35 Burst results for "Social Isolation"

"social isolation" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:54 min | 1 d ago

"social isolation" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Maybe it was a teacher maybe it was someone who had a positive impact, a grandparent, a father mother. Sister brother somebody who had a really positive impact on your life think of the power of that the meaning the purpose that gives you. That becomes a powerful way to take the preparation, the training that you've had from life and to grow from it. So, as we look at this, as we think about we all share the danger that's prompting our social isolation. And when we humans share a common danger, if you think about after a storm, people tend to congregate out in the street and there's greater connection greater bonds that tend to draw people together. So we feel the danger that those type of disasters that prompted in the past, but we can't connect the Kobe threat creates the danger, but it also creates the risk that if we respond like we normally do to the humanness that needs to connect. That becomes danger and that's part of the tension that we say. And we we deal with by learning to prepare and by seeing how others are prepared and trained to handle it. Life is trained as for these challenges just like our crews on the space station we all can draw those lessons of our lives and the strength we feel from each other and that's what that t really relates to us. And I think we're all hoping for you to learn a lot from this entire experience, and then maintain that positively through through this whole thing and of course, on the back end and and continuing to keep it going that that is right there Dr Williams, the connect to reminder community openness, networking needs, expeditionary mindset countermeasures, and then lastly, training and preparation taking a whole snapshot at this at this whole thing What does it really tell us about the impacts of social social isolation and what we have to do to make sure that we are going to be okay when this is all over with. I think he really tells us. Couple of really important things one. We really learn from each other. We are social animals..

social isolation Dr Williams
"social isolation" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:37 min | 1 d ago

"social isolation" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Member of our family or each of our loved ones may have different abilities to deal with the social isolation. So it really becomes important again, as we talked about earlier to remain mindful of those differences and to be responsive to them in the way they need us to be. That's part of the countermeasures that we also train the crew on being mentally prepared for the isolation having a mental acceptance. That period of time is going to pass while we have to be socially isolated. And then recognizing that different stressors are gonNA trigger potentially different coping strategies in its and each of us may differ in how we deal with it, and so we may think the best way to deal with it is the way we're dealing with it where another member of the family or the whoever were living with. is dealing with the differently and and we're wanting to try to make them change to our way, which it may be exactly meeting their needs at that point. I think what's unique about this covid nineteen situation that we're all in is you you talked a lot about understanding and connecting with people in finding ways to do so with a lot of folks that may have different needs I think what's also challenging especially in these times as I guess we're recording this..

social isolation
"social isolation" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

04:31 min | 1 d ago

"social isolation" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Can have a thousand dreams. While someone exposed to covid nineteen? And you become sick with it has but wondering. One goal, and that's to not become seriously ill or to cause someone else to become seriously ill. So it really becomes important to reframe the situation, meet our needs and recognized as we're doing. So we're really again could noting are physical emotional and psychological needs because we don't want to live the rest of our lives with a sense of guilt on. Intentionally contaminating someone else. Yeah, there's there's a lot to this to this particular part of the reminder connect the needs I think I think another one. What's what's interesting is You know you talked a lot about the the mental wellbeing and a in about. Think I. Think it's very interesting is just how important those physiological needs are just. Keeping your body healthy you know things that can help you in a sense of social isolation can be eating rights and getting enough sleep and exercising all things that I think a lot of people are having trouble with as as gyms are either closed or very high risk environments and end you know we you start sacrificing things like sleep and like having some good food just making sure that you're attending to those very basic needs. Another great. Of that point because what one thing we see is a lot of people kinda going back to the openness and using the open this to meet these needs, and that is people that innovatively finding ways to exercise where they live. So they're creatively looking at different ways to do exactly as in the point you made, and that is to maintain that physical. Fitness and that component of arranging their environment. To be more conducive to meeting their physiological emotional and psychological needs, and that's that's important that we remain open in creatively look for ways to do that to help ensure those needs are being met. Now this next one is interesting. It's called Expeditionary Mindset. Now, what exactly is that? You know this is a really important one in it's really you'll. You'll see a number of the astronauts have commented on social isolation and they really pull from an expeditionary skills model. So when we think about in expedition, we're thinking about your now heading out doing something kind of a sense of adventure. There's a readiness to respond you're learning from success of others you're sharing the. You have you realize there's GonNa be challenges that are gonNA come your way you take a lot of steps to. Foster, a sense of readiness to respond to whatever those challenges may be. You kinda use the challenge degree, the sense of adventure, and you remain open to the challenges that you're going to confront. So that's really what has helped others who have engaged historical expeditions. That's how they succeed. They studied what did others confront? How did they succeed? How do we prepare? What are the challenges we're confronting? How do we learn to address them with limited or no help that we might have? And how do we continually hone our skill sets for doing? So that's kind of what we mean by an expeditionary mindset that we don't say were stuck in this environment and there's not much we can do we say look this. If we adopt an expeditionary mindset, we approach it by saying you know what we realized that others are going through this others are learning from it. How can we capitalize on what they're doing? How can we build on that success? How do we build on her own success? What? Works. What doesn't work? How do we pull our family together kind of again getting the team activated so that we identify and respect the roles and responsibilities that each of us have for the success of the mission. In the same way, the crew would do each has a role and responsibility. How do we? How do we range our family? are others were living with.

