36 Burst results for "Software Engineer"

The Social Dilemma and Otherness

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:27 min | 3 d ago

The Social Dilemma and Otherness

"Just to have a smaller maybe episode just me. Thinking out loud with you and this one is about I call it the social dilemma and otherness in I. Don't know if any of you watched the Netflix documentary called the social dilemma. I watched it not too long ago and it was disturbing at it was as it was intended to be I won't pretend to be a movie reviewer that's not my thing. But I. Thought it was very good and I thought it brought a ton of points about social media In clearer view for those of us who may have. been aware of this but not to the extent that it actually was true. But to put my reviewer had on though I thought that the acting out of the personalized a algorithms were Eliza. Bit of a stretch but it did break up the talking heads which might have been boring for people after a while although I personally like talking head documentaries. But. The point of this. episode is, is about the key theme of the documentary and it's the way our minds are manipulated by social media platforms and the manipulation, and how the manipulation was intentional by the big tech players or the company's the money behind the big tech. The twist though is that the intentional manipulation was aimed at our attention. To get us to buy things but the super efficiency of the algorithms designed to do that. Was Not anticipated. They didn't think it was going to be good as it was then the negative consequences on human thinking and behavior was also nad intended. So it was sort of like creating a Frankenstein and I think one of the one of the people who reviewed on that one of the tech players who were reviewed actually said it was like creating a Frankenstein. The buying in quote unquote into distorted ideas about the world ourselves and each other that have become nearly ubiquitous sense. The pandemic Allah the rise of Cunanan and stand startling panoply of conspiracy theory and times been great awakening groups that have grown to amazing proportions to the point of moving beyond their virtual groups and into the world to act out demonstrations, hate speech and even violence. Now, the documentary features the narratives of several Silicon Valley defectors talking to the camera. These young executives, designers and software engineers all left lucrative an influential positions for a variety of reasons around sort of this theme. One of 'EM's ethical concerns about addictive media others were political concerns over the polarization of society and the spread of fake news or just general misgivings of the sort expressed by Tristan Harris formerly designed ethicist at Google who said in the movie. Quote when you look around. When you look when you look around you, it feels like the world is going crazy. Is this normal or have we fallen under some spell unquote? After watching this documentary I continued to reflect about how it really does feel like the world is going crazy. I also listened to many podcasts discussing these phenomena the polarization, the the the rise in conspiracy theory thinking end times beliefs anti-semitism of. Great Awakenings you know all this stuff and how How to address it, how to classify what it is and how to fix

Netflix Tristan Harris Silicon Valley Google
Fresh update on "software engineer" discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

00:32 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "software engineer" discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Semi political question. We're going to be careful with these. Jeff, we gotta be careful. Is the lockdown actually necessary. What are we doing here? And we're not in lockdown anymore. We're having to talk about software I think like talking about like. Epidemiology and public health I think is like outside of our. Global expertise inhabited the double anything about the software unlike the team and there's a that. But like I I'm just like a software engineer using my opinion, it will be. The. Kind of at. This point. Yeah, I gotTA agree. We're. We're we're super not experts here and I don't I don't want to pretend like we are. Yeah. Not even speculation come on you guys are unemployed. The challenge. In these projects working it for a few months was like ignoring all the armed ebony meteorologists that were on twitter that were in your inbox that were telling you things and. I think like a big part of it is knowing what you know and being able to be effective. is to be able to. Bring. Luck you're a game on things that you know and and and really try the deeply understand like the kind of what's going on. But like I think you have to understand also like where? The boundaries of your knowledge, our because I think the call otherwise, it causes a lot of throngs and a lot of like unnecessary churn and you can see that all over the place. It's funny in Silicon Valley we have this kind of love hate relationship with experts right icon classic and we're very smart and we. FIGURE ANYTHING OUT I. I think like I am unemployed I would like to be employed at some point in the future I. Have a reverence for experts I I like science. I like scientists have their own set of incentives well, you of course, they do everybody does but I think one of the ones that just go in the bay area have done so well with the pandemic is that we experience very seriously here we believe scientists when I'm am not a scientist but I, do listen to them and I. Follow their advice because they even if they're not perfect because no one is the in what they think of as the best thing to do information they have. What norms have changed most for you guys after the lockup lockdown. Think I think like everybody not everybody else. But like a lot of other people, I was doing this work early on, you know from home from from like our tiny little in San Francisco with my wife and my four year old son, and that was obviously very very challenging as it would be for for every other parent like during this lockdowns and stuff like that. So My All of my empathy and everything that goes out to every other parent out there it's rough. I was very very it to be able to do it under the best possible really of I spent a lot of time thinking about my mask. You know there was a great tweet had the other day, which is like I go outside and I'm like I forget my mask and I'm like, Oh, I forgot my mass like I'm spiderman or something like that that that's kind of how I feel somebody's Felix man like better not forget my mask I don't know. Is it weird that I've? Grown accustomed to wearing masks now, I kind of like it is that I don't know what I don't know what that's about. The only person feels though that's that's the strangest thing for me yeah, Sam I'm someone who likes to meet people. So I think you know given the fact that serendipity is Kinda gone. Two Zero is a challenging to figure out ways to Kinda go create serendipity, and there are great avenues to go through that. So that's something that I kinda like, struggle Western. Is. Just. Need to kind of be cognizant of that. Just make sure you're doing the effort meeting people virtually to meet New People and my kind of exercise. Those uses associate for me like really enjoys that slurring from other people right having figuring out venues avenues to go do that I am an introvert, and so I realized a lot of this stuff is Not Been as hard for me as it is for other people was funny I. I did get together last week for a distance wall with a friend of mine and I was like so excited to season I was so excited to see him your old college friend or whatever, and this is just like an acquaintance basically a like. So absolutely thrilled and one. Thing you want to give them a hug and all that good stuff. So yeah, at that. Are you guys anything else you want to add. I don't know what to say it was it was it was great I love doing it. It was an absolute privilege I would recommend it to anyone like have you ever have the chance to serve you ever had the chance to use like things you know how to do like use your your special Incertus to believe in it's it's just an absolute rewarding tremendous experience I would. I just can't recommend it highly enough. Yeah. Yeah for me I think it was is that know being able to bring my skills and have the opportunity to kind of bake a meaningful impact every for something that is kind of outside a Mike Domain. But provide that kind of expertise in and really helped movement needle was Manson incredibly rewarding experience and they learned a lot from how'd you integrate across different kinds? To like even learning a little bit epidemiology. So it was a blast and I'm really glad to have the opportunity to do it and I highly recommend people if you have the chance to go try and volunteer for all of these projects because fundamentally like they need software people on the show them what's possible and you'd be amazed at the kind of impact and value that you can add by just you know kill telling them what you see in things that are that they could do that. They can't do right now with computers right in here we're still really much at the infancy of what's possible across many many different domains. Okay guys. Well, thanks on the show. Thanks. Thank you so much. Triple Bite is a network of over two hundred, thousand top engineers. It works with more than four hundred tech companies including coin base.

Scientist Twitter Jeff San Francisco Software Engineer Silicon Valley SAM Incertus Manson Mike Domain
Interview With Whitney Wang

Embedded

05:39 min | 5 d ago

Interview With Whitney Wang

"Welcome to embedded I am Ille- Co alongside Christopher White. Today we are going to talk about professional Taco copters. Well actually prescriptions delivered via drones in places where growth's aren't viable. I guest is Whitney Wong from ZIP line. Thanks for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. Could you tell us a bit about yourself? Sure. As we said. Hong I'm embedded software engineer at supply. Supply is start and we make high-speed fixed-wing drones that deliver essential medical supplies around the world. Joins a blind a year ago straight out of college, and I actually have a background in mechanical and aerospace engineering. Building robots sand. Really, excited to be here today. We are excited to ask about drones and. Some world travel. But before that, we want to do a lightning round where we ask short questions may watch for. And if we'RE BEHAVIORAL OURSELVES WE WON'T ASK WHY. Are you ready. Good To to complete one project started as. Well. In practice I definitely start doesn't but in theory I would definitely like to compare one. Do you have a favorite acronym. That's a good question. I don't actually have a favorite acronym, but I have at least data acronym cuts new. Okay it's it's one of those reclusive acronyms. It's very annoying. If, you could teach college courses what would you like to teach? I took this really amazing course when I was in college called transformations in art and engineering and it combined art and engineering, we've got to do a lot of really cool embedded. He projects and was really free form and yeah very creative So I would definitely like to teach a class like that. Drone. Or Quad. Copter. I guess Quad Copter is a subset of droned. Depending on your definition but. Said fixed-wing. So What is the silliest application you've seen? ooh. Twenty question i. I guess. One of the summers for my internships. I worked at a startup where we try to make an indoor drone. It was basically a quad copter encompassed in a ball and it looked like the death star so. That was pretty fun. Cool. Do you have a tip everyone should know. Yeah Don't be afraid to get started I definitely seen many of my peers. get really intimidated by Harvard projects coming from like same more pure software background but you know, don't be afraid to to just like get moving in and make mistakes and learn along the way. Okay. So tell me about zip-line. fixed-wing launchers. Give us the rundown. Yeah. So the technology is pretty cool but it seems kind of random men and a kind of strange If you look at it from like today's perspective just watching videos online how it works is actually we have a swing drones. They look like tiny airplanes. They an operator assembles these drums on a launcher, which is basically a high speed catapult. The operators hit a button and these drones catapulted into the sky at a hundred kilometers per hour. So these drones, then move across the sky and We actually have a service radius of about eighty kilometers, which is about fifty miles and when it reaches the final delivery site which is typically a hospital or health facility in any of the countries that we serve. It will open. It's payload doors release a package with a parachute attached to it, and that package will guide to the ground and the local doctors who requested the order will go in retrieved package. Are Jones will autonomously fly home and it will actually. Do something that we referred to as a recovery, which is essentially It doesn't have landing gear. So what it does is it has a tiny centimeter long hook. At the end of its tail boom, and there is a big trust structure where our original like launching location is so like the recovery system is right next to that catapult launcher. And on top of this big trust. Will be a a line essentially like fishing line attached across this trust structure. The line will snap up as the drone reports keep. Yes. Location at a sub centimeter level accuracy back to the ground station and it will engage with the line catch on. So it's pretty magical looking.

