28 Burst results for "Social Justice Movement"

Awakening from the Trance of Bad-Othering

Tara Brach

05:28 min | Last month

Awakening from the Trance of Bad-Othering

"So, the title of tonight's talk is awakening from the Trans of bad ushering bad of the ring. and. If you've been with me for a while, you know it's a theme that I. Reflect on regularly and it's such A. Source. Of suffering. A start with a book that I really encountered recently from Dr Seuss and he wrote this when he was eighty and it was one of his last and it's called the butter battle book and it's got the UCS on one side who wear blue close in the souks where orange they live on opposite sides of a wall. And their conflict is that the UK's eat bread with the butter side up and the zoo cts with the butter side down on their bread, and this is very offensive and threatening to their cultural sensibilities. So it's a series of a growing mistrust in bad battering, and it leads to an escalating arms. Race starts with slingshots inside develops a slingshot and the other develops an even better one and the arms race goes on and on and their one upping each other until it finally gets to. A small red bomb that neither side has any possibility of defending against. And they all have to live underground with generals on both sides. Toys drop the bomb. And the book end in this is unlike any other ever read Dr Seuss the book and were the you who's a narrator asks his grandfather, the general for their side who's GonNa drop it? Will you are well he? To which GRANDPA NERVOUSLY REPLIES BE PATIENT Will See we will see. We're living in so much uncertainty. We don't know. What kind of primitive reactivity might? overtake. And what we do know is ultimately, no one wins when there's bad other spiraling when there's an office now. There's no positive social change is just that circling of violence and hatred. and. Whoever is on top temporarily? Whoever has the better slingshot for the moment has to organize resources in defense to maintain their power which they could do for days or for centuries. And everybody on some levels living underground because the danger in other words everybody has armor their hearts because their armor against the sense of bad Michelle there. So if there's a mindset of us. Against Them. A good us against bad others were watering the seeds of distrust and violence. We know this in our personal relationships I mean most of us have gotten caught at some point in that bad uttering dance of anger and blame maybe with a family member, your partner work colleague. Where each person is in some way triggered and whoever thinks it's the other started I it doesn't matter so much because in some way each is feeling hurt. A need to defend need to attack unmet needs. Each is feeling right and then they're blaming the other for causing trouble and pain. As they put out there blame that deepens the wounded an injury and there's more triggering. It just keeps going. So. It's not addressed in our personal relationships. The mistrust and anger and hate keeps US separate from each other in our own hearts armored we can't be really free. And we also know in the larger society that there's so much anger of right versus wrong. The good side bad side. There's so much dividedness right now this registered speaking whether. On an passion and anger masks for Co.. Are In of course, around the upcoming elections and social, justice movements and environment. You might be thinking this isn't just about a different opinion about butter side opera butter side down 'cause my side really is right and good that we're we're trying to protect against violence and hatred and destruction. And I know that mindset and feeling because my mind goes like that when are not? Real conscious on some level. There's that kind of a real rightness wrongness. But. Here's the thing. When I am honest and pause and deepen attention. To that perception of us. Them. It really is bad uttering and my heart is tight in contracted when that's going on, I'm not living from a sense of wholeness and away card sensitive. True connectedness with all of life of belonging. And that's why I call it a tramps, the transit bat other.

Dr Seuss UK A. Source Michelle Grandpa Partner CO
Awakening from the Trance of Bad-Othering

Tara Brach

05:28 min | Last month

Awakening from the Trance of Bad-Othering

"So, the title of tonight's talk is awakening from the Trans of bad ushering bad of the ring. and. If you've been with me for a while, you know it's a theme that I. Reflect on regularly and it's such A. Source. Of suffering. A start with a book that I really encountered recently from Dr Seuss and he wrote this when he was eighty and it was one of his last and it's called the butter battle book and it's got the UCS on one side who wear blue close in the souks where orange they live on opposite sides of a wall. And their conflict is that the UK's eat bread with the butter side up and the zoo cts with the butter side down on their bread, and this is very offensive and threatening to their cultural sensibilities. So it's a series of a growing mistrust in bad battering, and it leads to an escalating arms. Race starts with slingshots inside develops a slingshot and the other develops an even better one and the arms race goes on and on and their one upping each other until it finally gets to. A small red bomb that neither side has any possibility of defending against. And they all have to live underground with generals on both sides. Toys drop the bomb. And the book end in this is unlike any other ever read Dr Seuss the book and were the you who's a narrator asks his grandfather, the general for their side who's GonNa drop it? Will you are well he? To which GRANDPA NERVOUSLY REPLIES BE PATIENT Will See we will see. We're living in so much uncertainty. We don't know. What kind of primitive reactivity might? overtake. And what we do know is ultimately, no one wins when there's bad other spiraling when there's an office now. There's no positive social change is just that circling of violence and hatred. and. Whoever is on top temporarily? Whoever has the better slingshot for the moment has to organize resources in defense to maintain their power which they could do for days or for centuries. And everybody on some levels living underground because the danger in other words everybody has armor their hearts because their armor against the sense of bad Michelle there. So if there's a mindset of us. Against Them. A good us against bad others were watering the seeds of distrust and violence. We know this in our personal relationships I mean most of us have gotten caught at some point in that bad uttering dance of anger and blame maybe with a family member, your partner work colleague. Where each person is in some way triggered and whoever thinks it's the other started I it doesn't matter so much because in some way each is feeling hurt. A need to defend need to attack unmet needs. Each is feeling right and then they're blaming the other for causing trouble and pain. As they put out there blame that deepens the wounded an injury and there's more triggering. It just keeps going. So. It's not addressed in our personal relationships. The mistrust and anger and hate keeps US separate from each other in our own hearts armored we can't be really free. And we also know in the larger society that there's so much anger of right versus wrong. The good side bad side. There's so much dividedness right now this registered speaking whether. On an passion and anger masks for Co.. Are In of course, around the upcoming elections and social, justice movements and environment. You might be thinking this isn't just about a different opinion about butter side opera butter side down 'cause my side really is right and good that we're we're trying to protect against violence and hatred and destruction. And I know that mindset and feeling because my mind goes like that when are not? Real conscious on some level. There's that kind of a real rightness wrongness. But. Here's the thing. When I am honest and pause and deepen attention. To that perception of us. Them. It really is bad uttering and my heart is tight in contracted when that's going on, I'm not living from a sense of wholeness and away card sensitive. True connectedness with all of life of belonging. And that's why I call it a tramps, the transit bat other.

Dr Seuss UK A. Source Michelle Grandpa Partner CO
Unions threaten work stoppages amid calls for racial justice

AP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | Last month

Unions threaten work stoppages amid calls for racial justice

"In a statement for shared with The Associated Press, labor leaders signaled a willingness to escalate tactics. Toe force lawmakers to take action on police reform and systematic racism. Working families. Party national director Maurice Mitchell says economic and racial justice are linked. Labor unions are recognizing That the power of their labor work stoppages and strikes have a role in the Social justice movement, and this is an escalation. This is both an escalation and a historic historic show of Solidarity, says decision makers need to take notice. If I was one of them. I would be really concerned I would be even scared, Mitchell says. This opens a new front in the fight for racial justice.

Maurice Mitchell Social Justice Movement The Associated Press National Director
Unions threaten work stoppages amid calls for racial justice

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | Last month

Unions threaten work stoppages amid calls for racial justice

"I head of Labor Day unions representing millions across several working class actors are threatening to authorize work stoppages in support of the black lives matter movement amid calls for concrete measures that address racial injustice in a statement first shared with the Associated Press labour leader signaled a willingness to escalate tactics to force lawmakers to take action on police reform and systematic racism working families party national director Maurice Mitchell says economic and racial justice are linked to labor unions are recognizing that the power of their labor work stoppages and strikes have a role in the social justice movement and this is the escalation this is both an escalation and a historic historic show solidarity says decision makers need to take notice if I was one of them I would be really concerned I would be even scared Mitchell says this opens a new front in the fight for racial justice Julie Walker New York

Maurice Mitchell New York Associated Press National Director Julie Walker
Katie Couric Puts 2020 In Perspective

Direct from Hollywood

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Katie Couric Puts 2020 In Perspective

"Let's be real. Nobody has seen a year like twenty twenty in our lifetimes, and while Katie, couric has covered a ton of events over the course of her career. She agrees that this year as a whole stands as the biggest news story ever witnessed this confluence of events, not only global pandemic. You have a huge social justice movement, the likes of which we've never seen. So I. Think. It's sort of the imperfect storm of all these factors coming together and it's just I mean I think it's testing us. It's definitely a year. Nobody will soon forget and don't forget check out her podcast next question with Katie couric

Katie Couric Twenty Twenty
Loeffler knocks WNBA players for wearing shirts backing Democratic challenger

Nightcap with Ryan Gates

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Loeffler knocks WNBA players for wearing shirts backing Democratic challenger

"Any way, but not just for the dream. Players to wear T shirts before the game, But players from every team playing tonight have been spotted wearing shirts. That's a vote Warnock. Now this is a Reverend Raphael Warnock, who is challenging the Kelly left her for her Senate seat. And somebody that presumably all these players have decided, is willing to fight for the things that matter to them, that is supporting the things that they support. And so when Elizabeth Williams afford for the dream talk, Tio ESPN, she said, Ah, you know, we want to make sure we could keep the focus on our Social justice movement. And funny enough. Reverend Warnock is somebody who supports everything we support just happens to be running in that seat, so it worked out really well. I don't know

Reverend Warnock Raphael Warnock Warnock Tio Espn Elizabeth Williams Kelly Senate T
Orlando Magic's Jonathan Isaac explains why he didn't take knee or wear Black Lives Matter shirt Friday

Open Floor: SI's NBA Show

06:50 min | 3 months ago

Orlando Magic's Jonathan Isaac explains why he didn't take knee or wear Black Lives Matter shirt Friday