social isolation Foster
"social isolation" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

05:53 min | 1 d ago

"social isolation" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Great. Thanks so much for having me back. It'll be a real pleasure for me to share some of these thoughts but today absolutely, and it's very timely discussion. I think that we're having is all about social isolation something that I know I personally am very used to and I think a lot of our listeners are as well and I'm very interested to talk about this because it's not only something that is applied to. Humans face spaceflight, but it's something that can be brought into our own lives here on earth and I'm very excited to get right into it. Let's start though with getting a good understanding of just what we're talking about here and why we have to implement this thing called the connect reminder into that shortly. But I sort of setting the scene on social isolation. What is Dr Williams? What is social isolation? Pay so much and it's it's a really important topic. Just as you said all over the world, we're all dealing with it. So slice relation is really we voluntarily or intentionally withdraw from social contact with others. With our astronauts we've island, they voluntarily agree to complete a long duration mission. And for many of us today, we're kind of struggling to maintain the socialization that they volunteered to engage in, and so it's important that we kinda distinguish between being socially isolated and feeling lonely. interesting. So let's let's dive into that. So what what are those feelings Give give us a little comparison on that the the what can come what the results from social isolation and I guess how that compares to the traditional sense of loneliness. Great Question. So when we think about being socially isolated feeling socially isolated versus feeling lonely. Kind of the social isolation is when we self imposed a withdrawal away from other people or we do it as a result of being requested as we are now, and that's unfortunately when we withdraw that's often viewed as a precursor to depression people who become depressed they don't want to be around other people. And as a consequence of that loneliness as a common experience, you know all of us get lonely from time to time and but it's not always it versus it becomes only. Of when we sort of self exile and withdrawing from basically everything around us and we no longer kinda confront the ways that to our day to day activities we grow. So we withdraw we tend to. Foster personal growth like we could. So loneliness really kind of sets up an activation of a set of complex feelings and some of those results in negative feelings, and then the negative reactions we have. Can Be perceived by those care about us. They see US withdrawing they get concerned about us and we don't reach out as much. So it really starts to impact on our relationship with others and it kind of doesn't allow us to meet our social needs and that's why we get concerned and attentive to..

social isolation US Dr Williams
"social isolation" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

03:53 min | 2 d ago

"social isolation" Discussed on At Liberty

"Prevent that? Yes, I have heard that and I think it's a real concern. I think all of us would love for. US. To Somehow one day get notification of. Okay. All clear. As you know, we can all an outside and how Garnier's. And resumed life as neural but that is highly unlikely. What I suspect is that it will be a gradual process as rates decline that there may be loosening restrictions. But there will still be that concern of. Some lingering threat and so for many, this may result in continued patterns of is solution distancing one south from others. And in fact Franken. In cases where a city or municipality, the public water becomes unsafe to drink. And even after the problem is.

