I don't wanna give anything away. But something big happens to you, which is sort of at the crescendo. But it's also about this how all through your life. You have these reminders that you have two different parts of your family. And somehow people wanna make you choose. It's a really. Interesting. There's actually one really interesting part when you're describing little you having to deal with a certain word in in a certain book, we all read and little little tough Blackie was like yo you can't say that word and then little little white. You has like headgear. And it's just like, let's let's go out and play. Did you really have that sense of that dual personality? Yes, I think that the, you know. The experience of of somebody who is by racial is a unique in the fact that you have a insight into both cultures and you have an empathy in a relationship with both cultures. Right. And so when my friend who was white ended up having to read a word in a book. Right. That starts with an end. You know? Everybody kind of looked at me. And was like, oh my God. What's this person going to do? And you know, there was the thought that was like, oh, man. I have to fight this guy because I am black or perceived black, and I need to stand up for this word. But there is this. You know, there's other person in me who knows that white people are my cousins, white people are my family, and there's an empathy that I have toward that experience as well that maybe other people who are all black may not have in. So there was a moment where I was like, oh, well this. He's just reading it. And he was forced to read it. And he isn't this isn't this thing. So like being able to see the world through both of those lenses. I think really the word is that I have empathy to both sides. So that perspective makes it a little bit more unique. I guess is Bill Posey. The name of his show is the day. I became black is running threats SoHo playhouse through may six when I first saw this. And I said, no, we're going to do the segment I remembered something I saw on sixty minutes with Barack Obama. Yes. Have you ever seen this clip? It's from two thousand seven so he's handed Obama and Steve Kroft of sixty minutes. I asked him. This is the question yet at some point you decided that you were black. Mama goes. Well, I'm not sure I decided it. I think if you look African American and this society, you're treated as an African American. That's an incredible. The weird question. Right. Well, weird is a nice word. And it's really interesting when you watch this clip, you see Obama's is just they his he blinks a lot and he c- he self-regulates. Yes. He doesn't really say what he wants to say. What do you think about his answer? I think that that answer is the exact way that I felt once I kind of got an understanding of what it meant to be forced to identify. So this this whole time, right? Obama has such a deep connection to half of himself, which is his white half. Because he was raised by his white mom, and you know, when he announced his candidacy or or put himself out there as by racial was immediately, criticized white people wouldn't let him be biracial. They said that he was black black people were offended that he said he was by racial, and they're saying that he was black. And so after a while, you just feel this need to be like, okay, I'm going to stop fighting it I'm going to give in and the world sees me as black there decided that I'm black. So guess what? I'm black. And so I know in relate exactly to that feeling because it's really difficult to maintain a biracial identity that makes sense to you you describe it as being kind of tiring it can be very tiring at some times during your during your life. Yes. Because you have to keep correcting people or expressing to people how. Serious that identity is to you. And how much it means to you? And you know, I've been around and I've heard it from both sides. You know, also like there are for my experience to be around black people who speak poorly of white people and be like, hey, guys. That's my mom, and my cousins, and my family and people I love very much. But are also I've also, you know, there are biracial people who are white passing around white people and hear them say very district discriminatory things toward black people are like, Amen. I'm black late. What's wrong with you? And so like, you you always feel like it's something that you're thinking about something that you're trying to express to the world. But you don't quite know how to in at every turn you feel like you're getting pushback from it. It's interesting in the show. You talk about how you're just trying to navigate as a kid and you're trying to live in both worlds, and it's so innocent and sweet. And then you have this. Moment when your dad has to give you the talk. You're young black man talk. Nice sort of sweet firefighter, father semi turns Black Panther and your description, and and the way you portray. It is both. It's funny, and it's a