Quad Copter Whitney Wong Hong Ille- Co Taco Copters Christopher White Harvard Software Engineer Jones
Interview with Tina Wu Fredericks

Asian America: The Ken Fong Podcast

06:06 min | Last week

Interview with Tina Wu Fredericks

"Today is Tina, move. Fredericks and Tina is running for the School Board of Pasadena Unified School district, and I was just excited to meet someone who I think. Tina this is correct. This is your first elected. Effort and would like to introduce you especially to the folks. In the past school district who can vote but also to our national and global audience just to meet. Another Asian American is not going to sit on the sidelines and his decided to really get involved. So welcome to our podcast. Can thank you for having me. So you're second generation chinese-american. You used to teach public school. You've serve multiple terms on your local PTA board you are software engineer which. Blows my mind and you're you're the mom of two kids, two daughters who actually go to the USD schools. So what prompted you to with all the other things that you've done already, you're definitely involved parent why run for the school board. Yeah so I have I guess like you said, I have two daughters once ten wants thirteen and I've been ditching for a year. And one of those parents that are. Very active volunteering fundraising. Helping my daughter's school and you know over the years is been kind of the same thing budget cuts. we don't have a librarian we have to raise money for these basic enough staff and school supplies. Now, just see this repeating year after year that I've been here for eight years. and. That kind of coronated with the. I know this is. was go closures in the past two years in that was what? Was the. Last Straw you know of is like my daughter almost her school was almost closed and that's really really dramatic or. Little kids you know. So when they were closing schools like three three at a time three or four at a time, and that's really traumatic for kids in entire communities. So I want this is because of budget cuts yet due to the budget cuts and. and. There's like a fierce competition with private schools in Pasadena Area I believe we have the most A. Private schools per capita in the country. So that's an additional. Challenge for our district. Yeah, one of our previous guests maybe year and a half ago told me the history of private schools in Pasadena and I didn't realize it was it was an adverse reaction to the civil rights. Passage Act and there was all these parents that said well, even though this federal judges coming down. Out of the deep South, coming to P USDA, and saying, we're going to do bussing because you guys are segregating your schools. Then all of a sudden, all these people these groups got motivated to start these private schools and Christian wants to which you know when I learned that history. I'm I'm sure you're aware of it. I was appalled as like, Oh, I was wondering why there are so many private schools but now it makes sense it's like, oh well, we're not racist not against integration we just want to start her own school. Right yes. That it was a response to the busing in the effort to integrate our schools. Yeah. That's unfortunate. But yeah, that is you know we are feeling the effects of that. Now, there's a there's also learned in researching you. There's an altruistic reasons for you running for the school board and it has to do with continuing the legacy of your late mother. Yes Oh, you've done your research. Yes my mom and Wu is A arts promoter, she was an arts promoter, and for decades she was Camille leader. Back in. In San Jose North in San Jose. And she was quite the political activist i. KNEW GROWING UP I didn't know any. You know she's my mom but. Yes, she was really a activist and she loved A. On. Chinese culture and I grew up. Learning Chinese folk dances we would. Go to San Francisco on rehearse these dances sing songs in Chinese I didn't really understand what I was singing but. I knew it phonetically so I have really. Rich, culture grew up with a very. Deep appreciation for my heritage and I you know I think my my own mother for that and Yes she passed away a few years ago and We recently had A. Remembrance of her last couple of weeks ago and you know there. It's interesting because she is. So has impacted people so deeply that you know it just feels like. Her her passing. So fresh. And It's just strange to see grown Asian men crying. Dean coaching adds a deep she affected. The Bull. So yeah, I want to carry on her legacy of service community and. Yeah, she's she's not one of my inspirations. She clearly knew right from wrong and she stood up for what was right

School Board Of Pasadena Unifi Tina Pasadena Fredericks San Jose USD PTA Software Engineer Usda San Francisco WU A. Remembrance Camille
Fathers Now Allowed Time Off Work If They Need To Appear On Maury

The Topical

01:04 min | Last week

Fathers Now Allowed Time Off Work If They Need To Appear On Maury

"It comes to one year old Isaiah j u r not that's the sound of 31 year old software engineer Jace Wortley finding out he is not the father of his former girlfriend's child on a recent episode of Maury. He was able to attend a taping of the program. Thanks to a progressive new paternity leave policy that allows possible fathers to take time off to sort these type of issues out on the popular tabloid talk-show many businesses have been adopting similar policies and we're joined Now by our chief paid time off Kourtney Jenner Resnick to talk about this emerging new trend. Thanks for joining us Jenna. Of course, Leslie. So tell me how do these new policies work? These policies will grant potential fathers typically eight whole days to fly out to the studio taping a show and determine if they are really on the hook for the next 18 years or if they're old side piece is trying to trap them out of Revenge. The idea is that before now father's just didn't have the structure at work to take the time to properly scream. Partner or acts in front of a live studio audience on National Television, right exactly to

Jace Wortley Maury Kourtney Jenner Resnick Leslie Software Engineer Jenna National Television Partner
Chipping Away at a Monolith with Tori Huang

Ruby on Rails Podcast

03:44 min | 3 weeks ago

Chipping Away at a Monolith with Tori Huang

"Tori I'd like to dig into what your role is at Gusto. So I'm a software engineer on the partners engineering team. My teams basically responsible for building out the experience for accountants on Gusto. So what Gusto specializes in small business, we have this entire platform for accountants that allows them to manage multiple clients and it's it's a pretty awesome platform. We provide a lot of tools to help accounts give personalized advice to their clients. They receive revenue share for clients, neighboring Augusta, and actually just worked on a project that recommends some of our accounting partners to small businesses. So now we're bringing accountants new clients. Just generally, I'm very passionate about the product I think it's were being able to build something and immediately be helpful to so many people especially small business. So essentially, my job is building Gusto for accountants, and I really have a typical product engineering job. So the reason that I brought you into the show is that I came across the excellent article that you wrote under the Gusto engineering blog called chipping away at a monolith. So, there was a period of time where developers were really sheepish about having a monolith however boldly, at the beginning of your article, you stated that Gusto had a monolith problem but it was a good thing. So can you explain why? Yet I would love to. So really you can only have a monolith problem to the extent that Gusto does after years of building your software's first of all, that means you've already been around for a while and in the startup world that is a big success right off the bat. I wasn't around in Gusta those early years when they were known as payroll but from my experience working with start ups right out of the boot Camp I can tell you that you're not worried about creating a monolith I mean you should be focused on launching your product a doing it quickly getting yourself out there finding as many users as possible and beating the competition. So while you might might be trying to build things a scalable way, it's it's really impossible to see to from that short distance where patterns are going to appear in your code base. So I would argue that most of the work you do early on in the life of a company to prevent the creation of a monolith is kind of pointless because you don't really know where the patterns are yet they haven't appeared. By the time you have a monolith problem like I said you've been around for a while so you can start to see these patterns Hopefully by that time, you're in a position where you're mature enough as a company that you have the space to spend some time on tech and addressing those patterns in Europe. So the tr of that is you can't really see these patterns, these domain patterns until you've had enough time to build out your software and that means you're already had some success. Survive long enough to write that much gone. That's a really positive way of looking at it. So from your personal experience windy. No, it's time to build a service outside of a monolith. I think that there are two things that really indicate you should start looking at breaking down your monolith. The first of all is that you're going to see these patterns emerging in your code. You're going to see where these domains should be and where your boundaries should lie. The second thing would be more of a business consideration a that spending time breaking down your monolith spending time separating out your software is going to bring you more benefits than actually focusing on building those new features. So again, early on in a company's life, it might make more sense to spend a lot of time building up this new features because you want to get your product out there quickly. But once you are able to see these patterns that's when you've earned the right to work on this model is problem.

Gusto Gusto Engineering Software Engineer Tori Europe Augusta Gusta
Give Up Control, On Purpose

Developer Tea

06:24 min | Last month

Give Up Control, On Purpose

"One of the misconceptions that I had about this show when I started this podcast five years ago. was that every episode needed to be better than the last? And this was a misperception misconduct option of what this audience needs out of this podcast for a couple of reasons. The first reason is very simple. How do you decide? between two episodes, which one is the best. The easy answer might actually be substitution question. Which, episode, has more listens. Or? Perhaps the heuristic were this substitution that we make is which episode has the best feedback. Which episode is mentioned in reviews the most or which episode has the most chatter on twitter. All of these are just proxies to quality. And there's no specific way to determine. What episodes are? Unequivocally. Better than others. Of course, that's not to say that all episodes are then therefore equal to each other their episodes that I feel. Much more proud of over time but the perception, the confusion that I had was that my pride or my feeling of. Investment or my feeling of quality my perception of quality of the episodes were going to match up with everyone else's. My perception was that I needed to increase control and investment in every episode. But the truth was that I needed to like go of control. And invest less in the episodes not because I didn't WANNA put more of my energy and time. Into caring for the episodes but rather. that. If I tried to be a perfectionist about these episodes, then we wouldn't be able to publish this show on as regular basis. And the interesting factor here. Is that some of the episodes where I felt. Rushed or even. Like the idea for the episode, the premise of the episode wasn't very good. Some of those episodes I actually received very good feedback. You could argue based on those heuristic we talked about at the beginning. But some of those were my best episodes. So, why am I telling you all of this? How does it matter to your career as a software engineer? First of all I do want to mention the fact that this isn't true across the board. Not, every podcast is optimized for delivering two or three episodes a week like this one is. But I wanNA talk about a specific measure. That most suffering engineers will relate to especially as your career moves forward. And that is control. In. One of many things that we often have a confusion about. Perception that could be flipped on its head and many of us would. Benefit from that flipping. Our natural perception most of us at least. That as we gain more control things will improve. As as we have more influence. As. We have more say over whatever is happening. As. We have more information and more power. Things will improve. Our ability to our lives in a positive. Or our ability to affect other people's lives in a positive direction will increase as we gain more control. But time and time. Again, this shows to not be true. And, probably, for a few reasons, one of the first reasons that comes to mind is the fact that most control his actually an illusion. We aren't increasing our own agency most of the time. Instead, we are borrowing agency from someone else or something else. Or we're allowing ourselves to believe that we have more control than we actually have. Now how does this play out well? As an example, you may eventually become a manager in your career and you might find yourself excited to dive into the statistics of your team's performance. An as you open up those statistics for discussion and as you drive the team towards improving those statistics, it may feel very rewarding to see those numbers change. But there's so many problems that tend to happen when we manage purely by the numbers, this is only one example of how control can be an illusion. In this example, managing by the numbers creates very clear. Problems with those numbers if you have incentives to make a given number move in a particular direction. Then it's very likely that you're trading something else off or. You may unknowingly be creating a false measure, some kind of gamified measure. and. So this idea that we're controlling things more that were able to take those numbers and move them in the right direction by imposing our powerful position, for example. On other people that that is somehow a controlling measure. It turns out to move us in the other direction. We get a picture of things that isn't clear. And this isn't a new problem. This isn't a problem that has come up since. We started measuring things measuring performance with data. This isn't new it's not a modern problem. In fact, many philosophers talk about the idea that control is in some ways. The source of suffering for many people.