"social isolation" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

07:40 min | 2 d ago

"social isolation" Discussed on At Liberty

"Paper. That was published in two thousand sixteen that included data from four nationally representative samples, and it included measures of not only the structural aspects of relationships. So to the extent to which the size of people social networks varied. As well as the functions that these relationships serve and the quality of those relationships and what they. Was, a dose response affect meaning that for every increase in social connection there was a decrease in risk for biomarkers linked to hell including things like blood pressure, BMI and inflammation, and what was incredible about this is that it was also seen across each phase of life including from adolescents the way chew older adulthood and and so with. The suggest is that this is something that can affect people's. Physiology and physical health. Across the life span and that we're all somewhere on this continuum. So this is an issue that affects us all. Yeah and so looking specifically at something like someone's psychological status, their mental health, what does isolation due to that but does loneliness due to that? Yeah. So some neuro scientists have looked at. The sorts of things that go on in in our brains and what some research has shown is that our brain expects proximity to others. and. So when we are alone or we are not Louis trusted others. Then there's signals a state of heightened alertness. So we have to be much more vigilant to threats in our environment. The idea that was of have to do everything on our own right, and so that takes more effort. And this of course, signal other areas of the body that increase this state of alertness, which when experienced more chronically can lead to other kinds of longer term effects. But this can affect not only just our emotional state, our feelings of distress or anxiety, but also can affect our physiology as well. And so for people who are listening at home and perhaps in. Corona virus time they're feeling kind of. More isolated or more lonely from other people potentially are experiencing some kind of psychological impact from that loneliness. What would you advise as far as how to mitigate some of those things? Right. Well, first of all I think it's important to acknowledge that those feelings are normal and so if you're feeling distressed if you're feeling well Weli. Again. That's normal. That's your body's normal response to this. But it is important to. Take steps to mitigate that because we don't want that to be pro bombs. Especially because we don't know how long this is going to be. Right. But the thing that I think is relevant here is that that research showed that our perceptions of social support. Mitigate the distress associated with that. What others also had found was that when people were offered support so Interestingly, they would have participants com, they'd have the standardized stressor. And had to the participants were offered support. So if you need how I'm here to help you but importantly none of the participants. Any help at all but just among knows that just were offered. Hope this resulted in significantly lowered reactivity threats. So what just knowing that there's support available to you if needed that that's enough to help mitigate some of those. Effects of stress, and so just reaching out to your family, your friends, neighbors, and offering help to them may be an important way in which you can help others, and there's other research that also suggests that. Providing support can have a greater benefit than receiving support. So not only are. Others, but that that can help you as well. That's super super interesting both that. Being, offered help helps even if you don't receive the actual help and that providing that help or offering to provide that help helps you as well. So a lot of us are communicating through phone through text messages through zoom calls, facetime. That kind of thing is that good enough there's two parts to that. I think one is we need to recognize that when we are face to face with someone, we may be engaging all five senses or at least most of them. Maybe, not always all and so we may be missing important social information. When we limit that incoming information, the other point is that we have. Decades of research that have documented the psychological physical and cognitive health of stocks of social relationships and social connections. But most of that research is based on face to face kind of interaction, and so we really don't have as much evidence when it comes to these kinds of tools we shouldn't rely on them so much that they become a new norm once this crisis is over. And when the threat is lifted that you're able to reconnect in other ways that include things like pets, right. We can go give someone a hug and that right now feels like a long way off. And that's something that we don't have a good substitute for right now but we can offer emotional kinds of support through these tools and so using them where we can in positive ways is really what we're going to have to do until this crisis is over. You know and talking about all of this, we obviously don't know how long are social isolation will last I think that there are a lot of communities of people who experience this in a long-term setting and I. You know understanding a little bit about how We all might experience some psychological distress but I'm wondering how severe those. Things get for people who might be in situations like solitary confinement where there is just such an extreme version of social isolation..

