35 Burst results for "Software Engineer"

"software engineer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:10 min | Last month

"software engineer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Better framework music. What do you got all right. So this was published by medium dot com. And it's a blog post on medium dot com by shivani verma and it's from may the ten best visual studio code extensions old. It's pretty recent. Asfaw subjective yeah. It is subjective. But i thought that You know we'd peruse these things because they are cool. Yeah for sure it may not be everybody's topped him. But i'm sure they are pretty awesome. Live share number one one of my favorites in the list. It allows share your code actively with another person's. Vs code see. You can see each other's code whom you want to share it with and debugging together that's pretty awesome and then there's live server. It sounds the same as the live share extension but completely different from it. it's a must for web developers just like me helped me save countless hours improve my efficiency In there's links there to bookmark. Imagine you're writing thousands of lines of code and you make a mistake or there's a function not working correctly nested inside of other functions. Bookmark allows you to bookmark. Your functions classes and use it to quickly navigate through your file. I use comments like to do nice Vs code icons adds little cute icons to your files after this. You'll start loving your vs code gallons. Now this is. This sounds cool. And i didn't know about this With gatland so you can see who. Why and how. The code has changed. I recommend everyone get this extension. They all had positive feedback about it. It is highly customizable and you can set it up. According to you in visual studio we have you know Get history right so you can make it all the check ins right in visual studio but this is a cool little you know lens yeah it. It's it's been bringing visual studio feature in dig code really which is cool..

"software engineer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:18 min | Last month

"software engineer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"His in vancouver washington and man. That's i don't know what to say. We were just talking to dan. Wat lean an hour ago but it seemed like last week for you dear less records. It was one day. And you've gotten through your hurricane. And i am suffering in the terrible sunny days of being on the ocean on the west coast of canada. And that's just terrible. Oh i got a story for. Actually i got a story of hacking and story is in You can see it at the dot net show dot com. Actually show this. I have this mixer then. I'm by play in a band. And we used to have big mixing boards with a lot of failures and all that stuff for sound guys. And whatever but i got a headless mixer. So it's a thirty two channel box to black box. It's got thirty two microphone inputs and it's got sixteen headphone outputs each with their individual mixes. That can be controlled by the musicians themselves on their phones. It's really really cool so the bass player could turn it up just for the bass player. That's right you can turn down my guitar. Which is everybody's always telling me turning down so being guitar player like to hear a lot of guitar so anyway so the problem was that when i set this thing up at recording studio i mapped the inputs to the proximity to the musician. Because the input jacks were in the walls that ultimately ran to the mixer. So you know. I had no choice really but to use these inputs for these particular instruments. Otherwise that wires criss crossing the room. And it'd be a big nightmare. It turns out that after. I moved out of that space. We no longer needed to have this crazy out layout and up. What ended up happening was like to the horns or at one end of the you know the the list and scroll all the way to the right to get the other two warns and the vocalist. Were all over the place so it doesn't make sense. He handed to a sound guy in there. Like what is this. So i wanted to change now. Wanted to swap channels around and move them but the software in let me but it did allow me to export a seen as jason file. Nice so yes. So me being a programmer boeing. You know like. I'll fix this loaded our of no pad compels you. That's right and visual studio has discrete feature where you can paste Jason as classes and it will turn that into c. sharp classes. They'd classes may not make any sense but but it definitely takes the data representation and then you know the mixed classes out of it. Long story short ara to make a short story longer. anyway i Was able to write a little console application in about three hours. That i could you know. Put the list of channels up and swap them around and right out any jason file work like a champ. I love being a programmer. Yeah you definitely use your superpowers. That day i did and all the other musicians were like. I don't understand what you're speaking about this star trek I know what you do but anyway. That's my story. Can you turn me up please. But that's not my better no framework. This is my you know framework and this is my.

west coast vancouver dan washington canada jason boeing Jason
Author Craig Stanfill Sends Stark Warning in New Book 'Terms of Service'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:52 min | Last month

Author Craig Stanfill Sends Stark Warning in New Book 'Terms of Service'

"Stanfield stanfield. Wrote a book called terms of service. He's a computer. Scientist and a software engineer is very knowledgeable about artificial intelligence and he wrote a book called terms of service. It's so important. Though that we listened to his warning about the role that big tech is plain and the role of censorship on the internet facebook. Twitter all this has been co opted by these big tech. Titans and i had a chance to talk to craig's stanfield about his book and about the warning. He has for all of us who go online. Tell us first of all about the book. Because i haven't gotten my hands on it yet. I can't wait to crack it. Open described terms of service for people who want to learn about it. Know about the book is set in a theoretical future. Two hundred fifty years from now. I put it that far in the future to sort of bypass whatever. Our current contemporary issues may be an look at things more abstractly it posits that there are big corporations corporate monopolies that pretty much run the economy and pretty much run the world sort of corporate government and that flows from this notion that these companies can set their terms of service however they want so if you want housing you have to go to the housing company and you have to sign their terms of service. If you want food you have to go to the food company and you have to sign their terms of service that of course you see all your power to these companies now under sure. That's two hundred and fifty years. That sounds like twenty twenty one to me. I get a lot of that and of course. There's a is obviously written in with awareness of what's going on with big tech and this one of the theme is if you think it's bad now it's could get a lot worse than it is getting

Stanfield Stanfield Stanfield Titans Craig Twitter Facebook
How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

CodeNewbie

02:21 min | 2 months ago

How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

"Thanks for being here. Thank you so much so carry. You are a career transition or who was pursuing dancing. Tell us how you got into development. Yes so i had done ballet my entire life. When i was three and i kind of started taking it more seriously. When i was in high school. I started going to summer intensive by different ballet companies and those are kind of just like summer camps for kids during ballet and the summer before my senior year of high school i went to the joffrey ballet summer intensive in new york city and they offered to let me do a so actually ended up moving there my senior year of high school finishing high school online. And doing that and when it was coming time for me to think about college. That's kind of what i was like. Kay do wanna keep pursuing ballet. Do i to do something different. So i'm moving back home to nashville. And i studied public relations and after graduating i got a job in the music industry. Doing pr in. I done that for a few years as getting really burnt out. I was really stressful. A time anxiety was at a high. And i was like i need to figure something out so i actually stumbled upon code academy and started teaching myself to code and enrolled in a boot camp. And i've been in tech ever since. Wow that's exciting. So you went from ballet. Pr music to to coding. That's really add clyde a transition. Yeah so when you first started. Coding what did that look like. What were you doing. I went to the iron yard. Which was the boot camp. It was twelve weeks long. And i was studying front end engineering so it was a lot of it. We're learning h. Two miles css melodramas script and then my cohort studied view in number as our frameworks so it was a lot of in the morning class. Time learning about new topics and then in the afternoon applying those and working on various projects. And what was that boot camp experience like tons of people who are maybe considering it thinking about it. What was your experience like there. I mean it's like a fire hose of information conflict. You i feel like once. I kind of got the grasp of wine concept. We were like. Here's a new one. Gotta learn this and i mean it was twelve weeks long. It's hard to learn anything twelve weeks but it kind of preps you for the basics of what you need to know and then obviously most people coming into software engineering or currently in it know that we're always constantly learning so kind of just prompts you to how to teach

Joffrey Ballet KAY New York City Nashville Clyde
Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

Software People Stories

01:54 min | 2 months ago

Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

"One. Kushner was ability leader anga product year in caterpillar inc. You would hear this very stock in talk later and the passion he phone. I'm lita remove and woods park thinking and you embedded software and really moved him. Athletics medals the woods thinking realistically and thinking from a customer's angle and he also her is ashen words not just romar respected. Although from using his as as dolan onset listen all high blend welcomed the software people stories. Thank you so much for doing this. But when the high that's being pretty good fashion of the deal and Thanks for having me in decision. I want you to introduce yourself for our listeners. I know you along absolutely absolutely so i Actually lead the one of the divisions of character. India have been working company for quite a long time before that. I started my company called meaning now for five years and then i moved out love. What for lost twenty or so. So i be working in Cat and i've been non genetic leader and caterpillar of going engineering Either ship for right from a what be infused with playing that software. Studies rely staggered. Mike idiot us a software engineer. A little beat. Her family moved into engineering product. Looking plus no need pretty large.