Twitter Software Engineer
Facebook Dialogue Platform with Stephen Roller

Software Engineering Daily

15:02 min | 2 months ago

Facebook Dialogue Platform with Stephen Roller

"Stephen Roller welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. You work on dialogue research at facebook dialogue research. I. Think of as a better way of describing chat bots. So I may refer to chat bots and Dialogue Research interchangeably during this episode. Why are chat bots useful? I think it's a longstanding dream in the field of artificial intelligence and computer science. Right? We've we've always had the dream of what if I just talked to my computer like I talked to other people. In converse with them, they would know what are my intentions? Why am I asking them this? What can they do to make my life better or help me along and you know? Programming is fun I love programming, but you know it'd be nice to just communicate with. Computers as well. And what about you? Personally, why are you personally interested in chat bots? Have you pursued this line of work of of all the different kinds of computer science research you could be doing? Yeah. You know I sort of stumbled into this area join fair after my phd where I did work in natural language processing but my my work, my background work was like a little bit more linguistically oriented focused on like the meanings of words a little bit more like what can computers just about language rather than how do we teach computers to understand language? And so you know when I joined. Fair. I was looking for for projects to join projects to collaborate on. So I gave dialogue a shot and it turns out to be a really great ren for me a mix of novel research using using the greatest and latest neural networking and machine learning techniques as well as a bunch of interesting software engineering problems and opportunities for Staley and things like this. What are the domains in which conversational agents or chat bots are actually useful today? What are the places where they're useful versus the places where they're not so useful? Meaning like, what's the? What did they do major? We've actually conquered rather than the ones we're stumbling. Yeah I think you know obviously, you've seen a wave of digital assistance and I think that work is very exciting. a lot of what we focused on in dial in par lay in the dialogue research at facebook is on open domain chat bots, which are chat bots that can talk to you about like literally anything and they're usually not focused on. Accomplishing tasks for you rather like the goal is just to have a conversation with you about anything for as long as possible. So that's primarily where we work and I think we've seen a lot of exciting advances over the past couple years to where I think if you were to try some of these newer chat bots that have come out in the past year you, you'd probably be really impressed with like Oh. Wow. This was further than I. Expect. So I think you see commercially is a lot of digital assistants a lot of success in this a lot of customer service type things when I'm really excited about when I think we've you know where things have made big strides in an big strides in the past year is on these open domain chat bots can actually talk to you about anything. Really so as in I can sit down with a chap today and say, Hey, what's the weather and what is this spot on my skin and recommend me a restaurant that looks appealing. I can do I can ask all of these things of a chat bot today. Yeah. I would put those still in the category of like task oriented Tech Chat bots where there's like some goal in mind like you know answering medical questions or tell me about the. Weather when I really tend to work on and what I'm excited about is these chat bots right so rather instead you might ask what's your favorite chess move and it might go into into detail about like what's its favorite move and why that is or what's your opinion of the fall of the Roman. Empire let's let's debate that. So it's it's it's less about you know what can you do for Maine and more about like let's enjoy the experience together. So, can you give a few more descriptions of what a general purpose chat Bot would be doing? Yeah I think the end game here either. You know wear a true general purpose chapman should do both of these things right? Like if I ask it to to. But Mia, calendar and by then it should absolutely help me out with that where I focused my research is the social part. and. So I think we should see a mix of. The box that we've been developing really focused on I'm having a few different behaviors that I don't think you tend to see any sort of assistant on type chat bots they have consistent persona so they'll have like personalities like. I love basketball or I have. Friends in in the tech industry or something like this, and they can use this information like. Consistently referred to it. You know one of the other attributes that chat bots working on developing and believe Ms really important is empathy bright. So a chat Bot should understand you know as as it's talking with you, what's your mental state like how are you feeling and respond emotionally appropriately to that so no if you say something like my just ran away, you know the chat bots should restall on appropriately with something like, oh, I'm really sorry to hear that have. You say something like I just got a promotion than the Chat Bot should respond Oh. That's great to hear. Congratulations. So responding emotionally appropriately is a really important characteristic of a of an open domain chap on the last one is general knowledge. So you know I think when people talk to to chat bots, they expected to know things about the world some of that's encyclopedia some of its common commonsense reasoning but you know if I ask what's the tallest building in America? You know I sort of expected to be able to have this have this information available to it and be able to answer some questions like that or even integrate this information in in common and common dialogue just oh by the way you know what's what's interesting or you know funny story about that sort of thinks. So consistent personality empathy and a knowledge about the world. These are all things. I think are really important in general demand. You know Geno Purpose Chat Bot. Empathy you mentioned empathy s one of these things that requires some maintenance of context as to what is going on in the conversation. The Chat Bot needs to be able to acknowledge the perhaps sad state or happy state of the person. It's Inter locating with tell me about context how does a Chat Bot retain and understand context in a conversation? Yeah there's a few different ways that people go about it. So one of the more classic ways that people will do and approaches that people will take is they'll do something off dialogue state tracking. So you have like some information about the dialogue like, Oh, the users asking about a restaurant and they wanted to be on fifth street right and you'll have this as some sort of state. That you could do say like some sort of database query about and help them then like when you're doing dialogue research or billion Chapa, the task becomes a lot of like keeping track of that state and updating that state as the conversation goes on. The way that we often approach it is a much more like role neural network fashion. So we just like input all the dialogue context all history as one big stream. You know sort of same person. One said this person to says that person one said this person to said back? What do you say next? So we just treat things as as raw strings and habit. Input that in the model has to figure out Oh, what do we do with fat? How do I respond? Who said what all this has to be from scratch? I'd like to get into. A little bit more of a conversation about facebook. So if you imagined facebook in five years, what are the tasks that you envision dialogue models fulfilling for facebook? That's an excellent question I. Think you know there's all sorts of places where we're dialogue can be helpful to our users. We already have this product called portal. which is a a really excellent product lets you make video calls with people. In. One of the things you can you can do, you can already say like hey. You know call mom. And it starts dialing up on. And that super? Nice, you know some of the other things might be no. As I might have an assistant on on Messenger that that's helping me keep track of what's going what's going on with my friends. You know I might say a assistant you know where the latest updates on my friends and they could. Integrate that information. And you know look through my my news feed for me and say, Oh, Hey, your friend Jim has new photo. He got married right Oh that'd be really cool. So, I think there's a lot of places for for dialogue to be part of FACEBOOK PRODUCTS You work on par lay, which is spelled P. A. R. L. A.. I. What Is Parlay? Parlay is a platform for doing dialogue research. It's an open source platform. It's gotten over one hundred contributors and it's it's got you would need to do to dialogue research so whether that's a collect data set or I want to train a new model, and there's all these data sets out there and I just WANNA use those without without trying anything. I want to create a new new model and I need to compare two baselines compared to other other approaches of people tried before I can just sort try those those different models. It's got a model. Do you know what are the pre-trade models somebody else's released in leverage those when building minute chat? Bot and then it's got everything you will need. To also evaluate a chat, Bot. So you know once you have Chapada unlike a lot of areas in I research it's it's not always clear how to evaluated except the have people talk to it. So we've got all the tools that you need to connector Chapada, Amazon Mechanical Turk and have people chat with it and you give evaluations or give. Performance rating instincts like this. A little bit deeper into the problems that parlay solves for researchers that are using it. Yeah I think quite a few different problems especially in all those all those different spaces you know when you're you're a researcher and you want to create a new data set that you know, let's say you want to create a new data said that teaches the model how to how to have empathy. The thing you're going to do is have humans talk and exhibit empathy and annotate their their their utterances with this sort empathetic information. So we have tools so that you can like creek quickly spin up user interface where you can have that chat where you can annotate that information and sort of build what you need for that. So similarly with evaluation you know I need to connect with the Amazon Mechanical Turk and had people evaluate. You know I don't WanNa have to spend so much time focused on building the UI of this tool or dealing with the engineering of connecting Amazon Mechanical Turk impairing humans together, I. So abstract way from you and when we do that is by treating all. In the in the world as agents so whether you're a data set or Talking to it on Mechanical Turk or human talking to it at your local keyboard or a AI agent everything is agent. So we treat them all the same. This gives us really nice distractions to work with so that we can sort of plug in AI model in place of a human or plug human in place of the model really easily. Parlay makes available a wide set of data sets through its API. How does parley use these different data sets? Yeah, we have over one hundred data sets in parlay. Some of them are from our group some of them are from external groups. And so one of the things we really focus on as a first class feature in. If I want to train the AI that exhibits multiple behaviors. I'm a train, a multiple data sets at the same time. So you it's really easy to sort of say. Okay. That set a data set the set see in start training three of them at the same time and get a model that can do all three of these behaviors on. So that's sort of first class functionality within within parlay. When we were talking earlier about having a model that exhibited the consistent personality empathy in knowledge, we did this with a sort of multitask training as it's called where we train on all different data sets. So if you're a new user or new researcher who wants to come into dialogue, you can sort of take the stock wouldn't data sets out there already and just start utilizing them as needed and if you wanna mix and match behaviors? Hey, no problem. described. The workflow for training chat with parlay. Yeah. So we have a lot of it's very command line, heavy utility or command line heavy platform. So if you want to train a new model, it can be as simple as calling the train model command from the command line and you just sort of say are here the tasks I want here's the model. The model that I want what's the model architecture and things like this? And you know here's the learning rate and all the other neural network parameters and you hit go and start training. alanna researchers went to do a more sophisticated, maybe make a custom architecture or make a custom data set and it's really easy to just sort of build only the part of the data set you need or build only the what's special about your model. She might go right a little bit of custom code utilizing are sort of abstract base classes and things like this. And you'll be off on your way training, your special model, and if you don't WanNa mess with data, you don't have to mess with data you can just use the existing data sets. If you don't WanNa mess for modeling, you don't have the mess with modeling you can just just the data in and start training

