3 Burst results for "Society Permanent Cosmetic Professionals"

"society permanent cosmetic professionals" Discussed on Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

05:03 min | 2 weeks ago

"society permanent cosmetic professionals" Discussed on Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

"I mean they are exquisite pieces of our and that's the only way to despite them and so before you know my dad. They were doing that old. Mom tattoo the big eagle on the chassagne-montrachet right east fest was what was what they were doing. And so to watch the evolution not just of the tattoo industry pm view. Come into its own. You know we're doing a great piece on women in the industry. That have changed the industry. And i want to focus on women that have changed regulations. And so this. I mean you know. There's some amazing women that have pay pat hades away. I for they will pioneers in the industry. And if it weren't for them we would never have been able to do and these young people coming up with and they don't know what asked you what everybody had to go through right heart barry grim and how she orbits does like going all the legislation for society permanent cosmetic professionals in all of that so marjorie. Can you know few off. you know. Regulations that she's changed. She remembers people. She spoke to back. You know thirty years ago so you know but these are things that young artists don't know and so i feel like it's really important to have some startling documentation that so. That's something that we're working on here now. So yeah that's fine a little sneak peek insider. It's funny because my. I think it was last week or the week before we had john kerry on and he had a great quote and i'm not sure if it was his or one of his mentors and it was. If you're not growing you start to rot like fruit on the vine right. And so if you're not growing your east yeah. I thought that was really to where you find your strength. Like where do you find your courage because you you know you do brave things right and you put yourself out there. And that's what. I'm always always kind of preaching because i know that for me growing up people would not believe this but i was like a wallflower super quiet. My mom yes yes and i have a daughter you know one of my girls is like that now and the other one is like can't wait to get in front of the camera the other one doesn't want to be anywhere near right and so i was like that. It was very quiet very introverted. I'm still kind of introverted. Most people don't know. But i just i overcame a lot of things and i realize it. I kept putting myself out there on. That helped me yet strength. So where do you find your strength or courage. Where does that come from. Grace of god..

john kerry thirty years ago last week one girls marjorie eagle
"society permanent cosmetic professionals" Discussed on Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

07:45 min | 6 months ago

"society permanent cosmetic professionals" Discussed on Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

