35 Burst results for "Software Engineer"

What is dYdX Exploring the Leading Crypto Derivatives Platform

CoinCentral

00:40 sec | 9 hrs ago

What is dYdX Exploring the Leading Crypto Derivatives Platform

"3 a.m. Sunday, February 5th, 2023. What is DY DX exploring the leading crypto derivatives platform? DY DX is a decentralized exchange DX designed for trading crypto derivatives, founded in 2017 by Antonio juliano, a former coinbase software engineer. Today, DY DX is one of the largest DX's for high level trading with over 400 million in total value locked TVL and trading volumes reaching the $1 billion roof daily. It's available in 9 languages. The post what is DY DX exploring the leading crypto derivatives platform appeared first on coin central.

Antonio Juliano The Post
Its Time to Simplify Supply Chain Software  Total Cost of Ownership

MPO Blog

01:15 min | Last month

Its Time to Simplify Supply Chain Software Total Cost of Ownership

"7 p.m. Monday, December 12th, 2022. It's time to simplify supply chain software total cost of ownership. When I was COO, I'd software engineering commonly reached out with requests like we're running low on capacity and need another blade to which ID think there's goes another 400,000. Like so many others, we had to continuously buy capacity to handle our growing peak periods end of month. Thousands upon thousands of concurrent sessions, seasonal fluctuations like today's BFC M as supply chain software evolved in businesses increasingly outsourced solutions, total cost of ownership shifted, alleviating not only the cost of hardware, software, and departmental headcount, but also some of the sunk costs already embedded in the enterprise, like the facilities, networks, security, administration, shared services, and so on, and yet the accrual of systems and outsourced solutions found their own complexities and cost inefficiencies. Technology continues to develop, and with it the possibilities for running an efficient digital, global supply chain, especially one that simplifies how the IT landscape is managed at the lowest total cost of ownership.

"software engineer" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

02:08 min | 4 months ago

"software engineer" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"May you be? If you drop me off, where he is. Oh, of course. He moved on. But his wife, Linda is still alive. She remarried a software engineer from penzance, younger man. And then there's my husband. No, yeah, yeah, but soon enough. Probably enjoying the silence up there. Or was this sad talk too much? But he loves me. I suppose that will be quite complicated here. Love? Karen said nothing. John probably wouldn't look at me twice now anyway, I'm an old lady. Karen said nothing. Misses Langley looked up at the ferryman. There was something so dignified in the way that he stood there. Rowing in placard onwards. You're a really good listener. She said. Karen turned towards her. The woman talked, they always did. Every trip without fail. One of the mortals would detach itself from the group attach itself to him and start chattering. It never changed. Sure, they were different mortals, but how different were they, really? It was like a swarm of rats. You could probably tell them apart if you look closely, but who'd want to do that? The woman talked most of the time they were begging and pleading. They were so desperate to be returned to that thing they called life. They hadn't caught on yet, that life, or existence, at least. Was the one thing that they had in abundance. For all eternity, in fact Karen had some things to say on the subject of eternal life, should he ever feel inclined to speak? Notably, that it went on for a very

Karen penzance Linda Langley Rowing John
Craig Stanfill: YouTube Hides Behind Political Censorship

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:21 min | 4 months ago

Craig Stanfill: YouTube Hides Behind Political Censorship

"You gotta walk me through YouTube getting to hide behind vague, noncommittal content moderation is it not fair to suggest that this is absolutely election interference if they're trying to censor political views that they disagree with? First of all, Mike, thank for thank you for having me back as always a pleasure to be here with you. You bet. It's obviously political censorship. I did a little research going into this. Yeah. You showed, it's up there on YouTube. I don't understand how the exact same footage is okay when it's on WABC 7 New York. And it's not okay when it's on the sale of news network. That seems offline just a little bit fishy. But what we got to understand is that the virtual world, the Internet world, and the physical world, and I explore this a lot in my fiction, have become one and the same. You can't draw a line between them anywhere. What happens in that world has a huge impact on this world. And companies like YouTube are in effect, the government of the Internet. They're the government. Right. And they have a huge impact on our daily lives.

Youtube Wabc Mike New York
"software engineer" Discussed on Code Story

Code Story

04:39 min | 6 months ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Code Story

"A senior software engineer working as a dev for hire. He is working in python, PHP, JavaScript, view, was coding basic back in the 90s, hacking games in the Commodore 64 and he's been doing computers since before they were cool. Graham, thank you for being on the show today. Thank you very much for having me. Absolutely. Before we jump into your path into technology and learning coding, tell me a little bit more about you. I'm just turning 40. We're just a crazy milestone, right? I've been interested in tech since since I first saw, you know, a Nintendo back in the 80s. And I actually thought I was going to end up in hardware at one point, because I enjoyed hardware. I like Christmas for me, was the new latest graphics card. To play Tomb Raider on my really ancient PC, you know? Couple that were music, it's kind of gone hand in hand, really. Life is always been about tech new phones. My wife hates it because I'm always like, oh, there's a new phone out and it's got this really cool feature and I need it. She's like, but you've just got your latest phone. I'm like, yeah, I know, but it doesn't have this feature. So text always been a huge part of my life, but I did come into it as profession really late on. I didn't do university, I didn't do college. And I'm going to say this and I think I'm correct in the UK. It was really difficult in the late 90s to get into tech at a university college level because it was the late 90s, right? I left school in 97, and we were still rolling on plug in the wall Internet. And if your dad needed to use the phone, you had to unplug it and drop your connection. So I'll be like halfway through a Mortal Kombat cheat for my Sega Saturn or something and he's like, I need to use the phone. I'm like, no. Sometimes wish we could go back to those days if I'm honest because they were good days. You know, I was on the server when doom first dropped. I remember getting my first ADSL connection, which was 256 K bits and watching the Foo Fighters live on AOL. And I actually thought this is the future, man. You know, I'm watching this concert live. I can't believe it's like three in the morning. My parents are asleep in the bedroom. I bugged them and bug them. Can I have to say to yourself connection? I'll pay for it. You know, I'm not about 18 at this point. And two weeks later, World of Warcraft happened. It's always been tech based life. I remember getting my first word processor, electronic word processor, I remember getting my first laptop and I've always tried to stay up and obviously code and was a natural progression. To be able to, you know, in development and software engineering was an actual progression. And the music as well. I actually was I've toured the U.S. actually as a musician. Really? That's amazing. Who did you play with? I headlined toward the West Coast as a country music musician. No kidding. Wow. Amazing. Yeah, I did some good stuff. I did Folsom and all up with Johnny Cash country and all that, you know, and it was so cool. Yeah, so music's been a big part as well, but ultimately development always wins. So that's where I'm at. It's cool. It's good stuff. You know, we were talking before before we hit record about a book you're working on. Tell me more about that book.