Caterpillar Inc. Woods Park Romar Kushner Lita Athletics Dolan India Mike Idiot
Outhacking the Hackers: The Future of Cybersecurity

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Outhacking the Hackers: The Future of Cybersecurity

"Hey alva janet. Tell us more about this attack. It's my understanding. It had a cascade effect and the breach ended up affecting between eight hundred and fifteen hundred businesses and like a dozen countries. Yeah and not only did it. Impact hundreds of businesses. One of the most shocking. Things about this story is that kosei knew it was vulnerable a dutch cybersecurity group warned kosei about their weaknesses nearly three months before the attack. We contacted them on the sixth of april. This cybersecurity researcher victor gevers. He helps lead. The dutch institute for vulnerability disclosure. That's a group of volunteers who are software engineers data journalists and students by day and so called ethical hackers by nights we have a mission under the to make the digital ward safer by reporting on this we find in online and digital systems gevers in his colleagues scan the internet looking for weaknesses and software. That could be potentially exploited by cybercriminals when the dutch team found seven potentially dangerous weaknesses in cassia software. Back in april they made recommendations for how the company could and should tighten up their cyber security and action. The dutch team recommended. That kosei affixed the seven vulnerabilities. Within three months the goal was to beat cybercriminals to the punch. Here's dan timpson casillas chief technology officer one of the things that we could ask a lot is. Will you gotta heads up like why. Didn't you fix it faster. But i'm sure that you can appreciate some. Bugs are more difficult to fix than others. Cassia was almost done. I july second. The company says it had fixed four of the original seven bugs and had started patching the final three. But they weren't fast enough. Timpson says that just a few days before the internal deadline. The bad guys noticed an open door and they entered.

Kosei Alva Janet Victor Gevers Dutch Institute For Vulnerabil Dan Timpson Casillas Timpson
Transforming From a Service Company to a Product Company

The Schmidt List

01:57 min | 3 months ago

Transforming From a Service Company to a Product Company

"Tell me how did you get into technology. Did you trip and fall into it. Like the rest of us Was it the plan always from we child to grow up in build a service and product company someday. Cute story is that my mom takes credit for. She was computer science graduate student at the university of minnesota and we had an old. Ibm tandy. at all. I learn basic there and hung out computer. Labs water for lab mates tommy c. video games. I was a kid. So i just tool around like a guy who is pretending not to be a nerd. Almost building computers and writing. Nothing serious. i didn't ever really grow into a software engineering role primarily. It was mostly still just tooling around with friends. But that's where i got the connections that allowed me to start the company first place okay. So that was a. I've seen it with agencies before that there some are purposefully created in some you you back value back into because you build up a network declined lists and you just you see the demand you need to fill demand where other people are more like okay. We're gonna this is what we're going to do. This is the plan. This is all the things which waited for us we were. We set out to build a product. Miho founder was one of the first engineers on google plus projects and his roommate was the ceo of mixed at all and so he had a very strong desire for building a product company. And very little to no desire for building consulting firm and so just took a lot longer. There's a piece of paper that i keep floating around where viable business plan. That was like custom software agency. Learn a half years and of course it took four and a half years to do all the work that we needed to do to get to where we are and to get to the point where we could switch into product but that was the plan from the

Tommy C University Of Minnesota IBM Miho Google
Pharmacy and Audiology

Course and Career Chat

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Pharmacy and Audiology

"Hi aaron welcome to colson career hat. Thank you so much being with us today. my pleasure. Thank you so much for having me. Sorry i always liked to go right back to the start. I have a five year old for a long time. He's wanted to be a football of that him. Get for what he'd like to do when he gets old up but just recently actually he's been talking about creating an app so potentially he's down software engineering powerful something like that. What did you want to be when you were five years old. I going back to that time. When i was five years old. I actually really liked being gotten or being around sort of insects and crazy collies and collecting them off to the are very much of going outside and doing a lot of things outside and just being around natsha. When i was five years old. I really wanted to be some kind of biologist or something related to animal insects and things like that.

Colson Aaron Football
The Whistleblowers Are Coming Out in Spades

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | 3 months ago

The Whistleblowers Are Coming Out in Spades

"Hey everybody charlie kirke with assault and brunei otherwise known as james. O'keefe you brought a couple of people in the room with you. See i need you hard time. James suzanne on each other a couple of years hard time but you are one of the few people that actually do something meaningful in the movement. I appreciate that. So you are now. In a whistle blower project tell us about that whistleblower in the room right now you can't see them but Usps whistleblower we had a to tv insiders. One came on your stage april moss. Cbs detroit just. These are people currently employed by television news. Networks postal service. A new one came out today. Hasbro big story critical race theory. They feel compelled to go public with information. That is people. try to keep hidden. And it's the heroism. Because they wanted to lose their jobs. Now charlie so we have a dozen they have come out and and it's going to be hundreds so we're going to hear from david and a couple of seconds here but i wanted to get an idea of whistle-blowing this used to be something. The media was actually interested in right and you just kind of filling the void of courageous expose style journalism. Why i think there's a relationship. The journalists have become slaves to their access. They they've become dependent on protecting the people in power. They they wanna protect the status quo. Cnn invites clapper on even though he committed perjury. They have a symbiotic relationship with the very people are supposed to be holding accountable so no one is willing to do this. Sort of aggressive watchdog journalism anymore and twentieth century. These explorers lost their mortgages their homes they got divorces but now there's life after whistleblowing because of the digital age and websites like gibson. Go facebook insider morgan. Common last month raised half a million dollars. Charlie in twenty four hours. What did he exposed. He released documents inside facebook. As a software engineer they had quote vaccine hesitancy so facebook admitted. Even if what someone is saying on facebook is true they will censor you and they don't want you to know that they're censoring you and to me. That's the part that so shocking. They want to hide what they're doing. We want transparency into baked tack. So the whistle blowers are coming out in spades.

Charlie Kirke James Suzanne Keefe Brunei Usps Hasbro Moss CBS James Detroit Charlie Facebook David CNN Gibson Morgan
How SolarWinds Hacked the Justice, State, Treasury, Energy and Commerce Departments

60 Minutes

01:57 min | 4 months ago

How SolarWinds Hacked the Justice, State, Treasury, Energy and Commerce Departments

"Last year in perhaps the most audacious cyber attack in history russian military. Hackers sabotaged a tiny piece of computer code buried in a popular piece of software called solar winds as we first reported in february the hidden virus spread to eighteen thousand government and private computer networks by way of one of those software updates. We all take for granted after it was installed russian agents when rummaging through the digital files of the us departments of justice state treasury energy and commerce among others and for nine months they had unfettered access to top level communications court documents even nuclear secrets. I think from a software engineering perspective. It's probably fair to say that this is the largest and most sophisticated attack. The world has ever seen brad. Smith is president of microsoft. He learned about the hack. After the presidential election this past november by that time the stealthy intruders had spread throughout the tech giant's computer network and stolen some of its proprietary source code used to build it software products more alarming. How the hackers got in piggybacking on a piece of third party. Software used to connect manage and monitor computer networks. What makes this so momentous. One of the really disconcerting aspects of this attack was the widespread and indiscriminate nature of it. This attacker did was identify. Network management software from a company called solar wins. They installed malware into an update for a solar winds product when that update went out to eighteen thousand organizations around the world. So did this. Malware

Us Departments Of Justice Stat Brad Smith Microsoft
"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

04:31 min | 4 months ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"So i knew what he had gotten and i could use that as a ballpark intensive. I'm we've always had similar logs all the way through high school. Where at the same school. So they'd be similar assessment and things like that so that gave me an idea where so many students. If you don't have someone a sibling or cousin oh someone what you've had that experience. It's actually really really difficult to get an idea of what i tell you. might get. And i feel like lots of students fall into the trap of using ataur calculators. And you know like i sit there and gary for an i calculated you making a guess for all of your subjects what studies you'll get and then that's obviously making a guest the night harza ranking and it's it's all really messy but it is really hard because before results come out after you've done everything you've done all you sacks you've done your exams and everything it's still really hard the day before results come out to sit there and go well. What will actually be happy with because you know what you should be expecting. Yeah sorry. I do feel i really feel for shoot because i feel like it's a very difficult position to being. Yeah there's a lot of pressure on you will not comfortable with performing. That can really weigh on you. Yeah unloving these conversation. And i just wanted to interrupt briefly to let you know about an opportunity i have for you right now. A lot of students know that career planning is important and that knowing what they wanna do we'll take a whole heap of stress but at the same time they find it difficult to make time to do the research in the midst of studying for saks and keeping up with homework. So what if. I told you that you could spend about twenty minutes answering questions in an online form for me and then take your answers. Do the research for you come back to you with a list of courses completely personalized for you san interesting head to www dot roadmap education dot com slash shop slash. Perfect least for more information..