little stabs. I'd say very very funny, right? Did your dad really have that kind of transformation or is that a little political a little poetic license this a little poetic license? But there was also a level of like, you know. When when you're. When your parents sits you down and have a serious talk. You're like who is this person? You know, what I mean who does this person be become, and it also becomes a very interesting thing because you again, like I was saying you grow up around your white family, and you have a relationship to them. You see your dad, you know, shaking your uncles hands. And and and, you know, being with your mom, and you know, they your cousins, call him, uncle pose which is my dad's name and then for him to sit down and be like, listen that way family ain't the family. That's going to have your back. If stuff goes down. They're not the family who's going to accept you. If we split into a race war, you need to realize that you don't have the same privileges as that side of your family. So that so like to see a dad go from this from uncle pose to like watch them conspiracy theory like you're just like, oh my God. God what's happening? So I took on a different level of severity to me. And he came off a little bit more like a Black Panther. Then he did my dad at the time. You know? And I was just like, whoa. Who is this guy? I guess as Bill -posedly the name of his show is the day. I became black. The show's really funny, and you you really push a lot of push a lot of tough themes through comedy right up to the edge. There's you have a video games. Just that's a way to teach black history. But a look it's an enslaved person and change like you can make him break out. He's a Super Mario brothers. The little finger looks like and you call up presidents Jefferson Washington for having people you take up toxic masculinity through to porn black masculine deeper porn. Is there any one thing? You can tell really makes the audience uncomfortable that you kind of can get a sense from an intimate room. Right. Yeah. I think that they're, you know, cut it. You know, definitely the stuff that you're talking about in in the style without getting too specific. It is. What you start to realize or what I started to realize is if I was going to take on a black identity in this country that one of the things that I wanted to learn a little bit more about was what it meant to be black in America. Once I once I started to realize that that's how I was being perceived. And then when you go to look at it, you realize, oh, I've not really been educated on that in this country. It's as if we started slavery wake of Martin Luther King, and that's like nothing in between. So comedic hypothe- hypothesized that the reason why we don't do that is because it's too difficult, and I suggest different kinds of teaching techniques to do that one of which being slavery the video game. And as a joke in order to show that we can take graphic material. I mean, we do it all the time we go to World War Two and call of duty or the Spanish inquisition in assassin's creed. And those are both wars where where Jews were murdered and persecuted, and we still play those games and so through comedy. I try my best to express that. There is something systemically wrong in this country about the way black history is taught and so it's time for us to figure out a way to make those complex and difficult. Subjects more relatable to kids. Kids. And that was something that I think makes people uncomfortable that makes them laugh. I I think there's an expression, and I'm going to butcher it. But it's something similar I tried to tickle the ribs before you inject the medicine, you know, and just allow people to laugh, but also go, oh, he he's he's got a point. There is something wrong with that. And I I do think we need to learn a little bit more or I never thought of it like that, you know. Every person I think who gets a chance to see the show because at the end of the day, the show is about somebody search for identity, and I think that everybody who gets a chance to see the show identifies with some aspect of it. I had a seventy year old couple come up to me and say, I'm German. He's Jewish in our parents disowned us to and they related with my parents in the story, and they saw the two of them have to decide their identity as they were doing had people from the LGBT community come up and say, I know what it's like to have an identity forced upon me when it was something I didn't really understand at the time. And he didn't live inside of me. And so like that was somebody who had there was no racial. Connection at all. It was just an identity connection. So I think that those are some albeit uncomfortable and a little different. I still think that everybody walks out taking something from that show has anyone have you had any outbursts or weird. Vocalisations during the show that you didn't expect. Oh, let me tell you one of my favorite things is black people..

