35 Burst results for "Social Services"

"social services" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

02:06 min | 5 d ago

"social services" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"Get social services and makes it impossible from for them to get public benefits, and it drives them toward a cycle where the only option they have is to be in an underground or elicit economy. And I'm assuming that you applaud the New York district attorney who said over the last decade prosecuting prostitution doesn't make us safer, too often achieved the opposite result of marginalizing vulnerable New Yorkers. Yeah, We definitely applaud District Attorney Vance has done And I think that one distinction that I do want to make the anti trafficking community. Many of us think that full decriminalization of prostitution, meaning that you also de criminalized. You know the men on the on the John boards and things like that, that that's not the solution because we ultimately see that trafficking victims often want to see sex buyers held accountable for the violence that they perpetrate. But we do want to see law enforcement pivot so that they're protecting the workers inside of these establishments. Supposed to only protecting the communities from the establishment's themselves and Stephanie. What can we do? Your column was about Don't avert your eyes. I think it is important to pay attention and did not deny It does not, however, call for us to act individually because if it is, AH, listen, massage business run by a criminal network. You certainly don't want to go in there and many of them They will have a hard time admitting the situation that they're into a stranger. They're not going to ask you for help. If you offer it to them. E think the culturally appropriate services is a key part of this or you have to be working with service providers who speak The many, many, many different languages that people speak inside of those Listen massage businesses because the whole point when you're in a course of experience like this is to make sure that you don't trust law enforcement to make sure that you are afraid that immigration is going to come into port you and it's used as a coercive tactics to keep people in place. Yeah, That's Catherine Chan, CEO of the not for profit Polaris Project, which focuses on sex and labor trafficking issues. We also spoke with Boston Globe women's issues. Reporter.

Catherine Chan Stephanie Boston Globe New York one distinction Polaris Project District Attorney New Yorkers John last decade Vance
Demonstrators Call for Change in Chicago Police

WDTK Programming

00:23 sec | 2 weeks ago

Demonstrators Call for Change in Chicago Police

"People seeking changes in how Chicago police serve the city turned out in protest. Today was another demonstration influenced by the fatal shooting of a 13 year old Latino boy back in March. Groups called activate shy. They want changes in state and city laws on policing. They also want the police budget cut to make more money for social services.

Chicago
Senate Republicans Outline Their Own Infrastructure Plan

Chris Krok

01:03 min | 2 weeks ago

Senate Republicans Outline Their Own Infrastructure Plan

"Is looking to pass one of its major legislative priorities The American jobs plan. Democrats say they want to have bipartisan support on the bill, but the White House may end up using the process of budget reconciliation. Past the package without any Republican support. Jackie Heinrich reports on Republicans counterproposal to the infrastructure plan. It's a far cry from two trillion but the White House says it's a start. We certainly welcome any good faith effort and certainly see this is that Senate Republicans unveiled a counter offer to the American jobs plan. A $568 billion blueprint with the section defining what in their view infrastructure is on roads and bridges. The GOP more than doubles President Biden's proposal 299 billion up from 150. They also dedicate more money to modernizing airports. 44 billion up from 25. While they included funding for broadband. There's no money for electric vehicles, efforts to combat climate change or funding to expand social services. Like elder care, President Biden said he is willing to negotiate with Republicans on the size and scope of his roughly $2 trillion infrastructure plan. As Fort

Jackie Heinrich White House President Biden Senate GOP Fort
Biden Proposes $2 Trillion Investment in US Economy

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:54 min | Last month

Biden Proposes $2 Trillion Investment in US Economy

"Joe biden on wednesday called for a sweeping use of government power to reshape the world's largest economy and counter china's rise in a two trillion dollar plus proposal that was met with swift republican resistance. The president's american jobs plan would put corporate america on the hook for the tab as the government creates millions of jobs building infrastructure such as roads tackle climate change and boosts human services like care for the elderly. It's a once in a generation investment in america. Unlike anything we've seen or done since. We built the interstate highway system and the space race decades ago biden said in unveiling the program in pittsburgh. He said he had no problem. Asking companies to foot the bill and is going to put an end to amazon. Dot com inc and other major companies paying little to nothing in federal taxes biden second multi trillion dollar legislative proposal. In two months in office sets the stage for a partisan clash in the us congress when members largely agree that investments are needed but a divided on the total size and inclusion of programs traditionally seen a social services another economic proposal binomial release in april could add a further two trillion dollars to the total price tag coupled with his recently enacted one point nine trillion dollar corona virus. Relief package biden's infrastructure initiative would give the federal government a bigger role in the us economy than it has had in generations accounting for twenty percent to a more of annual output. Biden's team believes a government directed effort to strengthen the economy is the best way to provide support to an economy walloped by the coronavirus pandemic and contend with increased competition and a national security threat posed by china

Biden Dot Com Inc Joe Biden United States China Pittsburgh Amazon Congress Federal Government
From Foster Care to VA Teacher of the Year Feat. Anthony Swann

Teachers in Americ?a?

09:05 min | Last month

From Foster Care to VA Teacher of the Year Feat. Anthony Swann

"Read anthony that you grew up in the foster care system when you you think about growing up in foster care. How do you share getting past the trauma than seeing and knowing all the other potential you had. Do you have a moment in time. Do you have a person who influenced you question. Most definitely so. When i was taken to fall secure i was taken abruptly in the middle of the school day and i was sitting in fourth grade classroom and are distinctly. Remember social services Door and telling my teacher that they needed me to come with them and this was in front of all of my friends and saw felt embarrassed fell devastated and so ma teacher. I'm sorry i'm trying not to cry. My teacher came out in the hallway and she grabbed me and she hugged me. And she whispered in my ear and social services didn't even hear it but she whispered in my ear. She said anthony. Everything is going to be all right in that same teacher years down the road. She found me when i was fourteen years old and she began to pour into me as she began to. Just say i don't want you to grow up to be like your parents. I don't want you to get up to the system. I don't want you to go to jail. I want you to make something of yourself. And so by that time. I had started claims school. Because i'm gonna take all of my trauma and just put it into my academics loss to start playing school. I told her. I wanted to be a teacher. And she said that what you want to become. I'm going to support you in any way. That i can and so once. I was going to school and going to college and put amount self through college. My senior year did not have a car to get to my student teaching placement and she picked me up every single morning to take me to school before she had to be at school herself and to this day she still calls me and she still reminds me that. Everything's gonna be alright and she still tells me. Do you remember that. I told you at now get you. And so that was one of the persons who geared me. Because i was going the deep end because i didn't understand alive. I hated my life. Which that i was dead a. She took the extra mile because she saw something in me. So that i would not become part of the system as she pushed me to be great. Oh the love of a teacher in for her to recognize an anthony. I didn't wanna cry either. But the ability for that teacher to recognize into know and to see your face and to take that moment to run out and whisper that in your ear. That's everything right. That is just a moment. that probably is why you did not display school. You did school. You earned those achievements and wanting to become a teacher. Do you mind sharing her name. I would love for her to hear you give a shout out. Her name is mrs gerardo wilson. And she's still alive today. She's a retired educator for public schools. And she's just that's her name. Miss wilson we give you lots of hearts in love because that's a skill set anna an intuition that we all want to possess in hope that we can be that for that student in any student when you think about yourself now anthony and even before becoming teacher of the year. Do you see that you have that ability that other teachers see there something that he possesses that would benefit me had any encounters with other teachers where they want in are seeking out your advice. Yes a have. You seen before. Became virginia state teacher of the year or or even. Maybe it's happened since your name's been out there in your story is out there. There may be teachers. And i think i read this in one of the articles where a teacher heard. Your story heard your work with students and it's like how is he breaking barriers with students. In how can he help me. Yes so i was contacted by a teacher retired teacher. She was a mentor to a young male student and after her reading must stores. She contacted me and she said know. I just really have this student. I feel like that you can reach him because they're certain areas. I can't reach him in. Your story is so similar to history and so with the permission of the guardian traveled to meet with him. One one Share with him a story and he shared with me historic and at the end of that conversation. Before i left we have similar stories but before i left he looked at me and he says just more you know what anything is possible and that statement right there made all the difference because that is my platform is virginia teacher. The years to give hope to those students who find themselves in dramatic situations and emotionally disturbing homes to let them know that no matter the pieces that you may have been dealt. If they're broken take those broken pieces and build a bridge to better life in in heart of your platform you have. What i believe is part of your cooperative culture initiative of guys with ties. How did you create guys with ties. And can you share with our listeners. What the program is yes. So one day mock principal just came to me and she had this idea. She's just like see how you dress up every day. I think it'll be a program if we just have the fifth grade boys to dress up. Enticing me with him so she just really just threw something out there. So i kinda picked it up like a fumble and iran with an from of develop a curriculum that respect and integrity and cleanliness in. It's okay to be organized as a male is okay to to help and they also in the group we have those those hard conversations because a lot of the males do not have a father figure in the home. And so we talk about how you can overcome rejection in las share with the story. We do service projects when we're talking about the cleanliness in the organization. We take time out with. We are meeting. We have a day where we go around. And we help the audience in the school to pick up trash to attack him the rugs and the school. We also have done a service project where we give all of. The girls are carnation a bag of chocolate to let the boys know how to treat a lady so we also we just recently did one where the guys designed their own tie. And i'm going to have someone someone actually reached out to leeann. They're going to create that tie so just letting them know that it's okay to be guy. Mb sophisticated but at the same time teaching them those life skills teaching them about. What would your legacy be if you were to die today. Will people say about you. And i got that particular lesson when koby bryant passed away over year ago out of the blue but so many people have so many good things to say about him and so on and steal that the guys as well would let us here you leaving. How will people remember hugh if you were to pass away and that was a very powerful lesson is ill on. The group is safe haven. The guys have cried before especially the guys who feel neglected a male figures. So i've hit the other students. Who had the fathers in the home to console those students to let them know. It's okay you're going to be you're going to make something of yourself. So those are the types of things that we do in the

Anthony Mrs Gerardo Wilson Became Virginia Miss Wilson Anna Virginia Iran Koby Bryant LAS Hugh
Health workers are connecting people to social services, health care in Los Angeles County