"We had an incredible opening weekend of games name a star level player that player delivered at least once if not twice over the first three or four nights of the NBA's restart here in Orlando, we had crazy comeback wins. By the Houston Rockets, we had a dominant performance by. Jaanus over some little pesky pip squeak team from New England I forget who they might be. We got Marcus smart got fined for trying to work the officials. We've got storylines upon story lines. The clippers bounce back from their loss to the Lakers. Looking excellent and just throttling the New Orleans Pelicans. There's so many different directions that we can go Michael that I decided. Here's what we're GONNA do opening weekend heaters we're GONNA have just open ended questions are we're going to ping pong back and forth you give me your answers I'm going to give you my answers to these questions and try to cover as much ground as possible before we get there though I do want to double back quickly on the national anthem demonstrations that we touched on last episode, we got so many thoughtful emails from various members of the open floor globe on this subject, but I think there was a major development after we spoke on Friday. and. That involve Jonathan Isaac Meyers. Leonard Gregg Popovich Becky Hammon and one of the NBA referees all deciding to not kneel to not really participate in what had been in unified demonstration on Thursday. All of those people who chose to stand were obviously doing it on principle and they were doing it knowing there was going to be a lot of attention their direction. Now, if you look at Popovich amend the referee essentially, they were trying to just say, Hey, I support the the Social Justice Movement it's it's a private or personal decision for the referee said look I it's important to me to stand Meyers Leonard made a similar comment. Essentially. Saying that his brothers military service in the in the military service of close people in his life led him to WanNa stand to salute the flag. But within Isaac was a slightly different case and he actually used this entire demonstration opportunity to almost have a one man demonstration of his own. In his belief, the idea of the black lives matters movement quote unquote doesn't go hand in hand with supporting black lives. He also said that you know we shouldn't be necessarily judging things solely based on skin color that we should be trying to live a life basically you know in God's mold and try to live up to his standard, and that Jesus Christ was his personal savior and and that he wanted everyone to focus on that. Aspect of of living rather than the particular issue that was being brought forward with the black lives matter movement by the players he didn't really get any major pushback. Within the NBA Community people respected his right to make a stand. He actually not only did he stand during the national anthem? He didn't wear a black lives matter t shirt which many people notice because he was essentially the only player not to do that his whole personal story Michael took a crazy twist over the weekend and sad twist when he wound up tearing his ACL injury that's going to end his time here in Orlando obviously but also could cost him all of next season. So now talk about a whirlwind seventy, two hours for player who generated millions of us with his comments about the protests. I'm curious. Let's start with Jonathan Isaac. What did you make of his decision? After we've seen things settle in the last couple of days You know maybe it doesn't seem quite as Eye Opening as it did at that moment, but I'll admit I was I was surprised to see given the buy in from everybody on opening night. Right, I mean I just WanNa Start and say that it it really really is a bummer to see anyone get injured but particularly is ICK who was already on restriction he was already playing with a humongous brace on his leg from a previous injury that cost him a majority of this regular season before it was suspended. So I just I feel for him greatly. I I think generally speaking. The coverage of who stands in who sits I mean we talked about this heading in anticipated it I. Think I think the coverage is generally besides the point and it doesn't really get the point I feel like people are using. This as an opportunity to shame those who are standing in a little bit I mean Meyers Leonard. said, he couldn't sleep before he made the decision to stand and that's just like not. The whole focus or the point here right like. You can obviously Support Black lives and also stand for the national anthem. It is a symbolic gesture that is what it is in the case of Isaac. I really had a difficult time understanding even what his message was until you interpreted it the way that you did I mean I watched the clip of Him Multiple Times survey there I'm GonNa just GonNa read what he said I and then we can use that as a jumping off point because I don't WanNa torture what he said earlier and I might have done that. So sorry for that. He says quote absolutely I believe that black lives matter kneeling while wearing a black lives matter t shirt doesn't go hand in hand with supporting black lives. I. Don't think kneeling or putting on a T. shirt for me personally is the answer i. Feel like for me, black lives are supported through the Gospel. All lives are supported through the Gospel. We all have things that we do wrong. Sometimes, it gets into a place of pointing fingers. We all fall short of God's glory whoever will humble themselves and seek God and repent of their sins. We can see our mistakes and people's mistakes and evil in a different light. Racism isn't the only thing that flags our society, our nation and our world, and he basically said he wanted this conversation to get out of the realm of skin color because the answer to all of our problems in everything that goes on in our world is Jesus. So. when I watched the clip. I'll I'll be honest. I was a little confused where he was going to after typing it all out trying to marinate on what he was saying I think he essentially wanted to have a demonstration on behalf of his religious beliefs and that this was an opportunity for him to say look you know focusing only on one particular group I. Guess in his view, the black lives matter group and you know everybody wearing a t-shirt doesn't necessarily achieve the wider goal which would be presumably healthy living. You know honest living you know Living which to him as a higher priority I think that's where he was going with his statements.

Jonathan Isaac NBA Leonard Gregg Popovich Orlando Michael Jonathan Isaac Meyers Houston Rockets Meyers Leonard New Orleans Pelicans Marcus Smart Clippers New England Lakers Meyers Leonard. Becky Hammon Social Justice Movement
And They Will Inherit It

Latino USA

03:31 min | 3 months ago

And They Will Inherit It

"The film, salt of the Earth was made only a year or so after the strike and released in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, it tells the story of our group of Mexican American miners to Ghana. Powerful mining company to demand their rights their fifteen month long strike includes some unexpected heroes and we'll explain that soon. But I you need to understand how radical the film was for the Nineteen Fifties. Politicians at the time were determined to root out secret communists from Hollywood. There were even public interrogation of filmmakers. Are you now have you ever been a member of the? Communist Party, this is audio of the interrogation of filmmaker Herbert Bieber Bearman in front of the House UNAMERICAN activities committee. To use this to. The motion, picture industry and. The Right? Not only be be Berman ended up serving time in prison and was blacklisted in Hollywood because of his suspected communist sympathies, and then he made salt of the Earth along with two other men who also been blacklisted. It seems pretty clear that salt of the Earth was an act of defiance. The government had sanctioned the filmmakers for his sympathies. So they made a movie that was unapologetically leftist. In one thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, four, the film was so controversial, only a few theaters across the US would show it. Salt of the Earth was essentially buried from public sight for decades. But in one thousand, nine, hundred seventies, she gano and feminist movements embraced the Phil. They saw it as an example of what social justice movements could actually look like. In two, thousand, eighteen producer. Traveled to Grant County New Mexico to uncover the story of what would come to be called the Empire Zinc strike. He wanted to find out how is sleepy mining town erupted into protest, and if almost seventy years later, anyone still remembers Sayer give them is going to take it from here. Before I tell you about what things are like in county. Now, I'm GonNa, tell you the story about how things were and we're going to start with our to Florida's. He was an important figure in the empire's ING strikes. Please come in. Thank you. My Dad Arthur. Florida's one hundred years old. One of the first. President Sir Locally. Local. Late Ninety is the name of the miners union in Grant County. By the way, we're going to hear about it a lot and our to Florida's was a union leader there in the nineteen fifties. Here, it's OK. Okay. I ever I have no problem with talking. Hundred. Be. Dumb. You're doing just fine. Sits in a wheelchair. His thin silver hair is neatly combed. His son. Larry leaves out a set of old photographs on the table. Here's head. Here's some of the actors from the movie, Clint Man Walking Out of the Union Hall Women Flannels and big brimmed hats smiling triumphantly at the camera. There's two is a full head of thick black hair. The photo is labeled local eight, Ninety Activists Nineteen fifty-three.

Florida Hollywood Sayer Ghana Communist Party Herbert Bieber Bearman Grant County New Mexico Miners Union Berman Grant County Union Hall Women Flannels United States Gano Clint Man Larry Producer Arthur President Trump
"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

06:30 min | 4 months ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"One of the reactions I had was I mean there are just probably some things that Lebron just isn't passionate about like passionate about things. He's experienced. But what goes on in China? Maybe he's not as informed about. Yes, you're right. I mean every summer star players go over to China. They build their brands because. A lot of money to each and every one of them under armor Nike Jordan brand new. That's that's a money driver for NBA players. But how much do you allow for for that to be part of it that he just doesn't care all that much, which isn't to say, it's wrong. He just doesn't have the same passion for that issue that he does for others. If if everybody was held to that standard. I would agree with that, but everyone's not to that standard. We demand and a lot of the for lack of a better description. Social Justice lawyers are demanding that people that don't care about certain topics care about certain topics, and so if everybody was well, hold on. That's not their area of interest against police brutality. That has been rationalized and. Narrow down to just black people. If you do which I think is inappropriate. Because police conduct is a societal issue, it impacts all of us. We've narrowed the discussion to just black people will. Why should we be surprised that will? That's not my problem I don't have a passion for it and so I don't have a comment about what could Lebron have said better than what he did? I think he could have been transparent and honest. I would have said and done and Nike's listening and they WANNA. Sign me some sort of major endorsement deal. Here's what I would say. I have a my primary employers Nike I'm not addressing that. We have businesses in China. I'm not addressing. That's what I would say. That would be I. Think more authentic than what he did say. As it relates to. Maybe he's not passionate about things going on in Hong, Kong. If. That's the standard. Just go look across. Maybe Tom Brady maybe drew. brees isn't passionate about what went on with Ahmad, darker or George Floyd. He has that right? It's America, but we're demanding that they do care in that. They stayed in opinion on it. And so that same standard people were going to apply Ron GIC. That's a good point before I. Let you go I want to pick. Your brain has always been on TV for a long time. The NBA's GonNa play summer basketball. It's going to be part of their. Their postseason and into the fall there are a lot of people in the NBA. That WanNa make summer basketball, a permanent part of the NBA schedule. There are others that prefer and I think Adam Silver's part of this group that want to get back on track as fast as possible. Get December first as the start of the season and get back to a regular schedule. Where do you stand on that? Do you think the NBA could find a growth success by getting away from the NFL and pushing their postseason into the summer months? I'm going to answer your question in a way that. Doesn't address your question, but. It's what my idea. I I would love to see the NBA more involved with summer basketball. But not with their current players. I wish that everybody in Sports with take this. Corona virus. And look at it as an opportunity to reshape the way we do sports what I've always wanted. The NBA NBA to do is partner with the NC Double A.. And have summer. Basketball builds around the best. seventeen to twenty euro players in high school and college, and they do a summer internship ship. They go out to Vegas and they play basketball in. Do seminars were NBA players? Come in, connect and everybody. All the players get paid. The seventeen year old high school kids the kids in college. They get a nice fat check for participating in the NBA summer, Basketball League. which is the best seventeen. Year old basketball players in the world and they the ones that are in cosby. Pay Them enough money that it justifies them staying in college, continuing to build their brand in college because I think the NBA is stronger when a guy comes to the NBA with a passionate fan base from college. I think he's more valuable I think. He's a better player I think he's more ready to handle the NBA lifestyle, and so I would love to see the NBA of big summer brand impact league. That's going on. It's because the summer league that we have now with these rookies has gotten more interesting and we watch it on TV. I think we can put that on steroids by partnering with the NC. NC Double A. instead of the top athletes getting paid for the image and likeness. Let's let the NBA and the television networks pay these guys for six eight week period during the summer. Where generate new new money. This golf getting televised. It's good for the TV partners. It's good for the NBA. It's good for college basketball. Everybody went to the athletes with some of them are to to me like a senior in college pame a million bucks for coming, appoint point for these two weeks and I just think everybody wins I. Think Sports Fans Win I used to love college basketball. It's it's now been destroyed because the best players only play a year and we don't even really get to know him. I think it would help the NBA I think it would help college basketball I. Think what helped the young kids? And I think fans would love. I like the idea although you did just singlehandedly extend the work season of every MBA report out there into August a temper also. Probably more pay so. Well in that case Jason, I'll I'll take it Jason always appreciate the time man. Over it out kick I'll. Be Looking forward to. Reading you over there and everything? You're doing in the future Matt. Thanks for joining me thank you..