Barack Obama Bill Posey SoHo playhouse Blackie Martin Luther King Mama Steve Kroft America Jefferson Washington sixty minutes seventy year one day
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:33 min | 3 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thank you for being you income into these shows because one of the things that I really love about this show is it here we are in SoHo and we get to see a mix of people from all over New York in this space. I thought you saw she was there. I mean, not to say that there isn't great great programming at the SoHo playhouse, it's incredible. I mean, you know, there's so many amazing shows there, and they are doing so many great innovative things at that theatre. And one of which I think that is attractive about this show is I mean people from Harlem or coming down to SoHo I've had people come all the way out from jersey and queens black people from all over the place, and then they are mixing with what you consider to be. You know, your your average white theatergoers. Am to have for instance, the part, you know, apart that you were talking about is when I go the hardest person you've ever known to have black people go Grammy. And they guess who it's going to be before him because it is their experience talk about. I was like I taught my cousins the my white cousins the greatest black card game of all time. Black people yell spades. It's it's like to watch to audiences who typically. Experienced things and watch things differently. Black people are very vocal when they watch things, and why people are much more reserved when they watch things. So to have these two people interacting with each other at the exact same time is just so amazing. And it gives everybody the the ability to laugh because laughter is a universal expression. And it makes us all the same. Even if for a moment, we're all being vulnerable. We're saying, hey, I'm going to show you how I feel about something. And so when everybody gets on board with that man is a good. I guess is Bill -posedly the name this show is the day. I became black it runs through may six at. So hopefully, how so you can put up this list of of things that people call biracial kids. Yeah. I I have a biracial son falls into the superhero category. We call it bluish can Jewish Jewish. Yes. You have another name for. Because you you make the point that like these are two cultures like if you can survive both of what these cultures have survived. You are. You have another you have another strength. So out of that list. Some one is just sort of creative. And funny. Was there one that you were ever called or referred to that really hurt your feelings? Yeah. Zebra kid. That is the that is the the number one that one hurt the most. Because I just like. Understand why I was being called that. And and you know, I make a point in the show to say, I wasn't just called it by white people. I was called by black people to and let me tell you when black people are prejudiced. It hurts way more because you're like really like if anybody should understand what it's like to be looked down upon her or to be condescended. It's you, and you feel the need to do it to me it hurts way more. So. Yeah. Man, zebra kid is the one that hurt the most because I think it's also the most. Humanizing, and I it just hurt. Yeah. Although I'd say some of the kids that they've taken swirl back swirls back. I'm not lying. Basketball. I guess sometimes. But you know, like swirls like me. Oh, he's okay. It's kind of interesting when you take possession of something back. Interesting idea big part of the show, and I don't wanna give anything away because I want people to go. See NBC surprised is you really get into the concept of racism social construct, right? And you prove your point in the show that this is something that has been designations made by individuals to create system. Right. And and the like, I'm curious if that's where you meant to go with it. Or is that something that you sort of discovered along the way? Yeah. I think it's something that I discovered along the way. Which is you know, just the idea that like. I am somebody who. No matter who altruistic Lee wants to believe in everything is everything's gonna be. We're all love. Everything's gonna be great. Everything's going to be beautiful. I am. You know, but pollyanna in that and want to give everybody a benefit of the doubt in a chance and all that stuff. But that doesn't always set up with the world around me, and what is already kind of in place. Be it the way I'm perceived the way a other people's viewpoints of an African American in our society is is kind of perceived the idea that like I think I'm going to run around in every situation, and people are always going to give me the benefit of the doubt is naive. And so. Sometimes that ends up creating a little backlash as it does at the end of the show. And you can get me in trouble. Sometimes and the other thing I also wanna say is that the show is called the day became black. And it's just the understanding that there's a day that you realize you are perceived a certain way in our society, and that that's across the board. Right. I try in elaborate a little bit more at the end. But like there's a day that a woman realizes what it means to be a woman in this country the same way, I realized what it means to be black. There's some day that somebody who's gay realize what it means to be gay in this country the same way, I did what it means to be black and even even a white person in this country. There's a day that they realized that they're white. And whether that is realizing there is a level of privilege that comes with that or realizing that they don't want what's associated with that. And I'm not saying that it is the exact same as what those other