Graham Nintendo AOL UK West Coast Folsom Johnny Cash U.S.
A former CIA engineer is convicted in a massive theft of secrets released by WikiLeaks

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 7 months ago

A former CIA engineer is convicted in a massive theft of secrets released by WikiLeaks

"A former CIA software engineer accused of the biggest theft of classified information in CIA history has been convicted at a retrial I'm Ben Thomas with details Acting as his own defense attorney Joshua schulte claimed to be a scapegoat for an embarrassing public release of CIA secrets by WikiLeaks in 2017 What's come to be called the vault 7 league revealed how the CIA hacked Apple and Android smartphones in overseas spying operations as well as efforts to turn Internet connected televisions into listening devices Schulte had helped create the hacking tools as a coder at CIA headquarters in Langley Virginia prosecutors alleged the 33 year old felt the CIA ignored his complaints about the work environment and tried to burn the ground he had helped the agency create a

CIA Joshua Schulte Ben Thomas Wikileaks Cia Headquarters Schulte Apple Langley Virginia
Fact-Checking Police Brutality

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:34 min | 10 months ago

Fact-Checking Police Brutality

"One of the reasons I like the work of Chris rufo is that in places like city journal and elsewhere, he does a really good job in a concrete way documenting how woke culture plays out in major corporations and also in the media. But here's a very interesting story that comes out of Reuters. This is the Thomson Reuters corporation a massive media conglomerate that at one time had a reputation for kind of objectively and critically presenting the news and letting people decide for themselves. Well, no more. Reuters has gone woke in a big way. And Zach kriegman turns out to have become its latest victim. Now here's a guy who has got terrific credentials. He's got a BA in economics from Michigan. He's got a JD from Harvard. He's got lots of experience with high-tech startups. He's essentially an econometrics research consultant and he's been with Reuters for 6 years where he's in involved in statistics, artificial intelligence, machine learning, and software engineering. In fact, his title in the beginning of 2020 was director of data science at Reuters. Now, interestingly, when the George Floyd business began in 2020, this guy kriegman began to see all kinds of claims being made, not just broadly in the culture, but at Reuters. And he realized that these claims really don't stand up to any kind of empirical evidence. And so what he did was he began his own research project to sort of look into them. And he began to examine all kinds of statements that were being made by his own media cooperation and found them to be completely faulty. Now, what kind of statements are we talking about? Well, first of all, this idea that the police disproportionately target black victims. And kriegman found that to be simply not true. The police are just as likely to identify white perpetrators, not victims, but perpetrators. I'm sorry. And in fact, the system is slightly biased against whites that was this conclusion about after carefully looking at the data. Another data point is the claim that Reuters was uncritically transmitting that somehow defunding the police and cutting police budgets has had no effect on effective policing. And this guy was like, really, let's look at the evidence. Well, it turns out that there is an effect. And you see a kind of direct correlation between the cutting back of police programs and the soaring of crime

Reuters Chris Rufo Thomson Reuters Kriegman Zach Kriegman City Journal George Floyd Harvard Michigan
Wordle (MM #3976)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Wordle (MM #3976)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Three months ago, nobody had ever heard of the game, and now it's taking the world over by storm. In fact, the game was created by a software engineer back in October of 2021. In November, 90 people worldwide were playing it. Over 2 million right now playing whirl every single day. In just four months time, mortal has become so popular, The New York Times bought it for at least 7 figures. It's free. Everybody's playing it. I'll be honest with you. Every day I look at my Facebook timeline, everybody sharing how their world will score is for the day. But I know it's just a trend because I've seen it all before. FarmVille was popular, Pokémon go. Headquarters trivia now world. We're all looking for something, whether it's the pandemic or not to keep us occupied for just a few minutes to bring us a little joy to bring us a little brain workout, if you will. It'll stimulation. Everybody's playing it. We're almost everybody's playing it, and it keeps on growing. The New York Times bought in and have you bought in yet? I may play. I may not play. Although at this point, I'm really not that interested.

Kevin Mason Nasa The New York Times Facebook
Wordle (MM #3976)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Wordle (MM #3976)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Three months ago, nobody had ever heard of the game, and now it's taking the world over by storm. In fact, the game was created by a software engineer back in October of 2021. In November, 90 people worldwide were playing it. Over 2 million right now playing whirl every single day. In just four months time, mortal has become so popular, The New York Times bought it for at least 7 figures. It's free. Everybody's playing it. I'll be honest with you. Every day I look at my Facebook timeline, everybody sharing how their world will score is for the day. But I know it's just a trend because I've seen it all before. FarmVille was popular, Pokémon go. Headquarters trivia now world. We're all looking for something, whether it's the pandemic or not to keep us occupied for just a few minutes to bring us a little joy to bring us a little brain workout, if you will. It'll stimulation. Everybody's playing it. We're almost everybody's playing it, and it keeps on growing. The New York Times bought in and have you bought in yet? I may play. I may not play. Although at this point, I'm really not that interested.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Nasa The New York Times Facebook
Wordle (MM #3976)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Wordle (MM #3976)

"The NASA minute. With Kevin mason. Three months ago, nobody had ever heard of the game, and now it's taking the world over by storm. In fact, the game was created by a software engineer back in October of 2021. In November, 90 people worldwide were playing it. Over 2 million right now playing whirl every single day. In just four months time, mortal has become so popular, The New York Times bought it for at least 7 figures. It's free. Everybody's playing it. I'll be honest with you. Every day I look at my Facebook timeline, everybody sharing how their world will score is for the day. But I know it's just a trend because I've seen it all before. FarmVille was popular, Pokémon go. Headquarters trivia now world. We're all looking for something, whether it's the pandemic or not to keep us occupied for just a few minutes to bring us a little joy to bring us a little brain workout, if you will. It'll stimulation. Everybody's playing it. We're almost everybody's playing it, and it keeps on growing. The New York Times bought in and have you bought in yet? I may play. I may not play. Although at this point, I'm really not that interested.

Kevin Mason Nasa The New York Times Facebook
12 LESSONS LEARNED  OCTOBER  No. 10 - burst 2

Anna Jelen The Time Expert Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

12 LESSONS LEARNED OCTOBER No. 10 - burst 2

"I'm Anna and I am a well... What am I? It was in October when myself doubt almost got me to the ground. And do you know why? Because our thought I didn't own my titles anymore. And I had many. I was the time expert I was a keynote speaker. I was a podcast. But a lot had happened last year, and suddenly I thought, is the name time expert out of date? And I had not given a speech in one and a half years due to Corona, so was I still a keynote speaker? And I was not too fond of the title podcaster. On a long walk in the Swedish Woods, I understood. There is work to do annapurna. You have an identity problem. And this is what I have learned about how titles influence our identity. Welcome. Holly, I'm Jane and I'm a psychologist. Hi, I'm Peter and I am a software engineer. Hi, whoever and I am a coach. Now do this. Wherever you are, take your title away. Who are you now? Just Jane or Peter? And now take your name away. Who are you now? It does feel good to have a name doesn't it?

Anna Corona Jane Holly Peter
12 LESSONS LEARNED  OCTOBER  No. 10 - burst 3

Anna Jelen The Time Expert Podcast

01:54 min | 1 year ago

12 LESSONS LEARNED OCTOBER No. 10 - burst 3

"I'm I'm Anna and I am a well... What am I? It was in October when myself doubt almost got me to the ground. And do you know why? Because our thought I didn't own my titles anymore. And I had many. I was the time expert I was a keynote speaker. I was a podcast. But a lot had happened last year, and suddenly I thought, is the name time expert out of date? And I had not given a speech in one and a half years due to Corona, so was I still a keynote speaker? And I was not too fond of the title podcaster. On a long walk in the Swedish Woods, I understood. There is work to do annapurna. You have an identity problem. And this is what I have learned about how titles influence our identity. Welcome. Holly, I'm Jane and I'm a psychologist. Hi, I'm Peter and I am a software engineer. Hi, whoever and I am a coach. Now do this. Wherever you are, take your title away. Who are you now? Just Jane or Peter? And now take your name away. Who are you now? It does feel good to have a name doesn't it?

