3 Burst results for "Society For Human Resource Management"

"society human resource management" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

Talent Makers Studio

04:13 min | 3 months ago

"society human resource management" Discussed on Talent Makers Studio

"You mentioned earlier that you've seen a of progress that you've got good numbers relative to your peers. What are you measure. How do you actually measure diversity at at checker devastate has many dimensions. And it's important to recognize in highlight or of the dimensions of diversity. It can be social economic backgrounds raise. Gender religious views does vide at lot of dimensions of davis Or in my opinion posits even in goud to have Culture diverse workforce diversity of thoughts. But it's hard to make progress when we don't measure things in the united new junior. I i believe in in measuring progress in setting targets and goals in overtime by raging. You can make changes in any dimension though metric. You want the company as long as you walk out at ethan and keep focus on that metrics. We decided i'll core metrics for diversity will be gender diversity so we measure gender diversity by the percentage of non maalim That he mail in an auto gender identities we also have underrepresented groups as a measurement of diversity in we'll have a metric that is checker only metric which is the fat chance program infections diversity people with criminal records that including so are three metrics that will really pushing but again when we look at our data and surveys we order review sexual preference in a gin author of the more traditional metrics to make sure that we don't have any gaps or the making progress. You know dimensions of diversity. Fantastic so as we talk about measuring diversity any gotcha as anything to be careful about our watch out for as you think about what to measure yet measuring it's to after maybe you can. You can share from the perspective even having accurate measurement is not an easy process right. The difficulty is that in a lotta situations. people have to self identify. We've found that the accepted sherm. Society human resources management methodology. The preferred methodology is visual. Id so hr folks really just being someone. As a specific. Ethnic background is an acceptable measure. But obviously that's a slippery slope as well and so we're trying to combine both in making sure that where bucking someone somewhere but there are people who identifies in a multi-race or or to a more ethnic backgrounds. So there's a lot of slippery slopes there but we're doing the best we can between surveys and just our hr team being as diligent and fair as possible and identifying people. As far as the gotcha stuff. You just wanna make sure that you're being genuine in how you're approaching the metrics right in that you're thinking with diversity in mind rather than hitting that metric. That's not the most important thing. The goal was important. Because you need sort of a north star to guide you somewhere but everything is done in that process right ensuring that you're trying to get to the goal rather than just. Hey we're fifty percents gender diversity. Now we're done. We can slide the ratio back to seventy five percent male over the course of time. Because we've hit it once it's just really ensuring that the journey is always consistent in the intent is genuine if you do that then. You're headed in the right place. And i would add that to. The date is not going to be perfect because of those identification potential chinese trying to prioritize self-identification. So that people can you know themselves. Express their identity. It's gave the data is not perfect. You know. I think what's important. It's again these to move the metric into the right direction. So even if we're plus minus five percents off as long as we keep our eye on the improvement look at the metric also be anecdotes in the company and we make sure at the top of mine in. The program keeps improving. I think.

goud united new junior maalim sherm ethan davis
"society human resource management" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