"Hello. Hello everyone. Hello, beautiful. So good to see you. I'm so excited that you're going to join us today and Thursday. Introduced my special guest today Angela her SE, honi. So awesome. So we have a great interview today with Angela where I'm going to read her bio in just a moment. You'll see a c p c p which is certified permanent cosmetic professional after Angela's name because she is also the current president of the Society of permanent cosmetic professionals. She started her career change as a tattoo artist and was thrust into permanent makeup work when she had her lips tattoo to cover up a childhood scar. She's apprenticed as a tattoo artist in Brooklyn New York in June nineteen, ninety seven and was introduced to him you permanent makeup in two thousand and three and decided to retire from body Tattooing in 2012 to focus on permanent cosmetics and she joined the society permanent cosmetic Professionals in 2018. And again, like we said she is currently the president and the name I don't have it here of is it Flawless? Beauty is the name of your song? Yeah close. So I joined the s p c p I think in 2013, but I got on the board in 2018 and our Spas Flawless permanent cosmetics and Spa in Staten Island, New York wage. Ye, so obviously you guys probably can see the New York connection and know that again. I've known Angela for a long time and she has again you can see such a ray of experience with so fantastic is she also is really good at just giving you that information like she's an open book. She's very relatable. So I think you're going to find this interview very helpful, but I'm Angela. Thank you for being here. Welcome. Welcome. Why don't you tell me about that transition from traditional tattoo artists to permanent cosmetic and how that was different for you. And yeah, so I guess the shortest way to do this long story is that I didn't have an intention of being a tattoo artist at all. I was going to school for criminology jobs and I was actually working as a aerobics instructor at a Lucille Roberts and there was this girl in my class who was just like covered in tattoos and we're talking Nineteen Ninety Six when language did not have tattoos and I just thought she was so cool. And I was I wasn't even 18 at the time yet and I became friends with her. She was a tattoo artist and she kind of ushered me into tattooing kind of life in an apprenticeship where I really didn't know what was going on. It was like, you know, hey, can you do this for me? If you do that from you, can you grab this for me before? I knew it I was tattooing and I'm like, oh my God, what am I doing? And so fast. I was working as a tattoo artist because we were military we're moving around and you know, it's hard to find work and army guys always want to add to his right. So there's always work available for that long. And I was at a barbecue and I have this big scar right here on my lip. I got burnt when I was a kid and they kept you know, we're at a barbecue drinking eating putting lipstick on and this girl comes over to me when other Army Wives and she's like, you know, I see that you keep doing that and I said, yeah a scar and she said well, you know, why don't you let me make that permanent for you and I was like, what do you do to my face? And she was like, yeah. Yeah actually but okay, you know, like this was like two thousand three. I have not six years tattooing. I never occurred to me. So I went and had it done and kind of fell in love with the process and I learned to enjoy her and the rest is kind of History. So I didn't there wasn't a transition really it was kind of like I was forced into one and then I just kind of the other one throw it on top of me. That's so funny. And so a lot has changed since that time right and so much has changed in our industry. It's always evolving. What do you see? Is one of the biggest struggles for permanent cosmetic artist growing and starting a business. What do you find is like one of their key struggles. One of the struggles is already kind of almost over. I think that let's say let's go back five years or even ten years where the permanent makeup industry and the tattoo industry was so far apart and nobody wanted to share information and everybody was kind of faith that everything was so different and there were those of us that fought to say like know we're brothers and sisters, you know, we're we're not twins. We're like eyebrows. We're not sisters not twins, you know, and now off with all of these companies coming together and marrying tattooing world with permanent makeup world. I think it's gotten so much easier for artists to kind of come into the business and get good quality products suck at training all that kind of stuff. So I think that the harder things that were there for us have gotten a little easier for new artists, but now of course with its popularity, it's how do you stand out in the crowd like how long Rise yourself above everyone else that's around you and be different, right? Yeah. Absolutely. So do you have an element that leads me right to the next one? So what are your tips or what have you found works for you? Because everybody's going to have to find their own secret sauce, right and that's actually one of the things that we do and now they program is help people find what's unique and different about them and package that up. But what have you found works for you? Yeah. So I feel like everyone has their own style. Everyone has their own personality. I see and I tell people all the time that like just because like I maybe I could win every award that was ever given to permanent makeup artists came across the world and I'm the best time to make up artist ever, but if you don't like me or you don't like my work then I'm not the artist for you. And so I feel like my dad always used to say that there's a but for every seat I feel like that's very true. And so if you you know kind of stick to your style and not try to copy other people that there's going to be a natural kind of flow that comes to you instead of somebody else. Even when I'm teaching I like to teach the technique I like to teach the basics and the technical skills. And if I tell my students, you know figure out who you are your thoughts on was going to be different than my brown we could work right next door to each other and you're going to have your own following. Yeah. I love that. I love that so good. It's one of those like basic things of might be true to who you are. But it's awful. It's so easy to say sometimes but so hard to do to really find our value and do the hard work of looking inside like we want to just say, oh well that's working for them. Let me do that or that's working for them and down works for them might not work for you. Right especially if you're in a different market. So if you're in a market where somebody is like the industry is different or maybe they're a little behind the times or just all kinds of things that don't come into play what also would you say is one of the things that helped you grow like maybe a something that you take an obstacle that you had to overcome or Triumph dead. That has helped you grow. It's a great question and it's going to sound like a total as PCP plug but it's the truth. You know, I've always had two loves. So my first love was criminology forensics things like that. That's what I was going to school for and tattooing for me was the job that I had to get me through school and gave me the flexibility, you know with having children and moving and all that stuff and talk to me. It was not going to be my career. But as I became so in love with it that I got to a point where it was like fifty fifty like I loved them both so much and like what do I do wrong? And I think it was like 2015. Maybe we were in Orlando born as PCP been. I was hanging out with Karen beds and we were kind of talking it was time for finals and stuff. And so like I was stressed out and you know, we were talking about that.