Bill Handel

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Health workers are connecting people to social services, health care in Los Angeles County

"Have been connecting people with social services, health care and prevent 19 help during the pandemic. I know their struggle. Yes, Me. Cadenas is a community health care worker for the elderly care health plan. She's part of a ground level network, making sure patients get the care. They need its network That's growing just as the state is leaning on groups with community ties to increase vaccination rates. That's where the understanding comes In. For example, Cadenas knows Transportation's often a big issue. Sometimes these people are not willing to go for Like the love for your people. So, she says up rides helps with diet and meds and firms up appointments. Whether it's a standard doctors visit or a covert vaccination your vaccine hunter right now. Yeah, you kind of Chris and Carl. Okay, if I knew

Cadenas Chris Carl
Miss Major Griffin-Gracy on Being a Trans Sex Worker in the 60s

LGBTQ&A

02:59 min | 2 months ago

Miss Major Griffin-Gracy on Being a Trans Sex Worker in the 60s

"Back in the sixties before stonewall occurred. Were you involved in activism. Then i was involved with it when my friend. I puppy she was murdered in her apartment. By some man we knew at the time in the community that someone who knew her had merges her and the police did not care. Didn't matter to them at all and that was hurtful to us and so that started my activism. Then i wanted to know what cars people would gave in but the person to look like they got in with when they left and when they came back was important and one of the started keeping notes up when it was to keep up with the john. Because we didn't know what would happen to us then and so back in order to keep yourself safe while you are doing sex work where you will learning by trial and error or did somebody help you teach or mentor. You in that way. It was both you learn. Things did not some until you. You know you've gone by charleston air and you paid attention to web girls how you because you know it all. Nobody does and you've actually said that you loved it doing it. He loved being a sex worker. Would you like about it. Good number of guys especially in hell. I went into this because it was fun. Other girls wind toured for survival to make it. You know and. I would lucky that i've always work. I got a job in social services. Burs and x-ray commit john so with the apartment building that you're living in six floors of trans women if you can like estimate what percentage of them were also doing sex work. Although this could go one is to might not have been doing that but all of us were we active and you know somebody else than the five took de certain activity there and i guess what i'm getting at is like back then. There were very few options for employment. There were none. Billy you had to give job in your mail asala and hopefully work at that. That was too we. Hand the entire buildings epa. Maybe two people with hats lose that it was hard. But i guess being around people who like you did made. It seem comfortable. Amanda worthwhile

Ray Commit John Charleston John Billy EPA Amanda
Mayor Lori Lightfoot Provides Update On Chicago's Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout

Weekend Edition Saturday

04:51 min | 2 months ago

Mayor Lori Lightfoot Provides Update On Chicago's Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout

"Black and Hispanic Americans are about twice as likely to die from covert 19 is white Americans, yet they have been vaccinated. At much lower rates across the country that in Chicago, about half of the city's vaccinations are for people of color. The mayor of Chicago, of course, is Lori Lightfoot, and she joins us now more like for thanks so much for being with us. Good morning, Scott. A pleasure to be with you early in the vaccine roll out less than 20% of vaccine doses went to Chicago. Once of color. Now, that's half. What did Chicago do? That can make a difference. Can it be done in other places? Well, we work extremely hard to overcome. Vaccine hasn't see in communities of color protect particularly black and like flat necks, and really that hard work began at the very beginning of the pandemic. We were seeing the disproportion impact on communities of color, this horrible virus. We went to work in those communities, which trusted partners. And I think those that hard work over time is starting to bear fruit in the significant off take to go from, you know the low teens. Of uptake in the early days of the vaccine program to now over 50% is remarkable turnaround, and it's really do that the hard work of so many people across our city certainly led by city government, But really, our partners in the neighborhoods deserve the credit because they recognize this life saving Vaccine has to go to those people that are most in need. And in our city That means communities of color. But what's the messaging in this Because, of course, you know, a lot of the hesitancy is historic, based on things that, obviously well, what's the message Inky were able to convince you there's there's no secret sauce, and it's really ah lot of diligence, one on one conversation and getting people who are trusted. Community partners in those neighborhoods who recognizable literally. We've gone door to door for months now to get people educated. Provide them with information really do a lot of myth busting and you've just got a Put in the hard work to overcome their fears. And I think as people have seen people that they recognize whether it's a mayor of color as I am or their neighbors who are getting the vaccine without adverse consequences. It's bringing people who are really standing on the sidelines into the field of play and saying, all right I'll do this. I think it's safe. Have to ask you Mayor Lightfoot, a zoo, you know. Chicago Tribune reported this week that the city spent more than $280 million nearly 60% of the discretionary spending money it got under the Caress Coronavirus relief package. On CPD, the Chicago police Department. Is that true? And what do you say? OK, I'm going to quote Alderman less Fatah. The first ward, who says that money should have been sent on spent on housing assistance in small businesses, not the police. Well, we spent Tens of millions of dollars on a significant number of community service and social service programs. As you know, Scott when the tears package Came from Congress. It came through specific line items and grants for programs like homelessness, community health, um, violence prevention and other things. Those were designated dollars where there was really no flexibility whatsoever and how that money was spent, and we spent it accordingly. There were some money, however, that the federal government gave to cities like Chicago to address the unprecedented need to respond to covert 19. And yes, we spent money on a range of first responder activities because they were at the front lines in many instances, particularly in the early days of our covert 19 response. So the criticism that somehow we should have taken a pass on free money from the federal government that came to address unprecedented and unbudgeted needs that were in our city just doesn't make any sense. I make no apologies for the fact that we took advantage of the opportunities that the federal gave government gave us rather than passing on. Was expensive to our taxpayers, so that the the choices do we actually take advantage of the re rope the money that has given us two by the federal government and save Burden on our taxpayers, or do we just pass along the cost to the taxpayers? I understand with our taxpayers every single day and do everything that I can to save them from any further burden, And that's exactly what we did in Chicago. Thanks so much my pleasure.

Chicago Lori Lightfoot Mayor Lightfoot CPD Scott Chicago Tribune Fatah Alderman Federal Government Congress
Aetna Expands Coverage for Gender-Affirming Surgeries

Business Wars Daily

03:02 min | 3 months ago

Aetna Expands Coverage for Gender-Affirming Surgeries

"Twenty twenty one is already looking to be a brighter year for the transgender community. Less than a week. After president joe biden reverse the ban on transgender people serving in the military one of america's largest health insurance companies has agreed to cover additional gender affirming surgeries for trans women for transgender. Women just negotiated a major concession from aetna which is owned by. Cvs healthcare corp. the insurance company has agreed to cover gender affirming surgery like breast augmentation for trans women. In the past the insurance company had covered some gender transition surgeries but stopped short of anything it deemed quote cosmetic each of the four women had been denied coverage for breast augmentation as part of their gender reassignment surgeries. They maintain that the surgery was medically necessary and their doctors. Back them up. Gender dysphoric by definition is the psychological distress. That happens when someone's getting identity is different from their body. And they may seek to transition to align the two most insurance companies cover mastectomies and genital surgeries for those who are transitioning but some procedures that mostly affect trans women's gender transitions procedures like breast augmentation. Facial surgery and voice surgery have traditionally been categorized cosmetic and excluded from coverage according to a report in the hartford current aetna's new policy states that the coverage must be deemed quote medically necessary. The insurance company stated that it will reimburse some women who met this criteria and were denied coverage in the past but had the surgery. Anyway aetna additives told the times that the company had already been reviewing its policies on the matter before this latest negotiation fewer than ten percent of insurance companies in the us typically cover transition related breast augmentation surgery the current reports and some larger carriers have exclusions in november the mother of an illinois teenagers sued blue cross blue shield of illinois for denying treatment for his gender dysphoric according to bloomberg law. The plaintiff maintains that such denial of coverage is a violation of the affordable. Care act which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in georgia at least two plaintiffs are suing anthem. Blue cross and blue shield in that state for similar exclusions. this may be another milestone. In a new era of recognizing the rights needs of the transgender community. The supreme court ruled last. June that workplace discrimination laws also protected lesbian gay transgender bisexual and queer people. Lgbtq people for short giving this group a big victory in workplace equality but in one of its last acts. The trump administration's department of health and human services finalized a rule permitting social service providers that receive government funds to discriminate on sexual orientation and gender identity. Nbc news reported the biden administration is seeking to reverse that rule so this settlement with aetna is another piece of good news for those seeking gender affirming surgeries and a chance to help trans women feel a little more comfortable in their own bodies

Cvs Healthcare Corp Aetna Joe Biden Aetna Additives America Illinois Hartford The Times Bloomberg Georgia Supreme Court Biden Administration Department Of Health And Human Nbc News
Senator Cantwell talks about tribal broadband at confirmation hearing