Dialogue Research Facebook Researcher Stephen Roller Basketball Amazon Amazon Mechanical Turk Maine Staley America
Things You Have to Leave Behind as a Beginning Engineer

Developer Tea

04:48 min | 2 months ago

Things You Have to Leave Behind as a Beginning Engineer

"There's two more things that I want you to let go of to leave behind. On your pathway to becoming a software engineer. And realistically you're going to be on pathway indefinitely and that kind of inspires the next two things. The first one is the belief that there is a perfect tech stack waiting to be discovered. This is an easy thing to believe because there are people who have bought in very deeply. To, given tech stack in that stack works really well for them and perhaps when they write a blog post or they do a podcast, they go and speak at a conference. They talk about that stack as if it's kind of a one-size-fits-all solution or as if it's the pinnacle of computer, science? But the truth is that there is no one perfect tech stack. How can this be? When we're told this over and over, and over that, we're supposed to be refining our tools and. Building new ones and abstracting on top of those and getting better and better. The truth is that your tech stack is only part of the equation in you are a huge factor in that equation. Think about it for a second you are part of the tech stack. The tech stack doesn't build itself and it doesn't exist as some kind of autonomous entity right you are working with the tech stack. And if it doesn't you or if it doesn't fit the thing that you're trying to do. And it doesn't matter what? About it at a conference or on. Hacker News. So you're not going to find the perfect tech stack and that should also feel liberating. It's a little bit disappointing because it'd be nice if we all agreed and we just went in one direction and we could find a tool that just works for everyone magical but that's not going to happen and that can be liberating because we can let go of that constant pursuit and be okay we can choose. Tools that we like we can choose tools that are safe or we can accept the fact that the job that we have or working with a tool that maybe has some downfalls right? It has some weak spots that doesn't necessarily mean the end of the world it certainly doesn't mean that your engineering organization doesn't see the light. Once, you are able to accept the fact that there's not a perfect tech stack. Then you can work towards making the one that you have more valuable. Now have one final thing that I. Want you to let go of in this really is an underpinning theme of this podcast entirely, and that is that coding is not the job. Let go of the illusion that coding is the job. And understand that there is so much more to being a software engineer than just writing code and to illustrate this point, I want you to do a kind of mental exercise This is just a thought experiment imagine that you have your job today. You have your job today but. That we've somehow removed the responsibility of writing code from your. Plate. You no longer have to write the code. You still have to go through the same thought processes that you had before you still have to think through all the same scenarios. You have to understand the people that you work with. You still have to work with the same You know stakeholders, etc. How would your job look different? What would change about your job? It's important to understand that there are people who are hired just to be coders, but this is a fragile job. It's a job that could easily be replaced. And if you're just now starting out in your career, especially, if you have many years theoretically in front of you in your career then focusing on just coding is not kind of the pinnacle of what you'll do in your career. It certainly will be a part of it. But imagine that your coding is only one tool in a very wide array of tools that we already just mentioned. Right imagine taking that tool away what is left in your skillset focus on developing those things as much and perhaps even more than you're coding skills because they're going to. Pay You back in spades, not just in money, but certainly in relationships and. Personal fulfilment.

Software Engineer
CEO Chris Best on the growing appetite for paid newsletters

Digiday Podcast

05:05 min | 2 months ago

CEO Chris Best on the growing appetite for paid newsletters

"Welcome to the day podcast. I'm Lara Riley debate here correspondent in London I'm filling in for your regular host Brian Marcy throughout the on August. Today I'm delighted. So well, respected to the show Chris is the CEO substance. You'll obviously now is the newsletter of formats helping provide the obstruction for grabbed new class of entrepreneurs and some of which Reggie making more money now than their individual needs and they were. Prestigious salary jobs Chris got have you today thanks for having me? Where are you joining us from San Francisco fantastic? So, of course, before you joined stack just wants to go back a little bit. You're a software engineer and program by trade is that right? Yeah. And so prior to substitute stuck, you're one of the founders of kick, which is the the messaging APP that was particularly popular amongst teens but shutdown last year. which was also after you'd left to 'em. So how to kick come about how to kick? Why met Ted In. Third, year university. And kind of fair early on in the SMARTPHONE era I guess we would on -Tario the. Rim made the black. That'll phone that had the keyboard accident and there was sort of. A. Time back then when. It was early days smartphone. The people that had lack breeze were kind of like wall, Street, traders and interns from the university waddled the work that Larry and so we sort of had this early idea that okay. The smartphone is going to take over the world. which is something that was is seems really obvious rep respect. But at the time people maybe didn't fully believe or didn't fully understand and we started working on we actually started making a music player for the blackberry and went through a bunch of iterations morph in March and ended up. Coming to messaging felt like messaging was kind of the core most Gordon application of this magical new computer physiologic her And the kick was around for around skin ten years and it was I guess without its controversies Choisir. What was one of the biggest lessons that learn in in building that business? I mean, there was a lot of just mechanics of building company. I sometimes joke that doing it a second time as a chance to make mistakes. I think one thing that really stuck with me is when you have a system that people are using to communicate the rules of how the system are and the inch rations the just the the way the present interactions people can have a massive effect on. The emergent behavior in that system like the the outcomes, the kinds of feel a place. Is Massive we can be massively shaped by the rules of the game you set up a system Dealing with use a content as well, which which comes with its own challenges. Sure. This move on said why sub stacks 2017 is when you can officially founded the company what was the genesis of the idea that it can have start as a bit of a sites to hustle while you still CTO at kick? No, I've left kick under. Circumstances. That seem like the right time we bought a company. There's somebody that was perfect advice. Great your means by. Taking. I. Plan to take a year off and sort of do all the things that you don't always get to do when you're running fast company like spend time with friends and Family Rivas. Always, things and one of the things I've always sort of had envisioned to do try to write because I've always been an avid reader. I'm a huge believer that what matters sheets. Think you are in so great writing. Very, valuable high leverage to Like trying. Rights Vanessa blockbuster something. Projects that I do and I started writing something sort of complaining about the state of the media ecosystem. The. Theory being that, hey, the internet came along and revolutionized distribution for for content. You publish globally instantly free in this magical utopian technology. But at the same time, it came in smash all of the existing business models. and I was writing an essay complaining about this senator, my friend Hamish a writer SORTA got into it at. said, it's easy to complain about this stuff your what would you do about? This even work differently and it. Turned into the company. So I I sometimes I'm still just procrastinating from finishing not one essay.

Chris Lara Riley Reggie RIM Brian Marcy San Francisco Hamish Ted In London Software Engineer Larry CTO Gordon Family Rivas Senator Writer
Airbus Makes Autonomous Takeoff & Landing