NBA basketball Nike Lebron China Hong Adam Silver NC America Sports Tom Brady Jason NFL Ahmad Vegas partner George Floyd cosby
"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

10:27 min | 4 months ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"People speaking out has been avery Bradley and I've known Avery Bradley Pretty Longtime dating back to his days in Boston. I think he's incredibly bright guy, and he's got some some ideas as to how the NBA can contribute to this movement whether it's. Getting more black coaches black executives. Being involved in more social justice causes. What's your take on? The NBA specifically, but sports leagues in general like their roles in continuing in pushing this movement. That's a complicated question that I'm not sure if I have a great answer for because I think. for the NFL is different than the NBA. The NBA is really concerned about its global reach. And it's particularly concerned about its relationship when reach in China. And so I think leaning into the social justice thrive and leaning into questioning. America in American power and strength, and how we operate along race, I think it plays well for a league that is trying to expand globally I. think a lot of foreign countries like that. The United States which I believe is the world leader in Racial Progress I think they like the in the America being rain as the worse country released to race, the NFL is totally dependent on American audience. It's the most American sport of all. And I think they're gonNA. Pay a really heavy price here at home. The massively in terms of ratings, relevance support, and eventually there's going to be an enormous financial impact. If there's all kinds of protest on the field I think you're gonNA. See a large chunk of football. Fans tune out in tune out for a significant amount of time ever come back and so I I again when when the League tries to take going. Issues and athletes try to take on issues as complicated as criminal justice it trust me. That is the most complicated thing in the world to adjudicate justice fairly to the great melting pot. We have three hundred thirty million people from all different backgrounds all this diversity to have a justice system that works for everybody, and that's not making excuse because I think there's certainly some unfairness in the justice system. For the poor. If you're a wealthy almost regardless of your race, you could make the justice system work for you. The poor catch hell regardless of race in the justice system. We've rationalized. This whole conversation went to me. It's really an economic discussion, and so I'll just say again I've said this numerous times. I think there have been forty five US presidents. There have been like ninety three attorney generals, and that's because law and order crumbled suggested. It's so complicated that attorney general's step down get replaced. Get fired because that's the hardest job perhaps in America, and so to see these sports leagues think I will get on the forefront of criminal justice reform change. Really. That's a really complicated issue that should rather than league's. Doing that individuals should do that. Individuals within the NBA NFL Major League Baseball should do that I. Just don't know if you can have because first of all, there's just I. Don't think there's uniformity of opinion about what should happen in our justice system with everybody in the NBA NFL mainly baseball, whatever so I just think they're going down a very slippery slope. Do you believe that the NBA and other sports leagues should adopt some version of the Rooney rule. Do you believe that's useful when it comes to other sports, leagues? The Rooney rule isn't bad. It's not the solution I would choose. I can't strongly object to it, but to me in order to improve the opportunities for black coaches in the NBA NFL, whatever it starts to me more at the starting line, not at the finish line. And, so I say this as relates to football and I'm it's somewhat true for basketball. The starting line for football basically is the Graduate Assistant Coaching Job on college football. And that's where I believe with the NFL. Serious eighty throw financial support behind graduate assistant positions for minority coaches. Get Him at the starting line getting more of us at the starting line. I think the NBA should adopt that type of approach. How do we build from the bottom up so that the people at the starting line there's more of them at the starting line and that way you'll get more of them. Ready for the finish line become in an NBA head coach. And so. Those are the kinds of solutions. I'm four of more long-term organic approach. I I'm not against the the Rooney rule. I think it has helped to some degree. Of But! If we don't fix the starting line. We're never going to get the finish line, right. You mentioned the NBA being a global game and you're right. It is the most global of the four major sports unquestionably. Your colleague now Clay Travis, suggested I don't WanNa. Put words in the mouth, but to paraphrase that Lebron's. Zeal is passion for the current issues are in a way watered down by his refusal to. Participate in the discussion about Hong, Kong, and China, and and then he won't criticize China. Because maybe there's a financial stake in it for them it. It diminishes his position on issues like this. Where where do you stand on that? The Lebron's? And this was very public of course in the preseason when it came out with Daryl Maurice tweet in the reaction to it and Lebron's answer ultimately to me. Where did you come down on that specifically? I cannot speak for Clay Travis only talk about mom perspective, and that's what you asked me about, but I just WanNa. Be Clear I'm not trying to talk for clay. My position on this has always been, and I've been pretty consistent. Isn't Nike has vast business interests in China? And so Lebron James is primary. Employer is Nike. It's not the NBA. It is Nike and so I think a lot of Lebron's public posturing. Has To do with what's best for his private employer Nike. And so Nike relationships with China. I think compromise is Lebron again. A lot of these shoe companies, a lot of these athletes go to China and make a lot of money during all season, and they have extensive relationships in China and if I don't think people understand that China being a communist run country. There number one form of propaganda against the West against. America is to smear America as overtly racist and the most racist place on the planet that has been a tactic of communist countries from the beginning of tot that is their criticism of the West and so. Having you know I've never been to China I was involved with a ball state linebacker, who moved to China got in prison in China unfairly spent three years in a Chinese prison in it cost me money to get him out of prison, and so I have a different understanding of how China feels about black people and Black Americans than perhaps other people that have had no dealings with. China and don't have friends that have actually lived in China and so I think. there's some hypocrisy. I I I've seen a lot of information about how China treats. The black people that live there and it you know it makes us look like Mother Teresa or Gandhi or Martin Luther. King in. And so to hear people and their reluctance to talk about China Org. Just put America thing I think in. It's proper perspective. It does I think Lebron's hands are tied as it relates to comment on China I do think that it impacts how he talks about. Race and racism here in America and what he can and cannot say about China based on his relationship with me. Do you allow for I, mean when when that first happened not to relitigate it again, but that I happened one of my first reaction was well. It wasn't a great statement, but what would have been an acceptable statement. I mean wooded been coming out with a free Hong. Kong, T shirt on and announcing. You're not going to work with China more..

NBA China Lebron James NFL America China Org Clay Travis avery Bradley Rooney Nike United States football WanNa Boston Kong attorney graduate assistant basketball
"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

02:30 min | 4 months ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"This is not like two thousand eleven at least with those seasons. You're able to start and continue. You didn't stop once. You started this I. Mean I issue what people think? It is a real championship, but to me. This will always have that kind of asterisk attached to it, I think it certainly will have an asterix attached to, but the size of the Asterik will depend on who wins the championship, if Jaanus, Kawai or Lebron win the championship. The, Lakers the a box or the clippers, the asterix going to be smaller than if it's the Houston Rockets or or someone else or the Philadelphia. Yeah, it'll be like well. They caused some breaks and you know. Looking yoke is the way he's shown up like a different human being. There's guys on the other side of that. There's going to be so great that look like yoke is, it'll be like. Is that Jason Whitlock? So that's going to determine. WHO The championship! WHO The champion is. If Cow Kouzmin shows up looking like a that's going to hurt the Lakers chances of winning the championship, and so but I do think those one of those three teens, Bucks Lakers clippers wins. The championship were GonNa. kind of respect, it and I think if it's coli or Lebron I think. It's GonNa carry some weight that would be. That would be wise. Third Different teams led to a championship and that would be Lebron for tidal, I think. Five years from now ten years now we would give Lebron's credit for winning those championships and say look you know it is what it is. They couldn't have control the corona virus and so they WANNA title. Yeah! I've been I've been sniffing around trying to find out if there is a Shawn Kemp two point oh of of this. This, Erin not yet. I haven't found one team to say yet, but you're right about Yokich. Yokich is the only guy knows. The pandemic locked in a gym like he is who? Were not on video, but Hell I've lost sixty pounds. Kerr's they. Tried to make the most of this. You know maybe Oliver. Oliver oversight. Man Oliver Miller. There's a name from a.

Lebron Lakers Oliver Miller clippers Yokich Houston Rockets Jason Whitlock Bucks Lakers Shawn Kemp Cow Kouzmin Jaanus Erin Kerr Philadelphia Kawai
"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