Native America Calling

03:47 min | 3 months ago

Senator Cantwell talks about tribal broadband at confirmation hearing

"This is national native news antonio gonzales the biden administration says it's ordered a pause new oil and gas leasing on public lands does not apply to tribal nations the mountain west news bureaus savannah mar reports the administration issued the clarification after the chairman of the youth indian tribe called the initial. Moratorium direct attack on tribal sovereignty. Stephen fast tourists of the northern arapaho. Business council agreed that would impact all of our guests tribes. Pretty bad it would triple fast. Horror says those tribes rely on oil and gas revenue to pay for social services and unlike state and local governments. They don't have a tax base to back on. The issue is thornier for climate activists. Gold tooth with the nonprofit indigenous environmental network. It's nice to see them. Ministration recognized travel it is disheartening to the tribes. The use that to continue fossil fuel extraction moving forward gold tooth hopes to biden will support tribes in divesting from fossil fuel industry for national native news. I'm savannah mar this week. President biden signed a memorandum on tribal consultation. It directs all executive departments and agencies to engage a regular consultation with tribes agencies. Have ninety days to come up with a plan. Tribal leaders across the country are welcoming the memo in a statement principal chief of the cherokee nation. Chuck hoskin junior applauded. The action hoskins says meaningful consultation is vital to treble governments to have a seat at the table to shape policy and hold the federal government responsible. He says the memorandum is the first comprehensive white house affirmation of mandatory consultation with tribes since two thousand nine the tribal consultation follow directives laid out by the obama administration. President biden says he's committed to honoring tribal sovereignty and including tribal voices and policy and hopes to strengthen the government's relationship with tribes this week washington. Us senator. Maria cantwell address. President biden's nominee for us. Secretary of commerce rhode island governor gina raimondo and talked about tribal broadband. Steve jackson has more. Senator can't will introduce legislation last session. That would accelerate the deployment of broadband services to tribal communities by setting aside fcc and usda funds for deployment on tribal lands at the confirmation hearing for commerce secretary. Can't well made governor raimondo. Aware of the issue and the secretary will inherit a new program as part of the kobe. Bill the tribal broadband connectivity program. It two thousand nineteen report from. Fcc found that less than half of households in indian country have access to high speed broadband services a twenty percent gap from non tribal areas. And so i hope that we will be able to get good administration of that program. The cova pandemic has only increased the problem of limited broadband. Dude at more people working from home as well as distance learning for students for national native news. I'm steve jackson reporting from spokane alaskan native artist and illustrator. Michaela goad was honored by the american library association. This week with the randolph called toco metal. She said to be the first native american to win the award. A member of the central council of lincoln and haida indian tribes go was recognized for most distinguished american picture book for children. We are water protectors. The book written by carol lindstrom turtle mountain honors water protectors for fighting for indigenous rights and environmental justice. Awards were announced during the association's virtual midwinter gathering. I'm antonio

President Biden Antonio Gonzales Biden Administration Youth Indian Tribe Business Council Chuck Hoskin Obama Administration Gina Raimondo Hoskins Biden Governor Raimondo Stephen Maria Cantwell FCC Steve Jackson Federal Government White House Rhode Island Spokane Alaskan Usda
Report: St. Louis Police Led The Nation In Killings

Pacifica Evening News

02:21 min | 3 months ago

Report: St. Louis Police Led The Nation In Killings

"Louis Metro Police Department has the highest average rate of killings per population of any major police department in the nation. According to a new report from Arch City defenders released on MLK Day between 2009 and 2019 179 people were killed by police or died in jail custody in the ST Louis area. 92% of those killed were men and 72% were black. The report also found that media articles tended to protect the identities of police officers while exposing those of the victim's family. A manual Powell is an attorney with arch City defenders, he says. These deaths take a vast hole on those family members. They often face accounts Police department that refuses to provide information. On their loved one's death. There's a lack of legal advocacy, he says. There are a few attorneys willing to file civil rights claims on behalf of families and few prosecutor's willing to investigate and bring charges. He says families have a range of issues around how to pay for funerals and how to access social services and mental health support. Tony Taylor is the mother of Carrie T Ball Junior who was shot 21 times by police and 2013, she says grief can cause different illnesses, and it's critical for survivors of police brutality to take care of themselves so you could be able to stand up and fight another day for your love. One filing police last eight years for Kerry has took a real bits on my body. But this time I'm going to step back a little bit and get my help in order. Actually, Jackson is a doctoral student at Washington University in ST Louis, who studies patterns of police and state violence, she says a critical step to reduce police brutality is a federally mandated database that tracks each time. The police Harmon individual, I think a lot of people don't understand why committees of color Mistrust the police. Why, if we're in trouble what calling on what isn't really our first response right? It's because it's this entrance fear in this historical assistance of a racialized violence, Jackson notes, The police brutality can be more than physical violence. It could be psychological abuse is well, she says. It's key to understand how police violence permeates through a family, a community and even generations down the line. For misery. New

Louis Metro Police Department Arch City St Louis Tony Taylor Carrie T Ball Powell Police Department Kerry Washington University Jackson
What is Social Sustainability?

ECO CHIC

10:42 min | 4 months ago

What is Social Sustainability?

"Motivations for living ecoconscious lifestyle were pretty largely fuelled by climate change and climate action and environmental sustainability. Is kind of tricky. Let's first define it. Environmental sustainability can be pretty loosely defined as responsible interaction with the environment. Now what is responsible. That's different for different people but in my view environmental sustainability is conducting life in a way that inflicts minimal harm on the earth. And its natural resources now. I want to take a minute. Just acknowledge that. The word sustainability generally speaking. I think it's a little misleading because it truly just means the maintenance of an action sustainability when we look at like diet culture. Is your diet. Sustainable that means can you keep up with it. Indefinitely so sustainability is a weird word that we've attached to climate action because we don't actually want to sustain our society maintain business as usual. We want to do better. We want to decarbonise. We want to more aggressively achieve. Climate goals to ensure a stable planet so sustainability is really the bare minimum however in last year. We've really begun to open up the conversation around different kinds of sustainability and for good reason. I like to think about different kinds of sustainability kind of like circles that overlap in the middle of that ven diagram overlap. Portion can be environmental sustainability or perhaps more accurately when we're looking at society as a whole or community as a whole. we're looking at a pyramid. hierarchy of needs at the very base of that pyramid is social sustainability. Social sustainability is also pretty loosely defined because it manifest in a lot of other larger societal concerns essentially social sustainability looks at the societal structures in place that allow people to live healthy. Happy lives now. I know that sounds pretty big picture. But let's think about it. Social sustainability will look like things like equity diversity culture amenities so things like your social life type activities but also things like grocery stores job opportunities wellness and health safety community. engagement community. Engagement is one that i liked to talk about because a lot of climate action plans. Actually look at voter turnout looking at social sustainability because if people are active in their democracy. That's an indication that they care about where they live and they care about what's going to happen to it in the immediate future. If you really hide your pick of the litter it's not attractive to live somewhere with really severe inequity or really poor safety or no access to things like grocery stores. An area with these kinds of concerns would not be considered particularly socially sustainable because what incentive do people have to invest in communities that aren't actually invested in their own wellbeing and their livelihood hs. I mentioned job opportunities and someone out there may have perked up and like hey i think that might actually be economic. Sustainability economic sustainability is an interesting term because it can be both personal and societal. So for instance if you are buying a new car every year is that economically sustainable for you can you financially keep up with that but also is a society that relies on frivolous consumer spending economically sustainable. We saw this. During the pandemic people are generally more budget conscious and more inclined to save or maybe skip an extra non essential purchase. So how economically sustainable is it if there are entire industries relying on consumer spending. This is not necessarily saying that consumers shouldn't feel like they have to save a business. I'm talking about the necessity of consumers to spend on entire industries for their maintenance. So the example i'm thinking of is actually taxis about a year or so ago the daily which is the new york times daily. Podcast did a piece on taxis and taxi. Company had at the time opened up a suit against uber and ultimately there were some restrictions put on rideshare companies in new york city. But the bottom line. Was that a rideshare. Company was being seen as competition entering the marketplace. And it wasn't really on the city to protect taxis against consumer choice. That's the economy. That's supply and demand the model of taxis. Just waiting around wasn't economically sustainable. In that instance so the company is pivoted and maybe they lowered their rates or expanded their service areas or did something that allowed them to continue showing up as a worthy economic competitor. That's economic sustainability. Now let's go to job opportunities. Because i really liked this one. This again is a measure of social and economic sustainability. It is less attractive again to live somewhere without job opportunities or at least some reasonable access to job opportunities and public transportation to get you to those job opportunities and are those job opportunities reasonably profitable for you. Are people being paid fairly if someone needs to work two jobs to live somewhere. What does that say about minimum wage or the cost of living and favorite little sound line. One that i say all the time at work. And i've said it before on the show is that you cannot expect people to care about the solar panels. You're putting up in their neighborhood. If they can't pay their electric bill in the first place you are not meeting people's basic social and economic needs. They can't afford to care about the environment. Something we hear all the time when discussing healthy foods in sustainability and food access is the argument against fast food. So let's ask ourselves. Why do families by fast food on a weeknight for a meal. Well maybe it's preference. Maybe people just like it but also maybe it's time are they commuting and they don't have time to cook at home or is it budget because fast food is reasonably cheap when you're considering the cost of ingredients and groceries to make a comparable meal maybe it's access are they're reasonably good comparable options for them to eat out in their community or maybe they live in a food desert and don't have access good access to fresh produce and grocery stores if you're not addressing those issues of time and money and access who is going to listen to you when you're telling them that their hamburger requires the water equivalent of six months worth of showers or that a poor side cow lived their whole life in terrible. Awful slaughterhouse conditions. Just that they can enjoy a dollar menu hamburger. I mean maybe someone is going to be sympathetic in there. And say wow. I feel really bad. But that doesn't address their core issues of why they are choosing to make that decision in the first place that purchasing decision. Why are we not addressing the issue of time and money and access so another example. I wanted to skies which maybe a touchy one. But if you're listening to the show. I feel like i can reasonably assume that we share similar views on defunding. The police and the value in that studies have shown that an increase in active duty. Police officers does not have any significant impact on declining crime rates in an area. So let's talk crime. What types of situations may provoke someone to partake in crime. I don't know if that is the most correct wording but bear with me here. One thing that may drive someone to crime is money so let's talk. Money are their job. Opportunities are their job. Training programs for high schoolers are their educational opportunities and access to those training programs or transition programs and for people who are already working but just simply not making enough money. What does that say again about the minimum wage or how we value certain professions if the pandemic has taught us anything it's that the most essential workers in our society beyond of course our frontline healthcare are those employed in a trade or they're working in food food delivery they're cashiers or the people stocking the shelves. Oshawa barbara said this on our last episode when discussing the fashion industry if people at the top are billionaires and then the people at the bottom the garment maker is the people doing the most backbreaking work on the supply. Chain making pennies. That's a messed up system so bringing it back to crime. Let's get to the root issues. Let's address those social and economic concerns and issues that are driving people participate in it in the first place. Another fun fact. Random example that i learned in the classic city planning book. The death and life of american cities is that street lights and the length of city blocks are really good indicators of crime rates so if there is less light there's less opportunity for a nighttime crime. If you have a longer blocked have less alleyway less opportunity for crime outside of the public eye. And where do you have long blocks. And where do you have a lot of street lights in the suburbs. Not all the time course. But it's a good way to kind of guesstimate crime rates in an area when you think about a bad neighborhood quote unquote what do you think of its poorly lit. There's a lot of alleyways maybe in the scene that you're having in your head and that's also about city budgets and planning and money and time and access. So what are we funding instead of job training programs and education and social services that for these conditions to kind of perpetuate and kind of sink in to the societal structure in that community. So we've been talking about crime for while. But i would like to zoom out and bring this conversation back to the idea of social sustainability meaning that people's basic needs for living stable lives needs to be met before they have the privilege to care about climate change and environmental action and how their daily lives are impacting the planet. We can't tell everyone that amazon is bad and they need to stop shopping there without replacing that with a similarly low cost option or similar accessible option. What's getting to their house in two days are what's immediately available in their neighborhood. Ultimate social sustainability would be a society that conducts business and economic activities that protects both people and the planet when we're looking at environmental sustainability. We want to make sure that people have the means to care about it. Not just financially. I don't want to say that in order to be truly environmentally. Sustainable you need to be buying from. Environmental companies are environmentally backed companies. But that's to say that you have the capacity to care. You're not worried about larger more basic necessities to live stable healthy happy life. I also think this is a really good place to plug intersectional