three women people of color, and and people in the LGBT community experience, but they still experience something, and there it is a universal understanding that we are all responsible for putting each other in those boxes and labeling each other all blank do this because you're this. I. Think blank like those are all things that we are all battling against and at the same time responsible for perpetuating before. I let you go and do wasn't very difficult themes, you show some video, you know, video that we don't see on the news because we don't see the extended videos of certain examples of police brutality way too, many examples of police brutality, but you do have this idea of this mirror. This idea of having people look at people who are not like them for an extended period of time. Tell tell folks about that before you go. Yes. So part of the show we at I had it in the back of a truck. It was like my opponent man's Maria. Brahma they itch. And so we were taking the truck around the different areas in New York, and we would open it up and invite people go in the back of the truck and when they walked in. There was just this mirror and everybody thought it was a mere and when they walked in front of the mirror. Somebody else would would walk out. And they were different person, and the they would stare into a mirror of somebody who didn't look like them in the only thing that they were allowed to say is I am you, and you are me and for one minute they shared the same space. And that's something that we will be bringing back this next month later this next month before the show because we don't ever like just look at each other and drop all of the labels that come with it. And we just stare and say, I am you, and you are me because at the end of the day, most of our experiences or human they may be specifically different. But we all have the same human, emotion and human extent, fear pain loss. Love anger, all of those things. And once we drop all the preconceived stuff, and we're just there with another human being we can embrace our differences and cherish our similarities much, much more. And so that's what that experience was. In has been and I mean, let me tell you from laughter to crying to miming hearts that say, I love you. I mean, it has been such a magical thing and people have just really really responded to it in a way. I can't even imagine. And it is great. It has been really really great supposedly show the day. I became black is running now at the SoHo playhouse through may sixth bell. Thanks for coming to all of it. Thank you very much. And also just so, you know, we extended we are all the way until may twenty seven now. Ex lax says, oh, yeah. Please come out. I appreciate it everybody. And thank you so much for coming. And you're amazing. And this is this shows amazing. I appreciate it. Thanks, man. After break, it's a regular mind day segment with classical music, fix from w burn hill..

SoHo playhouse SoHo New York Harlem Basketball w burn hill NBC Lee one minute
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

13:43 min | 3 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Growing up my entire life. People would ask me me. Exact same question. Are you? What are you? What are you? What are you? Are you like what are you? Racial, people are growing three times. Eight in the population. There's going to be very near future for somebody like me. Let me guess you're mono, racial. I didn't know they were making them in all white anymore. The day. I became black premier at the Hollywood fringe festival in two thousand eighteen where it was nominated for best seller show. It is now running at the SoHo playhouse through may six and Bill is in studio. Thanks for coming to the studio home. I got thank you so much block walk away. No, man. This is so cool. Thank you so much for having me. I saw the show yesterday. And it's so funny. You have at the top of the show a couple of disclaimers about people white people in the audience and black people in the audience tell our listeners what the disclaimers are and why you felt they were necessary. Yeah. So I started the show the exact same. Disclaimer. I say we're going to go we're gonna cover some racial, topics. So we're going to go down some rough roads. And I just want to say white people. It's okay to laugh, it's okay. To laugh from the bottom of your gut. Black people do me a favor when they're laughing. Don't stare at him. Okay. Let's try and create a safe space. And I do that just because you know, I want to allow people to feel free to enjoy the show, especially creating a safe en-. Environment to discuss very difficult issues is what I want to provide especially in today's society. Whereas, you know, things people aren't being taken care of when we talk about things and people don't feel safe to express themselves. And I wanted to make sure that that was something that people fell, and I don't necessarily just mean for the white audience. I mean for the black audience as well, I didn't want them to feel defensive or that they had to feel you know, pressure to act a certain way because I've been in that situation where you know, you hear or see imagery that is tough or difficult to look at. And you are looking around to see how everybody else is reacting to it or seeing how they're looking at you react to it. So I wanted everybody to just feel safe and secure. So that we only thing they have to worry about is enjoying the show the titles provocative because it suggests there's one day. I don't wanna give anything away. But. Something big happens to you, which is sort of at the crescendo. But it's also about this how all through your life. You have these reminders that you have two different parts of your family. And somehow people wanna make you choose. It's