Angela Society of permanent president New York Lucille Roberts Staten Island Brooklyn instructor Orlando
Interview with Angela Torresiani

Beauty Marketing Simplified podcast

04:58 min | 6 months ago

Interview with Angela Torresiani

"Hello everyone. Hello, beautiful. So good to see you. I'm so excited that you're going to join us today and Thursday. Introduced my special guest today Angela her SE, honi. So awesome. So we have a great interview today with Angela where I'm going to read her bio in just a moment. You'll see a c p c p which is certified permanent cosmetic professional after Angela's name because she is also the current president of the Society of permanent cosmetic professionals. She started her career change as a tattoo artist and was thrust into permanent makeup work when she had her lips tattoo to cover up a childhood scar. She's apprenticed as a tattoo artist in Brooklyn New York in June nineteen, ninety seven and was introduced to him you permanent makeup in two thousand and three and decided to retire from body Tattooing in 2012 to focus on permanent cosmetics and she joined the society permanent cosmetic Professionals in 2018. And again, like we said she is currently the president and the name I don't have it here of is it Flawless? Beauty is the name of your song? Yeah close. So I joined the s p c p I think in 2013, but I got on the board in 2018 and our Spas Flawless permanent cosmetics and Spa in Staten Island, New York wage. Ye, so obviously you guys probably can see the New York connection and know that again. I've known Angela for a long time and she has again you can see such a ray of experience with so fantastic is she also is really good at just giving you that information like she's an open book. She's very relatable. So I think you're going to find this interview very helpful, but I'm Angela. Thank you for being here. Welcome. Welcome. Why don't you tell me about that transition from traditional tattoo artists to permanent cosmetic and how that was different for you. And yeah, so I guess the shortest way to do this long story is that I didn't have an intention of being a tattoo artist at all. I was going to school for criminology jobs and I was actually working as a aerobics instructor at a Lucille Roberts and there was this girl in my class who was just like covered in tattoos and we're talking Nineteen Ninety Six when language did not have tattoos and I just thought she was so cool. And I was I wasn't even 18 at the time yet and I became friends with her. She was a tattoo artist and she kind of ushered me into tattooing kind of life in an apprenticeship where I really didn't know what was going on. It was like, you know, hey, can you do this for me? If you do that from you, can you grab this for me before? I knew it I was tattooing and I'm like, oh my God, what am I doing? And so fast. I was working as a tattoo artist because we were military we're moving around and you know, it's hard to find work and army guys always want to add to his right. So there's always work available for that long. And I was at a barbecue and I have this big scar right here on my lip. I got burnt when I was a kid and they kept you know, we're at a barbecue drinking eating putting lipstick on and this girl comes over to me when other Army Wives and she's like, you know, I see that you keep doing that and I said, yeah a scar and she said well, you know, why don't you let me make that permanent for you and I was like, what do you do to my face? And she was like, yeah. Yeah actually but okay, you know, like this was like two thousand three. I have not six years tattooing. I never occurred to me. So I went and had it done and kind of fell in love with the process and I learned to enjoy her and the rest is kind of History. So I didn't there wasn't a transition really it was kind of like I was forced into one and then I just kind of the other one throw it on top of me. That's so funny. And so a lot has changed since that time right and so much has changed in our industry. It's always evolving. What do you see? Is one of the biggest struggles for permanent cosmetic artist growing and starting a business. What do you find is like one of their key struggles. One of the struggles is already kind of almost over. I think that let's say let's go back five years or even ten years where the permanent makeup industry and the tattoo industry was so far apart and nobody wanted to share information and everybody was kind of faith that everything was so different and there were those of us that fought to say like know we're brothers and sisters, you know, we're we're not twins. We're like eyebrows. We're not sisters not twins, you know, and now off with all of these companies coming together and marrying tattooing world with permanent makeup world. I think it's gotten so much easier for artists to kind of come into the business and get good quality products suck at training all that kind of stuff. So I think that the harder things that were there for us have gotten a little easier for new artists, but now of course with its popularity, it's how do you stand out in the crowd like how long Rise yourself above everyone else that's around you and be

Angela Society Of Permanent Cosmetic Society Permanent Cosmetic Pro Scar New York Lucille Roberts Staten Island Brooklyn