New York Times Daily Oshawa Barbara New York City Amazon
"Ecosystem of Social Good" With Rachel Hutchisson

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

04:10 min | 5 months ago

"Ecosystem of Social Good" With Rachel Hutchisson

"I'd like you to meet rachel. Hutchison vice president of corporate citizenship at a philanthropy at blackboard. Who has been there for twenty seven years. She told me climbing the ranks. She also has a master's degree in journalism. Which of course makes my heart sing. I met rachel at a conference last fall in new from our lunch discussion that i just needed to have you meet her. And i'm delighted to say that. Rachel is live with us today in person in washington. Dc allowing us to grab some time of hers before she heads to the airport. Thank you for joining us today. Agreed connections radio. Rachel and for making time for us on your trip to dc. It is great to be here. Thank you so on. The company website says the blackboard is powering social good and creating an ecosystem of good. What does that mean. Social good is a more current term. That's used today. In the past we would have said that we worked with nonprofits. We worked with fundraising so this ecosystem of good is really a definition of the world of social good so it means individuals who are taking causes into their own hands and going out and raising money and sharing their voice to do things. It's nonprofits of all kinds. Its grant making foundations and companies. And so it's that ecosystem of individuals in organizations. That are all focused on doing good in the world. How do you define doing good. Doing good means a lot of different things so it starts at the heart with philanthropic giving and that is our history. We have worked with me meal. We work with forty thousand nonprofits and where the systems and expertise said they used to handle their fundraising in their their networks of people in all of the incredibly rich and of serum needs that they have but doing good is also about volunteerism. It's about sharing voice it's about advocacy there. All sorts of ways you can do good in the world which is one recent weather That phrase social good has kind of been lifted up over the past couple of years because it's not just about the dollars or even just about the time so i presume that it ranges from light. The women's march to the inter american diabetes association for example in terms of who who yet and the sites of causes so i always use that description of individuals. Nonprofits grant making foundations and companies to give a sense of the different kinds of groups of people organizations. We'd work with but in terms of the causes. It runs the gamut so just looking within the nonprofit sector of we work with it can be anything from a very small. Social service to very large university run national or international. I am gio it rages. We have different solutions that scale to the needs of those kinds of organizations so you might have conservation international will be our world or or or say network so talk about the nonprofit sector's having verticals in. That's really very an internal term for us but although there are certain needs that are common across on profits in those needs would be the way they manage their constituents the people who care about them the way they handle fundraising volunteers. The functions are segue owning the things of the quote unquote business that are needs across the organization but then there are things that are unique depending on what kind of organization you are. So we've found that organizing our company actually around verticals helps us with that. So for example we have a business unit that focuses just on higher education. We have one that focuses on k. Through twelve private schools when that's arts and cultural faith based healthcare and it's important because those verticals have some unique needs the other verticals don't share one of those verticals as corporations and foundations so they have some very specific needs. That are nothing. Like what a higher education institution

Rachel Hutchison Inter American Diabetes Associ Washington
Minneapolis eyes deep police cuts after Floyd's death

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

Minneapolis eyes deep police cuts after Floyd's death

"Minneapolis lawmakers who tried to dismantle the police department after George Floyd's death vote today on whether to make major cuts that would shrink it the plan is the latest version of the deep on the police movement that Minneapolis and other cities have considered since Floyd's death ignited mass demonstrations against police brutality and a nationwide reckoning with racism most of the city council is in favour of nearly eight million in cuts from the mayor is one hundred and seventy nine million policing budget and redirecting it to mental health teams violence prevention and other initiatives the mayor is threatening to veto to protect cutting a hundred and thirty eight officers other cities like Los Angeles New York and Portland are shifting funds from police departments to social service programs an effort to provide new solutions for programs traditionally handled by police I'm Julie Walker

George Floyd Minneapolis Floyd Los Angeles Portland New York Julie Walker
Interview With Linda Johnson Rice

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:26 min | 5 months ago

Interview With Linda Johnson Rice

"Today. Linda johnson rice joins me skimmed from the couch. She is the ceo of johnson publishing company which published ebony and jet magazines johnson publishing helps give a voice to millions and chronicle the african american experience across the country. Linda has also served on numerous corporate and philanthropic boards including the chicago public library. Omni kong group. Grubhub tesla estonians national museum of african american history and culture. Linda thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skimmed from the couch. Thank you for having me carly. I'm excited to be here and sounds to have you here so i think you know the first question. We start with the same one every show. Skim your resume for us. I most certainly. I'm happy to do that. I am still the ceo of johnson publishing company. So that is great and it. Is that the founding company for ebony jet magazines and fashion fair cosmetics all started by my family and for better or for worse i have never worked anyplace else and so i grew up in the business. Grew up in the in the magazine business in the publishing business and also in the beauty business but always surrounded by incredible people great parents but great staff who were very uplifting and all about aspiration and inspiration for the african american community. So i grew up in the business. I went to Born and raised in chicago got my degree in journalism from. Usc came back and got my masters in management from northwestern. And i got my masters in management. So funny i started out full time in school and then i switched and i went part time so it took me longer but i really wanted to work at the same time and i had the luxury to be able to do that. A lot of people don't have that. But i did because i wasn't looking for a job once i got my degree. I already knew where. I was going to be an actually once. I i got my masters in management. I actually became president a company like the very next day. But i do want to stress. One thing that i think is really important here and that is i have worked in a family business but it was not a given that i was just going to step into this role and if you know if you knew anything about my parents it was nothing was given. You've really had to earn it. And so it does seem like boy. That was a really fast. Reject re but This was decades and decades of work. I mean i spent more time at a copy machine making copies and doing all kinds of stuff that you know people do when you start out in in a company. I don't think that was any different for me. Something that people would be surprised to know about you that if not on your professional bio oh my goodness. Let's see on a personal side. I i love to ride. I have horses. I've owned horses all my life so that is sort of my luxury right now. I don't have one. But it's the way i can relax and i studied opera. We do you think. Please don't ask me to sing. But i did. I studied opera for for many years. Took voice lessons and loved. It absolutely loved it. We're gonna dive into the family business. Tell me about your family. Tell me about your parents so you know my parents. John and eunice. Johnson were part of the great migration of african americans from the south to the north. So my father came from arkansas. My mother came from alabama and very different backgrounds. This is so it's really interesting. My my father came from nothing. And when i say nothing his town great people but only six hundred and sixty eight people there. His mother believed in him so much and she just you know the love that she had for him she poured into just him and so for her. The best thing for him was to get out of arkansas arkansas and get education and the way to do that was you know they. They got on the train and they came to chicago. they had relatives in chicago. So a lot of people. With the migration from arkansas people came to chicago alabama. They came to chicago. My mother came from alabama so my father dirt poor came to chicago. Went to high. School became head of the debating team editor. The school paper graduated attended the university of chicago and my mother on the other hand came from a background. Where you have to think about this. Her father was a surgeon. Her mother was a schoolteacher in psalm alabama so obviously black african american back then prominent family. Her two brothers were surgeons. Her sister was a phd professor in english and my mother came to chicago to get her master's in social services at loyola. So now you've got these two converging people now completely different backgrounds you know and and they met ed dance. My parents met at a dance and my father. I remember him saying you know. Ask your mother. You know at the dance. Could i take her whole and my mother said absolutely not absolutely not it. She said. I'm going home with the person that brought me. And so for my father. Being the maverick entrepreneurs salesman was game on. That was

Johnson Publishing Company Jet Magazines Johnson Publishi Omni Kong Group Grubhub Tesla Estonians Nation Linda Linda Johnson Chicago Public Library Chicago Carly Arkansas Ebony Rice Alabama USC Northwestern Eunice Johnson John University Of Chicago Ed Dance
Its about to get even harder for renters

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:49 min | 6 months ago

Its about to get even harder for renters

"We begin today with a pair of stories about two key parts of this economy. The first one's a quickie because it's something. We have covered every single week. Since march the number of people filing new claims for unemployment benefits seven hundred and forty. Two thousand was the number that came out this morning. That is people who've lost their jobs in the week ended saturday seven hundred and forty two thousand of big as that is it is lower than it has been overall. That is true but it's a week over week increase in that number for the first time in a month in other words. It's going the wrong way story. Number two is housing which just keeps chugging along pandemic well pandemic be darned. How about that. Because it's a family radio show. Sales of existing homes last month hit their highest level in fifteen years. That's according to the national association of realtors and yes prices were up again to more equity for those lucky enough to own now but meanwhile a report out today from harvard tells a different story about a different part of the housing market renters. Especially those with the lowest incomes. Marketplace's amy scott covers housing for us one in five renters. Earning less than twenty five thousand dollars. A year are behind on rent and chris. Herbert with harvard's joint center for housing studies says the racial and ethnic disparities are stark. While fifteen percent of white renters at that income level or behind twenty five percent of black and hispanic renters are behind and this reflects the fact that black and hispanic workers are more likely to be the sectors of the economy that have had a shutdown from the pandemic and so have lost wages meanwhile to policies that have helped renters stay in their homes. A national moratorium on evictions and extended unemployment benefits are set to expire next month so january. It could be a very difficult month for millions of renters and evictions haven't completely stopped. Carol ott with the fair housing action center of maryland says it's up to individual judges. We are seeing people being evicted through the courts. We're also seeing illegal evictions where the landlord will go and change. The locks on attendant widespread evictions could increase demand for homeless shelters. Emergency rooms and child welfare. Services says dan three a research analyst with the national low income housing coalition and the public costs to health and social services systems could range between sixty two and one hundred and twenty nine billion dollars. He says the solution is direct payments to help tenants cash up on billions of dollars in background. I'm amy scott for