07:20 min | 4 months ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"To cable news were all being event emotional anecdotes to make us frustrated I just think it's here responsible to throw something like that out there to forty six million dollars. Just isn't true Lebron isn't hunted every time he goes out of his house neither am I. The overwhelming majority of us do not feel that way unless. We live in a violent inner-city community. And we're truly not sitting there, shaking in fear or worried about the police. Were worried about the guys. Gang members in our neighborhood. That's where the fear of violence is real and authentic. And so I just felt like. At a time when the country was in chaos frustration. People unemployed. Don't. Spar more negative emotions by suggesting that again to me. It was a dog whistle like man. You should ride and be violent because trust me if you believe you're being hut I'd be right out there with you. Let's go to war. My life, not worth living. If I'm hunted every time, I step out of my house here in America. I felt like it's responsible. I also think that the Bron- does some responsible things, and you know a lot of social media I think Bates. All of us to say things that we don't truly believe things we haven't thought through I've certainly tweeted out some very stupid things a and look I'm fifty three on thirty five. I'm nearly twenty years older than Ron. I give me twenty more years of maturity. In if I was thirty five I would probably still be tweeting out more irresponsible things I don't know if I would make this mistake, but but I get it and I. Just think there should be some pushback on the Brian, and he should be more responsible at high uses social media feed. As. It relates to Orlando and wanting to play. Let me before we get to Orlando, do you? Do you think there's a usefulness in hyperbole in situations like this? I mean when Lebron uses a word like hunted. It's going to push onto those cable news networks, and it's going to make it more of the discussion than if he chose a different word there. Do you think there's any value? On I listen! We'd love to pick and choose when words matter. And you know some people get to be hyperbolic and that's a good thing. But I think there seems to be a general consensus? That when it comes to the president. You don't don't be hyperbolic. Don't be irresponsible on twitter. Don't use words that are so explosive and provoke emotion and Blah. Blah Blah and we say that because you know the president's platform is so huge and enormous and important, and so there's a general belief Lebron in a different lane. The Atlit Languid forty six million followers He needs to be held to a higher standard and just being hyperbolic for hyperbolic sake and saint, saying exaggerated things. That could make people emotional and make them feel that they're justified in going out and burning down their community, being violent in their community. I just think at this time. It's Wong responsible. I, think I look at Lebron social media feed, and I see a lot of similarities between the President I think both of them use social media ear responsibly there's. Thousands of reporters that call out the president for his irresponsible use of social media. There's one or two people I I. Don't know the people that ever called out Lebron other than me for his ear, possible use of social media. I. Think He needs that. Push back. As far as Orlando do it does sound like his approach is more line with what you were saying with Kyrie. And how the players should respond there, it seems pretty clear that Lebron is going to become a strong activist while he's in Orlando. One way or the other I mean he's he's the. We mentioned the the voting movement and look if Lebron plays as long as he's likely to play, his season could end like two weeks before the November election, which I would think would send a pretty powerful message and be pretty influential. Over the course of a number of months I mean. How do you feel about the ways kind of approached? Going to Orlando what we know about it well, I think Lebron has every incentive to want to play. He's got a great opportunity to win a championship. In a he. I, don't blame him for wanting that opportunity. The Los Angeles Lakers were having a very nice season in incredible season. He was having a season to me. That was MVP worthy I would go with him as MVP over Y- honest It's a no brainer to me and so I. Don't blame the Brown for wanting to complete this complete this season Gulf. War Championship in an perhaps win. The MVP am I think he understands it by winning and having that success, it does elevate his platform does offer him the opportunity of to support the cause that he believes it in a way that he thinks is appropriate. Do. You think it's more about for Lebron playing and. Adding another championship to his resume than it is anything else without question, and I don't blame him for that. He's a professional basketball player. Basketball's been his life. I don't I if I had a chance to put myself in the conversation restricted my conversation as the greatest player of all time, I would definitely go for it. I. I would definitely feel like you know. Corona and this pandemic has undermined my. Body to really really pushed the Michael Jordan conversation even farther I I. Don't think there's anything wrong with him wanting to do that I. respected as a competitor athlete. He should take his profession very seriously and he does. This is a a again a little off topic on on what we're discussing. Do you think this is the end. Will crown legitimate champion because I have my questions about it? You know there's four months four months pass Jason in the more team executives. I talked to the more I. Hear the phrase. This is a new thing, and you only have to look who's participating to to kind of get that the players that might sit out, but help Ben Simmons was done for the season as of two months ago. I mean buoyant. Bogdonovich in Utah was a 20-point-per-game score for a team on the rise. He's out for now I mean. Mean I think there's a real argument that says this is not like ninety, nine, two thousand with lockout..

Lebron Orlando president MVP twitter Basketball Los Angeles Lakers Atlit Languid America Ron Utah Ben Simmons Michael Jordan saint Brian Jason Wong
"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

08:59 min | 4 months ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"And so that that's not to criticize athletes I used to be one long ago a college athlete. Not WanNA late us all as As as as Unknown name but. There's a process to acquiring the knowledge. It takes to be the leaders and the drivers of the issues that they're trying to be the leaders in the driver's off and I just wish that they would. Figure out that support of those issues might be a better role for them than leading those issues. That my first reaction was i. it was Kyri, and having covered kyri pretty extensively in Boston, the last couple of years. I beat it. It's SORTA slants your view of him because he has been a disruptive influence for somewhat peculiar reasons in the past but I just found myself wondering Jason I. Does he have a point, and the more I thought about it I mean his points. Know not to put words his mouth, but it seems like he's like the Social Justice Movement will get lost in the shuffle if players back to Orlando and I start thinking about what I plan on going down to Orlando. I. I probably will involve myself. In the the basketball related discussions more like Lebron's chase for a championship Ben Simmons Back Injury Collide Leonard's need and you start talking about bass. Really things in does does the the things that have been talked about the last couple of months. Do they get lost in the shuffle? Did you feel like he had that he had? There's merit to his argument that that things will get lost if players go back to play no, I don't because I think those issues are going to continue to be addressed and talked about. By people who have the time to devote their attention to that. And I think he also and again. This is what gives loss. I think with this generation is that? They there was a process to building the NBA into a league that could provide this kind of enormous wealth from platform to these athletes. And they have a responsibility to take care of that Lee, and 'cause they stand on the shoulders of bill, Russell and Michael Jordan and Magic Johnson Larry Bird in third and Reggie Miller just on and on and on. They stand on their shoulders in the League is in a place where these guys can make twenty five thirty forty million dollars a year from playing basketball. And I? Just don't know if you can shut that down. And because of the enormous damage, it could. Do at league and so, what about the fifteen sixteen seventeen year old? WHO's coming behind these guys? What are they? GonNa, leave behind for them in terms of their league that has taken care of a lot of black athletes provided him enormous wealth that they can use to support the issues that they believe it, and so I think you can support the cause while supporting the industry that you're in because. I hate to say it but KYRIE's wealth has more value to the calls. He says he believes it then. Kyrie's opinions about what should happen for the cause. Yeah. It's funny when you mentioned bill. Russell I just was triggered back to one of the tweets. Yeah, just a couple of days ago. that it goes Kendrick Perkins. Who Labeled Lebron the greatest athlete of all time in Russell just fighters back with I could've made the Olympics back in fifty six and track and field news rang the number seven high jumper in the world that we forget just our athletic, and how great athletes some of these guys were I think we have a lack of respect for the athletes of the bygone era, and we think that Oh my God. If we drop them into the day, they wouldn't be athlete if they wouldn't be able to compete and I think that's totally boats I. Think look have. The equipment and all the things around him. Are they better athletes better trained now because all that we know, but you put Bill Bill Russell in today's environment with all the technological advances and all things we know about training. He would still be a beast. He was still being incredible player, and he would probably have some of these skills that the six hundred ten players now have you'd be able to step out of knock down three. You know he'd still be a tremendous player athlete, and for some reason we forget that or we just don't have respect. We look at the tape and go man. They were basically Sutin set shots or they were. They just don't appear athletic. I think it's a misread of just. They. Don't understand it's not I. I got an argument on on. Speak for yourself once with Marcel about Jesse Owens, and whether he could compete with track stars now in an someone watch the show, and it's all the debate and they send a link to a Ted Talk. About. Hey Jesse Owens if he were running track today in the shoes. They have now running on the surfaces that they have now. He would be right there with you saying both. And so. I think we think that the athletes today are so much. Superior to the athletes of the past is just not true. I'm guilty of that. Sometimes to especially I, mean look I grew up in Boston and I watched Bob cousy highlights, and I look at cousy dribble at the right hand, and say no way. Could he had I do remember a Bill Russell I must have been a teenager at the time. Russell was on the radio in Boston, and somebody brought this subject up and Russell was like the only player I would've had any trouble with was shack like I had welts I defended wilt just fine like I said the only player give many problems shock because of sheer size. He scoffed at the notion Jason that anyone else could just run circles around him especially defensively. I totally agree with Bill. Russell and I look at the tape. And see the same thing as you. It doesn't look the same for athletic, but trump i. just have ultimate face. Like Brown I hear. People say all he couldn't compete. Are you kidding me you turn? This is one of the greatest athletes of all time anything he played. He was tremendous at. It's you know we gotta get over up is working to respect our elders, because now I'm in l.. I got all this bray respect me. Sure Zell respect Russell. That's for sure what he accomplished in his career. One player we have not heard from on the subject of Orlando at least not specifically is Lebron James, and now we know Lebron's going to play. He has always believed. That his voice is the platforms that amplify it are stronger than a demonstration that he could make any is used those platforms recently. To push the black lives matter movement. He has formed that coalition organization. He's called more than a vote to attempt to turn out voters in November Jason. You've taken issue with Lebron's tactics or use of social media in the past in a recent column on outkick. You pointed out to tweet particular where Lebron suggested black men were being hunted. You call that the most irresponsible public statement uttered. In twenty twenty, so explained, just kind of where your issues are with Lebron specifically with comes to how we sort of using his platforms in this in this moment. Well I. Think as it relates to Almodovar, arbitrary in the events in Georgia I think anybody that watched. The tape was like. Wow, no way they should've killed and shot this man. This is inappropriate criminal I think everybody can see that agree with that. to suggest though that. As black men were hunted every day every time we step out our house and he said he used the word literally to set it up. I got understand if you believe that if I believe that as a black man. I would grab a gun and go to war. I really would. If I lived in a place where I felt like I was on it every day. I'm going to war I'm turning violent. I'm going to defend myself. And so at a time when the country's in lockdown and forty million Americans are newly unemployed, frustration is at the highest level, were all captive in our homes addicted to social media addicted.