Anna's Podcast Time Management Personal Growth Time To Change Personal Development Anna Jelen Philosophy Time Expert Time Jane Corona Peter Holly Anna
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Of nuts and bolts as you were. If I understood correctly, you highlighted, I guess prioritizing some performance improvements as one of the motivations as a user, I guess someone like myself would just benefit from those without even knowing it, are there interesting things going on in the C++ language or has it just kind of solidified given its longevity? No, I mean, don't get me wrong. The language is proceeding the C++ 20 release is a very, very large set of features. My concern and I think Google's concern has largely been that things like binary stability is dominating performance concerns. And so for example, because of the default assumption from compiler vendors that they can't ask their users to rebuild. This means that the hash containers in the standard depending on your compiler vendor probably are maybe ten years old. There's design problems in them as well that kind of contribute to the inefficiency. But we've done a staggering amount of hashing research in the last ten years. And it's worth a pretty significant fraction of fleet performance to be able to update your hashing at least if you have compute profiles like we do. And when it comes to, hey, we can use the standard types or we can refactor everything and do it ourselves. And it will be worth some percentage of fleet performance to run our own hashes and run our own hash containers. If the standard is unwilling to ask people to rebuild to adopt such changes, then I think we're just going to go our own way. And that plays out kind of over and over again. We like our interface for mutex better, and I think it's more efficient on most platforms. The hashing is wildly more efficient. And you get various aspects of that. The standard regular expression libraries are terrible. There's a joke that it may be faster to fork spin up PHP and do your regular expressions than to use standard Greg XP. But at the same time, I don't know how much of a joke it is. And because we won't even ask people to rebuild that problem is never going to get fixed. At most, they'll be a stood regex two. And that's not an entirely satisfying answer. So, you know, it's hard. I can't say that prioritizing stability is the wrong choice. It's very good for not frustrating users, but performance does matter. Absolutely. Well, I found software engineering at Google lessons learned from programming over time to be a great resource. I think there's lessons to be learned for people at all stages in their software engineering career, remind listeners where they can get the PDF or a print copy. Print copies that any fine retailers certainly Amazon, the PDF, if you search for software engineering at Google, there is a link on apps IO that has a PDF to download from there. And that is fully licensed totally legit, our goal with the whole project is to try to get back to the community and to provide some foreshadowing of the lessons that we had to learn the hard way and hopefully if your company's grow and your successful that you don't have to learn everything in quite as painful a fashion as we did. Absolutely. And today is where can people follow you online? I'm on Twitter at Titus winters. Sounds good. Well, thank you so much for taking time to come on software engineering daily. Thank you for having me. It's been a pleasure..

Google Amazon Twitter
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And it's impossible to skip everything and we need to run everything all the time to tests are a signals proxy sort of problem, run the subset of those that are going to be fast enough to give you some confidence and let the computers do the rest of the signal like gathering and processing to decide whether or not your change was actually good. And if it wasn't then roll it back. Most people intuitively know that some sort of code review is a good thing and I think a lot of people experience they were just thrown to the wolves. Just go have a code review. You and two people figure it out. Of course we should have some lessons learned and processed around that. Can you share a few tips? I know there's a lot in the book, but just some ideas about how to organize and participate in a good code review. Yeah, we did some interesting studies on this and even published academic papers on it. And it turns out that for all that we take code review very seriously, the primary benefits of code review are not usually in bug finding, it might be in inefficiency finding, but it's mostly in education and knowledge sharing and it's a communication activity with your team. A code review is a really good chance if you're on a team, for instance, that doesn't rely on pair programming extensively. Code review is probably the only time that someone else on your team is going to look at the code that you are producing in detail. And that is a really great opportunity for both parties to learn more about the code, more about the libraries that you might be using more about the accepted coding style more about the programming language. And it's even nice from a sort of pedagogical perspective because any lesson that might be transmitted during a code review is actually highly relevant. I was working on this. I did this thing that is maybe a mistake, now we have a perfect opportunity to introduce, hey, have you read this like best practice right up? Oh, yeah, that does apply. Okay, let me go update things. So like the educational aspect of it, I think it's really valuable. The other thing that is really important and not obvious to most people is code review because it is a communication activity with your team really, really needs to be very polite. You need to focus an awful lot on clear, professional communication. Be very careful about how you're written communication comes across. It's easy to sound kind of like an ass, whether you meant it or not. And since it is someone on your team, you probably don't want to piss them off or upset them. And that's not the same as you don't want to point out what's wrong, but you don't want to make it a finger pointing and blame sort of exercise. You want to use it as a learning opportunity again. And so the more that we focus on professional communication and clarity there and take advantage of those learning opportunities, the more that we wind up with code that several people on the team understand and everyone on the team has learned from. And that's kind of a great win. Well, in addition to your role at Google and being an author, you're also heavily involved in the C++ world. Can you tell me a little bit about some of the ways? So I spent a few years on the C++ standards committee and for about three years I chaired the working group for the library evolution. So that's roughly the design of things that changed in the standard library for C++ between C++ 17 and C++ 20. Most of those design changes went through the room that I was chairing. And yeah, I've spent a lot of time trying to get the committee to adopt a sort of different stance on adapting to change and being able to learn from or fix its mistakes. That has been challenging to say the least. So I think my committee involvement has dwindled a little bit, but I still am fairly active on C++ Twitter and in the C++ conference space. And internally, we rely a whole lot more on things like ab sales than on the standard library at this point because from what we can tell, the standard library is just not going to really prioritize the ability to change things. And therefore, they're not really prioritizing performance. And at Google scale, those performance needs kind of dominate a lot. And what's abs sail, so this is a project that started back when Google split into Alphabet. And we asked teams where we asked other companies that were about to be split apart. Hey, what are you going to miss when you're ejected from the Google Code base? And they identified a lot of things, but it was kind of the high level crown jewels like AI processing sorts of things. But because they're all computationally intensive, they were all built against the common libraries that my teams had owned for years. And we had never really had the funding to really aggressively clean those things up. But if we wanted to share the good parts, we would either be asking these other bets to adopt our technical debt in order to use those good parts, or we have to figure out a way to share the infrastructure and clean up the technical debt. And my leadership was wise enough and forward thinking enough to fund that effort. And so we had quite a number of engineers that were cleaning things up solving old refactoring problems, centralizing things and then open-sourcing that and that open-source is what we call Abb sale. What's a lot of infrastructure pieces, it's things like mutex and command line flags as well as very high performance hash containers, utility code. And this is the utility code that underpins effectively everything at Google. I kind of joke, and I don't think it's actually a joke. You probably can't get more than 6 feet away from code that I've touched without making a conscious effort, because everything that Google has built has to upsell dependencies and it would not everything everything. But almost everything. That's absolutely going to see somewhere. So it's our.

Google Twitter Abb
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The international payroll benefits taxes and local compliance, so you can focus less on paperwork and more on growing your business. Remote helps you onboard full-time employees or contractors in countries all over the world than minutes on its simple, easy to use platform. Even better, remote lets you rest easy by providing the most comprehensive intellectual property protections and data security in the industry. They own full local legal entities in all their covered countries, guaranteeing you never have to deal with a third party ever. To save you money, remote never charges any fees or salary percentages. You get access to everything remote offers from payroll to compliance to benefits management for one low flat rate. No hidden fees, no surprises ever. Just the best global employment solution in the business. Best of all, podcast listeners get an even bigger discount. You can get your first employee free for 12 months and two months free for any additional employees on boarded during their first year. Just visit remote dot com slash SE daily. Use promo code SE daily. Your.