about twenty minutes dot com many students www dot lots of students education
"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

04:06 min | 4 months ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"I get it. He's got up to your eyeballs and million assessments to study for and now having to make choices about what you wanna do when you finish school on top of that. The so much came out there futile cat. But i wanna make things easy for you. I want you to realize they are a million ways to get to where you wanna go and feed. Be excited about your next move beyond school on this podcast. I'll be talking to current students and academics to find out more about courses careers and the transition from positive for this study. You'll get an insight into what is all about so to make informed choices without mccutcheon. My name's team and this is causing korean chat. I am woken to colson career chat. I'm so glad that you've you've today today. I have an interview bootzack and zack. A bachelor of engineering majoring in computer software engineering at monash university and.

monash university today mccutcheon colson million assessments korean ways
The End of IP Address Targeting

The Big Story

01:44 min | 4 months ago

The End of IP Address Targeting

"Joining me. Today is our resident apple identity and privacy expert alison schiff who tuned into the event. Hi i'm blushing and joining. Us is senior editor james hersher. Who was doing a follow up story about apple's changes obfuscating email information as part of its privacy. Updates is there to fund one. Alson you tune dan. So how did apple reveal that. It was pulling ip addresses. Okay so i'll set the scene. Craig federici it's apples. Svp of software engineering. He's in a a well lit section of apple park in cupertino. The sun is shining brightly and pouring in through floor to ceiling curved windows. He's got this big smile on his face because he's talking about ipad. Os and all the cool things you can do. And then all of a sudden his whole demeanor changes he says next. Let's get into privacy. And then he steps on what looks like a button embedded in the floor that opens up into like a man hole in the floor that he jumps into. And then all of a sudden he's in the dark windowless chamber with a black screen behind him and the only word written on it is privacy and then it is very serious tone. He goes into the whole like at apple. We believe privacy is a fundamental human right. You that whole spiel. And then to privacy engineers step out from the darkness from behind the screen and get into some of the details about apple's specific privacy announcements. It was a little telegraphed. He jumped into dark bunker to talk about the evils of ad. Tech data brokers

Apple Alison Schiff James Hersher Alson Craig Federici Cupertino DAN United States
Darts Library for Time

Data Skeptic

01:25 min | 5 months ago

Darts Library for Time

"Name is gina tan. And i worked for unit date. She's a she's doesn't serve button. I had invited you on primarily to talk about a python library that i've been working with a little bit that you were one of the maintainers and i think original author of and that's darts. What's the high level pitch for darts. What is it in. Why do people like it so darts is like you said. He's a biden library. Which was primary goal is really to make it easy and straightforward to forecast time series but also we have a vision for eighth we want to do more than forecasting so we want to just make it easy to work with time series and all sorts of stuff like also anomaly detection etc but for the timing darts really time series forecasting library from. Let's say a software engineers point of view someone who has a time series problem. But maybe not the academic background in arena. And this sort of thing can they use this tool. Yeah that's actually the goal. One of the goals to really make it easy to lower the barrier of entry for building and using forecasting models and also testing these models comparing different models experimenting with different forecasting approaches. Hopefully tizzy enough. We are really trying hard to make the libraries as easy as possible to use without compromising to much on the functionalities which is the challenge in itself. I would say but ease of use is really the main thing we're trying to optimize for.

Gina Tan
Returning to Work After A Break with Software Engineer Curran Schiefelbein

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

02:13 min | 6 months ago

Returning to Work After A Break with Software Engineer Curran Schiefelbein

"I am back here with curran. We're talking about managing time out of the workforce and and getting back in so then when you did decide that you were looking for time work or at least to ramp up eventually to that take more career oriented thing. Have back into your your field. How did you go about doing that. Short so yards thinking about it years before. I knew i'd be going back because you got a lot of time to think when you have small children and you're just making sure that they don't eat the thing they shouldn't eat et cetera. So some of the things that i did were just sorta lucky meeting. The right people being asked to do something that i was qualified for but felt like a stretch for me. One of those things was taking volunteer chairperson role in the family network. That i mentioned earlier. Good friend was the chair the time she said you can do this. And i need your help. And i said i'm not sure but i'll try and it turned out to be the right thing at the right time for me to to build some built some of my softer skills with team leadership and project management and then. I also decided to apply for the chairperson role at the cooperative preschool. Which from the irs is point of view employed position because we were getting a tuition credit and at the person at that. School is jointly responsible with the director for the day to day operations of school. So for me. It was not a full-time job but it didn't ball things that were relevant to resume anywhere any kind of job. We were doing budgeting. I was helping with hiring and writing contracts. We were doing fundraising Looking for sponsors for the school auction you know they say. Don't put anything that says mother apparent on your resume. But i chose. I thought about it pretty hard. And i chose to put that right there in the employment section on parallel with my technical work. I took my job there seriously. And the message that i wanted to send Two people were looking at my resume. Was i took this work seriously. You should take it seriously to this is a job

Curran IRS
What Its Like to Break Into Tech as a Mother

CodeNewbie

02:06 min | 6 months ago

What Its Like to Break Into Tech as a Mother

"Things are being here thank you. I'm so thrilled to be here. This is like surreal very cool so you recently got a promotion from associate software engineer to software engineer at forms. Congratulations very exciting. So let's start from the very beginning and talk about how you got into tech. How did you break in. My father was a sales engineer. So i was surrounded by technology so in many ways i've kind of always been in tech but i guess officially my journey breaking in started in two thousand eighteen. So what happened then. What got you interested in. What got you introduced. So before. I started pursuing a career in ek i was a freelancer. It allowed me to stay home with my children. At first my son and then my daughter and i implemented wordpress websites for small business owners solar entrepreneurs that level and by implementing. I mean that. I found a theme installed a theme and then found different plug ins. That did what my clients needed done or what. They needed their websites to do. But i never got into the code. And so at some point in my freelancing i started getting clients with more complex requests that couldn't find the right combination of plug ins to make happen and so i then started to feel 'cause then i you know maybe search on the internet stack overflow or other sites and i would hear about php. And how if i edit the functions. Php filed than. I could get this to happen and that to happened. And that was when i started to feel the disadvantage of not being able to code. And i felt like i was coming up against a roadblock in my freelancing career so to speak so that was when the first occurred to me that i could learn to code.

Making Spark Cloud Native at Data Mechanics

Data Engineering Podcast

02:07 min | 6 months ago

Making Spark Cloud Native at Data Mechanics

"Your host is tobias. Macy inch today maneuvering giannis. Stefan about data mechanics cloud native spark platform for data engineers. So giannis can you start by introducing yourself to be here. So yeah. I'm john eve i am. I'm the co founder of mechanics. Priority mechanics was a software engineer auditor. Bricks lead their spark infrastructure team. Sanal being working. We spark cousin infrastructure provider for quite a few. But i'm pretty passionate about it. So i hope i have some interesting stories to share with your audience and do you remember how you first got. Involved in the area of data management. Yes so. i studied engineering. In france then went to the. Us stanford at the time machine learning was. Everyone's obsession. I remember the pretty popular machine. Learning class by andrew hang had one hundred thousand students registered but it was actually a separate class that interests me mining massive data sets at which was like my introduction to distributed computing and. I find that this area was a great mix of really software. Engineering problems algorithms architecture problems. And then i had the opportunity to join. Data breaks as a pretty early software engineer just out of college and that was an amazing experience. And that's how. I go all in that area. And so you mentioned that you had that experience of running spark at data bricks and now you're running it for other people in your company data mechanics. I'm wondering if you can start by giving a bit more of an overview about what it is that you're building their data mechanics and some of the story behind. What made you decide to set out on your own and run your own business to help provide this service to more people. Yeah of course. Sedate mechanics is a cloud. Native spark platform for data engineers. Our platform is deployed on kuban cluster. That we create and manage for our customers inside their cloud accounts so the contract with our users. Our users develops barcode. They submit it and then we take care of scaling infrastructure tuning the configurations collecting logs and making them available enough friendly user interface.