Bill Bill Russell Lebron James Orlando Boston basketball Jason I. Kyri Social Justice Movement Kyrie Jesse Owens Kendrick Perkins NBA Back Injury Bob cousy Ben Simmons Olympics Lee Reggie Miller bray
"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

07:11 min | 4 months ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on The Crossover NBA Show with Chris Mannix

"They are sports. Illustrate made incredible body of or I really appreciate the integrity. Is Well on. Great job. We love it luckily. Bank keys Kris menace. These employed by sports illustrated. The announcers got it informed. This is the crossover NBA podcast. You have a problem with it. Build a team that can beat of hosted by the one and. Thank. God mannix. Joining me now on the show Jason Longtime journalist commentator recently left episode one to join out kick, and he joins me on the show Jason I congratulations. Definitely, an eye opening moved to see. Leave F S One. To Join Clay. Travis and outkick. Yeah I think. It's an eye opening moves and I opening move for me, you know. I wouldn't have predicted this. A year ago. But Chris I think when you look at where the media is going. if you don't have your own platform to stand on. A year, really vulnerable. I think over the long term and you know. I was in a conversation with someone a few weeks ago and we worked speckling. What's the best job in sports media right now? And it used to be like you WANNA. Be might will bond Tony Kornheiser. And we had to say like no, and you know this is no comment on what we think of day Portnoy, but he's got the best job in sports media. He is his own man, his own boss. His website matters. He's made a ton of money. And he gets to say and be himself and authentic at all times. You know I would put bill. Simmons it same lane at a clay. Travis was working his way there as well and now we're going to do it together it out kit. I mean this is off topic. When it comes to basketball. Where do you think media is going I ask someone that I worked for Legacy Media Company in sports illustrated I'm working for. We were talking before we started as a startup in zone. Where do you do you see media going in the next ten years? I'm not sure because I think to be honest with you not to be critical of anyone or any particular organization, but I think there's a major disconnect between the mainstream media and the average sports fan. There's so much pressure to adhere. To the popular sentiment and conventional wisdom of social, media. That that Kinda disconnects you from the typical sports fan, and so I, think for the sports media. At mainstream outlet, they're GONNA. Have a hard time keeping a strong relationship with sports fans unless you're just the straight information guy. You're Adam schefter Adrian skin. You have information to provide. You are always going to be necessary, but so much of the opinion and so much of. Of just all sports media now is geared towards social media. that. There's just this obvious. Disconnect between them in the typical sportswear. Yeah I think there's definitely truth to that. Art, I want to jump in with a couple of NBA related topics that have been in the news for the last couple of days and. The biggest storyline amongst NBA types that I've talked to in last couple of days. Is What happened this past week with Kyrie? Irving spearheading the call with one hundred players on the call. Irving expressed his position. That NBA players should consider not going to Orlando but the restarting season that resuming the season would be detrimental to the players work on social justice and police reform. Jason. There's certainly a lot to unpack in this particular. Situation, but especially with the Messenger on the timing of the message I guess, but what did you think of? Irving's staking out such a strong position on this issue. I think that. High re certainly is an outside the box. Thinker will put that positive spin on. It He's a different food. And, so if there was going to be someone that was gonNA take far out position on. This would be career. Of. I don't think he's on solid ground with his position. I don't think you should shut. Work To focus on social justice reform I think that his athletes as an opportunity to do both to continue working to to. To continue acquiring wealth, did you can direct toward the causes? You believe it. And I think that's the best strategy for athletes. I think that a lot of the athletes think they have to be the leaders on this issue, and not the support for these issues, and that's where I think they tend to get in out over their skis. I think that we've moved in a place in the sports needed. We're we're not. Accurately describing who the athletes are sports, fans and we're not helping. Athletes understand who they are because it's not normal to go from high school or one year in college at Nineteen and then become an instant millionaire and I. Don't think the athletes understand how that warps. Their perspective changes their perspective. They don't have the life of a normal American citizen or normal citizen, almost any country becoming a millionaire at nineteen twenty years all. Changes Your worldview and disconnects you from the typical person and makes you again I. It's like some of these guys come from rough backgrounds, but when you're blessed with all that athletic, give it America you can become very entitled. Privileged added early eight. Even when you're twelve thirteen fourteen years old, because everybody can recognize, there's a pot of gold with all this athleticism and people. Start trying to usher. You do the process just to get to that finish line. And so I just don't think the athletes are aware of what they don't know most people. We don't know what we don't know and I think they're great. Wealth fools them into believing. I'm I'm one of the smartest people on the plant? How else could it be making all this money? Well might be because you're one of the most athletic people on the planet. Not because you know, you're this great.

NBA Irving Travis Legacy Media Company Jason I Jason Longtime Tony Kornheiser basketball Adam schefter mannix Portnoy Jason Chris Simmons Orlando
Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

Jewish History Matters

10:11 min | 9 months ago

Social Justice and Israel/Palestine with Mira Sucharov and Aaron Hahn Tapper

"Hope that you'll enjoy our conversation as we dive into the connection between scarlet work and the social justice issues of Israel and Palestine. A major major way in which history matters because through history we can better understand pressing issues of the day and as I think it'll come through clearly in our a conversation that as historians and experts we have something to contribute to these conversations to thanks for listening. I'm your hi Erin. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Jason Thank you. I'm really glad that you guys are here to talk about this book which I was really excited to see and to read through I wanna I wanNA start off by asking. What do you mean by Social Justice and Israel-palestine when you look at the title itself? What is the connection there? And why do you think that it's important to integrate. These two realms in the discussion of social justice on the one hand and the broad set of issues around Israel and Palestine part of our idea was that Israel Palestine conflict is taught as is an informational explanatory lands right through prescriptive questions in what happened in terms of what we mean. By a lens of social justice we we mean an inter our disciplinary perspective places concepts like rights justice and oppression at the forefront and that aims to Dick sexualize Israel-palestine Israel-palestine especially for those who think of this as some sort of Auger. That's been going on forever and we'll go on forever but it it's a conflict that will end. I just like the troubles in Northern Ireland and the horrific stuff in Rwanda in apartheid in South Africa and other conflicts in the world the people in Israel Palestinian or not onto logically different In terms of their humanness than other people conflict. That will end also our goal in terms of approaching this was social justice. Justice is this notion of introducing power to the conversation if we had only included voices of people with particular social identities and now other voices. I don't think that necessarily would have been just. But our attempt is to bring in a variety of voices and introduced concepts jobs related to power dynamics which is goes down the rabbit hole of privileged status access oppression etcetera so it also means bringing in the grassroots spotlighting hot-listing minority identities as rusty Israelis essay. Anat there's an essay on Bedouin. BS courses a grassroots in many ways a grassroots treats movement and really. Were trying to broaden the discussion from what is typically explanatory questions to more prescriptive questions saying what should happen in order for. Israeli people have Palestinian people in the region to experience a sense of justice and the social part is just that we wanted to flag that. It isn't simply a book about illegal intricacies. I have a little bit of a vested interest in the term because during the twenty eleven ten protests in Israel that started on Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Levine. Is released were protesting high cost of living biceps cottage cheese of the price of housing. And they were talking in terms of social justice. Senate Clinical Lt and it became very clear early on that to maintain a broad based movement. It would be bracketing. The question of Palestinians and social justice in purely early economic terms. And we know that here when social justice movements more broadly progressive movement's about social justice thinking not only economically editor of racial justice ethnic justice religious justice justice for every individual and collective. And so we're really trying lick the conversation back towards saying how. How can Israel and the Palestinians live their lives and we as editors have a singular answer to that but we brought together scholars and activists that have very specific the the actors for that very important question and they're engaging with one another on that question? We just had the episode Rachel Harris where we talked about her book about teaching about Israel and Palestine. And there it's very clearly a book about pedagogy a book that is directed at professors teachers. Thinking about how they can teach about the subject and here you're dealing much much more conceptually much more about getting into the issues themselves as opposed to how we teach them when you think about a book like this. Who Do you see as the person who you want to pick it up what you want them to get out of it? I think we intended this book per use in classrooms where the Israel Palestinian dynamic is being taught whether it's Israeli Israeli Palestinian conflict glasser history class or the social dynamics of how Israelis and Palestinians relate with one another so it's really meant for students and the professors who teach awesome. We also seems to make it as readable as possible as accessible as possible to a wide audience. Who aren't necessarily subject specialists and to that end really took care to write very concise intro pieces to each of the eight conceptual chapters showing the reader? What's at stake? AAC each of these major debates. I have an essay that appears Rachel's Book as well in the essay that I wrote in her book is really a precursor to this project which I engaged with Aaron and really. It's a short essay about my own personal struggle of how I had been seeking to keep politics out of the classroom and had been even feeling a little bit frightened of students. What if they brought the a word? I would say appears the night before a particularly contentious topic topic where I was worried. That apartheid come. What do I do in my the the foil for the students do? I need to debate the students that they see the other side. Whatever the other side is depending on what perspective is student is raising and I realized it wasn't really very healthier constructive approach so I think what we really wanted to? The book was to enable a wave for politics it should be able to seep into the classroom in a way that doesn't put the professor on the hot seat but enables the professor to shepherd students through the debates enabling students succeed as many perspectives as they can in contrast to mirror. I was coming up this project from perhaps not in context given that was a precursor newark yet that stage but in any event for about ten years I was part of a not for profit educational organization where we worked with muscles views Israelis Palestinians and everything we did was co taught. CO-DEVELOPED CO design. So I ran the organization with the Muslim Palestinian woman are high school programs with Jews. Muslims awesome were run developed design fifty fifty by twos Muslims etcetera. And so I was coming at this project from a number of years back back so to speak from the vantage point that regardless of attempts by some people to engage in objectivity or neutrality perhaps closer to objectivity than they might otherwise present. Things that it's impossible. I think to teach each about things in the humanities frankly without offering perspectives. Even if you said all right. Here's our issue. And here's three vantage vantage points on the issue. Great probably ten others twenty thirty others so I was already at that place because that was is how I been socialized in. That's my experiences regardless. Yeah I mean I think that what you both have brought up really is a critical issue. You look at this book wishes to say as I read it and as I was thinking about it. It seems to me that the central issue that you're engaging with this fundamental idea and and the way I think about this is that even though this is a book with many authors many contributors are pushing this fundamental central thesis that the politics the issues should be a part of how we engage with Israel and Palestine scholars in a way that some people say I want to avoid the politics I want to avoid the touchy issues and try to achieve some kind of noble dream of objectivity of neutrality etc.. I think part of what. This book is arguing in this ties into to mirror. What you were saying in your essay and Rachel Harris Book as well you have to do with the idea about what is the role of the scholar and how we interact with these issues? Yeah to that. I would add one more specific thing especially in the case the way I've been teaching the courses in my field. Political Science and international relations and in many areas of social science. Generally professors tend to focus on. Why questions or we could call explanatory questions? So why did Israel extended extended olive branch to the PLO nineteen ninety-three. Why did Camp David Two thousand fail and instead of keeping prescriptive questions the questions what should be what shall be? Why should it be this way? Instead of keeping those questions that Bay we wanted to invite space for students to see how scholars activists make those prescriptive arguments particularly as the book has become available for use in my own courses finding consigning op. Ed Science for students to write much more frequently and I'm encouraging students to take the various topics that we covered in the course I which is really pretty united eight until present day and make a prescriptive argument should be. DSP Out Lodge should be various political parties depending on what case they're looking at encountered the US embrace a different view of Palestine within their platforms. I should trump have proved the the embassy to Jerusalem or not and make an argument that necessitates taking into account the arguments of another point of view and really taking those arguments seriously in making a good case whereas in some years I might have read a student paper like that. Oh this is too ideological. This is too opinionated. I no longer separate informed. Well argued opinion. That is derived from a scholarly understanding of the situation. I no longer divorce that argumentation from a more detached explanatory Brian Tori type of

Israel Palestine Professor Rachel Harris Erin Rachel United States Newark Anat Rwanda Senate Ed Science Editor Brian Tori Dick Sexualize Jerusalem BAY
"social justice movement" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