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Absolutely. One of the things scalability brings you is sometimes problems you didn't know you had. Try to think of if I have a real world example, but maybe in the backyard when I don't take care of the plants. I'm like, wow, this is really grown and gotten out of control in a way I didn't expect. Are there things like that that Google has learned it's lesson on or maybe you had some foresight on that are interesting, talking points about what it is to be a software engineer. Yeah, I think so. So two that come to mind the very simple early experience working on a team you might put out a notice to everyone on the team saying, hey, I'm about to land this big refactoring. No one commit for the next few hours or days, that's fine when you're very small, but isn't actually going to work as you get bigger. And that starts nudging you towards. You're going to probably want to find a different way to do that refactoring. And then at our scale, one of the things that people often find surprising is you certainly aren't going to rely on your in IDE refactoring tools to make code based wide changes that just doesn't scale that way. The public statistics on say the C++ code base here, I've got 12,000 developers that will commit a change in my code base this month. And it's somewhere north of a quarter of a billion lines of code. Like, I can't load that in my IDE and do a find replace. That's not going to do it. And even if I could, I wouldn't want to because if I'm going to make changes to 50,000 files, it takes so long to sync that change like from upstream that by the time I'm done with the sync operation, it's very likely that some file in that set has already been changed because tens of thousands of engineers. And so there comes a point where you get so large that the changes that you might want to make to your most common vocabulary sorts of interfaces, you can't make that in one step anymore because you literally can't sink to head to commit that change. Before someone has changed something out from under you. And even if you could the question of can I test this? Can I roll it back if something goes wrong? These things actually start to be very concerning. And so you wind up having to have entirely different approaches to how you do refactoring at scale. So the chapter in the book on large scale changes goes into kind of some of the theory and the practice around all of that. And people years ago would have been shocked at the amount of like just kind of background cleanup churn that we go through. But we find that it's been really important to shake out bugs and brittleness and cleanup old technical debts. These days, changing 10,000 files is kind of a background task over the course of a week. It's just we got used to it. It's not a big deal anymore. Well, knowing that you had these challenges and also knowing that Google is a monorepo seem kind of confusing to me incompatible. Why still be a mono repo? Again, it becomes a question of choice, I think. And it's not so much that the everything is checked into one repo that matters, so much as some of the properties of that to matter. And for instance, I would summarize it as you need to not have a choice of what version you depend on. You need to not have a choice of where you commit. And you need to not have a choice of what you are sinking to. So as long as you have a consistent version of what is at head and as long as you know, this is the version of this that I depend on, then you'll be fine. But you're effectively building the properties of a virtual monorepo. And I know that it's surprising, but it turns out that when you have this sort of centralized and I have visibility across all of the users, yes, it is more work for me when I want to make that change. But when I look at it as is it more work for Google if I centrally discovered like, okay, this change needs to be made. I'm changing from food to bar in some interface. If I look at all of the uses of that, and I find the common patterns and I build tools to do that because I'll drive myself crazy if I don't have tools. Then through centralization and automation, I can probably just go into everybody's code and make that change for them. If it's not changing behavior, then this is safe. And if it's a modest change to behavior that we can generally reason about, then you can usually do this with a little bit of static reasoning. And you go run the tests. On the whole, this costs me a lot, but it's very cheap for Google as a whole. Whereas if we fractured everything into individual smaller projects and smaller repos, then someone in each of those repos needs to be asking the question of, hey, which version of things in my depending on, hey, for that version when I do an upgrade, is there an incompatibility that I need to take into consideration? What is that change? Oh, you're changing food a bar, how do I do that? And then you go track that down and you do it once kind of without experience and with a little hesitancy. And then you commit it and you move on and you multiply that by hundreds or thousands of teams. I can tell you which of those is cheaper for an organization in the aggregate. And that's I think to my mind, that's the actual argument for mono repo is. It's just fewer less hidden less unknown fewer choices and more opportunity to benefit from economies of scale. Do.

Google
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"One of the things that was interesting in Jeff meyerson's book on Facebook was their onboarding process. They hire people and you kind of first become a Facebook engineer and then you go to this kind of training camp and from there you're not applying for teams, but you end up joining some team through that process. Could you talk a little bit about the similar or compare and contrast the differences of what onboarding like at Google? In a lot of respects, I like the Facebook model for Google it is for software engineers. If you pass the interview bar, you get through hiring committee, then you'll probably be shopped around with some teams that have openings in whatever offices you are potentially going to join up in. And so there's a little bit of matching process that goes on there. But by and large, it's mostly done before you actually join up. And so you're sort of making those decisions based on resume and describing what the project looks like. And a couple of fit calls, those sorts of things. And so in some respects I like the Facebook model better in terms of you get a more hands on understanding of what that team might be like and what that work is going to be like. And I think that's maybe safer, healthier in the long run in some respect. There certainly have been plenty of cases where an initial team fit at Google was not quite right. And that's hurtful for the new hire and hurtful for the team and hurtful for the organization. It would be much better if we had ways around that. So what's the right point in my journey as a software engineer for me to pick up the book? I would like to thank that there's no wrong time for that. And honesty, I'm spotting more and more undergraduate courses on software engineering that are picking up the book as either primary text or additional reading. This is probably helped by the fact that the book is now freely available to PDF is just readily out there now. But I think presenting sort of a theoretical understanding of why one version control policy is going to be more effective than another or why dependency management is not a hard problem for a programming project, but is it existentially difficult problem for a long lived software engineering project? Those are great topics that I could easily imagine being discussed at length in a undergraduate lecture. Those sorts of things. I think for people that are, you know, new engineers, reading through the topics on culture and teamwork and even code review, those are very valuable sorts of things. And if you are a leader and making the technical decisions making the policy choices for your team, you think that there's still a lot of wisdom hid in the book on various topics. I don't think you have to read through it, cover to cover. I think you can kind of poke at what topics failed most relevant, but it should hopefully be useful and informative at all of those points in the career. Well, dependency management is one of those things, I'm sure there's someone out there, as you say at scale, everyone's line of code is important to someone, but by and large, software engineers don't particularly like managing or fixing dependency things. You know, we call it DLL or library nightmare and stuff like that. Are there things I can do to maybe better equip my code for the next person that's going to have to worry about it when I've moved along to something else? Tests. Just write tests, right? Good tests. That's by far the most important part. I wrote the dependency management chapter myself and from my perspective, most of what we do is not actually working certainly not at scale. And I think it's kind of wild that we're still relying on say 7 to suggest, hey, are these things going to be compatible together? Instead of actually run the tests, are they compatible? I think from an abstract perspective, it is obvious that semera is a very lossy like human attestation of how compatible do I think this is? Which is not in any way shape or form a proof. Running the tests is not proof, but it's a heck of a lot closer. And we would be I suspect we would have a whole lot less DLL as you describe it. If we relied more on evidence and less on estimate I feel like tooling has come a good distance in this. You know, the days when I was learning to programming learning to program and downloading stuff and copying things out of magazines, everything felt very nightmarish then. Although today I can sometimes go clone a repo type NPN I and everything's up. It just kind of automatically works for me. So we've certainly made a lot of advancements as an industry as software engineers. What are some of the major gaps you think that could be closed in the future? So I think that the ecosystems that are working like rust and node like you just mentioned, both have some ability to query against the public dependency tree of hey if I commit this change is it going to break people? And that's kind of key when we focus entirely on backwards compatibility in a theoretical sense where missing all of the nuance and it is entirely backwards compatible to remove a thing that you're sure no one is using. But that really points out the fact that compatibility is not a property, it's a property of a relationship. You can only really evaluate compatibility in the term in the context of how it is being used. And we're getting better at that. I'm thrilled to see legitimate language dependency ecosystems that are building up that actually account for that sort of thing. But I think some of the places like C++ is lack of cogent package ecosystem is really challenging. We're making some progress, VC package is very nice, for instance. Conan is not bad. But by and large, adding in dependency in C++ is still a thing that people will get up in arms about in python, the pip ecosystem scares me a ton because for pure python packages, okay, it's probably fine for packages that are built on top of anything lower level they've fixed the tool chain, the fixed the lib C version to something from basically ten years ago. And so a ton of energy and effort is being worked as being devoted to trying to work around version in compatibility things because they didn't plan for change. Time change. At the bottom of all of the worst problems..