Amy Scott Harvard National Association Of Realto Joint Center For Housing Studi Carol Ott Fair Housing Action Center Of Herbert Chris National Low Income Housing Co DAN
Los Angeles County voters pass Measure J to divert more money toward social justice programs

All Things Considered

01:02 min | 6 months ago

Los Angeles County voters pass Measure J to divert more money toward social justice programs

"Racial equity advocates in Los Angeles are cheering the passage of Measure. J. Charter amendment will require that at least 10% of L. A county's unrestricted general funds be spent on housing, mental health treatment and alternatives to incarceration. KCR W's Gerald Statesman has more Tony officials estimate that measure J could lead to the reallocation of nearly half a billion dollars in funding. None of that money can go toe law enforcement or correctional programs. Proponents argued that diverting funds to social services is essential to correcting racial injustices. Supervisor Sheila Cule was among the majority of supervisors who voted in August to put the Charter amendment on the ballot. That followed months of protests. Bird by the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Kyul says funds will be used to move people out of custody into address homelessness and instability. Catherine Bargor was the sole supervisor to oppose Measure J. She said it would hamstring future county spending and make it harder to manage economic downturns. In this case, your W's Darryl SATs been

KCR Gerald Statesman Sheila Cule Los Angeles George Floyd Kyul Tony Catherine Bargor Minneapolis
Cleve Jones: Queer Spaces After COVID-19

LGBTQ&A

06:04 min | 6 months ago

Cleve Jones: Queer Spaces After COVID-19

"The reality is that the Gayborhood are going away. So, if you look at San, Francisco's Castro district or Seattle's Capitol Hill or Washington DC's Dupont circle or boys town in Chicago West Hollywood or anywhere you want to look lavender Heights in Sacramento wherever you look where there's a defined gay neighborhood. It's not just a place where there's bars though bar life has always been an important part of our culture. It's where very important things happen. I is political power. When we are concentrated in specific precinct gives us the power to elect our own public office the the power to defeat our opponents, the power to pass legislation that directly affects our lives in our wellbeing. As we are dispersed. We lose that power. Another super important part of it was the cultural vitality look at all the amazing stuff that's come out of West Hollywood that's come out of my neighborhood I mean it's no coincidence that the rainbow flag and the First Gay Synagogue and the First Gay Film Festival and the Aids Memorial Quilt and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence all were born in the Castro because there's that magic that happens when creative people when choreographers and filmmakers dancers and deejays and painters. Are All in that same area and I. Know that collaboration can occur very effectively online but there's nothing like the magic of face to face contact close proximity for that cultural vitality, and then the third thing that's at risk are the specialized social services for our most vulnerable population. So. Whether we're talking about people like myself who are getting old long term survivors of HIV or queer kids trans kids who were fleeing trump's America where do they go? They can't come to the Castro a little crappy studio apartment in the Castro is going to cost you twenty, five, hundred dollars a month. So this is the reality that nobody's really quite talking about that that community that has given so much and strengthened us in inspired US moved. US forward. Being threatened and there's many factors technology. Many. People will say, Oh, well, we can live anywhere. We want. No, you can't. Tell me that try it. You know go to Duluth and walk down main street and hold hands no offense to duluth or any other city. You Might WanNa try doing that outside of a gayborhood. So we need these these spaces they're important and we need to figure out what's our next move? Do you have a solution. There's no easy solution but yeah, when people say oh, cleave. Cities Change well. Thank you for that brilliant observation. Yes. Of course, it has changed but we want to. Be Thinking about that change and the big factor is that cities have changed in a way. That's profoundly new. For generations since the industrial revolution, the cities were the place where refugees went immigrants, Bohemians, counterculture people, artists, homosexuals, and all these people of all these different backgrounds and ethnicities genders would you know create this these cauldrons of creativity and and they would climb their way up the economic ladder move out to the suburbs and that was really accelerated in the Post Warrior the nineteen fifties, the nineteen sixties, nineteen seventies, the phenomenon of white flight. So when I got to San Francisco, the population of that city had been declining steadily since the end of World War Two and we were able to go into these neighborhoods that had been largely abandoned by the working class immigrants that had built them originally. And create what we created I on Polk Street. Then on Castro and folsom street hate streets you know he's really vibrant communities. These are now some of the most expensive neighborhoods in the world. So the district that gave us Harvey Milk. is now inhabited increasingly by wide heterosexual gendered millionaires when you arrived in San. Francisco, you had a sleeping bag and a couple of shirts and forty two dollars and you were welcomed into this guy's home. You would never met who was not expecting you. It was an address you have from a friend and there was a safe place to live and to get on your feet. Even, if it's not as San Francisco, like that mentality is so unique. I think that's pretty much now partly because it's just so difficult to survive. So the young people I meet in their early twenty S. You know these and of course San Francisco, it's all tech And there's a lot of anger towards the tech invaders but I have a lot of empathy and. Real concern for them because first of all, most of them are working sixty seventy hours a week. They have no job security. There would never use the the phrase exploited workers to describe themselves but are blanche you are but I think also back then and especially in San Francisco it was still Kinda Hippie dippy. And it was very counterculture. It was very communal. And everybody was kind of expected and really encouraged to contribute in some way. You didn't necessarily have to be all that good at what you did, but you needed to do something whether it was a drag show or video or film or A. Poetry contest or something there was A. There was a real nurturing of people's creative pulses and a lot of support for there was so many places I knew where if I was hungry I just show up and there would be every night. There would be a communal potluck dinner. There were probably six or seven of those households within a few blocks of where I was living on Castro Street. So I never went hungry.

San Francisco Castro Hollywood United States Francisco First Gay Synagogue Duluth Sacramento Seattle Dupont Circle Chicago Donald Trump A. Poetry America Harvey Milk.
Why are so many Seattle Police Department officers leaving the city?

News, Traffic and Weather

03:49 min | 7 months ago

Why are so many Seattle Police Department officers leaving the city?

"Seattle Police chief Adrian DEA says two people have been arrested for attacking officers and setting fires at riots. First Jacob Greenberg, the essence. Greenberg is the guy I seen in a video, swinging hard with a metal baseball bat and hitting an officer on his helmet, according to charging documents after the real attack, the national from Kirkland Express remorse. Not for potentially fatally assaulting itself. For the fact that the officer was wearing a helmet that most likely saved his life, Diaz says. Greenberg later contacted Danielle McMillan. Greenberg also texted a friend that he would like to And I quote slit every SPD throat, Diaz says. Both McMillan and Greenberg then threw firebombs at the Seattle police, East Precinct and Police Officers Guild headquarters is clear from their actions that they're not here. They're not peacefully protesting anything. You are purposely and methodically planning attacks on police officers and our facilities. Greenberg is charged with first degree assault, first degree attempted arson and first degree reckless burning. McMillan faces first degree attempted arson charges. Chief Diaz says he supports the right of people to peacefully protest. But this just regard for people's lives and safety by throwing flaming objects into a business. This can't be our new normal. Business is small and large or struggling during this pandemic and is completely unacceptable that this is an ongoing violence is on ly com pounding their challenges, and he says it's an important distinction because arming yourself In this case, a baseball bat. Winding up, taking a swing and landing a direct hit to the head to the head of anyone, including a Seattle police officer is a brutal crime. Potential fatal crime. This is not a peaceful protests. This's not civil disobedience. This is illegal and this is violence. You will be arrested. This comes as protesters demand big cuts to Seattle police D. As acknowledges. Dozens of officers have left the department for us is really about showing all of the work that's having There is a requirement or need for a police officer. Every day day in and day out. We recovered 2400 shell casings this year over 820 guns were on pace to actually go out and probably recover over 1000 guns this year forth out of the last 11 years we are shootings have are at the highest level of the last 11 years. We've had, you know, a significant increase in homicides. And and so we have to realize that this there are some huge safety issues when it comes to violent crime in this city, and we need officers to be able to respond. And I need to keep the department asshole as I can. I need to make sure that I have officers to be able to respond to all those calls for service. And you know, there are things that I would love for. You know, maybe Social Services T take off her plate. But the reality is is Thursday was a great example of the officer involved shooting where you had somebody that had clearly mental health issues. But social services not gonna end up addressing somebody with a flaming torch, you know, running and throwing in an officer in their car. And so the reality is, we do need our officers. We need to have some level of safety and that is, I think the discussion that happens every single day in this city that people were starting to realize we do need officers. We want to make sure they're well trained. They're holding held accountable for their actions when they've done wrong, and you know that's as a chief. That's what I'm doing soon. The City Council begins its deliberations on the police department's budget for 2021. Its members have said they're seeking to reduce funding to police in order to support a reimagining of the forests that would allow for a rethink of law enforcement in Seattle.