04:31 min | 11 months ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"What they Aiming for is really to take control over our livelihood our territories Marcus just folsom nuisance. They have really include the threat to the communities all over the world whose livelihoods depend on the forest on the reverse on their lab for survival. And this is something we are we rejecting because it means more more corporate power those who have been for you who those responsible for the crisis prices will make business out of the crisis. I'm wanting to commodified nature our take control over our systems our lives and our systems uh-huh and we cannot allow for that at the same. The no he's not neither willing to pay for their historical responsibility. There are not willing to pay eh the loss of damage this already taking place all over the world and affected community. These people's and this is not taking care for in in these conference. So that's why we are joining forces from outside. I'm US side the call to make sure that they're aware voices are that we bringing the message forward so also the whole population and the whole world understand that we are being set into a trap. I'm in fact. Third World countries have been pushed into the corner to do as accept discover markets. Because they're not even offer any finance sounds for the loss and damage so we are calling also in our country's not brexit Kara market with these fundamental X.. Do I understand and listen to the communities disowned the ground that are suffering of change we can allow to keep we. Don't give him license to destroy the environment and the the crisis is he now. They need now. He's really taking the lives of so many people around the world displacing people from their territories from their communities. I'm destroying their livelihoods. Tom I WANNA go back to you. And then we're going to hear the speakers. The people behind us are shouting. Shame shame the people united will never never be defeated and Spanish and English They're also saying what do we want climate justice. When do we want it now? What climate the justice means right? Now this is a historical moment because India environmental and climate justice and Social Justice Movement. Right here today. We are standing here with international. Climate Action Network can international and those are some of the largest NGOs GEOS that were on the same page on lifting up false solution. But they're here today because there's a movement lifting up the injustice environment the racism that inequity frame existing in these halls. It's ironic that as indigenous. This people's here. Our caucus has been lobbying and fighting for language on rights of indigenous peoples. The the human rights NGOs has been trying to strengthen human rights language. It's ironic within the UN because now in UN after procedure here. They're recognizing our traditional knowledge. But they're not recognizing the rights of indigenous peoples so it's raising some serious question. Why is it that thereafter rafter? Recognize the after After our traditional knowledge we're saying also hartridge knowledge is not for sale so it's leaking keen up this issue right now. This movement also lifting up the importance of the territorial integrity of mother earth that mother Earth is a living entity that we have to be really serious here as civil society negotiators on flipping the script on how it looks towards its relationship that sacred and it's a mother earth. That's what we are also been demanding. Here is a new level of negotiation that recognizes is is the values of how we are living our capitalism our economy. That's what this is about. You know we're going to go right now to my colleague near means shape. WHO's in the middle of the crowd and she is talking to a Neem? Obasi of Nigeria..

US Social Justice Movement UN Marcus India Nigeria Tom rafter
"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"And so that's a challenging line of thought. And it feels really uncomfortable to level any criticism at anything touching on matters of identity. I also think that it's valuable. I think it's valuable thought experiment and something that is worth being on the lookout for. And I do think that a big part of his point came out in our interview with him the book takes aim at the right almost every chapter says, here's how the right is doing this too. And I do think that he is trying to open some minds. You know, there's there's a feeling of kind of get your people in it to me that I appreciate and respect for the left. The question is not just will also undermined democracy. But is it going to understand undermine our progress? In for the social Justice movement whose goal is progress towards issues of social Justice in many intersecting groups and identity groups, then I do think we get lost in is going to move us forward. I think the example he uses from the women's March is a perfect example, we take this moralistic outlook that the only way. We can get Justice is to protect our perspective at all cost. And not give an inch that there could be problems. And that's how we got into huge issues in the women's movement in a civil rights movement way before the women's March where you had feminist being racist, and you had civil rights activists being sexist. Okay. So you know, because the answer is not zero tolerance. How can we get everybody? A hundred percent score on issues of identity and social Justice. The metric for me is how to we how do we advance? So that we get more Justice for more groups, and you know, the way that we can shut it down and turn on each other. I don't think progresses that metric for me. I see it happen. A lot seen it happen. I'm not that old. But I'm old enough to have seen it happen before. And I, you know, I'm not saying that we. We throw it out. And I don't think that's what he's saying either. But I do think there is room for criticism of the left and of social Justice movements and not just among each other. I think just because the idea that someone on the right cannot see any flaws or have any valid criticisms of social Justice movements on the left is not true. I think there's a real sense of academic about mama. But nobody else can. And I don't think that's positive either. I don't think that moves us forward. I don't think that that's not to say we have to you know, let in every criticisms, I'm not I'm not interested in white supremacist. Criticisms of the social Justice movement, obviously. But again, I think that that doesn't mean there is no space on the right for any criticism of the left. That's fallad. And there's no space on the left or any valid criticism of right? What I feel most intensely right now in every conversation where our listeners on the left disagree with me to any extent, or in any kind of public dialogue between left and right is the sense. The valid one that because of this administration's actions there is no space for any criticism of the left from the right? And I think that we are rapidly entering a space where it's like the Affordable Care Act. We talked a long time ago way back in the quaint days before Donald Trump on this podcast about how we can't have valid conversation about healthcare in this country, a rich robust conversation leads us to good solutions..

social Justice movement Donald Trump hundred percent
News in Brief 25 February 2019

UN News

03:07 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 25 February 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. People's rights are under fire in many parts of the globe, the UN chief till the Human Rights Council on Monday. But he said that thanks to the progress made by powerful, social Justice movements. He was hopeful for the future until tenure Gutierrez was addressing the Geneva-based forum on the opening day of its fortieth session and underlined the council's key role as the epicenter for dialogue and cooperation on all human rights issues. Be they civil political economic social or cultural when billion people have been lifted out of extreme poverty in just the generation more than two billion people have gained access to improve sanitation and more than two point five billion. People have gained access to improve the inkling water resources the mortality rates for children and the five as declined by almost sixty percents. It's easy. These overall context of progress and concern that I want to focus on a few human rights challenges as I scan the global horizon the UN chief insisted that ongoing gender inequality. Not remains a major modern day challenge. Untold women and girls still face, insecurity, violence and other violations of their rights every day. He added while glass ceilings, abound around six thousand more mainly women and children have arrived in an overcrowded camp for the internally displaced in northeastern Syria having fled the town of by goose where the isolated is terrorist group is making its final stand against coalition forces UN spokespersons defenders Eureka told reporters at U N headquarters on Monday that new arrivals at the Al hall camp over the weekend meant that nearly forty thousand the right there since December conditions at the cap were extremely challenging particularly in the reception areas, which are currently hosting thousands of people but with insufficient, water and sanitation hygiene facilities. This is increasing the risk of disease outbreak to help decongestion these areas extensions to the cap already underway with services and assistance provided to people in those areas. Mr. digital said the UN was also gravely concerned. And by further reports of civilian casualties. Choose a hostess and unexploded ordinances in it lib and Hama governor it's in Syria, north west a group of UN human rights experts on Monday deplored the execution of nine men in Egypt last week. He were convicted on the basis of evidence allegedly obtained through torture, these convictions appear to be in direct disregard of both addition and international law and procedure said the nine experts in the joint statement expressing their dismay to thirties continuing disregard of the legal process. The men were executed even though an appeal and petition to halt, the death sentences was before Egypt's supreme constitutional court said the experts they pointed out that capital punishment may only be carried out after a legal process that gives all possible safeguards following a high court judgment in January last year, the experts called on Egypt to hold all pending executions following repeated allegations of unfair trials since President Abdel Fattah El Sisi came to power in July two thousand and thirteen Egyptian courts of upheld one thousand four hundred. Fifty one death sentences out of a total two thousand four hundred and forty-three referrals by lower courts. Matt wells, even news.

UN Human Rights Council Egypt United Nations Syria President Abdel Fattah El Sisi Gutierrez Matt Wells Al Hall Mr. Digital U N
"social justice movement" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"So I I would like to start by noting that we have spoken about this book before. And in fact, I am actually referenced in the acknowledgements full disclosure. Yes. Yes. So I wanted to go back and talk about the chapter that I reviewed do your do you? Remember a conversation from November twenty seventeen it was thousand years ago. There was on Email. So I'm sure abra trail serious. Yes. So one of the things that we talked about. And I think that is something that has come across in conversations. We've had about the book and the conversations you've been having about this book, more generally. And I'll read you my Email. It was on a specific chapter in the book truths entrance. Russians going to get you my thoughts tonight right now. My thoughts are that. It seems more boilerplate unless thought the modern social Justice movement is infested with cultural revenge is who obsess over restoring what they that which they perceived to have been lost. And I asked what was lost? What did say black trans women have in the nineteen sixties to which they're clutching desperately? And then I also put it out a use had said something about real forgotten America. And I said you're way better than this. What do you mean by forgotten America, which one is that where is that? And I think in the conversations that you've been having about this book, and you've been having conversations on MSNBC and in a lot of conservative podcasts because I know you were on. On Ben Dominic's show over at the federalist you I feel as if there's a fundamental difference in a fundamental divide. That's taking place right now in reactions to your book, and I think it has to do with not just your book, but the entire conversation of quote, unquote, identity, politics and the social Justice movement in general, so I wanted to start with why did you write this book? And for whom did you write this book? We'll just briefly address some of the stuff that you talked about their forgotten America as it were as something rather disdainful of it is notion that is appealed to by individuals on the far right and the far left to justify a grievance politics. The notion that they have had something robbed from them. And that they must appeal to a strong hand in order to restore it. It's a paralyzing construct one that isn't based in reality and justifies a program that I think is actually detrimental to the social fabric. Why I wrote this book, and basically the idea for it came to me because it's a lot of conservative bloggers are hostile towards quote, unquote, identity politics, which is. Catchall broad catchall contains multitudes of terms. But generally is that it does incompatible and a lot of ways within a gala -tarian ideal to which America expires aspirated sentiment that may not necessarily be achieved, but it is worthy aspiration than the less. And when I was in Ukraine, monster junket, I was there, but the imitation of government pro western government retreated to eight conversation with the chief prosecutor, and he was explaining to us rather pointedly why it was not in their interest..