social isolation representative Louis
"social isolation" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

03:01 min | 4 d ago

"social isolation" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"That affect our ability to connect with others are going to have both immediate facts as well as what are the long term implications. So. How does it affect us? You wrote this paper. The loneliness way to sing loneliness is as bad for you as smoking fifteen cigarettes a day. Well, that seems really bad for you over decades in other words, loneliness will get you. When I give you a little bit of background on where where that comparison comes from. So I am done two major Meta analyses and I know you know what they are, but maybe for your listeners. Familiar. With what a Meta analysis is really that's combining the data from from all of the available evidence worldwide. In the first night analysis, we looked at all the available evidence worldwide on. The extent to which people are socially connected and how long they live. So these studies follow people over years often decades. On average, they followed people for seven and a half years. Do they use this term longitudinal? Is that a word? Yeah Yeah. So how's along Hondo method you? These are large scale studies. So how big is large-scale? Yes. I am at analysis that included over. Three hundred thousand people and the second one included over three point four million people. That's that's pretty Meta is moving as big as big picture. So go ahead. Yeah. So in his first one, what we found was that people who are more socially connected had a fifty percent increase on the survival. And so you know when we found that finding, we knew okay. Most people aren't GonNa know what that means or how to conceptualize it in terms of how just how important it is for for our health. So. That's where we started. We decided we needed to benchmark. To other kinds of risk factors that we do take very seriously for our health. and. So when we looked across all of these variety of ways that we can connect to others, what we found was that that affect on, you know how long we live that risk for mortality. That was comparable to. As you mentioned smoking up to fifteen cigarettes per day that's the one that seems to get cited quite often but we also compared it to physical inactivity obesity flu vaccine, air pollution. You know all these things that we take really quite seriously, and then in the second man in office, we look specifically at social deficit. So all these indicators of a lacking social connection like social isolation. Loneliness and living alone and what we found was that. Loneliness was associated.

social isolation flu vaccine
Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

Outcomes Rocket

12:07 min | Last month

Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw Marquez here. Today I have the privilege of hosting Loren Driscoll. She's a healthcare strategist and entrepreneur and founded project well to support health plan's efforts to address critical non-clinical needs of their members nutritional and social isolation. Lauren is also a senior adviser in the strategy practice of partners, a health intelligence firm founded by former secretary of human health, and Human Services. Michael. Abbott Prior to partners Lawrence, served as corporate director of Oxford Health plans. Medicare business learns also co chair of the United States of care entrepreneurs. Council Lauren is also a board member at health works a healthcare organization that addresses the root causes of illness, poverty and neglect in Burundi. Africa she served as the Acting Executive Director of village health works and has also member of the University of Virginia College of Arts and Sciences Foundation Board. Lauren grew up in Baltimore Maryland, she received her bachelor's in University of Virginia, her masters in public health from. University today, we're GONNA be diving into the topic of really health through what you eat and the work that they're doing it project well as fascinating food as medicine and Lauren. is going to be helping US understand how they're helping people stay healthy and thrive with what they eat or in such a privilege to have you here today. Saw Thank you so much for inviting me to talk with you absolutely now, I love the focus of food are you and I had a chance to connect before the interview and it's near and dear to my heart might my family's heart what we matter so much before we dive into the value prop you guys have. I love to learn more about what inspires your work in healthcare. Sure. Yeah. There are really three things. So that have really told me end healthcare I would say I is just my beliefs that older adults really deserve better. There's just so much sort of preventable hardship and suffering with respect to health and you know I guess I feel like it's just super unfair that after spending their lives doing the best they can and often nurturing sort of next generations that we aren't doing a better job out with respect to the crowd disease that. So many of our older adults southwest so that that's number one number two I would say is just the unfortunate inefficiency of our US healthcare system. Part of me I, almost think I might have been a process engineer or something in another life that drives me crazy to not take the shortest path between two points and so I look at situations in our US healthcare today especially say with dual eligible 's the care for those who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid and therefore sort of among the most vulnerable in our country, and yet there's just there's so much inefficiency with these two payments streams and the two sets of rules really creating just you know perverse incentives that. End Up causing these folks to sort of Ping Pong around our system and Drive exorbitant costs and not even particularly good health outcome. So I would say it's inefficiencies like that that. You know really draw me into healthcare. and. Then the final one is you know you you introduce which is just I am such a believer and food as medicine I. Think it's very simple. Good food leads to good health and so as simple as that sounds and sort of even elegant. It's clear that there's just a sort of glaring missed opportunity and our country to really leverage the power of food. So it's really a combination of these these three things that inspired me to start project well. Get for you and You captured some heavy stuff there lauren, you know older adults deserve better and you know we're inefficient and food candy medicine and it is. So let's dive into this. You know what? What exactly is project well, and how you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure. So our mission out. So to start out by explaining project, well, tell your mission. Is really just to improve the lives of those who are suffering with with chronic disease. Often food insecurity and loneliness, and to bend the healthcare cost curve as we do it. So our solution is centered on food and. Look, at food and. Medicine but also as an anchor for socialization and Education Man's the end of the day we know people come together around food. and. So we are a young company. So we are really starting with home delivered meals and meal kits for those who really have sort of the most nutritionally sensitive chronic disease. So thank diabetes and heart disease and we're starting they're both because these are the people that have the greatest level of need we can help them us. But also because are proof of concept pilots drive results there must quickly.