STRUCK: A Lightning Protection Podcast

04:53 min | 2 months ago

Airbus Makes Autonomous Takeoff & Landing

"Airbus they sell flying plane just completed successful to act a taxi takeoff and landing. So this is not a small plane either this was the eighth HR fifty one thousand X. WB. And obviously. full-scale like commercial, Wayne which is pretty cool. So is this getting close to market is something that's in our near future autonomous or we still a ways away why I kind of wonder if this is driven by all the can I, fly the plane like just GonNa be pilot to push the button no. Undefined that will not happen for a long time but I, it's a large airplane, the three fifty, a bigger playing the dash one thousand is is a very long aircraft. I think. Airbus's flexing their muscle a little bit and I think Boeing would have done it already to if they could have they got other problems right now they're trying to deal with. The ability to. Fly An aircraft autonomously of that size, and particularly taxi taxis the place where a lot more difficulties it is not easy. So. You have to have a very, very talented engineering staff to even get close to do something like that and great software engineers and with all the ev to. Electric vertical-takeoff-landing aircraft talking by being autonomous and Honeywell and some others and Garm, and doing a lot of things that are nearly autonomous. I'm not surprised they Airbus's stepped up and say, okay, watch this. No way no way they went to show that yeah. Airbus isn't playing either they if they wanted to do it, they could do it but on the other side. Airbus has watched some of the problems that Boeing and Airbus as had with politics make mistakes in the air and I know Boeing this past week talked about the CEO was talking about. How the aircraft is, GonNa. Be More autonomous in that. They were GonNa let pilots make as many. critical decisions whether they could get their craft in trouble and Airbus has been down that path. His was done that long ago. So I'm not surprised that Airbuses doing it. How how would they would ever? I don't think wherever to the point in the next ten years. I don't see there's going to be autonomous aircraft in a commercial sense either cargo or commercial flight. But if it does release some of the burden on the pilots and make the airplane fly cleaner and smoother on all that I would expect a lot of those pieces of information that to Airbus has developed on this project will be integrated into the aircraft over time will be well, how does this affect pilots in the long term? So say you know ten years from now pilots don't have to take off they don't have to land. And they don't have to do that much. Do they become quickly out of practice like actually having to do these things to say the system is like not working one day and they have to land it and haven't landed a plane in a hundred flights I mean is this Nina I mean like if you don't Cook dinner every night, you get rusty at at whipping up of really nice meal. You know what I mean yes I think that's totally true I it's just a nature. Outcome that it's inevitable the the other side of that is. Companies like Airbus and Boeing. Aircraft Company have the ability to create simulators and put pilots in simulators into them. Quote fly the airplane. because the the one thing you don't want to burn a bunch of fuel getting a pilot up to speed if you don't have to And if there's any complacency. The regulatory bodies like Yasa and the FAA will be all over it. And the the first people usually complain about not getting enough lifetime other pilots quite honestly they wanna be as. As. Ever that's that's the big push by all the pilots. Unions is proficiency proficiency proficiency and proficiency means seat time actually flying the airplane in fact I remember flying on southwest. A couple of times this that's been tennis years ago maybe a little bit longer. Remember flying I remember the aircraft being hand flown. For landing I thought boy that is so it's been a longest time that I've been on an aircraft been hand flown because he just put the out how do you put on the flight path and it just flies it but the south I ask southwest pilot while was leaving the airplane you flew that you flew that by hand all the way down he goes. Yeah. It's it's he said it's good for US pilots to fly the aircraft. It just gives us more proficiency. So I don't see this is taking over. Time. But I do think there are when having redundant systems or helpful systems on aircraft and pilots out of trouble.

Airbus Boeing Aircraft Company Garm Wayne Honeywell United States Yasa FAA Airbuses CEO Tennis
Disney Pixar Acquisition: What did we learn?

Software Engineering Daily

02:28 min | 3 months ago

Disney Pixar Acquisition: What did we learn?

"Pharma. But the picture, the Pixar deal is really interesting. The cornered Resource Hamilton kind defines it as like what is something. It's not just one person, but what's what is some resource that this corporation has access to uniquely that nobody else could competitively come arbitrage and higher away in the case of a person, and for Pixar it was the brain trust right, and it wasn't just Ed and John it was. Was the two of them and the collective culture around all the directors picks are and what they were able to accomplish in the creative process, and so I think Disney masterfully handled this where the intimidated by Bagger getting the acquisition to a big reason it happened was he said two to head headed John and Steve Jobs to you. We want you to come. Takeover Disney animation in addition to Pixar. That we realized the brain trust is what is medical. What is the power here and so not only are you gonNA keep it. We're GONNA expand bobbies, the analogy of the canvas that you get to paint on which is perfect for that for that deal. Yeah, last like. So funny of. The other big thing that dictates this is leverage so. I think most of the folks listening to your show. Jeff is like. Many of them are. Software engineers they may have sold. A company at some point and saying things like it took ten days for Disney to get a deal done with Pixar or took the weekend to buy instagram. If they've ever sold their company, they're like what you. That was a six month. Awful, awful process and thank. That is largely the case when the big companies got. Time on their side, the startup usually is either running out of money or has to make a call at some point soon. Do we need to fundraise very sell? It's hard to get multiple bidders looking at you, and so it's it's really rare scenario where a company actually has enough the acquire e actually has enough leverage to force deal to get done and to force a bidding war and I think most of the. The time when it looks like as you know, your sponsor needs to the deal sponsor on the acquiring side needs to carefully use their political capital and bill decks and build models and make pitches internally and stake their career on getting it done, and that just as many month process that gets expensive. It has lawyers, and so that to me is also a big factor in sort of

Pixar Disney Bagger John ED Steve Jobs Jeff
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 3 months ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

Steve Case Business Rosen Fisher Jurvetson New York Chris Welcome Blair Silicon Valley CEO Restorick Louis Spacex Facebook Singapore
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 3 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
Your Present is Soon Your Past

Developer Tea

05:59 min | 3 months ago

Your Present is Soon Your Past

"Your perspective is centered on now. You see everything as something that is either happening in this moment or something that will be categorized as the future. Or categorized as past. But. It's very hard to imagine that the now. Will soon be considered the past, but what's even harder to imagine is that the now was once the future. And that at some point in the past you imagined. The now you imagined whatever was happening today. And likely. You imagined it differently. That's what we're talking about in today's episode. My name is Jonathan Control. You're listening to velvety, and my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers. So if you think about this for a second, there's a lot of insightful thoughts that can come from. Kind of lingering on this thought the idea that your perspective. You can imagine that you have kind of like a camera and the camera can look at time, and they can see it in these three distinct formats. Into the future into the now we'll talk a little bit more about what that means a second and then into the past. And in both directions in future, and into the past the further away it gets the more fuzzy it seems to be. And at some point. Incomprehensible, there's no picture that you can imagine at some point into the future. That is even close to accurate. And though we have some record of things that have happened in the past, even looking back on those things, there is some level of distortion that is inevitably going to happen because you are distanced from that event, the certainly happens as a result of simply non existing if we look far enough back into the past. We weren't alive. And so everything that we know of events that happened before we were alive. Are regurgitation. They're things that we learned that believed from someone else. Perhaps we have evidence of those things actually occurring, but the end of the day those are not memories are not things that we actually experienced ourselves. Now. Believe it as an exercise to the listener to go and. Do some research on the faulty nece of memory. Suffice it to say that memory is not an incredibly reliable mechanism. We can substitute memories for example things that we've heard from other people. We can imagine that we did them. If we've heard them enough and so our memories, even when we recall them are changing, but nevertheless this system of looking into the future, looking into the past is based on this somewhat faulty recording mechanism. But when we think about nine now. When we think about what's happening now. We'd like to exclude now from any of our critical thinking. So. How does this happen exactly well? When we look into the future, we make plans. We think with intention about what we want to happen. Or even if we don't necessarily think about what we want to happen, we think about what is likely to happen. This is a fundamental human attribute to imagine the future to play out different scenarios, even if only because of our own survivals were doing this even involuntarily. The more distant we go once again. Of course it gets fuzzy, but the further out we go, the more human those thoughts are. For example we can imagine unlike any other animal what the world might be like. We are no longer here. Additionally. We can imagine what the world was like before we existed. But as we look into the future, we imagine. And we create plans. We have intentions. We think critically about cause and effect. Similarly, we can look into the past and we can easily critique our previous actions. This idea that hindsight is twenty twenty. Shows us that we can easily look into the past with an eye of critique. Now. Why is it that we can look into the future with an eye for planning? We can look into the past with an eye. Four critique part of the reason is because we are not experiencing either of those things where imagining them. And, so when we think back, even though we were a part of that, maybe we did experience it. We're still having to imagine it. We're not imagining in the same way that we might construct something that never happened where imagining what it was like when it did happen. When we imagine things, we put ourselves a fairly low stakes environment. This means that we can be critical past cells because. We're sitting here now. Are Opportunities of being better. Are Abundant. And if we think into the future, we can be overly optimistic rather than realistic. We can imagine that even though we've never stuck to diet plan, but this is the year on the first of January. We're going to stick to it. More to the point of Software Engineering, we can imagine that even though we've never been able to estimate the amount of time necessary to complete a given sprint. Suddenly. This sprint will be different. And we can do this because we're separated. We're not experiencing the sprint. That's in front of us where imagining it.

Jonathan Control Software Engineering
How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

Learn to Code with Me

05:32 min | 4 months ago

How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

"Went through all this work in effort to become a pharmacist. And then you left pharmacy like you know got a job after you laugh, too. So what led to that like? Regis defined it as fulfilling, or you just were very excited by software, engineering or Yeah! That's a good question. Yeah spent maybe like. Five six years in an industry including education. I think. The more. That's really monroe for me when when I made that program to all the made finding prescription due dates. Preceding that that's program. Bring down the task for like two hours to less than the second. I. I can't tell you how amazing that was. Like it was so painful just looking through every specialty. Bro And finding that but being able to do that in just in just a short program. I thought that this is. This definitely I wanNA. Do in the future. Yeah. That's really cool and. You wrote that I program. What language technology re using some also thinking? Aren't there a lot of? Regulations like in pharmacies like imagine with their computers like things you can and can't do. So Dea it. They have lots of obstruction on the computer, but this was just a local, so I wrote it in Python and there's a local script. It didn't require any. External. dependencies in I didn't look for any other API's so I I just donald a spreadsheet file from our local pharmacy software and plug that into the firm Python program, and the on saw local, and there's nothing to worry about on security side. Gotcha I'm just laughing. Because I'm like imagining like in other jobs or other professions, you could just bring the work home with you, but it's like you can't just bring home like people like I'm sure. It's like sensitive data. Right that you're working with. Other. Same last name address and everything's all there, so you can't really take home, but. You're able to do it at the at the pharmacy while you're working and all that. Yes, keep it to that story, Yeah! Just for context for myself in the listeners. How long ago is this like when you first started coating when you're still working as a pharmacist? How many years ago at this point or pretty recent? Yes Oh. It's Today is the first. One full year that I've been at this company, and then the MRI her I saw been working. suffered the bubble for two years now. Yeah and I think I started just in these in opponent projects. Three years ago. So took me about a year to get. Re Yeah, yeah, exactly like you said about a year when I was working as pharmacists to feel comfortable to looking for a job, and I've been working as a developer for two years gotTa, and then how long were you pharmacist for? Awesome for two years, oaks about the same now right like seeing amount of work experience from pharmacy to announce a software developer torture. Gotcha okay, so we just got your background with the pharmacy in in all of that and your first job. which now you're not there. You're working at a SYNTECH company, right? Cool, so were you planning to work in Fintech? That sort of just come about because I feel like. Some of your experience would be really helpful in like a med tech kind of industry. Yes so that's that's another good question. So the eighty first company went down I. Actually had to go through a job, looking process and actually interested in metallic. How tap that sort of thing because? I thought okay, I do have A. Background there and that interest there, but the thing was when I started the appointees. I met second how companies they required. Either a lot of suffer experience or a lot of research, clinical experience and I had. Neither. So it was difficult to to get into that soul, I started looking into other companies that I thought I had a shot at and this company turned out to be a great fit for me. Go for Culture Wise, and also lies got it. That's interesting about the clinical experience. Research experience at the health. Tech MIDTECH. Quick Sino, could you? Is there a difference between those two things? I love talking about like the different sectors technology. Is There A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MED? Tech in health tech. Some people police Actually I don't think there really is a difference in my point of view. Yeah, I, mean I. Don't know I. I was asking I was like. Okay. Could be medicine, maybe or to the health could be like me. Look physiotherapy or something. Yeah, yeah, that's a good point. Maybe helps more broad. YEA like. Fitness APP or something, or like the thing I always get commercials for Num num the weight loss. You know talking about Donald State. Have as many on I have Hulu, Hulu live TV, and I swear like. Every break! There's a new commercial which is like I guess it's an APP that uses psychology to help you lose weight, but I feel like that's kind of like I guess it was developed by. Doctors by must be yet like health. More. Health Tech