America social Justice movement MSNBC Ben Dominic prosecutor Ukraine thousand years
"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"You know, I want to ask you before we let you go where you think the Republican party should go from here as you've considered these concepts carefully because I find one of the reasons people are so resistant to me when I define myself as from the right, or as a disaffected Republican as I often say right now, the reaction to that becomes will. You must describe to viewpoints that are misogynistic or racist or anti LGBTQ, none of which could be further from the truth because the party as a whole, I think has this perception of saying, well, we don't want to be the social Justice left. Therefore, we're going to deny the problems exist at all same thing with climate. We're not here on the green new. Deal. So we're going to deny climate change. And I just wouldn't what you think is the direction for the party that acknowledges where there are challenges in offers some solutions that stay in the healthy calibration, you know, that we've been talking about here while I think conservatism properly understood is pretty hostile towards these disempowering notions of victimization that have been misconstrued as some sort of self actualising empowering phenomenon on Donald Trump came along and adopted many of the social Justice less prescriptions for creating durable political coalition when he told his his supporters that basically there lots in life were not of their own making that the obstacles in their path were put there by condescending elites who not only looked down on them but discriminated against them that labor from abroad had made products of their labours undesirable in that unfair competition from foreign sources. Had had robbed them of their do. All this stuff is pretty powerful too to surrender to the notion that you are not the master of your own destiny is ironically, a very powerful notion, and it's the sort of thing that was philosophically alien to conservatism up until twenty sixteen and that is I hope in my fondest hope that this book helps the right in a sort of a subversive fashion. I mean, they're getting into this book thinking that it's an attack on the left in it is that untiringly they've adopted quite a few of these really dangerous ideals in it's my hope that at the end of this book, the social Justice movement on the right, but comes much more apparent to conservatives who've made a combination with a lot of these forces and begins to look like a really dangerous accommodation. That's ultimately not in their own interests, and certainly not conducive to a politically healthy environment. Unjust, social Justice in the unmaking America. Noah rothman. Thank you so much for spending time with us. My pleasure. Thank you. We hope you enjoyed our conversation with Noah Rothman, no had a little viral moment as I was discussing the interview on morning, Joe. And fun. Fact we've been on morning Joe today this morning as you're hearing this podcast on Friday. We were on the live broadcasts of morning, Joe, which we will be sharing the links with and social media. So you can check it out and share away. We were really excited. We are. So grateful for the opportunity, and we hope you guys enjoyed the interview on Tuesdays episode where to be joined by Courtney hill who has a firm that recruits African American women to run for office. And we're really excited to talk with Courtney about that effort until then keep it nuance. Jill. Dylan Garvan produces pantsuit politics every week in thanks for making a sound better and smarter Dylan. At least nap is our production assistant, which means we could not live without her scheduling organization, feedback and creativity. Thank.

unmaking America Republican party Noah rothman social Justice movement Joe Dylan Garvan Donald Trump Courtney hill production assistant Jill
"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"What have you not secular institutions like a community centers, these are imperative to allowing individuals to set down roots divorcing them from their screens giving them an opportunity to escape without appealing to a intoxicants. These are the sort of things that are absolutely imperative for a healthy human beings the distinction that we're. Drawing on here is in the judicial system. The Justice system is not a mediating institution. The Justice system has one imperative lettuce to deliver Justice in all that Justice as we understand it originating from English common law has a certain amount a certain precepts that we have not improved upon among them in gala -tarian ideals, like the presumption of innocence. This is an enemy this enemy concept to social Justice advocates on the left and the right. The idea that individuals individuals alone are responsible for their own circumstances is is a fundamental problem for social Justice advocates on the left and the right. And we saw that in the collective response, for example, most recently to Jesse smollet story Jesse smell. It wasn't an individual. He wasn't a victim. His accusers weren't individuals. They weren't responsible for their lots in life. This was a collective problem. This was a societal sickness that had been exposed as a result of these individual actions. Those individuals were bit players. It was a medieval morality play in which these individuals weren't really people at all. They were. Representative of collective forces. That's not Justice. That's something much different. Maybe it's because we just don't have a great, you know, when a win people feel divorced from the political system, and I'm trying to think of some other institutions where we could play this out. We put the burden for everything for all morality for all systematic changes. In course, corrections on Justice system built for individuals. I don't disagree with that. I think it's too much pressure for that system. It's not what it was built for you. I think this is probably a direct development of sort of the expectations that social Justice current currently constituted social Justice thinking places on the public sector expects it to deliver a lot of things that cannot deliver in. So you develop a lot of expectations moral assumptions that cannot be met. And when they're not met you have a real lashing out as a result of that. Look social Justice itself is a noble concept than it's got a pretty robust foundation to it that it's activists may not even be aware. Originates out of the Catholic church in the nineteenth century is kind of an alternative theory of organization to compete with the largely secular Protestant enlightenment. That was mostly about charity, but it had some collectivist elements to it John Rawls put some meat on these bones. When he talked about thinking about Justice is basically like it's a finite commodity and developing a theory of Justice that would ascribe to institutions the province of distributing Justice in lightened fashion, but to do so from behind a theoretical construct. He called the veil of ignorance, so the enlightened distributor wouldn't be able to satisfy their own biases. The modern social Justice movement has no use for the veil of ignorance that is a morally obtuse concepts. How can you have an enlightened distribution if you do not know who the objects of your distribution are going to be who is oppressed who deserves to be lifted up who deserves a come up that is the modern incarnation of social Justice that I think is so toxic. And so deleterious because it compels it's it's it here. Not to think of people as people, but as collective representatives of either oppressed or oppressor who deserve to be a thought of not as individuals not as people, but as pawns in a much larger game, and that's a really dangerous way of thinking that kind of brings me around to where I had planned to start in initially reaching out to.

Jesse smell John Rawls Jesse smollet Catholic church Representative
"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Is valuable insofar as it provides you with self actualization and racial and cultural awareness demographic awareness. None of that is what I take issue with in my book to do. So it'd be to argued from a position of ignorance the philosophy of this particular line of thought intersection -ality in particular has in practice become dis empowering for people who apply it in as a form of social organization in probably the most prominent example of that denomination. Is how this law Sophy tour the women's March apart intersection is a perfectly Val way of thinking about how prejudice manifests in the real world. How individuals suffer from varying degrees of prejudice, which is doled out again in degrees based on individual accidents of birth as an organizing philosophy that was adopted by the women's March, for example, it compelled it's individuals to think of themselves as inhabiting a matrix of prejudice that is unethical without the help of certain enlightened and elite power structures. It compelled its adherence to see its allies not as allies based on their ideological predilections. But as very degrees of adversary based on their accidents of birth. So women who were white in Jewish who may be shared their predilections, ideologically weren't allies because they were white Jewish in the words to makeup Mallory they advanced white supremacy. Whether they knew it or not and this organization was compelled to embrace figures with no political constituency whatsoever. But to abandon them. Would be to a legitimize the prejudices against which they say they fight. So the women's March embraced a Saudi Cora convicted cop killer living as a fugitive from Justice in Cuba, or the anti semitic minister, Louis Farrakhan, again that could have abandoned these people, but it would have been a sin against intersection -ality, and in the process, they lost control over their influence within the Democratic Party of the Democratic Party has had to abandon them as an institution in order to preserve their own influence so this philosophy while perhaps individually empowering has forced them to abandon until lose a lot of their political influence, and that's not empowering it's an illusion of empowerment what you just said helped me embrace some of your book more. When I first started reading the first chapter. I have a very strong reaction to the entire situation surrounding Justice cavenaugh because in my personal life experiences. And I always try to check my Nyeri action to news against what is prompting this reaction. Recognize that my personal life experiences. Do not involve Brett cabin. All you know, I have to put some space between those things. So I found myself trying to read your book paragraph-by-paragraph using that improv technique of. Yes. And you know, because I wanna just reject based on my own emotion about that particular incident. And as I did that you always got to my hand. And so when people hear you talk about social Justice, I think it is important to point out that in the book, you are very careful to say a lot of what you said to Sarah that movements. Like black lives matter start as part of the essential building blocks of our democracy ways to move America closer to its ideal. And then there's kind of a tipping point where it becomes illiberal. Can you say more about that precisely in? That's thank you very much. Really appreciate that. This one of the kinder things I've ever heard anybody say about the book. So when you talk to for example students and I'm going around the colleges now in Utah. Them about the American ideal. The American ideal is sort of a frustrating notion for them because if all you ever know about the American ideal is that we've failed to live up to it. Why would you think it's worth preserving? And that to me is frankly and misunderstanding of the very definition of the word ideal ideal is aspirated, it'll it's never going to be achieved. But the fact that it is unchangeable nets utopian doesn't give you license to abandon the project the operative word in the phrase. A more perfect union is not perfect. It's more. This is a project in ongoing one. And as you said, and the for example, the black lives matter movement is very important because it is a dented the ways in which has the civil rights movements leaders appeal to our common sense of humanity in our common notions of idealized perfection in that we were failing to achieve them. Black lives matter movement..

Democratic Party Val Louis Farrakhan Mallory Cuba Brett America Utah Sarah
"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

Pantsuit Politics

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on Pantsuit Politics

"Mm-hmm. Imagine ordering and chatting with doctors all in line and getting birth control delivered right to your door every month. Intern erects accompany that's here to make getting birth control easier near X means fewer doctor visits skipping pharmacy lines and automated refills you don't have to think about plus. It's the most affordable option out there without insurance and could be free with insurance. Go to end, you are ex- dot com slash pantsuit for a twenty dollar credit. When you begin to dehumanize people. You're no longer talking about them as people you're talking about them as members of a class or a tribe, and you can do a whole lot to somebody. When she no longer see them as a person we've seen this in countless societies it hasn't happened here. But that doesn't mean it never will. This is the sort of thing that I think you have to address really proactively because when it becomes a real problem that is societal at in scope than it's too late. This is Sarah from the left and Beth from the right? You're listening to pay through politics. They're shouting. No insults. Plenty of months. Hello everyone. Welcome to Friday's episode at PNC politics today. We have a special guest joining us Noah Rothman is here to talk about his new book unjust on the social Justice movement. And I will tell you that. I think we had a very nuanced conversation with no, what do you think? Sarah or do. I was not mad at him. When it was over. I feel like that's a good sign. I'm very excited to share it with all of you Andy hear your feedback before we dive into the conversation with no want to call your attention to our event with the wild geese bookshop in Franklin, Indiana. We are very excited to be joining them on Thursday, February twenty eighth you can find the details on our Facebook page..