Lauren United States Oxford Health Loren Driscoll Acting Executive Director Of V University Of Virginia College Marquez Social Isolation Michael Senior Adviser Ping Pong Burundi Secretary Baltimore University Of Virginia Maryland
Turning video game tech into accessible tools

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:28 min | Last month

Turning video game tech into accessible tools

"Why can't we just or Wilshire up to an XBOX and play it? Why can't we just drive up and be able to control a drone in the sky or vehicle, and that's where this adapter that we developed. The freedom link came from is orthopedic. And Bill Binko Co. and a lot of people who are in those medical spaces have been saying to us for awhile you should be able to take these highly specialized highly customized devices that make ends of hours in order to put together thousands of dollars and just use them on different algae without having to reinvent the wheel every single. Let's talk about e sports a bit obviously. Sports are increasingly popular. Are there tools that maybe some of these competitive game players are using to get an edge that then could funnel in to accessibility technology even for non? Gamers. Lot of items that are not intended for the. Community that end up working out just great For example, this ord is the latest and greatest in audio technology everybody who's a Gamer everyone who's a player as a discord account and this just a program you put on your phone in order to play in talk to each other during the Games. But now people use it for interviews I use scored more often than I use zoom these days. So Zuma's just inherently inaccessible. I use a program called Dragon Naturally. Speaking to be able to type. So if I'm you the call in Zoom, it beauts my entire computer. So therefore, I am Mel rendered completely unable to communicate with anyone else while that's muted. So that's why programs like this corridor better because they've already fought about accessibility and have included it where you know plays, legs zoom still have some catching up to do you know there's there's things like, for example, one of my most recommended a trawlers is called a track I. Are Right and it's a controller where you put a hat on your head with a little infrared cliff and there's a camera that sits on top the your monitor and when you move your head around down left right it can see that and it was originally intended to be art of Microsoft flight simulator. So you can look around the cockpit of an airplane like pretty down there but we discovered that you can use that same technology and make you keyboard inputs so. That now I can hear letters with just moving my head and that allows you to games. So what you're constantly doing if you're a disabled is re purposing and re engineering things so that they can be used in everyday settings. So maybe there is a controller that can push three buttons at the same time, and in fact, there are and you can use these in eastwards if they let you now not every eastport allows you to do this kind of thing. There are oftentimes where they consider this against the rules it's cheating etc etc, and there really hasn't yet been an opportunity for years with disabilities to really get into eastwards arena and you know that's one of those projects that we continue to work on his hottest work out could aren't we make it fair for people with disabilities play while at the same time, not giving a superior edged people who are already very, very good with a standard controller. So you know, it's just a matter of working out the fairness and figuring out eastwards fits in the disability community. But that brings up the point that accessibility in gaming is more than just about playing the video game itself. Absolutely. Yeah. you know we always say gamers is that it's just an attempt to allow people to have that way to on that social isolation though inside charities mission purpose is on vessel isolation, foster inclusive communities, and improve the quality of life for people with disabilities, and we do that like connecting you to other human beings, your family members, your friends, your community you can get back out into that and not be alone. Using video games and you know some people will be like, oh, video games are not important or I'm not a Gamer I. Don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa play. It's like we're trying to explain but this is just the tool they were using. It's like your car, right so you may not care about what you drive, but you just need a tool to get you from your house do hanging out with your friends and that's the same thing. The video games can do. We can get you to an area where you have a purpose of going in providing or your guild mates and and having that real sense of purpose. Gamers was really fortunate a few years ago to work with Walter Reed Army Hospital, and we were able to find that in instances where someone is coming back and they have had an injury that they were more than eighty percent less likely to consider self harm. If they had that close knit units the same experience of being over there with their army units. Over here in video. Games Steve Spawn Chief Operating Officer at able gamers charity he told us there were about forty six million potential players with disabilities in the US. Of the people reaching out to his group in particular have a physical disability that limits their ability to use traditional