12:30 min | 1 year ago

"society human resource management" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"This is on point I magnin Chakrabarti we're talking about something interesting that's happening in two thousand nineteen and that is the fact that this year women become the majority of the college educated workforce in America now ostensibly that could bring some pretty good changes to the American workplace but also on just continue to persist so we WANNA know what you're seeing in in your workplace if you've seen a growth in the number of college educated women there what has changed for the better what hasn't changed we're joined today by Nicole Smith she's chief economist at the Georgetown University Center on Education and the workforce Arianna hege fish also joins US as program director of employment earnings at the Institute for Women's policy research now Arianna Nicole I promise that we're we're GonNa talk about sort of the positive changes that can come along with this transformation of the workforce but I gotTa keep it real here for another couple of minutes and let's talk more about that persistent pay gap because I'm seeing evidence here that not only do pay gaps still exist across the board regardless of a women's education level but that in fact there seems to be some evidence that the more educated a woman becomes the pay gap actually grows between her and her similarly educated male counterparts Ariane is that true unfortunately it's too I mean I should what I should say is it still is a good investment to have a degree right unless you can do a very good apprenticeship but to have a degree you earn more but you don't ernest much as as a guy and the problem is you know partly it's discrimination in the job but you may not get hired to the same high performing firm and you may not had promotions as much as a similar man and you know bias may creep into the the performance assessment that you get so one thing that all those women who've are now in academia have pushed is much more research on the type of biases and to try to develop trainings and really increased awareness of all the type of Houston flow in that really have nothing to do with performance but lead to wage gap I mean at at the advanced degree level for example it seems like the gap can be I don't know twenty thirty percent even so I have some numbers for yeah yeah a woman with with a bachelors degree on average can make almost thirty thousand dollars per less per year than a man would a bachelor's degree for me should all degrees like lawyers that's up to forty thousand and PhD's unfortunately like myself about twenty thousand so so it's not necessarily you know one hundred percent increase with with Marge Gatien but at the end of the day it's somewhere between twenty thirty or forty thousand dollars difference per year between a man and woman who is equivalent qualified and if you are sub anywhere between twenty and forty thousand dollars for some people with high school diploma and above so at the end of the day these are significant differences that can accumulate over time for women for Families for you know women who are heads of households this has a lot to do with the types of degrees at women pursued at types of jobs you're in but this is a significant portion of that that's also discrimination and something that Ariane raised about people's perception about women we all know that the very first salary you get could be platform upon which all your other salaries are based so you might go in there and you've even if you get a raise it's five percent ten percent ten percent of your base if you start off at a lower number then even if you get that increase you will always be running a losing battle because you you'd never actually GonNa make exactly what your male counterparts make and personality wise we we've done research on what types of personality I mean there's a lot of sociocultural breath perceptions and behaviors that also influenced this women who are extreme remotely aggressive or or or conscientious or asking for what they think they deserve often looked upon an unfavorable manner and and you know might be shooting themselves in the foot in terms of getting that opportunity would a male counterpart doing exactly the same thing asking for exactly the same race would be looked at as a go-getter so there's still lots of differences in perceptions of what is the women's place in how she should approach her boss or a director for that race that she deserves I am one hundred percent shaking my head in in affirmation based on personal experience Nicole Look I haven't cleared I remember my first job when I asked for a little bit more being told you should feel lucky that we offered you what we did so I didn't feel like he for the record I did not but also let let's I want to slice these numbers a little more deeply also as well because we're talking about numbers and aggregate but when we speak about women of color princes are even bigger aren't they absolutely so let me give you some numbers today if we use the Census Bureau's Most recent estimate the gender wage gap on average it's eighty two cents on a dollar between women and men but for Latino women it's fifty four cents on the dollar for Black Women sixty two cents on the dollar compared to what a white man makes for White Women Seventy nine cents on the dollar and for Asian woman it's ninety cents on the dollar and that's what average is off to the eighty reset so depending on race you can see extremely significant disparities pay gap and that's that's important interesting and go ahead I n t to to some extent those gaps reflect differences in educational attainment so in women for example are the group most likely to have college degrees but what you find is even if you compare just the women with college degrees they are women and men with college degrees the real racial hierarchies in pay and to some ex- and this is you know if you think black women may work a social workers is a big occupation its occupation which is notoriously under eight and you typically you need a master's degree to work there so you know it's this issue of occupational segregation and the fact that we really don't value those type of jobs where a lot of women were well. Let's go to Whitney who's calling from Tampa Florida Whitney you're on the air so how are you well Whitney what's your thought so I was agree with everything that you you've been talking about and my comment was actually sparked off of one of the prior callers about the female employees in the hospital who made less money having eight years Syrian versus the new graduate male for the same position I feel like some of it not all of it but some of the contributing actors come down to more of a societal cultural viewpoint of how we're even raised for example men being the rough tough usually more of a a stronger personality and the women not as much so when we go in especially initially to these job interviews and where trying to negotiate for pay I feel that men have a bit more of an advantage of an upper hand and because society almost kind of preps men to handle those types of situations a little bit better nine all cases but just in a lot of cases I feel that women can be a little more tended in accepting of what comes their way sometimes so I feel like that does play some some role right Winnie thank you for recall in Iran let me turn to you I want to take witness comments step further here because yes you could talk about sort of how women and men are socialized differently but I think I believe I read studies that show that even when women do ask for more in negotiations the manner in which they ask for it really makes a big difference right if they sort of do it in a conventional way and say well I feel like I deserve X. Because look at my background sometimes they're not as successful as if they sort of couch it in a in collaborative terms and so is there a sort of a gender difference even there yes I think this is exactly what Nicole was getting yeah we telling women you have to Goshi eight more you have basically have to be like a guy right the men are the models and if women behave like that they are not valued in the same way it's seen as something that is not feminine you know and therefore you're penalized for it so there's some study to say even if women asked Moore then you know you get rejected more But I do think that kind of advice for preparing a discussion with US supervisor about saying I think I should gain more the the advice to everybody's always to think through what can I contribute think through about the kind of goals and pressures on the person who you're trying to convince to give you a raise to be collaborative and to you know say the this is what I can deliver and I think you will benefit as well as I and it's fair so you know to be collaborative is always good and negotiate agents at least initially well Ariane Nicole hang on here for just a second because I want to bring into the conversation now George Bush way joining he's joining us from Fort Lauderdale Florida Georgia Vice President of human resources at the real estate and construction firm Styles Corporation he's also an expert panelist at the society Human Resource Management Georgia welcome to on point begging I'm glad to contribute to this important conversation so first of all tell us if you've seen the difference in your field or even in your company is specifically as as as time has marched on more college educated women are entering the workforce that that cohort of candidates because it's it's challenging to find good talent in the workforce and to have it any kind of bias towards not having women in the workforce is really not good for business because the talent pool take a smaller but I will share that that part of the challenges that in some areas of the business and certain industries the pool a smaller a case in point we happened to do commercial real estate development and construction in those particular areas it's hard to find candidates women Kennedy he's for for us a higher only because you don't have too many women that go into those fields contrary to that is in our account nothing divisions and within our property management division where you have women that are more interested in those fields it's a much larger your candidate pool and indeed when we look at our our divisions as to the demographics of it we do find that in probably counting the majority are women and construction development the majority of men and and we truly do make an effort to try to bring more for diversity across the board not just women but even from from a racial perspective different ethnicities because within the HR world it's it's it's acknowledged that diversity of thought is.