Donald State Hulu Monroe Regis Fintech Software Developer Developer Sino
India's Burgeoning Crypto Scene with WazirX CEO Nischal Shetty

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

03:30 min | 4 months ago

India's Burgeoning Crypto Scene with WazirX CEO Nischal Shetty

"Waza Rex is part of the Internet and Mobile Association of India is the largest exchanges exchanges in India. So lots of talk about. regarding both the Indian crypto. SCENE AND The. General! Performance of the quine in other assets. In emerging markets stop in particular India's interesting, because it is the largest democracy world they've had a number of interesting macro events of course last year couldn't demonetisation. Where many people were stuck in bank lines trying to redeem their cash? After the government's slashed the maximum size paper currency they have a cultural affinity for Gold's. Ritchie exactly. What that translates shoot terms of digital goals. And talked about quite a few topics that might be of interest as we think about emerging market interest in crypto beyond just China. And East Asia. South Asia perspective long overdue for this podcast and I'm excited to talk more about it. Shelter Yeah. Great great connect here. So why don't we? Why don't we start just by Having, introduce yourself and and talk a little bit about S-. While direction and some of the work that you've been doing. Over the last couple of years, maybe you start with the origin story personally how you fell down the rabbit hole. On a show so to give a bit of a background about me. I started my career as a software engineer. Writing Gold for a typical corporate job, and then eventually I quit my job and start it up. a social media management off. Guard crowd fire, and this is be back in two thousand ten of been event credible still new. Building on top of the API was like a really new thing. The API platform ten stuff The advent vital. Signed up millions of users on that and a wild. This was happening I was also the Hula zone or finding what was new? On the time reading every blog that spoke about new tax and stuff, so I came across Bitcoin, billy, then two, thousand, nine, I even bigger remember trying to mind bitcoin on my. PC BAGHDAD But it was just you know just coming across as trying it out and then mowing. then again, Gordon? Do a Bitcoin and twenty, two, hundred, twenty, thirty when a couple of Wallace started emerging in that space. again tried out a few of those early wallet. Sand sent. A bitcoin through my friends Some and then again I just lay. brainy seventeen years the whole. I got garden the Rabbit. Dole says that I've never been able to come out of it, so I would say my initiation into crypto happen and twenty seventeen. And eighteen built was. My my idea was to build sort of. Obey for people in India too easily on Crypto and when I experienced a global products and products that well being built in our country I saw a stock defense in the whole use it expedience, and that motivated me to build something which everyone in India accord easily on Border Crypto, and that's how I ended up bailing was he'd eggs?

India Mobile Association Of India Gold East Asia South Asia China Ritchie Dole Software Engineer Wallace Gordon Sand
Apple announces transition to Apple silicon chips

Daily Tech Headlines

00:55 sec | 4 months ago

Apple announces transition to Apple silicon chips

"Apple announced it with transition. Some of its hardware line to arm based chips. It calls apple silicon by the end of the year, though it didn't specify which models apple says the full transition, we'll take two years and that Intel powered. MACs are still also being made with apple silicon chips. macos will support IOS and IPAD APPS natively. Arizona pro APPs will be opted to support apple silicon in Mac Os next version. It calls big Sur and Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Figari says the vast majority developers can get their apps up and running in a matter of days. Michael was big Sur will also include Rosetta to to. To automatically translate existing APPs at install time, and is using virtualization for running versions of Lennox on these new Max developer transition kit in the form of a Mac mini enclosure with apple's a twelve Z chip cigarettes of Ram and a five hundred twelve gigabyte. SSD Can't be rented for five hundred dollars and returned to apple at the end of its quickstart programme for developers

Apple Senior Vice President Of Softw Intel Craig Figari Arizona RAM Developer Michael
Healing Hypnosis with Erika Flint

The Addicted Mind Podcast

04:40 min | 4 months ago

Healing Hypnosis with Erika Flint

"L. Everyone welcome to the addictive by PODCAST. My guest today is Erica Flint Erica. You want to introduce yourself. Yeah, sure so I spent. Fifteen years in high tech as a software engineer, and went through some really low period in my life, and ended up wanting more, and so I became a hypnotist, and now I am get to help people retrain and reprogram the most powerful computing device in the world, which is the human mind, and so I love helping people with all sorts of issues I love to help people lose weight. Stop Drinking. Stop smoking a sleep better. Better and I hope a lot of entrepreneurs get out of their own ways that they could be successful and I'm also a bestselling author, and I love helping people my latest, but can you be a hypnotist? Is All about taking people who've been through challenges in their own life, and then they want to become a hypnotist themselves and turn around and help other people, so that's the other part of what I do is I help? And people with big hearts that went to be of service in the world I helped them become hypnotists and help other people in the world. The world better place awesome. That's the whole reason. I wanted. You know podcast because I'm really curious about hypnotism. I've heard of it I have clients that asked me about a hey. Have you tried this on like well? I don't I don't know so I was excited to have you on, so you could explain it and talk about it, and we could discuss it in more detail. Yeah, and a lot of people have questions. Questions about hypnosis, because for most people you know, their experience with Enosis is oh, they saw something on America's talent, or they went to the fair, and they stop. They saw stage hypnotists or their high school graduation. They had a hypnotist, and so that's people's primary experience with stage hypnosis, and so I love telling people. How do we take what you might see on a stage hypnosis show? How do we turn that into something extremely useful in your everyday life once we make it into the hypnosis office, so just let me know questions you have about it. Great because that's that's been my experience is. Going to the fair and seeing the guy on stage. Who makes people do crazy things or do a crazy dance or I? Don't know, stand on their head. All sorts of crazy stuff and the krog goes wild and everything like that, so that's been my experience of hypnosis, but you're talking about something a little bit different. You're talking about what I understand is like a clinical hypnosis or hypnosis that can help you move through some of the stuff you were saying earlier. Addiction or eating issues or smoking are probably a lot of other. Other stuff too right right and one of the things that will tell people is. They'll say to me. Oh Eric. Are you GonNa? Make Me Bark like a dog, or are you? GonNa make me click like a chicken, and they're trying to reference you know what they see in stage. hypnosis in one of the want everybody to understand about hypnosis really is that yes, you can do things in hypnosis like you see in a stage hypnosis show, but those shows really are for entertaining. So the purpose of those shows really to demonstrate. Wow! Isn't this ICAL function of the mind? Is it really possible for me to be able to forget my first name? And under what circumstances would that be useful right we'll. It's not released. In that case, and so, can we take that function? Though is there something that can we demonstrate the power of the mind and help? You not experienced the pain chronic pain that you've been experiencing. Can we use hypnosis and help you overcome your limiting beliefs and figure out why you keep eating, even though you're not hungry and so I like to ask my clients when they when they ask me those questions. Questions about clicking a chicken or barking like a dog, I say well. Is that what you really want to do? In Your Life like that? That can kind of demonstrate the power of hypnosis, but if we're really talking about empowering your mind, what would you really liked to do? Because nobody has ever once asked me to to be able to cook like a chicken therapeutic setting people are interested in that. They want to stop smoking. They want to stop being and so that really is part of my job. As a hypnotist is to say, Hey, you know that's that's cool in that. That's interesting, but if you really could have the full power of the human mind, what would you really want to do right

Erica Flint Software Engineer Enosis Eric America
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 9 months ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daily the cid welcome back software engineer daily yeah thanks for having me get lab has highlighted something called the tool chain crisis basis described the tool chain crisis as you see it i think what happened is that over time we got more and more tools in the devops process it started wages ages some version control some CI but over time there are so many best practices we implementing true tools and for example you can see this in progressive delivery feature feature flags they're happening we have sometimes chaos monkeys we got incremental rollouts automated rollbacks all these things are supported the tools and what happened is it every practice kind of got its own tool now what's happening is if you wanna go from planning something to getting it out there you have to go go to ten twenty tools to do so in between all these tools are handoffs there's no visibility like some days one tool some is in and other people don't have equal equal access the i mean some tools but not hundred tools and that's slowing p pulled out these handouts are taking longer and that's the crisis like we have too many tools calls every customer we meet every user we meet it's like devops tools are great and we were using all the best ones but our problem isn't the individual jio tools they can do what we need our problems integrating all of that our problem is transferring people between teams are problem is visibility and that's the tool chain crisis there are a number number of case studies of get lab usage within large enterprises so goldman sachs is an example coming goldman sachs they've had software infrastructure structure that they've been building on for decades so it's like an archaeological dig they have all these different strata of old tools and these things are all plugged into mission mission critical workflows so win they start integrating get lab into.