Walter Reed Army Hospital Bill Binko Co. Wilshire Social Isolation Zuma Microsoft Chief Operating Officer Steve Spawn MEL United States
Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

The Takeaway

12:36 min | Last month

Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

"Threats for me and my family and harassing my daughters to the point where I have to get security is just I mean, it's amazing I wouldn't have imagined in my wildest dreams. That people who object to things that are pure public health principles are so set against it and don't like what you and I say it, namely in the word of science. That they actually threaten you. That's Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious diseases, speaking to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, about threats he and his family have received because of his work. And Dr Fauci is not alone. Public health officials across the US are also receiving threats from people who are against the policies they put forth to combat the corona virus. Things like recommendations to wear masks and practice social distancing. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and she's been researching this exact topic. Michelle, Welcome to the show. Happy to be here. Shall you wrote an article about the attacks on public health officials during covert 19. What was it that prompted you to even look into this? Well, it happens that one of my bosses that Stanford is married to our Santa Clara County local health officer here in the Bay Area, So I do have a personal connection to somebody who's experienced these kind of attacks. Tell us a little bit about what kinds of attacks were talking about. All across the country. We've really seen a number of things that made your audience seem pretty shocking and are unusual even in the American context we have seen, you know the usual Internet trawling, but the attacks have taken on a highly personal and almost violent dimension. Across the country. We've seen health officer subject to dock, saying the exposure of their personal information like their addresses or loved ones, names on the Internet. Angry and sometimes armed protestors showing up at their private residences, vandalism of their offices and homes, lots of harassing telephone calls and even death threats to the point of having to have private security details assigned to their families. Michelle, one of the things that prompted me. I'd saw the research here and then saw that Dr Anthony Fauci has needed to get his own extra private security because I believed his family had been threatened. Are we primarily talking about high profile figures like that, Or are we talking about? Anyone who's sort of on the front lines dealing with Corona virus cases. In particular, we're talking about people who ordinarily are about his low profile. As you can get local public health is thean visible angel that keeps us all healthy. But most of us until this pandemic you never heard of or seen our local health officer. They have been in the news lately on television and newspaper a lot, so they're no longer such private figures. But these are not high profile figures. They're not national figures. In most cases, they're not. They don't have a political agenda. There are doctors trying to do their jobs. Who are making these threats. Well, it comes from a variety of quarters. Ah, leader in Catalyst in this movement has been the anti vaccination movement here in the U. S. That has all of a sudden pivoted from their usual agenda of attacking public figures who advocate vaccination to going after health officers who are advocating masking and the extension of state home or business closure orders, But it's not on ly these groups. They've been joined by thousands of people across the country who are just really disgruntled and incredibly stressed. By the long term economic impact and social isolation that has stemmed from public health orders during the pandemic. Medical professionals are take a Hippocratic oath to serve whoever it is that needs their help. So like this, this feels like doctors and nurses didn't necessarily sign up to be. In such a political battle, You know, it's interesting the politicization of first responders because those on the front lines were actually caring for covert patients have been politicized as heroes in this pandemic. But the same groups of individuals, doctors and nurses who are working in the public health sector have been demonised as villains. They're all working toward the same goals, and we need to understand that, although they execute their objectives in different ways, they're all working towards a single and so are we. So it's really striking to me that there's been this polarization and how folks have viewed First responders and public health doctor's Michelle. Stick with us. We'll be back in a moment. This is the take away. On the next. All of it, looking for a job thinking about switching to a new one will discuss how to navigate the remote workforce in our series, the future of work, and we meet the director of the new documentary Boy State, which goes inside the weeklong mock government exercise that gathers more than 1000 high schoolers to create their own state government. I'm Alison Stewart. Join me for all of it weekdays at noon. We're back and you're listening to the takeaway. I'm tansy. No Vega. Michelle Mellow is on the line with me. She's a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and we're talking about recent threats against public health officials all around the country. Michelle. Have we heard anything from the Trump Administration or other politicians at any level of government about this? Because recently in New Jersey, there was a federal judge whose family was attacked. Now there are talks of increasing protections for federal judges. And I'm wondering if this is now transferring over to medical professionals and health professionals. Well, yet we have to distinguish between medical professionals who are on the frontline response like the ones who are working in hospitals and the ones I'm talking about. Are those were working in public health departments. I'm not aware of specific problems involving the folks who are working in hospitals other than nobody wants to stand next to them at the grocery store. But the public health officials really have had to have protection stepped up. Unfortunately, most of our elected officials to the extent that they're speaking to this issue at all have been joining in the attacks. You know, there