a really interesting. There's actually one really interesting part when you're describing a little you having to deal with a certain word in in a certain book, we all read and little little tough black was like, yo you can't say that word and then little little white. You has like headgear. And it's just like, let's let's go out and play. Did you really have that sense of that that dual personality? Yes, I think that the, you know. The experience of of somebody who is by racial is a unique in the fact that you have a insight into both cultures. And you have an empathy in a relationship with both cultures. Right. And so when my friend who was white ended up having to read a word in a book out starts with an right? You know, everybody kind of looked at me. And was like, oh my God. What's this person going to do? And you know, there was the thought me that was like, oh, man. I have to fight this guy because I am black or perceived black, and I need to stand up for this word. But there is this, you know. This other person in me who knows that white people are my cousins, white people are my family, and there's an empathy that I have toward that experience as well that maybe other people who are all black may not have in. So there was a moment where I was like, oh, well, this, you know, he's reading it. And he was forced to read it didn't he hasn't. This isn't this thing. So like being able to see the world through both of those lenses. I think really the word is that I have empathy to both sides. So that perspective makes it a little bit more unique. My guess is Bill posted the name of his show is the day, I became black. It's running threat. So playhouse through may six when I first saw this. And I said, no, we're gonna do this segment. I remembered something I saw on sixty minutes with Barack Obama. Yes. Have you ever seen this clip? It's from two thousand seven so he was candidate Obama and Steve Kroft of sixty minutes. I asked him this is the question. Yeah. Yet at some point you decided that you were black. Goes. Well, I'm not sure I decided it. I think if you look African American and this society, you're treated as an African American. That's an incredible Lee. Weird question. Right. Well, nice word, and it's really interesting when you watch this clip, you see Obama's I just they his he blinks a lot and he c- he self-regulates. Yes. He doesn't really say what he wants to say. What do you think about his answer? I think that that answer is the exact way that I felt once I kind of got an understanding of what it meant to be forced to identify. So this this whole time, right? Obama has such a deep connection to half of himself, which is his white half. Because he was raised by his white mom, and you know, when he announced his candidacy or or put himself out there as by racial. It was immediately criticized why people wouldn't let him be by racial. They said that he was black black people were offended that he said he was biracial. And they're saying that he was black. And so after a while, you just feel this need to be like, okay, I'm going to stop fighting it I'm going to give in and the world sees me as black there decided that I'm black. So guess what? I'm black. And so I know in relate exactly to that feeling because it's really difficult to maintain a biracial identity that makes sense to you you describe it as being kind of tiring it can be very tiring at some times during your during your life. Yes. Because you have to keep correcting people or expressing to people how. Serious that identity is to you. And how much it means to you? And you know, I've been around and I've heard it from both sides. You know, also like there are for my experience to be around black people who speak poorly of white people and be like, hey, guys. That's my mom, and my cousins, and my family and people I love very much. But are also I've also, you know, there are biracial people who are white passing around white people and hear them say very disres- discriminatory things toward a black. People are like, hey, man. I'm black late. What's wrong with you? And so like, you you always feel like it's something that you're thinking about something that you're trying to express to the world. But you don't quite know how to at every turn you feel like you're getting pushback from it. It's interesting in the show. You talk about how you're just trying to navigate as a kid and you're trying to live in both worlds, and it's so innocent and sweet. And then you have this. Moment when your dad has to give you the talk young black, man talk. Nice sort of sweet firefighter. Father suddenly turns into like a Black Panther. And your description, and and the way you portray it is both it's funny. And it's a little sad to say very, very funny. Right. Did your dad really have that kind of transformation or is that a little political a little poetic license this a little poetic license? But there was also a level of like, you know. When when you're. When you parents sits you down and have a serious talk. You're like who is this person? You know, what I mean who does this person be become, and it also becomes a very interesting thing because you again, like I was saying you grow up around your white family, and you have a relationship to see your dad, you know, shaking your uncles hands in and, you know, being with your mom, and you know, they your cousins, call him, uncle pose which is my dad's name and then for him to sit down and be like, listen that way family eight the family that's going to have your back. If stuff goes down. They're not the family who's going to accept you. If if we split into a race war, you need to realize that you don't have the same privileges as that side of your family. So that so like to see a dad go from this from uncle pose to like watch