Giannis Sanal Andrew Hang Tobias Macy Stefan Stanford John France United States
How Capital Invents Staffing Crises to Bust Unions and Depress Wages

Citations Needed

02:00 min | 6 months ago

How Capital Invents Staffing Crises to Bust Unions and Depress Wages

"Every few weeks it seems we hear about some essential industry suffering from a critical quote unquote labor shortage. Nurses truck drivers software engineer teacher. Construction according to corporate trae groups and their media mouthpieces these industries simply can't find trained workers to fill their ranks but a closer examination of claims of worker shortages reveals that there's very rarely an actual labor shortage at all what there is however time and again is a pay shortage. Industry is not wanting to provide adequate compensation or safe work conditions for the available labor force. That is perfectly willing and ready to work instead of a worker shortage. There's a not hyper liquidity in the labor market problem for capital the perfectly capable and trained workers that industries do have easily replaceable. Potentially or already unionized and making demands of capital that those industries simply don't like in an effort to increase the labor pool and thus give capital more leverage over existing workers corporate lobbying groups constantly whine about labor shortages knowing the media. Will mindlessly repeat. These claims without any skepticism are evidence to increase recruiting of new potential employees promote legislation that loosens licensing or health and safety standards and reinforces media. Ready means that. American workers are lazy and greedy. Pr extra capital routinely evoked the spectacle of worker shortages knowing full weather claims will be unquestionably repeated by american media. Who never bothered. Ask why they're reporting on the same suppose labor shortages every year for the past thirty years later on the episode we'll be joined by kevin cashman senior associate at the center for economic and policy research. It's a lot easier denies people and say well you know you should be taking this job instead of taking unemployment you know. We should have unemployment amount. That's adequate for everybody. And then we should have employers that are paying wages that incorporate all the requirements of the

Kevin Cashman Center For Economic And Policy
Apple to Build New Campus in North Carolina

Fresh Air

00:25 sec | 6 months ago

Apple to Build New Campus in North Carolina

"DEVICE maker Apple has announced a major investment in North Carolina's research Triangle area, the company's saying will open its first East Coast campus, in move expected to bring at least 3000 new jobs to the region. Apples pledged to significantly boosted spending in the U. S and hard thousands of new workers. Apple says it will invest around a billion dollars in Raleigh Durham Mary facility, which will do work in machine learning, artificial intelligence, software, engineering

Apple North Carolina East Coast Raleigh Durham Mary Facility U.
Facebook Introduces a New Miniplayer That Streams Spotify

Daily Tech News Show

01:58 min | 6 months ago

Facebook Introduces a New Miniplayer That Streams Spotify

"The short film co. let from facebook's oculus studios and e as respond entertainment game studio won an academy award for documentary short subject the first project from the game industry to win an oscar. The film was created for the video game medal of honor above and beyond and is available to stream on youtube oculus tv and the guardians website the new york times reports that the indian government ordered roughly one hundred posts critical of the country's covid nineteen response to be removed from twitter facebook and instagram india claim the posts were misleading and could incite panic. The platforms complied with the order with twitter blocking the tweets in india but leaving them available outside the country on monday apple detailed its plans for. Us development over the next five years including investing four hundred and thirty billion dollars building a new campus in north carolina and adding twenty thousand jobs in the us apple also pledged tens of billions of dollars for the development of next-generation silicon and five g. Technology apple says the north carolina campus will support at least three thousand jobs in machine. Learning artificial intelligence software engineering and other fields. Facebook rolled out support for a new spotify. Many player in the news feed which will continue to play content as a user continues to grow their feed part of a partnership that the companies announced last week the features available to free in premiums spotify users. who will now see facebook and facebook newsfeed option when selecting the share option from within the spotify app and a separate blog post. The company also confirmed its building. Its own app. Podcast player was shows having to opt into the service and expected to roll out in the next few months and macrumors confirmed that the revival ransomware group removed all references related to an extortion attempt against apple which previously included images and schematics. Stolen from the odium quanta. The group had pledged additional information through. May i if not paid a fifty million dollar ransom and it's not clear why the information was removed

Facebook Apple Academy Award Twitter Indian Government India North Carolina Oscar The New York Times Youtube United States
Apple Commits $430 Billion in U.S. Investments Over Five Years

Morning Edition

01:01 min | 6 months ago

Apple Commits $430 Billion in U.S. Investments Over Five Years

"Tech giant Apple announced this morning plans to invest more than $430 billion and add 20,000 new jobs across the country over the next five years from member station W. U. N. C. Jason to brew in reports on what that investment will look like. In North Carolina. Almost 3000 jobs will come to research Triangle Park commonly called RTP the tech and form a hob near Rollie. Those jobs will focus primarily on machine learning artificial intelligence and software engineering. Apple plans to build a one million square foot innovation hub in RTP for a total investment of more than a billion dollars. The area is surrounded by Duke UNC Chapel Hill, North Carolina state, seen by many tech and pharma companies as a rich talent pool, the Republican led North Carolina Legislature in 2016 past the infamous bathroom bill, which led progressive companies to curtail investment in the state. Law was fully repealed last year, and LGBT Q rights advocates credit the repeal for helping to attract the Apple investment.

W. U. N. C. Jason Apple North Carolina Triangle Park Duke Unc Chapel Hill Republican Led North Carolina
Amazon Hiring for Alexa Guard in Canada

Voice in Canada

01:32 min | 6 months ago

Amazon Hiring for Alexa Guard in Canada

"I wanna tell you about a job. They came across recently. This is actually post linked in among other places and this is for a software development engineer for lexi guard specifically so in addition to this job being available so first of all. If you're interested in that job. I encourage you to look it up on the amazon jobs and apply for it but What i find more interesting is that they are specifically advertising for someone to work on the lexi guard Technology and this is something that is not available in canada. Now this jaw. Their advertising is specifically in vancouver. And so i have to assume that they're looking at developing this technology for us canadians. That would be great. We'd hopefully would have that feature come sooner rather than later. the little blurb about it just so that you know it says the lexi smart security team is focused on bringing lexi customers peace of mind safety insecurity about their households and loved ones. We will lexi feature such as lexi guard and integration. With smart devices such as contact and motion sensors cameras security systems et cetera. So i find this very interesting like i said. Could this mean that lexi guard is going to be coming to canada. I hope so. I guess there's no guarantee there but I find this quite encouraging and of course if you are interested in this type of and you are a software engineer then definitely check it out and maybe it could be part of the team that brings this particular feature to

Lexi Amazon Canada Vancouver
"software engineer" Discussed on Zombie Coder

Zombie Coder

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Zombie Coder

"To cast where less is more versus better. Features that focus. This is the lead on dead software engineer. Andrew speaking from a house in the mid west a small farmstead. We might even say..