Officer Seattle Jacob Greenberg East Precinct And Police Offic Danielle Mcmillan Chief Diaz Baseball Kirkland Express Adrian Dea Arson City Council Assault Firebombs
"social services" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"social services" Discussed on Slate's Working

"Up initial pilot programs to provide legal services to benefactions uh-huh and to provide legal services for for immigrants in need of legal help and so just so reorganizing management. That was a key part of changing the direction the agency. Yeah so you you walked in and said it's time to fix this org chart number one puffball also spent the time. I knew I needed time to wrap about my leadership of elite society and I also took myself out of involvement with all litigation appointed but I spent spent the month of March before my first day on the job which was Hippos Day I I spent the month of March conducting focus groups with advocates And legal services providers and client groups to really hear what an agenda from for change would be and and literally begin. I we begin to implement. you know significant changes the changing the management was part of it changing the policies as was the other part of it but we need to change the management structure in order to drive the policy changes that people who were outside the agency thought were needed and frankly people inside edition additionally our neither was going into government like you expected I mean where there are things that surprised you about it. A friend of mine and in the council said to me I think after I was in government for about a year so you must be so frustrated given the pace of change and I said actually things are so much much faster as the commissioner than by bringing litigation. You can make change so much more quickly by running the agency than by Suing Agency Sir. So let's take an example of change. I think people are interested in in. How do you might have you know? Goes from just an inkling taught to actual policy. Let's take attorneys for people on Housing Corp.. You know. I talked to someone who who does that for my my first episode of the series. Where did that I just start? Well well you know. This is something I had spoken about a a lot when he was the chair. The General Welfare Committee and the Council member You know we used to both engage in the in the budget dance and I used to come and meet with them and request a funding from the council because it wasn't forthcoming from the administration to to be able to prevent cancer being evicted and so the importance of providing funding for civil legal services to prevent evictions with something that.

benefactions General Welfare Committee commissioner Housing Corp cancer
"social services" Discussed on Slate's Working

Slate's Working

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"social services" Discussed on Slate's Working

"You're listening to working the show about what people do all day. I'm your host Jordan Weisman and this week we have reached our final episode of of my ongoing series about who work in homelessness services. This is a really special interview. I'm really excited about it. I spoke with Steven Banks. Who is the commissioner of New York City's Department of Social Services and also it's Department of Homeless Services you know his title is a little bit complicates dual role? What's important to realize as banks is the guy in charge of overseeing the programs for New York City's poorest residents everything from food stamps to the sorts of homeless outreach that we spotlighted spotlighted in earlier episodes of the series but what makes him a really really fascinating character before he was in charge of all this? He was known as a lawyer who sued the city over the inadequacy of services for the homeless. He spent decades as an attorney at the legal late. Society eventually ran it as attorney chief. And he was part of these landmark losses that helped establish New York. City's right to shelter which I've talked about in previous episodes just view. Is this idea that now. If you live in New York state you have a right to a roof over your head. Even if it's a bed in a temporary shelter somewhere. He was the guy pushing the city through the courts making changes in activist and then the vase administration. He came inside the guard. He he joined as a commissioner and he's now trying to make change from the inside and what I love about this episode is it gives you some perspective from someone who it came in as a rabble rouser guy who tried to make change courts.

New York City Steven Banks Department of Homeless Service commissioner Jordan Weisman New York attorney Department of Social Services
"social services" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

16:12 min | 1 year ago

"social services" Discussed on The Healthcare Policy Podcast

"Sixty five and older the average age in that group Of there's over ten thousand people is roughly eighty years old And then the group that is under the age of sixty five so twenty one to sixty four. And that's the one care program that age is is is in is around fifty So when you when you sort of nap both of those out it would give the appearance of a younger population but that would be misleading So that's why we look at it. SORTA through those two those two lenses. Okay thank you you mentioned Cares provided Both in a in a clinical setting. And and then you do some home care You did start piloting in twenty fifteen a mobile integrated health program. Could you tell us a bit more about that. I think that approach is still growing in frequency. I'd be happy to do so you know. One of the one of the bright spots about our organization is that we we have many practicing and vibrant and curious physicians and clinicians and in two thousand and actually goes back to two thousand and thirteen Some of our lead physicians were Looking at the reasons for people being admitted to the hospital and they were concluding cluding that people really could have been treated and served in the community and and instead what was happening. Was that people. Not only we're going to the emergency room getting set up to a floor in the hospital but oftentimes being discharged in a worse condition than they arrived. Medications were changed changed their care for their their care. Management relationship was getting disrupted and our physicians. At the time that they're there must be a way we can. We can intervene intervene and and what we piloted was the opportunity for the the patient. Actually call their care partner or health outreach worker when they had a escalating condition that they thought as a consumer would require them to go to the emergency room and we piloted sending out highly trained paramedics. That were trained on our protocols Four advanced care in the community and we train the paramedics on How how to how to manage and treat both the geriatric population but as but as well a population that could have significant behavioral health challenges or physical Michael Disability and we piloted this and we We learned that through this experiment that about eighty eighty five percent of the occurrences that historically were playing to the emergency room could be avoided and treated in the community At the same time we learned that for that population there was not a subsequent trip to the hospital within seventy two hours which is usually the the period of if time where if something's not not been resolved their recurrences that someone will go to the Er and at the same time there was a net promoter score of ninety nine which means that ninety nine percent of the time the consumer would refer the service to a friend to us so it was a it was a remarkable success. And we've been we piloting and measuring it and perfecting it and it really became a real program Ah towards the end of two thousand fifteen and then by two thousand seventeen. We started to evaluate whether we could commercialize it and offer it to every one of the subscribers that were enrolling in. CCA's programs and here we sit now in two thousand nineteen. The program is is serving about half the state and by early next year. We will be statewide in. This program will be eligible for all of our consumers so it's better remarkable success. Great thank you. Let me go to one other. Ask you to highlight one another. And that's medically You're medically tailored meals program. This was discussed in a April twenty eighteen health affairs. Article that Several of your staff co-authored This article begins by noting. Food Insecurity is associated with seventy seven billion dollars in excess healthcare care expenditures each year And of course we do know It's a fairly pronounced thirteen percent of households report feud food security Problems and we do know insecurities associated with poor house and increase a big ticket. Health Services is explaining the Excess health expenditures annually. So could you explain How you are conducting running or managing this meals program? Yeah so this is a really good one because one of the things that you know. Obviously we want to provide food security to anyone that is vulnerable vulnerable. And that's really critical for us. We went further to say if we're providing the security of getting someone food if we actually took the meals and tailored them to an individual's diagnosis so in other words. If someone is a diabetic that requires a low sodium diet for example Should we tailor the meals is there potentially a positive impact on doing that And what we learned and was published in the study a you're describing. Is that providing just a meal for an individual there. There's there's there's there's there's not a return on that investment asks meant other than to get someone that's the security they need with the food which from a from a from a social perspective and social responsibility ability as well as program perspective. It's absolutely the right thing to do if we can go. One step further and tailor the the food to someone's Munns medical diagnosis which obviously takes a few extra steps and coordinating The care plan with the meals. Then there's also a positive impact on that individuals. Israel's healthcare costs so so that becomes a scenario whereby we are we are aligning with the person's clinical needs and at the same time creating food security for them and the program is is not only covering it's cost but it's saving money in the long run right. The conclusion of that article said that This severance showed promise and curtailing the use of selected costly health services for a dual eligible. So exactly your point we could run through I did mention you. Run these I found interesting on behavioral. Real health matters these crisis stabilization units. Again you're this. ICMP plus program where you take the highest risk patients from partners healthcare and care for those any number of others. But I do have to sadly get in the question of financing of course always relevant Roland. Obviously how social insurance isn't known or not for paying providers generously. So how are you managing integrating health and social care under your financing limitations. That's a great question I mean first of all Massachusetts has been a pioneer in this concept of creating the the reimbursement structure structure. That aligns both Medicaid which is the state's Healthcare spending with with Medicare which is the federal government's healthcare spending Massachusetts and a pioneer in. This I mean the scope program was launched in two thousand three as an integrated Demonstration that combined the financing so Semester spent a pioneer. I think the folks that that we are serving through these programs are individuals that would would potentially be costing more money and receiving a lower quality of healthcare as well as health and wellbeing if they were in fee for service alone because again we are reducing the avoidable Trips to the emergency room in the hospital which are very costly Ashley Healthcare occurrences We are able to to our approach. Looks at the entire person so that we are able to to you know. Essentially in a lot of these instances spend very small dollars on on food and heat security or if someone has copd needs needs. and An air conditioner I mean again. You're talking about the decision to spend a couple of hundred dollars to provide someone an air conditioner and avoid you know. What could it'd be a ten thousand dollar admission to the hospital because they have trump? Someone has trouble breathing in the warm weather. So we've been a pioneer. We've had that flexibility. We do have to continue to demonstrate seven straight to the state and federal government that there is a return on that investment We have to live within the rates. We use the traditional Medicare advantage edge rate-setting methodologies. We're using mainstream risk adjusted individualized rate-setting methodologies And that aligns with the state's Medicaid rate-setting which is A multi A multifaceted Rate Sell based on someone's Conditions so. We've we've been able to demonstrate that we can live within the these premiums And at the same time You know the last three years in a row. CCA has received the highest Rating of consumer satisfaction based on the CAP survey in. It's one care program. And we've been receiving for four and a half stars from the CMS Medicare advantage quality rating system so so so it is providing this robust healthcare and access to whole person care that I described throughout the podcast But being fiscally responsible role in creating and delivering product at the consumers are finding very very beneficial. Okay thank you. I've my my last question is I wasn't trades interested by reading a bit about this Program Winter Street ventures which I understand in is basically a skunkworks for developing accelerating and scaling a innovation. Can you I found that particularly particularly intriguing. Can you provide an overview of that activity be happy to so winter street. Ventures was my brainchild creation and early. Two Thousand House in Sixteen I'd only been at the Organization for about five months and Learn about the wealth of Entrepreneurs preneurs that were coming through. CCA's doors to learn more about our populations and had thoughts and ideas and Solutions is to solving very difficult. Healthcare problems that we were facing everyday and and there was a few consistent teams that we realized one of which was the entrepreneurs brewers were short on funding They didn't have A think tank to align themselves with to learn more about what healthcare looks like on the frontlines ends either as a provider or health insurance company and they didn't have a a willing audience to test their products with and we happen to have all three so We launched winter street ventures which is exactly what you accurately described it as David. It's It's a IT'S A. It's adventures accelerator. That's putting you know very small capital dollars to work But but is helping spawn Entrepreneur's ideas Around solving the challenges that we're facing every day and just to give you a very very brief example We invested in a company That uses technology to create a proactive voice environment event using the Amazon Alexa. Whereby right? Now unless you say Hey Alexa the the the device will not respond to you and this software Allows that to be proactive meeting. That Alexa will start talking to you before you have to use a wake word and that is really Brilliant brilliant for us because we have so many individuals that are under our care that we need to check in on every day and and figure out if there if they've if they've you've if they've woken if they've had food if they've taken their medications if they're aware of an upcoming healthcare appointment and this technology is is fully customizable sizable per person and can really align with one's fluid care plan and and And it can run automation and if someone responds you know for example if the if if lexuses Hey David did you take your medication today and you say no. I'm not taking it immediately. Your manager or your care partner that I I talked about earlier. We'll get an alert. You need to check in with this with your patient. Because he's not taking his medication or whatever. Whatever that negative response aunt's baby so it's just one example of something that historically that would be four five outbound phone calls that we would have to make and using some type of Robo calling methodology and this is a much more intimate approach that we can? We can push out into the community for less than a dollar a day. Interesting interesting interesting thank you. That's not this life pot I read about is it. That's something else that incorrect product I just described is his life pod. Okay thank you well. It's very interesting conversation. Chris sorry were worried about our time. I'll of course give you The last word. Would you like as a summary comment to make first of all. I appreciate your you're interested in our organization we We believe that our purposes to lead lead the way in transforming our country's health care for individuals rules with you know what we describe as the most significant needs. And and we've we've done this for very long time in Massachusetts and we believe that the type hypoth- care that that this state has pioneered is a pathway for A good healthcare platform for the super users that we're finding being Being paid for by the taxpayers and there are methodologies like what. CCA's doing that can provide someone a better.