Facebook Jeff meyerson Google Conan
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:04 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So I think you might be most famous for being one of the authors of the flamingo book. Maybe there's other credit that shines higher sometimes, but for listeners who don't know it, what is the flamingo book? This is software engineering at Google from O'Reilly. We put that out. Great timing. It was late March 2020. There was nothing else going on then. Let me tell you. But now this was a joy project sort of following in the theme and style of the SRE books. But whereas SRE was itself fairly novel, software engineering isn't necessarily, but at the same time, Google has been let's say we have some scale experience that isn't common for others. So we've solved a few problems and encountered some things that we thought would be useful to share with the rest of the world. So absolutely. Software engineering at Google, as you said, there are tackle there are problems that Google's tackled that I'm sure they were the first to tackle a many times over. How has that shaped the overall process in the ways in which Google approaches software? So I think that the commonalities that we keep finding are that it's really a matter of teamwork and communication and making sure that our processes sort of scale, which really isn't a given there's plenty of software engineering norms that kind of don't scale once you get above a certain threshold. But then it's also a lot about planning for time and maintenance and change. I say fairly regularly, things like software engineering is programming integrated over time, like these are different dimensionality. I don't believe that change for change is sake is good, but I do believe that over the expected lifespan of your code if your project, you need to be capable of changing and it's often wise to practice, and the places where I think had the most success have been in the places where we really kind of planned for how are we going to change this effectively in the future? And that's been a little novel in my experience. I think this is a point a lot of people even seen your software engineers sometimes struggle with, it seems that something about source code feels like you're writing it in stone once you've got it working. It's this mathematical obstacle that's just perfect. Why is that incorrect? Because the complexity of everything that we're building is just so intense and it's rarely in the case that we have a perfect mathematical proof of this is correct, much less optimal. And even in the cases where you have an idea that, oh, this is theoretically optimal. They're still going to be changes in hardware and languages and dependencies underneath you, and over time, given enough time, something is going to change. I lean a lot on examples from security incidents and vulnerabilities, because those are clearly very high stakes. Say the speculative execution vulnerabilities, the Specter and meltdown. Those making all the headlines a few years ago. And that are still very much a real thing. I think that for mitigating those sorts of things, by and large, you kind of just have to re-compile. And I know that a lot of groups like aren't on a current compiler or don't have access to the source code to re-compile. And if you don't even have the ability to change the binary that you're operating on, then if we wind up with vulnerabilities in that binary blob that you're depending on, now you have a choice. You either suffer the security vulnerability risks or you figure out how to change that thing. And I think once you start looking around at over 5 years or ten years, most of the things you rely on are going to change in some fashion. And probably in ways that you don't expect that gives you a different sort of stance and footing for what do you accept and what are you going to try to plan for and what are you going to practice? Well, there was a time in my life when I was going to live somewhere for just a few months. So I said, you know, I'm not going to buy new furniture, decorate. This is temporary. And maybe I've written some software like that where it's just to bridge a gap, but generally I like working on software projects where I think I'm building, you know, for the next thousand years or something like that, even though I know that can't be true, do you have a good rule of thumb or way to think ahead, what am I building for when I take on a big project? I don't have a rule of thumb for making that decision because I think it's very, very contextually dependent. I think it's very commonly the case. If you're working for a startup, you should probably assume that you're going to be around for 6 months or a year. You need to make it in the next round of funding. You don't need to plan a whole lot further out than that. If you become successful, then you can deal with changing the life expectancy of your project at that point. I think it's sometimes the case that you can know ahead of time that the code you're about to produce is going to be years or decades. And a lot of the time, you know, you're just writing like a throwaway little shell script or something. I mean, you're going to delete it in ten minutes or you never run it again. And one of the ideas that I lean on a lot and that's very present in the first chapter in the book is that there's 6 orders of magnitude of reasonable answer to how long is this code going to live? Somewhere between seconds and decades. And it would be absolutely bananas if we actually thought that the same best practices applied on both ends of that spectrum. And the people that are really zealous about no, you have to write tests and have code review even for those little shell scripts. Like, I don't know if that's true. Maybe, but I wouldn't fight anyone over that. Whereas on the very long end of the spectrum, like plan for change, yes, write tests. Yes, have a code reviews. You need a different perspective. And then between those points, you have this kind of gradient. I would recommend people probably plan for a little bit longer than you expect, you know, very much like your example of I'm not going to buy furniture. It's really easy to underestimate how long something's going to live. But still, I think the most important thing is, ask the question. How long is this going to live?.

Google O'Reilly
"software engineer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"Better framework music. What do you got all right. So this was published by medium dot com. And it's a blog post on medium dot com by shivani verma and it's from may the ten best visual studio code extensions old. It's pretty recent. Asfaw subjective yeah. It is subjective. But i thought that You know we'd peruse these things because they are cool. Yeah for sure it may not be everybody's topped him. But i'm sure they are pretty awesome. Live share number one one of my favorites in the list. It allows share your code actively with another person's. Vs code see. You can see each other's code whom you want to share it with and debugging together that's pretty awesome and then there's live server. It sounds the same as the live share extension but completely different from it. it's a must for web developers just like me helped me save countless hours improve my efficiency In there's links there to bookmark. Imagine you're writing thousands of lines of code and you make a mistake or there's a function not working correctly nested inside of other functions. Bookmark allows you to bookmark. Your functions classes and use it to quickly navigate through your file. I use comments like to do nice Vs code icons adds little cute icons to your files after this. You'll start loving your vs code gallons. Now this is. This sounds cool. And i didn't know about this With gatland so you can see who. Why and how. The code has changed. I recommend everyone get this extension. They all had positive feedback about it. It is highly customizable and you can set it up. According to you in visual studio we have you know Get history right so you can make it all the check ins right in visual studio but this is a cool little you know lens yeah it. It's it's been bringing visual studio feature in dig code really which is cool..

"software engineer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"His in vancouver washington and man. That's i don't know what to say. We were just talking to dan. Wat lean an hour ago but it seemed like last week for you dear less records. It was one day. And you've gotten through your hurricane. And i am suffering in the terrible sunny days of being on the ocean on the west coast of canada. And that's just terrible. Oh i got a story for. Actually i got a story of hacking and story is in You can see it at the dot net show dot com. Actually show this. I have this mixer then. I'm by play in a band. And we used to have big mixing boards with a lot of failures and all that stuff for sound guys. And whatever but i got a headless mixer. So it's a thirty two channel box to black box. It's got thirty two microphone inputs and it's got sixteen headphone outputs each with their individual mixes. That can be controlled by the musicians themselves on their phones. It's really really cool so the bass player could turn it up just for the bass player. That's right you can turn down my guitar. Which is everybody's always telling me turning down so being guitar player like to hear a lot of guitar so anyway so the problem was that when i set this thing up at recording studio i mapped the inputs to the proximity to the musician. Because the input jacks were in the walls that ultimately ran to the mixer. So you know. I had no choice really but to use these inputs for these particular instruments. Otherwise that wires criss crossing the room. And it'd be a big nightmare. It turns out that after. I moved out of that space. We no longer needed to have this crazy out layout and up. What ended up happening was like to the horns or at one end of the you know the the list and scroll all the way to the right to get the other two warns and the vocalist. Were all over the place so it doesn't make sense. He handed to a sound guy in there. Like what is this. So i wanted to change now. Wanted to swap channels around and move them but the software in let me but it did allow me to export a seen as jason file. Nice so yes. So me being a programmer boeing. You know like. I'll fix this loaded our of no pad compels you. That's right and visual studio has discrete feature where you can paste Jason as classes and it will turn that into c. sharp classes. They'd classes may not make any sense but but it definitely takes the data representation and then you know the mixed classes out of it. Long story short ara to make a short story longer. anyway i Was able to write a little console application in about three hours. That i could you know. Put the list of channels up and swap them around and right out any jason file work like a champ. I love being a programmer. Yeah you definitely use your superpowers. That day i did and all the other musicians were like. I don't understand what you're speaking about this star trek I know what you do but anyway. That's my story. Can you turn me up please. But that's not my better no framework. This is my you know framework and this is my.