are folks who are making their name for themselves politically. By joining in the chorus of attacks against public health officials. In some cases, their own public health officers, you know, saying things like their anti Democratic their tyrannical when in reality, those same health officers are the only people in that state who can issue these orders. They're executing. Planning done by other elected officials, who then sort of hide behind this rhetoric, So it really is, in my view, despicable that instead of offering support to these hardworking, underpaid under attack health officers State and local officials. And in some cases, congressmen and the president have joined in the attacks, and the president himself has been the foam enter and chief here Retweeting such statements as everyone is lying. The CDC media Democrats are doctors, everyone we're told to trust That kind of statement fans the flames. Michelle did your research show whether or not there was a difference in health officers who are in red states versus blue states or our folks that work in these positions across the board, subject to this type of harassment. You know, we really have seen it in all kinds of communities. Certainly there is a red and blue divide in willingness to accept public health measures like masking and to the extent that you're leading a community that's more red than blue. You might have a larger segment of the population going after you. But some of the people who have been under attack are in heavily blue communities were actually most of the population really supports what they're doing. Polling is very much in their favor. But there is a vocal extreme of vocal minority that is dominating attention. Is there anything that public health officials Khun do to protect themselves? You know, to protect themselves. Many of them do need security details, and they need elected officials to stand up and indicate that when these actions crossed the line into illegal forms of harassment, they'll be subject to prosecution in terms of self defense strategies. You know, I think it may be late in the game for this, but there are some things that I think We know help to cultivate public trust and buy in to coerce of public health legal measures. Polling shows us that when people feel that they have a say in public health policy agendas when quote unquote people like me can influence agendas in public health policy, they're more likely to accept laws, even the ones that they don't love. So I think there are opportunities for some health officers to double down on the transparency and candor in their public communications. We do have examples of where this has been done Extraordinary. Well. I think it helps to humanize health officers to telegraph that they're really struggling with these decisions. They don't take them lightly, and also that they have the support of consultation of a number of other people. Well, they're not acting alone and imposing these orders. Do you know of any health officers who have decided to leave? Ah, the job as a result of this because it doesn't feel like you know, the virus is not going away. Assume as many of us would have liked, and people are going to have to make policies and an implement policies until we've got some clarity on where what the next phase of this is so have folks that you know, decided to leave their jobs as a result. Absolutely. I think the count is up near 30. Now, health officers who have either resigned or been forced out by their elected officials since the start of the disease pandemic because of the politicization of their orders. And that includes Oxiris Barbeau, who was the New York City health commissioner. It includes Nicole Quick, the health commissioner of Orange County are most affected County in California. In terms of covert cases it includes West Virginia health officer for the state had the slam so lots of folks who are dealing very, very difficult situation simply, it's just not reasonable to expect them to go on month after month. In this kind of climate, especially when they're not getting any support from other officials mentioned Oxygen's Barbeau and I know that was a big issue here in New York, particularly because she clashed with Mayor Bill de Blasio. Are we seeing a lot of that? A CZ? Well, just internally among Officers and public health officials, and also just, you know, the other officials that they're dealing with. It feels like I don't know if that was very specific to New York City politics or if that's also happening across the board. I think that is happening in a lot of communities. Yes, where you have a schism between elected branches of government that represent communities that have a particular ideological bent and help officers who have been serving you know for many, many administrations many many years and you are You're acting on the science a TTE this point of the pandemic. People are fed up with the science. They want a balance of between health concerns and economic and other concerns. And again. Some health officers have been very good at explaining how public health orders balanced. Those concerns and others who are maybe less transparent, really have been confronted by a lot of attacks from Ah, elsewhere in government. But, you know, responding to local political pressures themselves you mentioned earlier. We we are having to differentiate between threatening health officers and health officials and making and threatening frontline workers like doctors and nurses. But Our doctors and nurses subject to any type of politicization and threats right now, because of the role that they what they could possibly represent, or have they gotten off Have they sort of not been in the cross hairs? If you will. You know, I'm not aware of those kinds of attacks. I think it's more just that What we hear from them is the difficulty that they have in their personal lives Because people know they work with sick people. They don't want to be around him. They don't want to be around their kids. So it's the usual story in any pandemic, where You're the child of somebody who's working with an affected patient. Nobody wants their kid in school with you. I think that causes some difficulties for them, but it's a different quality and caliber of attack than what we've been talking about with public health officers. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law at Stanford Law School and a professor of medicine at Stanford University. School of Medicine. Michelle. Thanks so much, Thank you.