software engineer Andrew
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Back to software engineer daily. Thank you so much for having me again. Jeff you've been on the show a few times once you were talking about a side project related to security and privacy and one time when you were at aws. When did you start working on a company so this company actually came out of a previous company? I was at but it was really colored from my experience at aws working with customers in launching new products. They're such as the stage maker product as well as talking to a lot of these large enterprise customers. Where cons listening? Hey this is awesome. We love machine learning tooling that you're bringing to us. But can you apply that to my bill? Because it's you know two terabytes large now at absolutely inscrutable. I don't know what's going on. How to even forecast on level and optimize against it so heard about a lot and then you know definitely was very well aware of the problems and particularly being a data scientist in the role. I left to go into working at you. Know Large Fiance Fortune. Five companies and seeing the pain from the customer side this really on on managing cloud costs essentially not to the point where no one was doing anything about it and you know we felt like we had to take some bias for action and build a solution here. Say Nobody's doing anything about it. There are a TON OF COST OPTIMIZATION COMPANIES. So did you have an idea for doing something particularly different? Yeah definitely so the thing that you know we constantly hear from customers and my response was all his. Hey Go look at. Aws Partner Golic at one of the many many partners out there who focus on this and you know what I hear time and time again when those customers back to us. Hey you know. They're great. They got US twenty percent of the way there but I still have to have a team fulltime spending four hours a week doing the billing administration and the accounting and even then the recommendations and suggestions that I get out of the third party tools need to be implemented and go through sort of a verification process on our side so they're still along overhead and you know the problem is that while they might money they spend more time and our goal was really to come out from an automation. I approach and really get to the point where we could take that officer or finance person. Who's spending four hours a week? Doing Laundry Building Administration management the purchasing. And take that down four hours a quarter with ample use of automation and sort of machine learning optimization on the back end to make sure that that gets smoothly and the risk for the customer was greatly reduced. Okay so our I that stands for reserved instance correct. So you know folks who are probably more familiar with large deployments running on aws probably Indus by. There's always a lot of confusion in the industry around what the term actually is. Is it a machine that you're serving in someone else's data center or what is this sort of object and I think a lot of people are unfamiliar with the fact that you know the cloud gives you all of this flexibility and you're renting essentially this virtual machines that are very fungible Howard when people think of an all right we think of it as a specific instance in their cloud infrastructure one? That's actually it. In fact one is actually a contract. It's a contract that says. Hey as long as you're holding this contract in your account you can use anything that matches it and that's will essentially be covered. It'll have zero cost to you in lieu of that are I. That pre paid contract covering that instance. So it's sort of an interesting and and counter-intuitive concept and it also creates a lot of paint especially around attribution of who owns this. This object can float between almost any instance running across your cloud. Infrastructure are there particular kinds of applications that people use reserved instances for you not so usually the general advice it? Something is a long running obligation that needs to be up. Twenty four seven. That's a really good candidate. For a reserved instance however as obviously the cloud.

aws US software engineer Jeff scientist officer Golic Partner Howard
"software engineer" Discussed on Side Hustle School

Side Hustle School

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Side Hustle School

"It was more than fifteen eighteen years ago when Chris Germain attended his first photo. SCAVENGER hunt that of course was a different time with no smartphones less Internet access and a reliance on good good old pen and paper. Needless to say the hunt was Lo fi in analog but also a lot of fun in fact. Chris enjoyed it so much that he wanted to arrange a hunt of his own. A photo scavenger hunt challenges groups of people to get outside their comfort zone and explore the real world they complete tasks from a list and take photographic proof to go along with it the tasks might include things. Like take a photo of yourself a candy shop or where a stranger's hat but Chris never figure out a way to make it work so he sat on the dream for a decade decade. That's right ten years. In that time. He built a career as a software engineer. It was his interest in technology along with the rise of smartphones. That inspired him him to revisit his old idea of creating a photo scavenger hunt but with a tech enabled twist. It turned out that all this time he'd been over thinking it he was trying to plan a dream dream scavenger hunt but he should have been building a good enough scavenger hunt to see if anyone would actually be interested in paying for it. He devised a very simple way to conduct a hunt with a smartphone. Without having go to all the trouble of building an APP went like this would give each group a list of items and a code corresponding to each one when they took a photo of something on the list. Like like take a picture of having a thumb war with a police officer for example they would email it to a unique address with the item code as the subject line. Chris then wrote a program that would scan the email extract the picture and use the code to assign a correct team. You log in judge. All the photos notify the players. Who want he tested? Tested this concept by planning Heintz through meet up groups and his own social connections for a while the only people who showed up were friends or friends of friends. No not side that network. Chris wasn't worried enjoy the process and ran his hunts on a casual basis at least until a life change made him reassess. That change came when Chris unexpectedly lost his job as an engineer. Instead of stressing out and frantically trying to find a new job he took the opportunity to consider what he really wanted for his life. Was it staring at a screen. All Day we're taking a chance on finding something that might enjoy more. His job had paid well six figures and he was frugal so we had enough savings to last him a couple of years instead of looking for a new job. Chris decided to ramp up his scavenger hustle. Now it didn't work right away in fact because the lack of income bothered him more than he thought it would and not earning that good salary while transitioning into building business was a tough adjustment so he took on consulting work on the side as often as he could and hindsight views this as a mistake and he feels like he could have used that two year window more effectively still. He found time to work on the business now. Called Frog quest for months the only clients. Chris was able to pick up from his second tier network and while they paid. It wasn't lucrative enough to live on not by a long shot but a stroke of luck was about to turn things around you see at the end of each hunt. The guests would meet in a bar and Chris would play a slide show of the best photographs. This often involved laughter and boisterous behavior which led to others asking. All the phone was about out one time. One of those people was a manager from a local business who asked Christiana Hunt for their team building day. It was his first corporate client and it brought in a good payday. It also highlighted the fact that businesses were the perfect clients. They paid well booked in large groups and required far less organization so Chris hope to find more of them into that he positioned himself on Yelp in the team building category and ask customers to leave him reviews. That's when the business began to grow as Chris started to make real money from frog quest. He let go outside consulting work and focused on turning it into a real business one of the things he invested in building an APP to replace the email method he was using for over five years. And it's helped him scale. Chris could set up hunts but didn't actually have to be there to run them. He could facilitate through the APP from a remote location. This has helped Chris grow frog. West into a moneymaker that allows him to keep working on it fulltime last year he earned sixty thousand dollars not as much as his old six figure salary but more than needs to live on and with a much improved lifestyle while it didn't happen in a flash. Chris eventually took the perfect picture..

Chris Germain Christiana Hunt Heintz software engineer officer engineer Yelp
"software engineer" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Self the Russia with our amazing software. is able to actually. that break our brains into that state are you with me yes yes yes so you go from I mean I've seen you know you know artistic children that are bouncing off the walls aggressive you could let me use them they they sell like Mexican jumping beans right they come in to fit into the the Russia here put on the headphones and then we play our trilateral balancing sign ways that's it that is okay yeah. so so these are waves that are based on binaural beats is binaural means one and one right two one one year. other well our software engineer Brian came up with three and three. there's three going in one year. and others see of that you know there's a there's a base left and right it's just genius what he created so I experienced this so I went in you just Lana it just took chairs the easy chair and in the headphones has this these beats that you're talking about the three and three there's music so you're in this parasympathetic peaceful relaxed coherent correct field. then what am I missing what I. that that the piece that I'm missing is the is the. software what what what the the software is transmitting those frequencies yeah so the frequencies come from the software into the headphones right however there is that's just one pathway that that the frequencies get into the cells were the body remember..

Russia Brian Lana software engineer two one one year one year
"software engineer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"The openings are for full time positions with benefits job fairs will take place September seventeenth in Arlington Virginia Boston Chicago Dallas Nashville and Seattle yeah and again the software engineer we talked at NAS you you go look at the best jobs that are out there. especially for. higher income. nurse practitioners. was big nurses was huge. and pretty much every state was software engineer coder things. it's not. it is. it's totally crazy and yet a majority kids going to college right now are going there for what. I'm getting my degree in humanities. its interpretive dance feminist studies. okay. that's the way I think we should do college. based on you as far as what we charge there is a need for computer engineers. coders things like that so you know we're going to do your college is a virtually gonna be free. you want to be a feminist humanities studies with you know a philosopher not a lot of jobs out there it's gonna cost you a lot of money. that's not fair I'm just saying three two three five three twenty four twenty three action Bronson showers or Twitter. how happy are you we rank the happiest states and the most on.

software engineer Arlington Virginia Bronson Nashville Seattle Twitter.
"software engineer" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