CCA Massachusetts partner David copd Alexa Michael Disability Israel Chris Roland Amazon seventy seven billion dollars
"social services" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"social services" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Fill the Brooklyn social services office during a chaotic tug of war with police over her one year old son day, Mon witnesses say it started as a confrontation with the security guard about sitting on the floor with no other seats. Available. Headley was arrested in faces charges that included resisting arrest and criminal trespass child was turned over to Headley's mother. Who says Headley was trying to protect her son? There was no reason for PD to tug and pull like the way they did with him. He was a rag doll basically police say Headley refused to leave the office or comply with officers orders. When they arrived, New York. Police Commissioner James O'Neill called the video very disturbing. The Brooklyn public defender's office is calling on prosecutors to dismiss the charges national race across America day is Saturday. The annual movement aims to cover all veterans grave markers with Christmas. Reef preparations are underway for ceremonies at Arlington National Cemetery and more than fourteen hundred additional locations across the country. Becky Christmas is the president of American. Gold star mothers and their slogan. This year is mothers on a mission. It's not the same mission as our children. However, in some ways, we feel that we are continuing the mission of service, and we honor their sacrifice to serve and every time a wreath is placed. It's so important that volunteers say the name. Of the soldier out loud. Hardest thing for us to bear would be that our son hud's name would never be said again. And so we want everyone to say the names of those buried in any cemetery as they lay a rate. I'm Shelley Adler in Manchester, New Hampshire. Police are looking for a man walked off with a toys for tots donation jar with about twenty bucks inside a clerk signature flight support near Manchester airport says the suspect inquired about fuel. And when the clerk turned around the man swiped ajar ran off. Anyone with information is asked to call police.

Headley Brooklyn Arlington National Cemetery Manchester Becky Christmas Shelley Adler New York New Hampshire James O'Neill president America one year
"social services" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"social services" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Police the city social services in there and tried to address some of the problems, and maybe society before it happens again, you know, it's a little bit more difficult when the motives are spread out, and it's it's not a gang versus gang situation. But just a person with a gripe could blow up any moment. Make it a little bit more difficult for police sort of get a handle on it. Knowing your reporting on this as you sort of observed, the activities of city leaders, do you sense that they have urgency about this issue? Or is it just the this is just an everyday business kind of thing. I think there was certainly was a lot of urgency in the summer as the numbers crept up especially in eight they declared a crime emergency actually in that area of city. You know, I think residents whenever something happens near them would like to have city hall. We don't jump up and down and and and scream and try other things and. And so I do think there is always a sense of urgency. Violent crime is down this year. This is the only numbers are up so far. And so that really makes us stick out. What are the challenges with policing these areas? Getting the trust of residents. Kidding? Yup. Having resources which can be spread thin at times, depending on what else is going on in the city. But again, it's it's sometimes really difficult. A lot of these things are personal disputes between.

"social services" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Community and social services. Here is one of the questions she was asked by a reporter at the press conference earlier today. I'm wondering if you can explain why you know that the basic income pilot project wasn't working isn't isn't providing what is meant to do if the research isn't done. So here's the, here's a situation. When many parts of my ministry were repatriated we started to look at and I started received briefings and there was a a great deal of of disjointed patchwork policies that really weren't communicating with one another. What we have seen however, is that the program isn't doing what's intended to doing and it's quite expensive. And so, and so we have decided that we will wind the program down. I'll have more details at a later date and how we plan on doing that. But I want to assure on Tehran's who were on the pilot project right now that we will do it ethically. Or proof for examples. Do you have that wasn't working your your press release in your statements day that it wasn't working? It's not affected at and what data is there? You're not allowing the pilot project to play out. Well, look all simply say this four, the amount it was costing the province Ontario and the impact it was having. It was certainly not going to be sustainable, and we feel that there is a better way to proceed. So today I'm here to announce a one point, five percent increase in rates that we are pausing the liberal plan that we are going to wind down the basic income pilot project, and that in one hundred days, we'll be able to report back with a sustainable plan. That brings all of the different projects within my ministry together in order to best lift on Teheran's up. But let me be perfectly clear to spending more money on a broken problem program isn't going to help anyone. This is a tough job. This is. Really gonna be one of the toughest jobs. Our government's gonna have to face, but it's necessary and it's necessary because we have to be there for the people of Ontario who need us most. And those are all noble people. Some cloud on terriers minister for children, community and social services speaking a press conference earlier today, as she mentioned, there will also be a one point, five percent rate increase for people on some welfare programs, which is approximately half of the three percent rate increase the previous liberal government planned to institute..

Ontario reporter Teheran Tehran five percent one hundred days three percent
"social services" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

White Coat, Black Art

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on White Coat, Black Art

"For students with other physical developmental or autism disabilities and i'm only in high schools by choice so the issue of transition is ever isn't always and the planning for transition and the lack of availability of resources are reprehensible roadblocks that are out there as well people have been talking about navigating and silos so community and social services offers a plethora of programs but they don't work in tandem with the ministry of ed or the ministry of health so the dollar stay within that ministry and so you really wonder at the end of the day who who are we servicing we're supposed to be servicing holistically and we can't when ministries are not working together so the thrust of my colleagues and myself is to keep people as informed as possible about the programs that are out there there are times when i get discouraged and i think unless you know somebody with a disability that the students that i work with and the young people are on the bottom rung of the ladder there isn't enough publicity there isn't enough talk about it and i think that that's part of what the problem is that it needs to be something that is front and center and that there needs to be bonding i think almost like a class action suit i think sometimes a families getting together in voicing their displeasure and their their anxiety about the quality of life that their children are going to have because they're entitled they are entitled in a society where we have a nice one percent of people that are getting all sorts of benefits why why are people who are really in need truly in need have to struggle to get the disability tax benefit have to struggle to get residential setting have to struggle to get the appropriate health services.

one percent
"social services" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on Richard Herring's Leicester Square Theatre Podcast

"Great i think about moving those avenues on open to me and i understand the bleak because it's harder and harder than not then if you create your own exact same people say oh how stunning writing juliet in romeo and juliet instead i'm doing stand up comedy i mean that's you find your new don't you but it's usually the fucking cleaner implied pledge it is whether or not so you find whatever in you and you just go with where you're not true where people will not play strictly so you felt that there's this of offices this patronizing attitude in the face it as being working class comedian even but you felt that was hold on record that was kind of about recco spot from social services and kind of reclaiming the negative language or a mental health social services and curly and i focused specifically on three words that were mentioned in my files rebellious defiant and rude supplies in the cable i don't know why and by the end of reclaimed those words rebellious as a sign of creativity defiant as a sign of a strong will rue just fucking almost anti i won't was looked at my family members because a lot of the maria slob struggle with psychosis and opposite they did not research recently that proves that successful comedians more psychotic traits than anybody else in the professions so i think better so i said last great for me isn't it 'cause i'm genetically wide to be fucking hilarious.

psychosis juliet
"social services" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Our next storyteller limb see say is celebrated and beloved poet and novelist and chancellor of the university of manchester in england he was born to the opium mother in wigan a town in greater manchester limbs mother went to study in great britain and after finding herself pregnant she was placed in a mother and baby unit at two months of age limb was placed into the care of social services his mother was asked to sign papers allowing limb to be placed for adoption but she refused hoping she would be reunited with her son when she was better able to manage instead after spending eighteen years in the care of social services limb was finally released without a penny to his name and no record of his personal history except for a birth certificate and a letter from his mother lim shared his story at an evening we produced at the union chapel in london here's lim si say live at the mar the the first thing that i was given when i left the the organization the social services was my birth certificate in in one thousand nine hundred eighty four up until then for the first seventeen years of my life i thought that my name was norman the typically had my name and my mother's name leme see say and i was given a letter from my mother plead infamy back dated nineteen sixty eight she came to england to study and she was advised because she was pregnant she should see a social worker and she wanted me fostered for a short period of time and the social worker had no intention of giving me back to her was his evaluation and the organization the organization believed in the evaluations i grew up in foster care for my first ten years and after that i moved into a series of children's homes in my mid to late teens i was there was a file that was being written about me the lasted from nineteen sixty seven to nine hundred nineteen eighty five and.

england britain lim union chapel chancellor university of manchester opium wigan manchester london norman seventeen years eighteen years two months ten years
"social services" Discussed on The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on The Kinda Sleepy Podcast