west coast vancouver dan washington canada jason boeing Jason
Author Craig Stanfill Sends Stark Warning in New Book 'Terms of Service'

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:52 min | 1 year ago

Author Craig Stanfill Sends Stark Warning in New Book 'Terms of Service'

"Stanfield stanfield. Wrote a book called terms of service. He's a computer. Scientist and a software engineer is very knowledgeable about artificial intelligence and he wrote a book called terms of service. It's so important. Though that we listened to his warning about the role that big tech is plain and the role of censorship on the internet facebook. Twitter all this has been co opted by these big tech. Titans and i had a chance to talk to craig's stanfield about his book and about the warning. He has for all of us who go online. Tell us first of all about the book. Because i haven't gotten my hands on it yet. I can't wait to crack it. Open described terms of service for people who want to learn about it. Know about the book is set in a theoretical future. Two hundred fifty years from now. I put it that far in the future to sort of bypass whatever. Our current contemporary issues may be an look at things more abstractly it posits that there are big corporations corporate monopolies that pretty much run the economy and pretty much run the world sort of corporate government and that flows from this notion that these companies can set their terms of service however they want so if you want housing you have to go to the housing company and you have to sign their terms of service. If you want food you have to go to the food company and you have to sign their terms of service that of course you see all your power to these companies now under sure. That's two hundred and fifty years. That sounds like twenty twenty one to me. I get a lot of that and of course. There's a is obviously written in with awareness of what's going on with big tech and this one of the theme is if you think it's bad now it's could get a lot worse than it is getting

Stanfield Stanfield Stanfield Titans Craig Twitter Facebook
How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

CodeNewbie

02:21 min | 1 year ago

How to Do Remote Work Well With Kara Luton

"Thanks for being here. Thank you so much so carry. You are a career transition or who was pursuing dancing. Tell us how you got into development. Yes so i had done ballet my entire life. When i was three and i kind of started taking it more seriously. When i was in high school. I started going to summer intensive by different ballet companies and those are kind of just like summer camps for kids during ballet and the summer before my senior year of high school i went to the joffrey ballet summer intensive in new york city and they offered to let me do a so actually ended up moving there my senior year of high school finishing high school online. And doing that and when it was coming time for me to think about college. That's kind of what i was like. Kay do wanna keep pursuing ballet. Do i to do something different. So i'm moving back home to nashville. And i studied public relations and after graduating i got a job in the music industry. Doing pr in. I done that for a few years as getting really burnt out. I was really stressful. A time anxiety was at a high. And i was like i need to figure something out so i actually stumbled upon code academy and started teaching myself to code and enrolled in a boot camp. And i've been in tech ever since. Wow that's exciting. So you went from ballet. Pr music to to coding. That's really add clyde a transition. Yeah so when you first started. Coding what did that look like. What were you doing. I went to the iron yard. Which was the boot camp. It was twelve weeks long. And i was studying front end engineering so it was a lot of it. We're learning h. Two miles css melodramas script and then my cohort studied view in number as our frameworks so it was a lot of in the morning class. Time learning about new topics and then in the afternoon applying those and working on various projects. And what was that boot camp experience like tons of people who are maybe considering it thinking about it. What was your experience like there. I mean it's like a fire hose of information conflict. You i feel like once. I kind of got the grasp of wine concept. We were like. Here's a new one. Gotta learn this and i mean it was twelve weeks long. It's hard to learn anything twelve weeks but it kind of preps you for the basics of what you need to know and then obviously most people coming into software engineering or currently in it know that we're always constantly learning so kind of just prompts you to how to teach

Joffrey Ballet KAY New York City Nashville Clyde
Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

Software People Stories

01:54 min | 1 year ago

Its Not About the Software With Bhuvan Anandakrishnan

"One. Kushner was ability leader anga product year in caterpillar inc. You would hear this very stock in talk later and the passion he phone. I'm lita remove and woods park thinking and you embedded software and really moved him. Athletics medals the woods thinking realistically and thinking from a customer's angle and he also her is ashen words not just romar respected. Although from using his as as dolan onset listen all high blend welcomed the software people stories. Thank you so much for doing this. But when the high that's being pretty good fashion of the deal and Thanks for having me in decision. I want you to introduce yourself for our listeners. I know you along absolutely absolutely so i Actually lead the one of the divisions of character. India have been working company for quite a long time before that. I started my company called meaning now for five years and then i moved out love. What for lost twenty or so. So i be working in Cat and i've been non genetic leader and caterpillar of going engineering Either ship for right from a what be infused with playing that software. Studies rely staggered. Mike idiot us a software engineer. A little beat. Her family moved into engineering product. Looking plus no need pretty large.

Caterpillar Inc. Woods Park Romar Kushner Lita Athletics Dolan India Mike Idiot
Outhacking the Hackers: The Future of Cybersecurity

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:03 min | 1 year ago

Outhacking the Hackers: The Future of Cybersecurity

"Hey alva janet. Tell us more about this attack. It's my understanding. It had a cascade effect and the breach ended up affecting between eight hundred and fifteen hundred businesses and like a dozen countries. Yeah and not only did it. Impact hundreds of businesses. One of the most shocking. Things about this story is that kosei knew it was vulnerable a dutch cybersecurity group warned kosei about their weaknesses nearly three months before the attack. We contacted them on the sixth of april. This cybersecurity researcher victor gevers. He helps lead. The dutch institute for vulnerability disclosure. That's a group of volunteers who are software engineers data journalists and students by day and so called ethical hackers by nights we have a mission under the to make the digital ward safer by reporting on this we find in online and digital systems gevers in his colleagues scan the internet looking for weaknesses and software. That could be potentially exploited by cybercriminals when the dutch team found seven potentially dangerous weaknesses in cassia software. Back in april they made recommendations for how the company could and should tighten up their cyber security and action. The dutch team recommended. That kosei affixed the seven vulnerabilities. Within three months the goal was to beat cybercriminals to the punch. Here's dan timpson casillas chief technology officer one of the things that we could ask a lot is. Will you gotta heads up like why. Didn't you fix it faster. But i'm sure that you can appreciate some. Bugs are more difficult to fix than others. Cassia was almost done. I july second. The company says it had fixed four of the original seven bugs and had started patching the final three. But they weren't fast enough. Timpson says that just a few days before the internal deadline. The bad guys noticed an open door and they entered.