Whitney America Tampa Florida forty thousand dollars one hundred percent ten percent thirty thousand dollars twenty thirty percent five percent eight years
"society human resource management" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

10:12 min | 2 years ago

"society human resource management" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Pizza corner pizzas. Sure has garnered a lot of attention lately. But one thing remains constant the same great taste just ask Shelley. Also, my family was really skeptical at first she bought from this and try it, and my son is the biggest people over your other meat. And now he's so non buying many are already, and it is awesome pizza corner pizza, fresh new look sane, great taste. Here is your W f three day forecasts from weatherology dot com. Mostly cloudy tonight. Low temperature thirteen Friday, partly sunny, high of eighteen mostly cloudy on Friday night with a low of eleven Saturday, mostly cloudy skies, high temperature Twenty-three Sunday, partly sunny, high of twenty six from the plague weather center meteorologist Tony Vogel on AM eleven hundred the flag right now sixteen this is the Savage Nation. Just as the first amendment does not allow the government to suppress dissent or you marvins of the ACLU. You're smart boy chicks from NYU and Columbia law. All your smart, Alex sooner about the first amendment. You think you wrote it you think your grandfather out the first amendment it specifically protects the right of the people peaceably to assemble Harold, Michael Savage, a host like no other union, weeknights at ten. Ten PM for the Savage Nation right here on the flag. Back on what's on your mind. Talking the safety. On a safety. Talk segment about a big conference coming to Bismarck. Speaking of safety, by the way. Senator John at the bottom of the hour. What's next for Heidi Heitkamp? We'll have it for you. Stay tuned for that. But I wanted to talk a little bit about safety, and you know in North Dakota. When it's twenty below on the winds fifty miles an hour. You pretty much need power to your home. Don't you? Hot summer day air conditioning goes off now what? Ninety one hundred summer days, not uncommon in North Dakota. So I'd like you to think about secure energy. Not just a have energy, but secure energy. If you go to secure energy future, secure energy, future dot org. You'll find out more about these secure energy coalition that is protecting defending fighting for secure energy for you as we speak every day, and they're up against a lot onslaught of global warming jihad if people that want to twist things for their own political reasons, don't get to the facts don't watch the progress that has been made in this industry. Clean beautiful. Find more secure energy future dot org. Twenty one past the hour. The mentioned we're talking to safety, by the way. Tomorrow on the program. We're gonna play you. Our interview with governor Doug Burgum, which is really interesting on many fronts. One of which was his enthusiasm and zeal or allocating fifty million dollars. From the fund that is dedicated to legacy in North Dakota legacy projects. Two the teddy Roosevelt presidential library at the national park. The fifty million dollars would only be spent if there was one hundred million dollars that matches it and there a lot of legislative push back on this. A lot of pushback from our listeners we're going to give him a chance to explain that a little bit on the program and look forward to that conversation as well Monday. We'll be at the legislature the seatbelt law being debated as we speak Sunday. Opening is in the news who can be open and win all those issues. Tackling firsthand if you have any questions of things are happening for the legislature. Remember where there every Monday so feel free to just again. Call eight five five two zero zero seventeen seventy six hundred textile with questions Qatar me. Sorry, don't want the buzzer. All right. Let's continue. Now talk a little bit about some things happening. Very soon for the forty sixth annual. Safety and health conference, Bismarck events that are Bismarck, North Dakota. It's the annual safety health conference forty six years in the making Serena Schmidt marketing manager for the North Dakota safety council, and Jane wick more for safety and insurance are here with us today. I mentioned patient care courses hands on again, which is a big feature. What are you doing? There. We introduce the patient care courses last year. We partnered with Cindy, and they were a huge hit. We brought them back and we introduced some new topics and one of the big issues the north quarter right now as trenching safety. So we introduced a course to help companies prepare for how to care for patients if they were involved in a trench collapse. We'll have that will do a cardiac arrest one again industrial explore something happens. You have multiple injuries. You know, how to react in those situations and then one of the common injuries on the work site is being struck by an object. So we're to do something to make a head injury, and they'll have life like patient simulator. That will respond the type of carrier giving them so you can practice that actually see how a patient would respond to the