Noah Rothman Sarah Intern Facebook PNC Franklin Indiana Andy Beth twenty dollar
"social justice movement" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Thanks again to Bob Mondello wanna take some time now to talk through the history of coming out day as we know it now to do that. I sat down with professor MARCY Gallo Hello? Hello. How are you? Talked to cal-. I'm great. Is a Sam. This is Sam. I'm so excited and you can call me, MARCY. I won't call you MARCY. Wonderful, wonderful. MARCY is an associate professor of history at the university of Nevada Las Vegas. She specializes in race, gender sexuality in social Justice movements. She's only that to understand how coming out got its own day. You have to understand the history of the gay rights movement. You might think of that began in the sixties. But Marcie told me the roots of this activism we can actually see them decades earlier. I would go back to the post World War Two period. Okay. And World War Two. Some people say because it broke down the social norms in such a huge way and because remember it was a war against. Hate it was a war against discrimination, right? We were fighting the Nazis when you see these black men comeback, and they fought for freedom elsewhere and they can't be treated as free people at home and sack. Exactly. So the impetus for the civil rights movement, there's a direct connection between the lack civil rights movement and lesbian gay movement. Many of the early activists were either in the civil rights movement if they were white or black, or they were working against the war in Vietnam. That's the other thing that's happening. And I think they started to realize, hey, you know, we're minority to lesbians and gay people are treated horribly, and maybe it's time for us to organize and start fighting for, right. You know, in speaking of coming out, it is very easy. I think to assume that this is a thing that people always did, but cultural notions of sexuality in divining sexuality have chain. Changed and there was a time when the whole, the very concept of defining or declaring sexuality wasn't a thing, right? No, right. Exactly. You know, for gay folks, I think the whole idea of coming out is is very much a sort of a more contemporary kind of concept. When I was doing research on the first lesbian rights organization. The daughters are believes who started in fifty five nineteen fifty five in San Francisco. They didn't use that terminal. They didn't even require that people announce their their sexuality. Any woman could join the organization. But when they did refer to it, they talked about taking off the mask which I really, I think that's such a great visual. So the coming out stuff I think might have been sort of thing with game in and certainly, you know the the obvious connotation right is around society. Body by debutante coming out parties where they would be presented to society. Well, that wasn't my world, and it wasn't the world of a lot of people in his story before I was out. I actually was an escort for a friend to her debutante ball. You did. Renna tech's. Same trying to make something happen. That was gonna happen. Great. That's a great story, right? So that when people say coming and I'm like, what do you mean like Debbie, but it really gets popularized as sure you know is in actually in the seventies? Yes. When Harvey milk says, you got to come out. Most importantly, every person must come out. So I stopped ide- Harvey milk. He was an openly gay member of the San Francisco board of supervisors..

MARCY Gallo Harvey milk San Francisco Bob Mondello professor cal Marcie associate professor of history university of Nevada Las Vegas Renna tech Debbie Vietnam milk
Ron Dellums, U.S. lawmaker who led push for sanctions against South Africa, dead at 82

All Things Considered

03:38 min | 2 years ago

Ron Dellums, U.S. lawmaker who led push for sanctions against South Africa, dead at 82

"Cornish. This hour Harvard University turns over new documents in a lawsuit over its. Admissions process what those documents say about how the school evaluates Asian American? Applicants praises like is he in bright or, works hard. But little she have any fun also followed for the head of CVS who faces allegations of sexual misconduct and a new list of the two hundred greatest songs. By twenty first, century women you look at lists even if the best music of the two thousand you'll get beyond saying at. The top but often the rest of the list is really mostly centered. Around men now news from k. q. e.. D. news I'm Tiffany. Cam high the former mayor of Oakland and. East Bay congressman Ron Dellums. Has died Dellums was in Oakland native and in one thousand nine hundred. Seventy one he became the first black congressman from northern California during his career which spanned more than. Forty years he was an war activist and a supporter of social. Justice movements He died this morning at his home in Washington DC at the age of eighty two, k. q., e. d. politics reporter guy marzorati joins me now to look back on Dellums. Life first of all guy how did Dellums get his start in politics. Well it really was through organizing and activism has uncle Seattle was a? Well known local union leader dome served in, the marines. He then became a Berkeley city council member right at the time we're Berkeley was kind of a national epicenter of antiwar protests and Dellums really took that activism. With him when, he went to congress what kind of impacted Dellums have when he served in the US house of representatives well. I think what really stood out most from my conversations today with domes. Former colleagues and his friends is that he. Never lost that activists. Spirit when you've got to Capitol Hill he. Kind of just shouted it. From a larger platform and he was known to take stand strong political. Stance the first being against the Vietnam war than his efforts against apartheid government in South Africa you. Know year after year he would put forward these resolutions against the South African government finally, in the mid eighties he got an led an effort to impose sanctions I talked? With, Sandra Swanson a former assemblyman who was an early staffer for Dellums and he said domes really took the efforts to back Nelson Mandela really personally and that's when he grew a, beard he said I'm going to I'm going to not, shave his beard Nelson Mandela's three although he keep his. Beard after Nelson Mandela was free and that culminated in one thousand nine hundred ninety when, Dellums actually, hosted Nelson Mandela a huge celebration at the Oakland call him Dumbs was also the mayor of Oakland from. Two thousand seven to two. Thousand and eleven what was his legacy there yeah I think it's. Fair, to say that most, people when they talk about domes like they split. It between his time in congress and then those four years in the mayor's office because those were, rocky came during the great recession there's a lot of internal. Turmoil at city hall and ultimately I. Think the, complaint you may, hear most is that he just wasn't present hands on. Enough I talked with former councilman Ignasio de LA Fuente he ran against alums in two thousand and six here's how he put it being mayor of the city is specially like golden Different again before. In job is the different. Demands that and and I don't think he was Well. But he tried and obviously could but I should say that domes time in congress he did he was known. As someone who provided for his district who got a lot of federal funding back to Oakland what kind of?.

Ron Dellums Nelson Mandela Berkeley Oakland Congressman Congress Harvard University Cornish. East Bay Seattle California Washington City Hall South Africa Beard Guy Marzorati Dellums United States
"social justice movement" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Courts we need people writing their state legislature we need people taking action on all of these levels in without the attention that the black lives matter move and has brought to this issue you know we wouldn't be here today talking about this issue i we wouldn't have produced this book that movement like so many movements that came about after killings right after emmett till was killed after mid for evans with kill they were so resurgence of social justice movement and the black lives movement is the social justice movement of our day this is not just kids out on the street you know this is a series movement and i really appreciate the work that's been done uh by the individuals in that moment in it needs to continue uh here's the bulk of policing the black man it is subtitled arrest prosecution and imprisonment covers all aspects of that it is edited by angela davis and all has a series of how many authors total on this while they're levin chapters a couple of them are co authored sell about twelve or thirteen authors altogether individuals who i'm i'm just very proud to include like brian stevenson i mention from equal justice initiative share lent i fall director cancelling double acp legal defense fine mark malloch of the sentencing prize i could go on and on and we work very hard to make this book assessable to everyone who wants to pick up and learn about this issue and learn about ways that they can make a difference right by working to reform our criminal justice systems anything by compiling this book what did you land learned a lot uh i was really fortunate that so many of these great authors and activists who asked to join me joins me and i learned so much from all of them i mean i thought i knew a lot about the criminal justice system but each chapter brought something new for me and i'm sure it would do.

angela davis brian stevenson mark malloch emmett evans social justice levin director
"social justice movement" Discussed on FM NewsTalk

FM NewsTalk

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on FM NewsTalk

"The electric coops out there and they were like his is st louis okay is ferguson doing alright and unlike you first have to explain to people not only did the entire city of st louis not burned to the ground but neither did the entire town of ferguson this was a it was a horrible incident but it was limited to like a street about six blocks giver joked right and have those walks weren't even in ferguson the next found over dole would you i know extremely frustrated right and you have you touched on you know the jay nixon situation earlier to a tragedy for the city because here we think we've got the national guard to protect us and in you know what happened was was the social justice movement got the governor to back off in our town burned you know before and a dump cut me off of him going the rug legend but you know so jay nixon announces he's going to have you know national guard oliver ferguson and we're all think right like like like a lot of other former governors have done i think we didn't day hearns had an incident back in kansas city i think in the fifties your 60s there was riots over there he immediately brought a national guard and you have to establish order right and i think that's what anybody will tell you democrat republican independent they'll tell you were a national laws and what will figure out what happened but before we can figure out what happened we have to have peace and law you know right and so that's what he should have done instead why think he just let the mayhem continue well so what happened was he announces his bringing all these troops and in the social media of the social justice moment just went wild ose's exactly what's wrong with america we treat african american flag through an invading force which we african americans like the raw criminals we don't need the national guard down on west force and we're going to be on new force and the very fact that the governor thinks he needs to put national guard in place in ferguson is proof of all this wrong with our country and so you know governor nixon who at one point thought he might be vice president nixon backed off rights of the they pulled the troops out because the.

st louis dole oliver ferguson hearns kansas city social media african americans governor nixon jay nixon social justice america nixon
"social justice movement" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"social justice movement" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"The social justice movement eta stand in solidarity and the spirit and legacy of dr king the clergy's gonna hold the trump administration any attorney general jeff sessions accountable in the wake of an increase in hate crimes mass incarceration and discrimination and i think that's very very important right now especially when they're talking about orders ban of gays in the military but anyway we'll we'll talk about that a little bit later also have to remind you that the politics nation program with reverend al sharpton his on every sunday morning on msnbc at eight am eastern seventy in central make sure you like it on msnbc and check out politics nation with reverend al sharpton every sunday morning either in our next segment we're going to be joined by mary pat hector we all know mary pat she's the national youth director of the national action networks youth move and we're gonna talk about why is president trump going against his campaign promises with his recent transgender ban in the military why is he doing that is this just another one of his distractions or he says we'll talk about that and i'm sure that the clergy when they meet on august twenty eight in washington dc for this historic ministers march for justness they're going to have some choice things to say about it if the president is really serious about this or it could be just you know a cloak to try to hide some of his nakedness but we'll see in our second are we going to be joined by jennifer jones austin we all know jennifer she's the chief executive officer of the federation of protestant welfare agencies that's on social policy advocacy organization when nearly two hundred member agencies she's an antipoverty advocate and she's also the daughter granddaughter uttar and greatgranddaughter of baptist ministers and social justice activists in we'll talk about now that the gop senate has voted on how to proceed with health care reform was next and how does the recently revealed democratic economic plan fit into this space we are i talk about that will talk about you know what are the next steps for congress concerning health care reform what are the details and policy implications of the democrats is it a better deal and.

reverend al sharpton msnbc director president jennifer jones chief executive officer gop senate health care reform social justice attorney washington federation of protestant welfa congress