goldman sachs software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Videos play a key role in the continuing education of a software engineer video can capture many different types of content that might be useful for an engineer engineer conference talks to to`real videos and podcasts style interviews are all popular formats in online video youtube has become become the predominant source for video content about software engineering. The open nature of Youtube format allows for a tremendous range of content. No matter what your preference is for how you like to learn and be entertained youtube has something for you. Tech Primers is a media channel that is dedicated to sharing technical technical knowledge in the form of videos get hub repositories and a thriving community tech primers has over three hundred videos on youtube and more than forty eight thousand subscribers who regularly watch content about subjects like A._W._s.. Spring and Coober Netease Tech Primers was founded by Ajay Kumar a software engineer and vice president at j.p Morgan Adjei has been in the software industry for fifteen years and he has been working in banking technology technology for seven years. He has deep experience in modern technologies and engineering practices. J. Joins the show to discuss the modern world of software for engineering and his experience building a media platform. He also talks about the technology. Culture of India. Ajay is based in Bingo Loro and it was exciting to learn how much are different societies have in common. Thanks to Technology Ajay also had me on his Youtube Channel for an interview which was a lot of fun. That link is in the show notes. Find Collapse is the company I'm working on. It's a place to find collaborators and build projects and we recently launched get hub integrations. It's easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects and if you're looking for someone to start a project with find collapsed has topic topic chat rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology you can find people who are curious about react or crypto currencies or Coober netties or whatever you want to build with also we recently launched pod sheets an open source podcast hosting platform we are building pod sheets with the learnings innings of software engineering daily and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you've been thinking about starting a podcast checkout pods sheets dot com song you probably do not enjoy.

youtube software engineer Morgan Adjei Ajay Kumar Technology Ajay engineer Coober netties Ajay Bingo Loro India vice president fifteen years seven years
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Limited by or enabled by the nature of this day store like literally as described this in a dependency graph performance issue. We had to have a database that would work really, really. Well. For for the needs that we expected our end users to have and also because I think we were basically a vertically integrated product right as in if you were going out and designing your own developer database like volt or rethink or salon. You know, the challenges, you know, you have to support a wide range of different developer use cases on top of it. Right. For us. We have to support a wide range of end user use cases. But you know, we only have to support one developer on top of our own database engine, right? Which is effectively we create the only front end that's allowed to talk to directly to our data storage engine. Like, we're building that kind of end user interface. And so I think we can actually make a lot more kind of vertically integrated decisions around what types of behavior that database engine cannon can't support and where we make trade offs. And so on. When I was working fulltime. As software engineer. I was always trying to start projects within the companies that I was working and those projects were often crazy they were sometimes unrelated to the core business of the company, I was working at, but I assume this would be desirable for the companies because this is how companies disrupt themselves, this is how companies develop new products, and it always struck me that that was so hard to do in any of these organizations. It was really hard to get projects started. And it was really hard to find other people to work on those projects with me. I have been thinking about that problem ever since I left the software industry to start software engineering daily. And now I have a product that I'm working on to solve that problem, which is fine collapse. Find collapses a place to find collaborators and to build. Projects. Find collides has an open network, and it also has a closed enterprise system in the open network. You can find collaborators to work on your projects with from all across the world and in the closed network enterprise offering you can just create closed projects for people within your company to collaborate on with and all of it is free right now, you can sign up for the enterprise offering by just logging in with your corporate Email address your corporate Google, Email address Bleich if it's at software engineering daily.

developer software engineer Google
"software engineer" Discussed on Photography Tips From the Top Floor

Photography Tips From the Top Floor

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Photography Tips From the Top Floor

"If not now when so. Now Frank you also have a unique skill set. And that is the engineering background. If you wanna combine engineering photography. I believe this is the right time. And as a software engineer you have an incredible skill set to get started in that field. There's a ton of machine learning related activities in photography right now. So a computer science background is probably one of the best things you can have at this point. Also, no cameras are becoming more computational every day. Where are we we are at the brink of several paradigm shifts and photography that all have to do with computing? A are for example, will be an integral part of our lives sooner than you think. Mark my words, and it'll be even more pervasive than our smartphones. All right now, and that plus computation that together with computation will change photography and fundamental ways. In in what ways I don't really know yet. But maybe. That's for you to find out. Try many things explore and do them while you still have a regular income through a day job in software engineering. And when the opportunity comes you will be ready and prepared. Wow. This episode is getting re long. Anyway, I can only do these shows wave your health with your questions your input. That's what.

software engineer Frank Mark
"software engineer" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Reveal

"And that was really really surprising to me because it was really different from what I had been doing before. I would say a lot of people in the software world looked at front engineering something that like you didn't need degree to do. This is an important distinction in software engineering front and coding, which Kelly was assigned to focuses on what the consumer sees in their browser back in coding interacts with the plumbing like servers and databases, and that's what Kelly had done before she came to Google, and I very quickly noticed that that was where all of my women calling working was in front of engineering. So I was like that's kind of annoying. But at the same time, I was still like well Google though, you know, at Google everyone has a level starting at level one for interns and hourly workers up to level ten or higher for top executives the higher. You are the more you tend to get paid and Kelly started to suspect that she was hired at the wrong level. I had had another software engineer. Join my same team the week after I did. And he and I both graduated in the same year, but he was level for when I was a little three on top of that. There was a whole group of new grads straight out of college who joined a couple months after Kelly. They were all starting at the same level that I was at and that was when I was like this feels wrong. But when I would ask people about it. They would say, well, you know, we sometimes down slot people. And then we'll just correct it come promotion time Kelly applied for promotion. She says the committee reviewing her application. Agreed. She was doing the work of a level four, but they didn't promote her because she hadn't been Google long enough to show an upward trajectory, and that was when I realized like that I was always going to be playing catch up because like by the time that I was going for promotion from four to five like the people who were forward already at level five. So I was frustrated, but I was still like, well, it's still Google, you know. I don't think I considered quick..

Google software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Whatever kind of games get developed and put together the best teams on earth for those games people seem to age out of the east sports business quite rapidly are there any eastport games you've seen where older players tend to do better magic the other thing i don't know i don't know why that for the pure strategic games i mean i don't know why that would be nor would i count on that being the case forever right i mean there's probably something to be said for hand eye coordination and dexterity being a gift of younger people right in the same way that it is in anything for this pure strategic games for hearth stone if you will as long as you're willing to adapt or die then i see no reason for that trend to continue magic versus hearths down which one do you prefer how should i answer that question we have a har stone team we don't have a magic team so heart stone it is faster it is indeed faster bryan singer and thanks for coming on software engineer daily it's been great talking to you all right thanks if you are building a product for software engineers or you are hiring software engineers software engineering daily is accepting sponsorships for twenty eighteen send me an email jeff at software engineering daily dot com if you're interested with twenty three thousand people listening monday through friday and the content being fairly selective for technical listener software engineering daily is a great way to reach top engineers and i know that the listeners of software engineering daily are great engineers because i talked to them all the time i hear from cto's ceo's directors of engineering who listen to the show regularly i also hear about many newer hungry software engineers who are looking to level up quickly improve themselves and to find out more about sponsoring the show you can send me an email or tell your marketing director to send me an email.

software engineer cto ceo marketing director bryan singer
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Moore's law states that the number of transistors in dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years moore's laws less like a law and more like an observation or prediction moore's law is ending we can no longer fit an increasing amount of transistors in the same amount of space with a highly predictable rate dennard scaling is also coming to an end dennard scaling is the observation that as transistors get smaller the power density stays constant these changes in hardware trends have downstream effects for software engineers most importantly power consumption becomes much more important as a software engineer how power consumption affect you it means that inefficient software will either run more slowly or cost more money relative to our expectations in the past whereas software engineers writing code fifteen years ago might have been comfortably able to project that they're code would get significantly cheaper to run over time due to hardware advances the story is more complicated today why is moore's law ending and what kinds of predictable advances in technology can we still expect john hennessy is the chairman of alphabet in two thousand seventeen he won a touring award along with david paterson for their work on risk which is the reduced instruction set compiler architecture from two thousand to twenty sixteen he was the president of stanford university john joins the show to explore the future of computing while we may not have predictable benefits in moore's law or dennard scaling we now have machine learning it's hard to plot the advances of machine learning on any one chart which we discussed in a recent episode with open ai but we can say empirically that machine learning is working quite well in production if machine learning offers us such strong advances in computing how can we change our hardware design process to make machine learning more efficient as machine.

Moore software engineer john hennessy chairman david paterson president stanford university fifteen years two years
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Okay very saying that we in like in like a less than a month we will open so something for my opinion would be which well it was okay well i'm excited to see it levin thanks for coming on software engineering daily awesome thank you so much if you are building a product for software engineers or you are hiring software engineers software engineering daily is accepting sponsorships for twenty eighteen send me an email jeff at software engineering daily dot com if you're interested with twenty three thousand people listening monday through friday and the content being fairly selective for technical listener software engineering daily is a great way to reach top engineers and i know that the listeners of software engineering daily are great engineers because i talked to them all the time i hear from cto's ceo's directors of engineering who listen to the show regularly i also hear about many newer hungry software engineers who are looking to level up quickly and prove themselves and to find out more about sponsoring the show you can send me an email or tell your marketing director to send me an email jeff at soft or engineering daily dot com and if you're listening to the show thank you so much for supporting it through your audience ship that is quite enough but if you're interested in taking your support of the show to the next level then look at sponsoring the show through your company so sent me an email jeff at software engineering daily dot com thank you.