Kosei Alva Janet Victor Gevers Dutch Institute For Vulnerabil Dan Timpson Casillas Timpson
Pharmacy and Audiology

Course and Career Chat

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Pharmacy and Audiology

"Hi aaron welcome to colson career hat. Thank you so much being with us today. my pleasure. Thank you so much for having me. Sorry i always liked to go right back to the start. I have a five year old for a long time. He's wanted to be a football of that him. Get for what he'd like to do when he gets old up but just recently actually he's been talking about creating an app so potentially he's down software engineering powerful something like that. What did you want to be when you were five years old. I going back to that time. When i was five years old. I actually really liked being gotten or being around sort of insects and crazy collies and collecting them off to the are very much of going outside and doing a lot of things outside and just being around natsha. When i was five years old. I really wanted to be some kind of biologist or something related to animal insects and things like that.

Colson Aaron Football
The Whistleblowers Are Coming Out in Spades

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:07 min | 1 year ago

The Whistleblowers Are Coming Out in Spades

"Hey everybody charlie kirke with assault and brunei otherwise known as james. O'keefe you brought a couple of people in the room with you. See i need you hard time. James suzanne on each other a couple of years hard time but you are one of the few people that actually do something meaningful in the movement. I appreciate that. So you are now. In a whistle blower project tell us about that whistleblower in the room right now you can't see them but Usps whistleblower we had a to tv insiders. One came on your stage april moss. Cbs detroit just. These are people currently employed by television news. Networks postal service. A new one came out today. Hasbro big story critical race theory. They feel compelled to go public with information. That is people. try to keep hidden. And it's the heroism. Because they wanted to lose their jobs. Now charlie so we have a dozen they have come out and and it's going to be hundreds so we're going to hear from david and a couple of seconds here but i wanted to get an idea of whistle-blowing this used to be something. The media was actually interested in right and you just kind of filling the void of courageous expose style journalism. Why i think there's a relationship. The journalists have become slaves to their access. They they've become dependent on protecting the people in power. They they wanna protect the status quo. Cnn invites clapper on even though he committed perjury. They have a symbiotic relationship with the very people are supposed to be holding accountable so no one is willing to do this. Sort of aggressive watchdog journalism anymore and twentieth century. These explorers lost their mortgages their homes they got divorces but now there's life after whistleblowing because of the digital age and websites like gibson. Go facebook insider morgan. Common last month raised half a million dollars. Charlie in twenty four hours. What did he exposed. He released documents inside facebook. As a software engineer they had quote vaccine hesitancy so facebook admitted. Even if what someone is saying on facebook is true they will censor you and they don't want you to know that they're censoring you and to me. That's the part that so shocking. They want to hide what they're doing. We want transparency into baked tack. So the whistle blowers are coming out in spades.

Charlie Kirke James Suzanne Keefe Brunei Usps Hasbro Moss CBS James Detroit Charlie Facebook David CNN Gibson Morgan
How SolarWinds Hacked the Justice, State, Treasury, Energy and Commerce Departments

60 Minutes

01:57 min | 1 year ago

How SolarWinds Hacked the Justice, State, Treasury, Energy and Commerce Departments

"Last year in perhaps the most audacious cyber attack in history russian military. Hackers sabotaged a tiny piece of computer code buried in a popular piece of software called solar winds as we first reported in february the hidden virus spread to eighteen thousand government and private computer networks by way of one of those software updates. We all take for granted after it was installed russian agents when rummaging through the digital files of the us departments of justice state treasury energy and commerce among others and for nine months they had unfettered access to top level communications court documents even nuclear secrets. I think from a software engineering perspective. It's probably fair to say that this is the largest and most sophisticated attack. The world has ever seen brad. Smith is president of microsoft. He learned about the hack. After the presidential election this past november by that time the stealthy intruders had spread throughout the tech giant's computer network and stolen some of its proprietary source code used to build it software products more alarming. How the hackers got in piggybacking on a piece of third party. Software used to connect manage and monitor computer networks. What makes this so momentous. One of the really disconcerting aspects of this attack was the widespread and indiscriminate nature of it. This attacker did was identify. Network management software from a company called solar wins. They installed malware into an update for a solar winds product when that update went out to eighteen thousand organizations around the world. So did this. Malware

Us Departments Of Justice Stat Brad Smith Microsoft
"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"Yeah so yeah so you are like a for that six months officially part of the team like it's not like you poppy in for an hour here and they're like you you go in and you're actually working as pot of which have attained placed in which is awesome. Correct me if i'm wrong but the way you had the intern sheep. Eat your current employees now. Is that right now that you finish the coast. Yes i was lucky enough to get an off a fessel to a casually the on during my last year union and then as a full time graduate tennis yet. So that's awesome. Because i feel like that's the of thing that happened. That can happen quite a lot. I don't know about your experience like we have friends in your course and things like that if they had the same theme but as a teacher when you have placements and things like that lots and lots of students get a job after their placement because people have been able to see them do their work so they're not basing enough just a an interview there. They've actually been able to say what you like in a specific role and yes. And that's awesome that you got to to keep working there. So can you talk about the. You finished your course at the end of last year. Is that right. Yeah and so what. What is your current role like. Now what what are you doing these fast. These fast official role in your career. Yes i'm still working on the same project. That was actually when i started the intention which would have been women. Hockey is again. And i think while the same project and in many ways the way i was treated as intent is kind of the same them treated now which is just a member of the team as part of the company. Never thing like that being able to come back to the company and back to the same project as a graduate is a really good way to show you're more mature..

six months last year an hour end of last year lots lots of students
"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"The yet here isn directly communicated to usa and the way the coast on that is you did quite a variety of old different pots of software. Sir front end and back end and then there's also quite a heavy focus aung teamwork and doing projects and things like that which not just software engineer. The i think that's each other of careers is being at work with people and being able to see a project through from Its conclusion yup. So in addition to that. I also did which was product costs. It's called the ideal witches industry based learning program and the way that works. Is you have the option to do a six month. Intend show at a number of different industry partners to 'application process where you apply to be part of the program. And then if you're accepted in you have interviews with when i did. It was around thirty different companies be have interviews with all of them and then you end up getting place depending on how you did in the interviews awesome and i was lucky enough to get chosen for place one of the companies and it ended up being a really great experience because you get to experience. What a real industry project is. And i think that's worth a lot while you're learning and as probably close one thing that i thought of as i reflected back on it was going into it. I was quite stressed. And because i still felt like a university student didn't really know how to form in real industry. Then one thing you learn there is. It's not actually that bad. And especially if the company that i was out everyone's very welcoming ends. It made it really easy to learn and to fit in and then coming out of the costs i felt like had had the opportunity to mature a lot and i felt like i felt more like a career person rather than a student at that point the experienced the really allowed me to to love.

six month one usa one thing around thirty different compan each
"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"And specialize in and i put down electrical engineering of the dufferin as my second preference but my match results from festival not that good electric during his very heavy on the mass and so i didn't end up getting that and i got suffering which is my second for the them as that went on really enjoying it and i ended up dropping my science degree so good circus completely on doing suffer engineering graduates. I'd love that journey that you've gone through the. I think i really love double degrees because particularly if you're in that situation where you don't know exactly what you wanna do. It just gives you that option to explore a bit more at unique. Because you're looking at the different things. And i love what you've done there where it's like you stop with science and arts you kind of having a play with ego nut sciences really where i want to guard said any into engineering because it makes sense that you'd like will stop me more practical. I think would suit me better doing birth abilities and then now i'm good now with engineering. Do you know what. I mean like you eating through and you find you pass and then you go. This is actually thesis. Actually where. I want to wind up. And i love the way that you can go about that at uni so you can go along these different. Pathway explore your options. Were cat what you want. And it's easy to kind of. Do those transitions once. You're at union and sort of move between the different courses as long as you say you him box up and things like that because there are different hurdles at different stages throughout the. Yeah so that's awesome. You were doing software engineering from like your third year. Unions that rush that when it's sort of narrowed down to actually software engineering. It would've been halfway through the idea. I think yes when my style. But then i didn't end up dropping science until full..