TalkRadio 630 KHOW

06:45 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on TalkRadio 630 KHOW

"Yet another major corporate breach of your information Capital One over a hundred million Americans may have been affected by this breach course it happened back in March we're just now hearing about it that's always the case this is a story of a troubled software engineer I guess I'm supposed to feel sorry for her who was able to find a vulnerability in Capital One cyber security and steal personal information of over a hundred million people to include credit card applications bank account number social security numbers one of the problems was some of the bank accounts are the credit card applications were for secure credit card just meet people with bad credit to begin with needed access to credit cards for say booking an air flight or a running a car or various other things they were already struggling financially to begin with and their information is out Brad Garrett is former FBI agent and now crime and terrorism and Elizabeth analyst for ABC news and he points out that cyber theft is the biggest threat to the US financial system Brad this is this here's what it really disturbs me about this is that ultimately Capital One probably has a slush fund in a bank account where they pay fines when they step outside the law that's what will happen now and then it'll be a slap on the wrist and just like the finds that Google's going to pay the fines that Facebook is going to pay nothing is really going to happen to punish those responsible for leaving gaping holes while they profit off of our data yeah and what we don't know Leland is how she got into their system the belief is she found a vulnerability in their firewall and got in that way in it you know may be just as disturbing is that she stole all the stuff like in the eight March April time frame in a fairly Capital One had no clue that it had been stolen until somebody reached out to them say Hey by the way yeah your data is out there and so in a panic at that point obviously and get it launched in the FE I could figure out who she is and they ultimately arrested her so this this this girl worked at Amazon is that right at some point it's been some point we don't know when some yeah okay it EM is on at least one I think she worked there had the cloud account for Capital One so you know does that mean anything they're not really sure that is relevant to how she hacked and but the point being she's a software engineer this is what she does well we better check that because that's terrifying exam is on right now has the clout for the Pentagon correct yeah it's a terrifying I get all that you know the the problem is that we've created collectively these systems the whole data like the cloud right and you can note that the other safeguards built the will of course there are all the stuff has at some point of vulnerability whether it be the this troubled person who hacked into capital want war some really super bad guy let's say in Russia trying to hack into DOD don't you think that if the consequences were I mean your lawn order guy if the consequences were bigger that the companies that control our data would work harder to protect the maybe all I can tell you is they spend an unbelievable amount of money on cyber security because let's face it happens like this cost them hundreds of millions of dollars to resolve so I don't think it's probably sort of role lackadaisical behavior of their part I think you know they hired a lot of people that work twenty four seven trying to find the vulnerabilities I think it's sadly the you know the inherent nature of the internet that I think that but I I think there's another sinister thread a foot here have you seen the new documentary the Netflix special on the great hack hello okay I I did in my queue and it it's really I'm sure it's going to be left leaning because it's really about Cambridge analytica and what they did in the last election with president trump and the the the reason I say left wing is because it the promo completely ignores the fact that what happened with Cambridge analytic has been happening since the Obama administration they actually used and brag about the same technology but that's beside the point still still a powerful piece but in the promo for this video it actually says that there that day your data is worth more now than the entire oil industry it makes me feel like there is no out for the consumer when data has gotten that big when companies profit off of our our very actions are very patterns of behavior to the point that it's bigger than oil I just don't think that there's any effort on the part of the government or corporations to really close this down because they make too much money off of our you know following our behavior patterns of collecting our data yeah I I can only say that I I do think they spend a lot of money and they do put some of the biggest brains in the cyber world on this I just I think a lot of it just goes to hello good and I'm not going to put this woman in this category because I don't think that was a sophisticated hack perhaps you're talking about some of those are quite sophisticated the take months to do and it you know let's face it if you are a very talented hacker Lee one and you're basically you know in an apartment in Louisville and that's all you do is trying to figure out a way to break and the axe so you know that's the unit that's sometimes difficult to overcome right except that you're telling me that this girl was not able to do a sophisticated hacking got into it while at the same time they're spending a lot of money to stop it you gotta be able to stop the non sophisticated ones I guess is my point you would think yeah you would think I'd Brad it's always good to talk to you thanks for your input on this take care hi I just I just fundamentally did them I'm sure they are spending a lot of money but I fundamentally disagree that they're doing everything that they can to protect your data because they're collecting it they're they're overwhelming their overwhelming goal is to collect every single behavior and thought that you have here's what's changed in the last.

software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"You find inside Google that was related to this idea of fairness from religion furnace was machine morning over the whole firmus all Sturman for machine learning furnace whatever it is that they want the foreigners for direction think of service was on Phil because it's taking us import the courts for making armed Serrano which signals or been generated from somewhere signals watched it out before show your parents house also received a troll of confidential documents from within Google this document is about algorithmic unfairness it reads quote for example imagine that a Google image query for C. E. O.'s shows predominately men even if it were is factually accurate representation of the world it would be algorithmic unfairness Goron GTA a Google software engineer independently verified the thesis of this document in fairness it seems this isn't a confidential document correct dose is not a document in Google is come out and if needed is that this is their process in in this in this document.

Google Phil C. E. O. software engineer Sturman Serrano
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

15:41 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"To software engineering daily. Thank you. So you were the third place winner of the find collapse. Hacker Thon, that is this company this product that I've been working on, and you got third place for this project that you started called rivaly, and I'd like to talk through some different elements of this experience. I guess I'd like to start with find collapse. How did you find out about find collapse? So yeah, I'm longtime listener of the Sultan daily, so I have one of the episodes about it, and I just love the idea. So this has a it up in the idea of collaborating on the internet with, I guess, somewhat strange people. It is a prize you that this hasn't really been tackled by other people or has not been successful. Tackled. Or what what's your personal experience with internet collaboration? Yes. So. Yeah, definitely. I'm surprised it hasn't taken off anything else. I guess the closest thing that I could think go phase open source products like guitar, or something like that, or maybe even product but nothing close to collapse. So, yeah, I would definitely say, I'm really visit price about the in do you think the platform kind of works in its current set of incentives, and like the modalities of, of the product or because because my sense, is that I'm not sure if it works entirely. I mean obviously the vision is to have people, spontaneously meeting each other and collaborating on new projects, and it doesn't quite have the traction that I envision yet, and I'm just trying to figure out if there's some kind of missing set of incentives. What's your perspective there? So what a lot about it is that you can just see all of those passionate people. They have their own idea and their product that they wanna get going, and you get really excited about those things. So one thing that I find myself wanting to getting mold in those projects, I might not want to commit fully to buy the short description that are on the products might want to start a little bit slower. Like making a few changes or communicate and little bit with people and getting started little bit slower or not committed fully right away. Probably okay. We'll talk more about your critiques a little bit later. What was your experience getting started with the platform like as you as you count on boarded with it? And I, I assume you heard about the hacker Thon and then that was what made you start creating rivaly. Tell me about your on boarding experience. Yeah. Yeah. I have this idea for, for some time to, to create rivalry. Yeah. I'm boring to find collab- few changes going in the beginning there. So it was redesigned coming along. And all of those things, it's quite nice. And I think right away to us. If you people riding saying, there was like a nice year, so. I was kind of good start in that sense, like you immediately started communicating with people that might be interested in joining us. Well, so that was pretty cool. And when did you create rivalry on the site, I think it was kind of right after I heard about it. So very, very soon after the episode on software engineering, daily describe what rivalry is what was your idea for it? So idea is kind of an app for informal tournaments or ranked lists kind of. So if you have for example, ping pong at work, you might wanna know who is the best at pinpoint work who's winning the most. So here's like a simple algorithm. Like yellow ranking like the do for just like he can enter who won who lost. And you get in the unlike a ranked list of who is the best pinkham play at work, or who's the best tennis among your friends, or something like that. And when you started it on find collapse, what was your spec or what did you have so far? Did you have any part of the code base, or were you starting just from this idea just from your idea had nothing? So how'd that idea, and we shouldn't for, I've made some rough sketches the new code will what's been your process in the past for hacking on side projects pros as in code wiser or more like designers, generally going from an idea to building a mobile app or building a desktop app. Take me through that the creative process from the inspiration to actually having something in code. Yes. So I think the most important my process is probably releasing day, too. So just creating something day woman, this releasing its day two and then take it from there. And so basically doing the whole process, a few hours as possible and I'm going to have done that he can eat rate. On reason next. If you want to do something else, that point, that's fine as well. I think that's the most important thing for my person process. Why is that aggressive development show important to you like 'cause awfully like I found a product doesn't get released and that's kind of sad. Like if you can get like an MVP or like something really rough out early, then you can kind of elevate their idea. And, and see okay. Is this something that is actually viable like you said something? Yeah, I actually want to spend my time on for four more hours, this drug should I'd rather spend it on something else. Okay. So you started rivaly the app for informal ranked leagues such as ping pong. The idea around the low scoring system for whatever informal game you're playing with other people. You just sketched out this idea on find ca labs, and then what did you do after that one of my favorites tool, it's if you used. Yeah. It's a sketch, or like isn't designed to basically can can do rough or like you can do even detail designs on that. So it's really nice as a data first thing, I did was just finding out this and, and try to try different designs that could could work, right? I wish I would have learned designed tools a little bit earlier in my career like it was only probably three years ago or four years ago when I started using sketch and Photoshop and now I think, fig Mayes is better than a lot of these other tools, or at least. It's it provides a different workflow. There's also things like there's what invision envisions pretty cool, this prototyping tools. Why do you think it's useful for programmers to know these prototyping and designed tools. I think it's really helpful to be able to sketch out before coding them, so you see no. If it's viable, not from my point of view, like L. Finally, when I saw coding and haven't really sketched things out beforehand realize halfway through that. Well could us play time by just doing this instead or something like that. So I think for me personally timesaver, I think I think it's also of course way to make sure that it feels good from the point of view. So you created this project on find collapse. Did you actually find collaborators to work on with you on the project during the hacker on? So it was interesting, like it was a lot of people interested in the beginning at our Sino designer, and also Puttick manager to the project. But in the end, it was not really any collaboration happening outside of the discussions, we had on find collapse. So nothing we can with code or designs or something like that. It was more like a discussion in that sense. Yeah. This is what makes me a little bit. Unsure about the current format of the platform is, I think fine clubs is useful kind of sketching out your ideas and like hosting your different links and kind of maybe framing your own thoughts about where this project is going. But unfortunately, a lot of people are having trouble actually finding collaborators in getting collaboration. There's, there's been fewer positive case studies in that regard. Do you think that's a is that a characteristic of maybe just not having enough people on the platform? Or do you think maybe it's just people would prefer to work on their own projects rather than collaborate with others? If that was true release that, but if he was actually, like, fundamental issue like I would love to do with other people like on vine club, but just today on find club called grownup on his like a really good idea for. Have you seen it? Yeah. I did. I did. Yeah. Explain what that product is. So he find instead quickly. It's like you can get help like you have an app or a platform. Like, Jim, I think they're example is like going through bankruptcy with your company. You can see others have done the same thing or expert, help from some like someone who's really good at that or has worked with it. As you can. You can they walk you through the kind of deception needs to take to be able to do the bankruptcy kind of in that position or something else if you hear something else. Yeah. And I really want to like that was something that I would love to contribute to that. But I also know that I probably not I'm not committing to being the full time program that product, so I would probably need to contribute Smoller, and that might not be optimal for, for the product either. I don't know. So this one of the issues with the interface in its current form, is that when you create a project you create roles for those, those projects and the way that the roles look is kind of like job descriptions, it looks like oh, I'm going to have to join and do this significant workload. And I think this is in contrast to the experience on get hub, where you get if you want to contribute to an open source, repository, you can go into the issues and you can find a good first issue. And the issues are, are oftentimes much more bite sized. And so it's it, you can, you know, the level of commitment, so I, I don't know. Maybe would do you think it would bloat the interface too much to add some kind of issues feature? No. No, I think that, that would be like maybe issues per se by going to bite. Size work would be I think it would be really cool. Like, if for example, one to have, oh, we need a design for for this idea here. Like some, some people could contribute that it would be great can get like mecca collaboration going on specific thing basical for sure. It now since you did not find collaborators. Did you actually get anything out of fund collapsed itself? Or was it more just kind of experiment for you? Or you just kind of got the, the hacker Thon part from like, what did you get? Did you really did you get anything out of the experience as what I enjoyed the most about the experience just seeing the fine Columbus breath itself? I guess that's almost as contributor to the platform or them else. Like sure. I want this. I want this to work kind of way. But if I got anything out of it for the product itself, I mean, there was some feedback going into discussion like in the comments. So that was nice. And I obviously like by the comments. I realized, oh, this is actually something that people are interested in two. So that was kind of nice that was probably the, the main thing, I guess, that's kind of cool. It could be a forum for discussing these projects like, whether you're actually collaborating with other people on the work, you get collaboration in just kind of the audience, maybe you ended up building this thing in flutter. Tell me a little bit about flutter as you see.