"I'm trying to stay just put that on them but i think so all sides point two yes okay all right i was just saying i mean because i'm calling parents so call them parents okay so all signs point to yes on that just don't get it i don't understand with a little heavy for me yeah yeah i so rested peace to that kid i mean he never had a chance to actually grow up in his life and you know to go from being a powerful symbol of protest to being a moderate the same time is sick and say it in so you know just want to say recipes that would bother me the most was there there was a pending open social services case that's about to air against those women yeah wow that was a social services case apparently they had not been feeding the kids consistently geez it's all i think it was something about you know one of them wasn't you know being bathe properly or something like i i'm not sure yeah there's a lot of pieces on it and i don't really want to get to heavy today because that's that's a real heavy story everybody in this world is going crazy the entire rainsy's fiercely clans i'm not gonna laugh at you right now people who didn't laws they mind we gotta get some good news going on stacey dash has withdrawn from her congressional out.

stacey dash
"social services" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The city of renew social services and eight okay what happened tell us what happened also finding cubicle in my supervisor team and got me and he took me to our associate directors office where there was three verdict city police officers standing office in were talking director i'm like what's going on and then they put me in the office then close the door and the three officers were outside the office like right at the door and they that told me i was being dismissed from the agency and they gave me paper in bullet points on it in one of the top bullet points was a workplace safety concerns and i said what does it work what workplace safety concerns in said well it's a safety concern for you too because you have your concealed carry permit it's concern for the building in your co workers and i said ma'am i've never had my gun on me on my during a visit in the office on the property ever and she said how do we know that and i said shirts later thankfully officers here and i asked if everyone getting fired ever like they always have three police officer fares sent show only because you're serious safety confirmed because of your concealed carry permit and i guess they could tell i was getting teary eyed and i said can they take a minute and if i can go to the restroom they said oh because your date deacon fired i think that they were treating me like a criminal on that it was student for dissemination and she said go ahead i was in escorted by the three police officers to my office or stripped down the first director in my supervisor was touching all my personal belongings putting on my car and then it will i was excavated by three police officers out at the building to my car okay so that begs a couple of questions first off how did they know you had had they talked to you about a permit before what sparked them to even consider that or even to ask you about that about two months ago i was calling the office of my supervisor in the investigation supervisor and i was ask them your questions like diesel safe in your is there domestic violence and i was like what like what are you talking about and they were like well come to our attention that you have guns in.

director supervisor officer two months
"social services" Discussed on talkRADIO

talkRADIO

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on talkRADIO

"The social services is that is the really big drain isn't it because it really is half the mummy well over half the money raised in cancel tights goes to looking after people social care and mentally we might have got a picture of an old lady in a care home that and that is part of it the the number of old people we need to look after that by fourteen point three percent but that's not where the biggest increase in demand is the biggest increase in demand for cancel services and social care isn't people of working age and that's that may surprise some people but they sometimes social care has never been free at the point of delivery like it is with the health service and social care is always being paid for and sometimes older people have had a little nestegg they've bolton earned money to pay for has the biggest did mound increases in if a cancelled his people who have necessarily had that opportunity there younger they may have some they may have survived thanks to medical science but have really been able to play a full economic place that is highly dependent on this by this and this will be people with disabilities manager and abut social care falls on the local council to the gulf by extension local taxpayers when this is this is the thing although get lots of our local spending is is cow is actually from a government government money as well but this is the i think that a lot of people still confused by because goodness me how many times the share we talked about the nhs in the publisher deadlocking it's horrible phrase buffet they people who don't need to be in hostile the daily medical care anymore but there's nowhere safe that they can gay the i because they haven't go adequate social care at hype and yet we call this massive separation is huge big wall between the national government spending on the nhs and his lakewood government funding on social services uh do you think a loss of people who who pay that counts tax that you know has that you get dismissed at any place the.

nhs publisher lakewood government three percent
"social services" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on KGO 810

"All to my draining our social services are the biggest rain comes from your brain our social service who is they emigrants yeah you you do realize that given them a past the citizenship then you could keep all that money that you can't get now you could keep the the income the sales income taxes that you're not getting you get social security from them are they are already paying taxes because they they every of that are supposed to link come is great they're buying thesell their co are actually contributing right as far as draining our us haunts forced raining are out what our medical services what what type of services you talking about he met hotel and i'm not talking about just that i'm talking about also and are not contributing these are elderly people coming here and signing up for social security and getting it it was in the chinese paper now lonnis rounder elderly okay we'll chinese the chinese immigration is nowhere near what we're talking about when you're talking about mexican and in central america you're not here in trump and others attacking them we if we have problems if we have problems with our system it's because then we have not gone to one pair and single payer that's what we have to do we have to fix the system it's it's it's just it's systemically broken and it's not broken on the backs of undocumented immigrants blame me it's broken on the backs of big pharma and and huge corporations that are all about all profitdriven and they could give a rat's ass about you or anybody else traffic from the children auto body traffic does looks like that problem in oakland is still there was supposed to be cleaned up at six o'clock but southbound eight eighty at ninety eight the avenue the right lanes shut down for emergency repairs there was some metal debris sticking out of the roadway pop tires it is solid from downtown and nine eighty alltime on eastbound 580 grant line road fenderbender has been cleared from middle lane but it's heavy over the hill from greenville rubbed san jose northbound 280 attempts three offender venter block in the middle lanes has been cleared in cupertino southbound 85 at deanza crash there is on the shoulder no backup at the baybridge toll zip heading into san francisco heading out sluggish on eastbound eighty from bought the onetoone splits of lower deck at the baybridge size or by parked and fly this.

social security america trump oakland cupertino san francisco social services shut down greenville venter
"social services" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on WGTK

"Say get anything if wade what you're talking about is not getting wealthier benefits that's already supposed to be the policy and it's pretty widely enforced if you're talking about not being allowed to go to public schools or not being able to go to emergency rooms you're crazy no no no no michael i'm not fair met i was like what are you saying won't be allowed to vote and collect any social services from the country aznar way way when you say social services hold on that's what i was that's when i was talking to you about is the any social services include schools in other words you're here your children are nativeborn you're saying that nativeborn americans shouldn't be allowed to attend public schools no that's not free again your rifkind occurring we said any social is is education and social service pre clear none i'm asking you will is education a social service that the vac record will work with them if they're americanborn for the through that can get strip the wik but i will put it back on their parents still heavy the parents got the go the rest of the world nothing when you seek got nothing to say gutted go when you say got to go i understand and that is certainly a message that should be sent and i think the trump administration sending effectively which is one of the reasons that immigration crossing the border is way down was down from a was during the 1990s it was at one point six million a year crossed the southern border is now down to less than three hundred thousand so it's gotten way down that's before building a wall or before a hinting the security barrier which i assume will happen but this idea and and can i suggest that people might my fellow conservatives this term got to go gotta go got to go please try to think about this not as an abstraction not as numbers on a page but as people with lives okay who have eight eight of worked hard in most cases to assemble a life which in most cases not all is decent for the in decent for people are members of criminal gangs or welfare chesler's yes they have to go we'll be right back on the medved show your daily dose of debate show you're so armored never agree with michael medved show my pillow is now offering buy one get.

wade social services aznar michael medved
"social services" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"social services" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"You are involved in this lifestyle you have to pows ahead of you one involves you being a victim of violence have be involved in violence the other might involve getting neil social services or the rest and this is your choice in fact we have a letter it's got a custom kashmir has your name on it and has everything we know about you and what we're telling you now is that your risk and if you don't shave out we're going to bring a hammer down hard on you if you get in trouble again and this is a caused by public health approaching the sense of they're trying to identify people who are at risk but of course the problem of the public health approaches you got to actually have the components of social services in the rest which uh you having really been funded to the the the way that i think many people wanted them to be funded let's let's be honest though is in fact a bit invasive patronized has i think it's a i think that if you can just imagine being that person sitting here apartments hundreds of knock on our door and a police are says look an hour rhythm has predicted that you're going to be more a risk that is a measure of social control honestly it's a measure of surveillance and it is threatening in many ways and i think that it is a far more problematic than the place based predictive policing i'm in part because the inputs that get you on this list involved in this is a current standard and why whether you have been arrested for violent crime a weapons crime and narcotics whether you've been the victim of a violent crime or an assault a your age at the last arrest the younger the age the higher the score and sort of the trend line is this going up or down are you actually you know be more involved in crime or less and the problem with that is when you have arres as your input you are necessarily also dealing with how police do their jobs and if you have a city like chicago which in two thousand seventeen the near doj civil rights division went there investigating found.

social services public health assault chicago doj civil rights
"social services" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:20 min | 4 years ago

"social services" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"We can't afford the social services for our own people so we we we can't we can't be all things to all people let's let's let's fixed the broken pieces of the legal immigration process but less secure the border protect americans and and let's promote rule wall and when you say secure the border you know for many people who don't have an experience with border crossings and only a few states have that experience some in the north and most in the south and what does that mean does it mean building all to me a wall is more than just a symbol of wall is a physical barrier but that wall can be comprised of virtual elements what you said it so eloquently i'm gonna make noted that because i i think i as i don't think i could add anything to it it is there are physical barriers there are technologies that can be brought to bear in oh era oh stats and and and other ways that you can use technology to identify long before they even reach the border so it's all the above in its whatever makes sense each sector has calls for different action step some need more people some need physical buries a fence some need their cameras so it's it's just making sure there's comprehensive vat one barrier comprehensive astra structure and technology to make sure that we can secure the border we've got that technology it's just that we've had eight years where we haven't made that investment because we weren't serious about this president is this congress is we need given the resources to do the job i think it's pretty straightforward actually the abacus antiindia constituents maybe not yours in particular but the constituents out there feel as though the president's on the right path in that congress is holding and back cell and that's not just in the area of immigration but it certainly in the in terms of the economy in terms of health care and all the rest of it people want to see more action you know what i wanted to say about texas though i worried about texas is changing color for the last eight years i saw who have the demographic shift to the legal immigration we also have some other components to that but the one thing that happened that's going to prevent that is the.

social services president congress texas eight years