second third year second preference double
"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"Jenny might find different things that you enjoy doing anyway that you may not have even that you wanted today like i think for people rally yard jaas as you imagine when you're younger it's always so many variables and things that life can throw it. You change that direction yet. The things that come along the way you know they might have been better than what. You're expecting us place. Yeah that's true and if you just take a step in a direction from them and then you will lend something along the way and whether that is that hype this something and you don't wanna pursue it all. He likes something. And maybe that does change where you want to. If you just take one step at a time and just see where it takes you then yeah you can learn a lot about yourself about what you actually might like today. Which is yeah. It's it's kind of fun if you think of it that way. Take it a little bit less seriously. So you've mentioned before so you weren't sure what you wanted to do. Sort of keighley on nbc. But you obviously need to get a attack preference lists together in august of you twelve. So when did you sort to start to work out. What you'd like today and do you remember what causes you had on your preference least yes. At the time. I still wasn't really show what i wanted to end up doing. Sir for my preferences ended up having quite a variety of things and i saw the figure. This is like whatever i get into. That's what i'll try out my fest preference. Which ended up being the coast. Got was a science not stubble degree at monash. I chose odds. Because i was still interested in filmmaking. At the time. I thought if i did a Double degree i could issue birth that and then also science. Which was the thing i had been interested in since i was younger than i thought you could do. Earth see which one..

Jenny august today one step Earth twelve nbc Double degree keighley
"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

05:25 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"It's early on in high school but there comes a time where you do start to made to do some more work in at least some of his subjects and it is really tricky. Isn't it because all of a sudden saw hang on. I'm not used to this and so you'll learning those skills at the same time as trying to do the hard work. So that's what it's testing you're on realize how well he can work and how you can look which isn't just something had developed as much as a thing so we mind. What subjects did you choosing mesa. And how did you go about picking those subjects so ended up just picking things. I was interested in in vc. I did physics in your eleven. And then i did methods chemistry literature and media which also i. I chose them because emphasis. I just found like physics and chemistry interesting yet. Another with media. I was sort of into film at the time and something to pick up his all at that point. Did you have an idea like it's great. Cushy chose that subjects. could you enjoy them. But did you have an idea of where you wanted to go at that point. I think that was on the issues. That i have in. Bc was the. I didn't know that wanted to do when i left here for wanted to do to do the job and say that kind of black of motivation. I think like why. I wanted to do sort of holds me to not study as much as i should have like things. I was interested in the at the same time you know. I wasn't like yeah. I could do this as a joke. And so i just didn't spend the time you really like percocet on working hard tour gets her any particular point. Yeah and he's hard to get that motivation as you say when you're not sure where you're going if you're you're kind of sitting there going well i'm at school and my teachers asked me to do these work. It's kind of interesting. But it's not something that i want to go and spend hours on the weekend. It is really hard to find that motivation and use that to sort of get through and get those high mocks and things and i. It's funny. I was probably a little bit different in high school where i had no idea what i wanted to do but all i had was if i just if i just get a really good an to score at the time but if i just get a really good asia then things will fall into place and i find it funny because now i know that that's not how it works because i still got to a point where i did get good results but i still didn't know what i wanted to do. Sorry it didn't really matter..

eleven asia
"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

Course and Career Chat

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Course and Career Chat

"I get it. He's got up to your eyeballs and million assessments to study for and now having to make choices about what you wanna do when you finish school on top of that. The so much came out there futile cat. But i wanna make things easy for you. I want you to realize they are a million ways to get to where you wanna go and feed. Be excited about your next move beyond school on this podcast. I'll be talking to current students and academics to find out more about courses careers and the transition from positive for this study. You'll get an insight into what is all about so to make informed choices without mccutcheon. My name's team and this is causing korean chat. I am woken to colson career chat. I'm so glad that you've you've today today. I have an interview bootzack and zack. A bachelor of engineering majoring in computer software engineering at monash university and.

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The End of IP Address Targeting

The Big Story

01:44 min | 1 year ago

The End of IP Address Targeting

"Joining me. Today is our resident apple identity and privacy expert alison schiff who tuned into the event. Hi i'm blushing and joining. Us is senior editor james hersher. Who was doing a follow up story about apple's changes obfuscating email information as part of its privacy. Updates is there to fund one. Alson you tune dan. So how did apple reveal that. It was pulling ip addresses. Okay so i'll set the scene. Craig federici it's apples. Svp of software engineering. He's in a a well lit section of apple park in cupertino. The sun is shining brightly and pouring in through floor to ceiling curved windows. He's got this big smile on his face because he's talking about ipad. Os and all the cool things you can do. And then all of a sudden his whole demeanor changes he says next. Let's get into privacy. And then he steps on what looks like a button embedded in the floor that opens up into like a man hole in the floor that he jumps into. And then all of a sudden he's in the dark windowless chamber with a black screen behind him and the only word written on it is privacy and then it is very serious tone. He goes into the whole like at apple. We believe privacy is a fundamental human right. You that whole spiel. And then to privacy engineers step out from the darkness from behind the screen and get into some of the details about apple's specific privacy announcements. It was a little telegraphed. He jumped into dark bunker to talk about the evils of ad. Tech data brokers

Apple Alison Schiff James Hersher Alson Craig Federici Cupertino DAN United States
"software engineer" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"House three years from now. Do you have any idea what the price of that house is going to pay? I'm looking for a two bedroom, two bathroom about, um, It's probably either going to be a condo or something like that down here in Miami. I'm looking to live a little bit more of North, maybe, like mayor, Mark member times. Houses in the discos kind of range. But for the house that I'm looking for, I don't really want to spend over like to 15. I'm studying to be a software engineer. So I'm most likely going to be making anywhere between 80 85 toe almost 100,000 of like a base salary when I get out of school, and I couldn't leave already graduating. Bring 2023. So I'm thinking that I would be able to afford more house But I don't walk more house because I want to be able to save a lot of money in my twenties. I got it. So let me ask you this how you're in college, Uh, incurring the costs of college. How is that you're able to save money? Are you working? Yeah, Yeah, I am working. But also I have lot of scholarship. So I'm actually getting paid to go to school because of how hard I worked in high school. Congratulations. That's your hard work's paying off. Wonderfully for you. That's really terrific. Okay, So here's Here's the thing. Investing is about two subjects, not just one Most folks when they think about investing focus only on one subject, which is return. How much money can I earn from my investments? And that is an important thing. But it's only one thing. The second thing is risk. How much risk do you take to get the return one of the ways we can reduce risk? Is by increasing time. In other words, the more time you spend invested the lower the risk of losses. If you invest in the stock market today, it might fall in value tomorrow. 10 years from now, 20 years from now, it's much more likely that the account will be higher in value. So the more time we have to invest the more confidently we can invest in stocks. With attitude that will likely make money can promise it, of course, but that's a reasonable perspective to have, but you don't have 20 years. You've only got three years, maybe four. Depending on when you do this. That's not a terribly long time. So I'm a little hesitant to see you investing a substantial amount of your money into the stock market because history has shown us that in a two or three year period of time, prices can go down. We saw that in 2008, for example. So we want to protect ourselves against that..

Miami Mark software engineer