Hacker Thon MVP Puttick Columbus fig Mayes Smoller Photoshop Jim three years four years
"software engineer" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on The Interchange

"Well, you know, I'm a software engineer. What can I do to help? So Astro is really successful. She probably could've stayed at Google in some very important position for a long time, but similar to both of us, and I'm sure many people listening. She was searching for new problems to solve and starting your career over in a new space that takes a ton of groundwork. No matter how successful you are for astroid. It was years of networking before she ever felt comfortable thinking about setting off on her own a basically started tone and everybody I met that. I was interested in energy tech. Usually when I have that conversation with people that are like, oh, my cousin works the at a regulatory authority or like, I know a guy who from my school who has little bit cleantech company. So I feel like the last three or four years, I told everyone I know that I wanna work in the space, and then I have gone and met with the people that they know their cousin the guys from their school, whatever and talk to them about the space. So you took the meet with anyone in everyone approach where people open and beating with you. I'm really I think that overall the cling tech community has done incredibly welcoming and rob ably somewhere around sixty or seventy percent of people that I reached out to we're willing to go as far as to like put aside time to go get coffee and talk about the space people have been really generous with their time and actually really welcoming. It's been nice in. How does that compare to other forms of tech in Silicon Valley in in terms of people's willingness to meet? You know, like, my starts took is somewhat colored by the fact that I've been at Google for almost fifteen years in general, folks. Google URL separately. Nice, right. Like, they're also pretty nice and pretty welcoming. But I think that is not always true if the broader tech industry, especially when you look at the startup space. Cultures vary from company to company as well. Certainly in the broader tech industry. I would not expect if I reached out to somebody who was very busy that they would get back to me and like put aside time for lunch without ever having matinee and without any recommendation, which I've definitely seen people in the Queen text based willing to do. Yeah. That's that's definitely my experience. This. Well, I think this is a big community of well-intentioned really intelligent people who are interested in exploring ideas, and you know, debating issues and are happy to with people. They know and people they don't know yet. And that's why I found Astra's story. So important as a reflection of what we've been talking about. It sounds so basic to tell people to network, it's very cliche, but people in this field in particular, so incredibly passionate about spreading it. They're probably more willing to talk than another areas. So yeah, I think one of the great things about the sectors that it's easy to have that first conversation. It's not it's not hard to find your way into into a discussion. I think a lot of people probably especially coming from outside the sector, there worry would be you know, are they informed enough for the deep enough in the knowledge of the sector to to come off. Well when. They have those conversations. Definitely I I felt this too. I mean, that's plenty of places in my career. It would you know, I was talking to people who are way smarter than me. And I was wondering like am I worthy of even having a conversation with this person? And that's where it helps to be confident in the path. You wanna take which again comes from just doing a lot of reading and coming up with a personal thesis and talking to people and to embracing your unique perspective or experience. So I talked with another guy a battery engineer whose much earlier in his career. His name is Mark Hughes. And he's one of the lucky few who had a pretty good idea of what he wanted to do. So I've kind of been a science nerd ever since I was a little kid..