carrier giving, and that's just not something you can just pick up the phone and say I want to do this. Right. I mean, that's that's a rare opportunity to have that level of those hands on patients here. Right. I mean, there's a lifelike patients. These are simulators I've seen it before. It's kind of creepy actually because they look so real, but it's very important to the training, isn't it? Yeah. And it's an awesome opportunity. And there's it's Mandy travels around the state and offers this and they agreed to partner with us in our conference. And how this gives them more lifelike first aid training for our our companies. So Jane, what will you be doing on the WS eyesight as far as course offerings? We have five core courses that we're going to offer this year with our in house experts. One of them's slips trips, and falls course, which is actually tied to our new safety discount program that just started January first we have this program in place just because of twenty percent of all the claims that w. Gets is in regards to slips trips and falls in those twenty percent claims make up thirty two percent of our total costs. Another one is in regards to workers classification, and that's more geared towards contractors. The other one is understanding and managing work related injuries. This is where Robin and Renee come in and talk about claims management return to work, which is really really important. Granted we don't want claims to happen. But when those claims happen employers need to know how manage those claims, and then get that injured worker back to work, and we also have worker's compensation fraud in North Dakota. And then the other one that we're going to have as opioid use in what you need to know. And our director of pharmacy will be putting on that. Once all good classes to come to Friday. Keynote is something anybody can come to whether you are trying to improve your safety program in your business or not just purely into leadership. You've got great keynote leadership courses that are happening. Tell us a little bit about that. Serena this year, we decided to add a third key. Now, it's that'll happen Friday at. Are closing session. So we know for a lot of companies budgets are tight. So if you're looking to give some sort of professional development opportunity for only thirty five bucks to register and come in and see Marc Hernandez's name, and he'll do Aquino called game day and talk about becoming real leaders in what kind of how you can improve your influence in your company, so just thirty five bucks. So that's any company. I mean, the whole conference is open to anybody. There's leadership training each day. That's whether you're a safety professional, not it would be applicable to you. But Friday, we had we have a full lineup that day. So you can come in the air and Davis, he'll do some presentations on championship teams, and we'll have Fred Shafer with some wellness training. So if you want to come in on for the full day Friday, it's only one hundred seventy five bucks with all the discounts. So if you're looking to get a little bit of leadership training some wellness training in you only have a half a day, come in for one hundred seventy five bucks, get four hours. And that includes the Keno. I know people that need them know, what CU means, but for for all of us, what is this the EU continuing education unit. So if you have some professional certifications something new this year, we partnered with the local section of the American society for safety professionals. So this year, we will be able to offer see us for the safety professional, which is huge for anybody. Who has the certifications that the other thing that's really new for us as we partnered with a central Dakota human resource association. For a lot of companies HR in safety overlap. And so we really wanted to offer more incentive for them to come to the conference. So were offering what they call Sherm credits society human resource management. So sixty five courses are approved for HR continuing education credits, and I think almost eighty are proof for safety professional CEO's. So you needs continue education if you need those officials see us were offering them this year. We also have used for EMS professionals and law enforcement North Dakota post board approved a ton. Of course. So log onto our website at NDSU dot org. Go to the sessions page has all the information about the CEO's. Why is this important twenty six people died fatality claims on the job for North Korea workers in two thousand seventeen twenty eight thousand ninety five fatal crashes resulting in one hundred and five fatalities in about forty three percent of the workforce right now in America is sleep deprived? These are all things. Better addressed at this conference is so important. It really is. It's about getting your home at night to be with your family. Serena Schmidt chain wet. Thank you so much. Great stuff. We appreciate it. We'll see if the conference, okay. Good. Thank you. More after this on what's on your mind to the.

North Dakota Bismarck Pizza corner Serena Schmidt Savage Nation CEO Tony Vogel Jane wick Heidi Heitkamp NYU ACLU Shelley North Korea Alex Michael Savage teddy Roosevelt NDSU Columbia law Senator John