cto ceo marketing director jeff levin
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"A lot more value out of it and i actually ended up starting as a systems administrator after about a year into the degrees so the my schooling and my day job were able to play nicely off of each other in terms of what i was learning in both places so if you like that was one of the really key elements to my success in my degree program and in my subsequent career as a software engineer and his a systems administrator and somebody working in the tech industry oh yeah well that apprenticeship phase of either having an internship while you're in college or like you did it having a copathetic combination of going to school either online or in person together with a fulltime job where you're actually applying some of the skills that you're learning the the feedback loop between those two domains can be really productive and and satisfactory because you're you know you're not throwing away money on a degree while you're not make taking money from that knowledge and you're not going to a job where you don't feel yourself leveling up as much because even if even if you were you would be learning on the side so it's a the education plus occupation path is is pretty rewarding absolutely and that's also part of why continue to do freelance consulting is because it provides another outlet for morning new things and being able to play my day job off of my consulting and you know where i i might take on a consulting engagement where i'm working with cooper netease where that's a system that i'm working on evaluating for my day job so there are a lot of potential synergies between the two activities.

software engineer cooper netease
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Have people on the conversation who can both provide the technical expertise and then on the other hand you have people who can act as listener surrogates and ask those kind of obvious questions that actually help to illustrate it a lot and they even help the more advanced listeners to because they reinforce effectively the understanding by analogize it in a different way so the stuff is challenging but for technical audiences especially like yourself a like yours you know i think that what you say about your about page is pretty apt which is that you know you should expect to understand programming like one percent better developing one percent better after each episode and that's kind of how i feel about let's talk bitcoin too is it's like it's not like they're any episodes that are you know so important that they constitute most of the understanding it really is just a gradual conversation and really it's been a way for people to learn along with me and as my opinions continue to help and other hosts too of course you know so it's all perspective right nobody knows kind of what the elephant actually looks like we're all just feeling around with our own effective and then sharing those results and that's why i kind of look at everything as an experiment to is because lacking best practices all we have our first practices and first practices or quite often wrong but they still work better than you know for spices that don't work at all i now i doubt that people are tuning in to hear about building a podcast network but i personally am curious because software engineer daily for me was we're not just my first serious for a into podcasting but i was thinking of it as here's a way to learn a little bit about business firsthand like how do i build a little podcast business let's see where this takes me and there is a fork in the road that you reach is a podcast or and there are many podcasts out there that that reached this fork in the road where you get to a point where it's the question is how do i scale this because you you end up being a personality business or you end up being a business that is limited in scope to a single podcast.

software engineer one percent
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Yes that's correct so basically when you're dealing with many many many different systems which can be distributed across many locations around the world having automation in tooling and writing software to manage all that is the only way could attain basically survive eh series don't scale linearly was nation so s we rely alternately has been what's been mentioned before for smoke players are up by relying on tooling software in order to make their kid expanded capabilities and make himself be able to do more and be responsible for more and what's the interaction between software engineers and sra's so isn't software engineer should be very very tight especially in the environments where i worked at a software engineers in ece res of effectively functioned as as team members just basically obviously have a slightly different focus on stock but a purposes they they regard themselves as being you know here's team members so the interactions very tight and you're the head of s aria atlassian what are your responsibilities as the head of 'sorry right so i oversee the overall direction and piety of the organization so i take what the company parties are do a little bit of ti the readings you leave spent a lot of meetings to in discussions i facilitate the contribution of the esa reorganization towards those goals by no that's probably a kind of very big but basically look up what the company's doing with the needs are by look at what our capabilities are necessary that i worked towards providing our support towards meeting those goals in alava is basically in delivery service reliability are the 'sorry practices so atlassian has a bunch of different products are the 'sorry practices standardized across those different teams and across those different products.

software engineer alava esa atlassian
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Yes that's correct so basically when you're dealing with many many many different systems which can be distributed across many locations around the world having automation in tooling and writing software to manage all that is the only way could attain basically survive eh series don't scale linearly was nation so s we rely alternately has been what's been mentioned before for smoke players are up by relying on tooling software in order to make their kid expanded capabilities and make himself be able to do more and be responsible for more and what's the interaction between software engineers and sra's so isn't software engineer should be very very tight especially in the environments where i worked at a software engineers in ece res of effectively functioned as as team members just basically obviously have a slightly different focus on stock but a purposes they they regard themselves as being you know here's team members so the interactions very tight and you're the head of s aria atlassian what are your responsibilities as the head of 'sorry right so i oversee the overall direction and piety of the organization so i take what the company parties are do a little bit of ti the readings you leave spent a lot of meetings to in discussions i facilitate the contribution of the esa reorganization towards those goals by no that's probably a kind of very big but basically look up what the company's doing with the needs are by look at what our capabilities are necessary that i worked towards providing our support towards meeting those goals in alava is basically in delivery service reliability are the 'sorry practices so atlassian has a bunch of different products are the 'sorry practices standardized across those different teams and across those different products.

software engineer alava esa atlassian
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Hear more about go cd and the other projects that thought works is working on listen back to our old episodes with a thought works team who have built the product you can search for thought works on software engineering daily thanks to thaw works frigate tuned to sponsor sovereign j daily and for building go cds in aside from that dares these ambient cultural stereotypes so even the stereotypes that exist outside of software engineering the stereotypes that the world that his ex journal to computer programming what they imagine that the average software engineer to be a white nerdy male wearing glasses and unkempt that permeates the uh the actual engineering community and affects the the engineers within it tell me what do you think about the impact of of stereotypes both the external stereotypes and the stereotypes that programmers within the software engineer community themselves hold yeah this is i think a really big issue an and not one that people talk about too much because i think people who see themselves as fitting that stereotype just instantly you know get a bit of a confidence boost from it and anyone who sees themselves is not fitting that stereotype even though they might not consciously think it i think they get a little bit of a detriment to their confidence and so there have been some studies on different things like this they've found that just reminding people who don't fit a stereotype that they don't happen to fit the stereotype by giving them settle choose before giving them a little quiz question or a problem to solve instantly reduces their performance this is called stereotype threat by just reminding people that they don't match it it tends to instantly you know reduced test scores or or outcomes on on problem solving and then similarly there have also been studies.

software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"You were able to build this and you don't having a software engineering experience and then he he so look i'm pretty sure that if he really wanted to fire and find a job as a software engineer you can very easily find find one so he he gave me a lot of advice and i also got the sense that it is not just that i wanted to work with him i i got the sense that he also wanted to work with me on some level as may be more junior dev and i think that that was very helpful because you don't really want to push someone who may not have the time were energy or where human interest to network with your war or or help you right uh so you definitely want to test the waters but once you have sort of some indication that you can have a very fulfilling relationship that's win win on both ends you should definitely go forward by and you are able to show him that you could provide value on and that was a big big step forward that's right yeah okay so you start working at this startup company your software engineer does hard echo it's it's very very hard i think when when you hack away on things on your own you don't really think about some of the things are required in a in a in a professional software engineering environment where you have their ship called to production so things like.

software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"They can also tell you about their experience there because sometimes from douse i accompany may look really promising but from from the inside there are a number of problems they may want to avoid so so i i wanted to build this network with the software engineer in crowd here so i i went to a hacker thon put up by google and i met a guy there his name is charles and charles turn out to be one in the original four engineers who build the entire i tuned stack for apple backing the '90s after apple bought sun jam so he is a more a older engineer a very senior engineer and he is a very very good technical architect and i i work with him on the heck with on i knew that i wanted to work with him at some point so i stayed in touch with him over almost two years i i keep asking him as head why are you working on like i evolved to work with you on something like let me know what can i do and eventually he went through a startup called montage studio which is a sort of founded by the team of folks who came out of apple when next so he went there and he's like hey i i'm i'm here i'm working on some kusov issue com and that went there and there was my very first software engineering gig that's really cool so can you give people would like tell them exactly how you call the beta that relationship with him like you met him at this event and then like where do they were did it go over the next how long it took you to get this job you have coffee once a month you sent an email of interesting articles how'd you keep their relationship going yeah so i i tried to do both so trough actually lived in texas and he he was doing consulting gigs of the time so he would travel back and forth and i i would just paying him out say okay wearing towel next and i knew that he'd love to go to meet ups too so i was okay okay let's go check out this meet up together and then won't go and then we'll we'll listen to some tech talk which had the bear and they i.

software engineer google apple technical architect texas two years
"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"Yeah absolutely say you had to san francisco you're about to get married you have no job you will you identified which is a huge step you've identified that you'd like to build things in so you're starting to check things off your list of what you want to do things you don't wanna do so what happens how do you find your next gaik sure so i i really wanted a job as a professional software engineer i i've ridden code for a long time and i have contributed to some of the largest opensource software packages in in the world but i knew that if i worked on the quote unquote professional software engineering team you will be a very different learning experience than me hacking way on opensource project online with folks from all round the world so in order to do that my my strategy was basically to golden meet up and me as many people as possible i think one of the uttar themes i have about building my career path over the past twelve years or so is as you get more a senior more experienced the the kind of rolls that that really are promising for you we've actually turn out to be the ones through your connections so nowadays when i'm looking for for jobs i no longer apply online i no longer look for jobs on linked anyone not i always check with my network to see okay i want to war cassi airbnb who do i know or food i know we know someone who can introduce me as someone airbnb i think that that both gets you into the door more easily and also.

software engineer software packages san francisco twelve years
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Gosh it must have been around episode two hundred or two hundred and fifty or somewhere round they're not only about half way through and so you left software injuring gala because you wanted to become a software engineer yourself and that motivation was hard for me to take at the time because it left me a high and dry but as time has gone on i have totally understood and respected your decision described the motivation to leave software engineering journalism and become a software engineer fulltime yeah i think this is a tough thing to kind of also route header on because understandably it was a difficult decision for both of us and it always makes me feel bad when when i have to recollect splitting up been kind of deciding to go about my own thing an i think a lot of it was similar to how preat the custody felt when she left venture capital to become a software engineer because she kind of expressed the sentiment of when she was at a sixteen c in seeing all these companies come in and all these talented founders and technical folks coming in pitch their ideas there is a strong yearning within heard also embark on that journey and i kinda got the same experience through being the producer of esi daily when i edited episodes and listen to all these fantastic people talking about the technical challenges the interesting projects they working on i knew that i also had that spark to want to dig in technically and were con stuff like they were working on.

software engineer venture capital producer esi