Google Mark Hughes software engineer Astro engineer rob Astra seventy percent fifteen years four years
"software engineer" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"This is marketplace, I'm KAI Ryssdal. Artificial intelligence, whether we realize it or not is in our daily lives, and it is here to stay. And we that is humans are not entirely sanguine about what it's going to be in for us. That's the upshot of a new study out from Oxford University captured by two wrote about it for vox Kelsey. It's good to have you on thanks so much. So we are going to I'm gonna let you interpret this study for us because you look at this stuff. And and you you report on it a widely. I I do want to start though on a somewhat hesitant note. And that is the point out that one of these researchers don't you that people that they talk doing this survey are not convinced that, hey, I advanced artificial intelligence is going to be to the benefit of humanity. That's slightly troubling. Yeah. I do think that slightly troubling one thing that's going on. There is a lot of skepticism about the systems we have now and whether they're helping and then separately from that. A lot of skepticism. About what is going to look like in ten years. So let's talk about what we have. Now. Are we talking like like Siri and short of the semi-autonomous car stuff that we've got going on is that what you're talking about. So hey, I today I think people want to Siri they point to the translation services that have gotten a lot better over the last couple years to semi autonomous vehicles also to the algorithm that Amazon briefly debuted to identify good hires that they found was actually using gender in order to decide who is likely to be good software engineer, also the algorithms that send you notifications on Twitter and Facebook that have been criticized for being addictive and encouraging people to spend more time on their phones than they. Okay. So that's what we've got now with all of those problems. And I confess I had not heard about the the gender thing. An Amazon are we are we counting on AI to get smarter by itself, or we can improve the inputs to the algorithms as we move toward advanced a I I think there's certainly a lot of experts who are sort of warning us here that yeah, if AI safety research is moving slower than capabilities research, then we're gonna have extremely powerful systems that still aren't doing what we actually want them to do and are sort of executing on their badly specified goals in ways that can be tremendously destructive. Okay. Wait. Let's be clear about this. The people working on a safety will call. It are not the same people working on making a is smarter. So there are definitely people whose work involves both. But there's a there. There's a lot of people who are working on making a is smarter who are not working on making a is safer and the more conservative. People. I know working on is safety tend to actually say we don't think we would be making is smarter right now, we think we need to sort of work on transparency and interpret ability. That's understanding what are doing. We need to get that stuff right before we do more capabilities research. There is an economic reality to a right, which is this entire idea of technological unemployment. And the fact that wants machines can do it better than people whatever that task is up to an including speaking, your native tongue into a microphone people are gonna lose their jobs. Right. And there will be economic disruption. Yeah. I think that was definitely one of the concerns that a lot of the public mentioned in the survey in the past technological development has just meant creating different jobs. And a lot of AI experts have said that we'll see more people in caring professions, teaching things where working with another human being is just powerful. But there are some people saying this one could happen so fast and be so disruptive. As to sort of change the game there, and we need to be thinking about, you know, in a world where we don't need to work. Are we going to have society structured so that everybody has enough and can choose how to spend their time. Or are we going to have a society where most people live in poverty kills me piper at vox writing about artificial intelligence and the future of it kills you. Thanks a lot. Preach, tom. Thank you so much..

AI Amazon Siri KAI Ryssdal vox Kelsey Oxford University Twitter software engineer Facebook ten years
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Founder of slate robotics. Welcome software engineer daily. Hey, jeff. Thanks for having me. I wanna talk to you today about robots and while you're building it slate, robotics, let's start with a state of the robots address. What are the industries today where robots are being widely used? Let's good question. Probably the easiest one that everybody would know a would be manufacturing by far the most successful application of robots would be a lot of the like where the big money is is probably like the Kuka robots. These are the kinds of things that are in automotive manufacturing nine they're able to like pick up whole cars in move them across their workspace within like one tenth of a millimeter of precision other areas. Probably the next biggest is probably just research and development. I can't think of anything else that's really had anywhere near the success of. Manufacturing? Why is that what are the shortcomings of robots today? Well, it's a great question. Everybody has their own opinion about what that could be. I happen to think that price in cost are two of the biggest problems with the state of robotics today. So if we were to analogize robotics to personal computing, you know, back in the late sixties early seventies. Computers weren't very popular. In fact, most people thought nobody would ever need a computer for anything until the price came down to a point where everyday people could go purchase one. And then engineers got excited about it. They started building us flap -cations, and it was kind of off to the races from there. So I think if that analogy ends up working for robotics. The big problem today is that they're just too expensive. And throughout a point where the engineers can't afford the kinds of robots that they would want to play. With into program on. So that's pretty much the whole point of the company in in what we're doing. It's a win. Did you get involved with robots almost exactly two years ago? I was a software engineer so a little bit about my story. I graduated from college with a bachelor's in Spanish, a minor in criminology and in global studies, and basically I was going to go work at my dad's place. He said if I went off and got my MBA, you know, maybe I could do something financing. But I ended up working they're doing some low end IT stuff. And I learned how to program and how to build software nine ended up over the three years. I was there kind of managing all of their technology building all of their applications supporting olivet working on their databases. So that's kind of how I got into technology and the transition to robotics was really through might just learning machine. Learning for fun. I picked up the book called deep learning by Ian Goodfellow, and that was kind of my introduction to the world of neural networks, and I was just thinking one day when it'd be great if I could take. Some of this knowledge and tried to apply it on a robotic platform, and like all good startup founding stories, I scoured the internet for solutions and come to find out really the kinds of robots that I had in mind you needed to spend anywhere from like, seventy five grand to half a million bucks. So that's really how it got started. And that was about two years ago in in serving the robotics landscape, you came to a the perspective that there is an orthodoxy in the robotics industry. What do you mean by that? What is the orthodoxy? So I came across the orthodoxy by building my own robots and publishing them online. I've published a few on like the robotic sub read it, which is like, I suppose, we're all the clergyman hang out, and if it's a personal project the look at your robot, then they'll praise it. But the. The second. It's a product. They've got nothing but negative things to say about it. Some of the things that they believe to be true that are false that have allowed me to have whatever level of success have had so far are things like, you know, DC Motors aren't very useful for building robotic arms and three D printing is not technology. You can utilize for a production product. You know, it's great for prototyping, but you can actually make a product and have been a good if you use three D printing..

software engineer jeff Founder DC Motors Ian Goodfellow two years three years one day
"software engineer" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

Neil c Resona apple Matt Netflix Twitter writer Samsung Hughes five years one day
"software engineer" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"I think that you can say, oh all that person. Does and is is blocked. All that person. Does is right front end code like, they're not a real engineer. And I guess. It can become dangerous because I think the skill set you need there might be. And I'm not saying this is true. I'm just going to invent something as a generalization, but to say like oh in front, and that's not as technical that you you don't even need to know differential equations to do that. And it's like, I might be true. But it also means working with artists and constantly vastly changing requirements, and you know, having an eye for design because you don't always have the designer at your disposal. Right. It might mean. A skillset does actually quite difficult and hard to do. But, you know, working on, you know, compiler optimization theory and the symbolic logic of that. Or maybe that is a much more academic thing. But it turns out like, yeah, that's very rigorous and difficult in those puzzles are very very hard to find making progress comes in spurts rather than you know, you I marks. But that doesn't stratification as we are trying to vacation implies like almost a strict ordering, and I don't know that I on this right word. But like, I don't know that it's strictly this one's better than other. It might be different people shoot at different stratification. Totally the wrong word. I think it's more like what sort of looking for where it's just it's just clustering or just split out. So that so that front engineer like if someone wants a front engineer, they don't put more defined roles like more right nuance. More granularity in the roles. Yeah. Exactly. Now, what fortunate thing is that is that anytime you put two different labels on two different things. There's going to end up being a hierarchy, right? If nothing else the supply and demand dynamics of those jobs will be different and that will cause the pay to be different. And that will cause a hierarchy right? I mean, I mean, but that happens already, right? So so by by sort of hiding under the software engineer label, it actually just makes it harder for people to advocate for better salaries and things like that. Because it just as more variance right to your point. I don't think I think it would be wrong to assume that any of those jobs is better than the other one. I mean, they're they're all there also require different set of skills. But you are right. I don't and without getting I don't want to drag it onto a conversation. But you are right there different one on me better or worse or harder easier. But supply and demand will dictate prices might be different like the pay. Yep. Yep. So. Yeah. So I can see it both ways as well. I personally still lean towards like why not I mean, especially if we software engineer becomes I mean, let's imagine in the future ten percent of all employees globally. Our software engineers, I mean, that's that's obviously much farther from the universe. We're living now. Right. But let's say that happened. Right. I mean, there's you can't just have software engineer as a job title, then it would be absurd. Right. And so you know, that that as the job becomes more and more prevalent, eventually, so I mean, I think I guess on the fly China coming in analogy, if you talk about a medical doctor, so people still say, you're a doctor, but there's pediatricians and there's surgeons, and there's cardiologists, and there's general practitioner, I'm not I'm not an expert. Things if you looked at a job description, it probably would say, doctor, right? But you'd still other people might call it that they know there's new ones you'd still say, oh, you're a doctor like you're still paying you're still a doctor you still go to medical school. But then you develop a specialization and you're right job. Offer would be very clear about hey, this is a position for, you know, working in the hospital as a chiropractic surging terrible anyways. But, but you know, it's going to say very specifically what job ends going to have a good label because it's a sort of stable thing. And everyone knows what it means. But it's probably true that like a pediatrician doesn't make as much money as a brain surgeon, despite the fact that people both call them doctors, and they probably both referred to themselves as doctors..

software engineer engineer China ten percent