them conspiracy theory like you're just like, oh my God. God what's happening? So I it took on a different level of severity to me. And he came off a little bit more like a Black Panther. They he did my dad at the time. You know? And I was just like, whoa. Who is this guy? Like Bill -posedly the name of his show is the day. I became black. The show's really funny, and you you really push a lot of push a lot of tough themes through comedy shit right up to the edge. There's you have a video game. You just that's a way to teach black history. Look, it's an enslaved person and change like you can make him break out a Super Mario brothers, the little figure looks like and you call up presidents Jefferson Washington for having enslave people you take up toxic masculinity through to porn black masculine Beathard porn. Is there any one thing? You can tell really makes the audience uncomfortable that you kind of can get a sense from because an intimate room. Right. Yeah. I think that. Cutted definitely the stuff that you were talking about in the style without getting too specific. It is. What you start to realize or what I started to realize is if I was going to take on a black identity in this country that one of the things that I wanted to learn a little bit more about was what it meant to be black in America. Once I once I started to realize that that's how I was being perceived. And then when you go to look at it, you realize, oh, I've not really been educated on that in this country. It's as if we started slavery wake up and Martin Luther King and like nothing in between. And so comedic I- hypothe- hypothesized that the reason why we don't do that is because it's too difficult, and I suggest different kinds of teaching techniques to do that one of which being slavery the video game. And as a joke in order to show that we can take graphic material. I mean, we do it all the time we go to World War Two and call of duty or the Spanish inquisition in assassin's creed. And those are both wars where where Jews were murdered and persecuted, and we still play those games and so through comedy. I try my best to express that. There is something systemically wrong in this country about the way black history is taught and so it's time for us to figure out a way to make those complex and difficult. Subjects more relatable to kids. And that was something that I think makes people uncomfortable that makes them laugh. I, you know, I think there's an expression, and I'm going to butcher it. But it's something similar I tried to tickle the ribs before you inject the medicine, you know, and just allow people to laugh, but also go, oh, he he's he's got a point there. There is something wrong with that. And I do think we need to learn a little bit more or I never thought of it like that, you know. Every person I think who gets a chance to see the show because at the end of the day, the show is about somebody search for identity, and I think that everybody who gets a chance to see the show identifies with some aspect of it. I had a seventy year old couple come up to me and say, I'm German. He's Jewish in our parents disowned us to and they related with my parents in the story, and they saw the two of them have to decide their identity as they were doing. I've had people from the LGBT community come up and say, I know it's like to have an identity forced upon me when it was something I didn't really understand at the time. And he didn't live inside of me. And so like that was somebody who had there was no racial. Connection at all. It was just an identity connection. So I think that those are some albeit uncomfortable and a little different. I still think that everybody walks out taking something from that show has anyone have you had any outbursts or weird. Vocalisations during the show that you didn't expect. Oh, let me tell you one of my favorite things is black people..

Barack Obama Bill SoHo playhouse Martin Luther King Steve Kroft America Cutted Jefferson Washington sixty minutes seventy year one day
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Was first reported Saturday afternoon in the Penn State forest in Burlington county, it was fueled by high winds and some ten thousand acres have burned. But it's now mostly contained. No, injuries are reported the blaze forced the closure of roads in Burlington and ocean counties. Ash, reportedly rain down on parts of the state destructive forest. Fires have long been feared in the one point one million acre pine lands because it's dense fog. Forest interspersed with population centers, former Newark mayor Kenneth Gibson has died. He was the first black mayor of a major northeast city after Gibson was elected in the wake of the Newark riots in nineteen seventy he reflected on the white man who founded Newark three hundred years earlier. Sure. He never realized. Gibson? We'll go on to serve four terms. Current newark. Mayor RAs Baraka said yesterday that Gibson's election Mark the moment when African Americans began to stand up and be counted. Gibson was eighty six years old. We do expect a sunny day today. Highs near fifty degrees. It'll feel a little colder with the wind. Winds will be from the north west from fifteen to twenty miles per hour. Clear tonight. Lows around thirty four degrees right now. Thirty five degrees. Fair skies in New York. It's six oh seven. Support for NPR comes from progressive insurance, offering its homequote explorer so shoppers can evaluate options in one place when buying home insurance custom quotes and rates are available online. Learn more at Progresive dot com. On the next album Bill -posedly, he's a comedian and an actor and the star of a one man show at the SoHo playhouse it's called the day. I became black plus Romney USA new semi autobiographical. Shell on Hulu.

Kenneth Gibson Newark Penn State forest Burlington county Burlington RAs Baraka Progresive dot Ash Romney USA New York Bill -posedly Shell SoHo NPR Thirty five degrees thirty four degrees three hundred years ten thousand acres
"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Any. Cardboard box. Snap. Judgment. Lot changing the world. One story at a time. See this performance in brilliant technicolor step. Guzman dot ORG. For those that joined snap mission. You might see secret. Never never broadcast judgment comic extravaganza. Let people know that you swing now. Step judgment pin. Or here's from snap. Judgment music. It's easy. Snap stuff. For the asking snap. Judgment dot ORG. Drafted break last time. She was on the judgment stage. She told story about girl scout cookies almost broke. That's right. Steps with Jim Cobra. She would turn to the brand new story. Laughing your whatever off in just a moment. That doesn't live in Brooklyn. On the next all of it. Bill -posedly. He's a comedian and an actor and the star of a one man show. We at the SoHo playhouse it's called the day. I became black was USA new semi autobiographical show on Hulu tells the story of magician American millennial named Rami reconciling with his Muslim identity and his life is politically divided neighborhood in New Jersey. I'm Alison Stewart guiltless all weekdays at noon on WNYC. WNYC is supported by Carnegie Hall, presenting two wings, the music of black America in migration produced by Jason Moran and Alicia hall Moran, including an appearance by author Isabel Wilkerson on March thirtieth tickets at Carnegie Hall dot org leadership support for WNYC's. Local and global news coverage is provided by the Jerome L. Greene foundation, partnering with organizations to promote Justice and equality for all New Yorkers..

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"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"soho playhouse" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And then the next day she and her parents start a new life, and they take the train out to the countryside. And the story ends with a beautiful image of gret stretching her young strong body. It was like a confirmation of their new dreams and excellent intentions that at the end of their journey. Their daughter sprang to her feet first and stretched her young body. I felt so connected to being the one with the young strong fit body while my sibling sibling was left behind. Gregor is so well drawn he has such a kindness to him such compassion for his family. Even though he fails to communicate with them. He's always thinking of them. And wondering if maybe that was cats attitude towards all of us. It made me want to be good. It made me want to be like the good, Greta and not like the bad. Greta it made me want to be always compassionate towards cat and contemplate what her in her life was like her and her life was completely opaque to me. I think the story is about dignity in a way and just trusting that if you knew someone's inner life, you will be able to love them. Katherine Phillips died in two thousand twelve from complications red syndrome. She was thirty to her mother. Susan Zimmerman published a book about her called keeping Catherine Helen Phillips. When you heard of that story is a writer. She's got a new novel coming out this July called the need, which is a thriller about motherhood and loss. Our story was produced and scored by Tommy the excerpts from Kafka's metamorphosis were read by Paul. Coming up how the rocky horror picture show embraced and embraced and embrace law. So. That's next on studio. Three sixty. On the next all of it. Bill -posedly. He's a comedian and an actor and the star of a one man show currently at the SoHo playhouse it's called the day. I became black plus Rami USA new semi autobiographical show on Hulu tells the story of an injection American millennial named Rami reconciling with his Muslim identity and his life is politically divided neighborhood in New Jersey..

Gregor Catherine Helen Phillips Katherine Phillips Greta Rami USA New Jersey Rami Susan Zimmerman Paul SoHo writer Hulu Tommy Kafka