Michelle Mellow Officer Stanford University Dr Anthony Fauci Professor Of Law Professor Of Medicine United States Sanjay Gupta Bay Area CNN Santa Clara County Stanford New York Alison Stewart New Jersey CDC Social Isolation Vandalism
Survivors of COVID-19, who received hospital treatment, show increased rate of psychiatric disorders

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:54 min | Last month

Survivors of COVID-19, who received hospital treatment, show increased rate of psychiatric disorders

"More than half of people who received hospital treatment for Covid nineteen were found to be suffering from a psychiatric disorder a month. Later, a study has found. Out, of four hundred, two patients monitored after being treated for the virus, fifty, five percent were found to have at least one psychiatric disorder according to experts from San. Rafael Hospital in Milan found. The results based on clinical interviews and self assessment questionnaires showed post traumatic stress disorder in twenty, eight percent of cases depression in thirty, one and anxiety in forty-two. Additionally forty percent of patients had insomnia and twenty percent had obsessive compulsive symptoms. The findings increased concerns about the psychological effects of the virus. The paper published yesterday in the Journal Brain behavior and immunity says PTSD major depression, and anxiety. All high burden. noncommunicable conditions associated with years of life lived with disability, the study of two, hundred, sixty, five men, and one hundred, and thirty seven women found that women who are less likely to die from Cova than men suffered. Suffered more than men psychologically patients with previous positive psychiatric diagnoses suffered more than those without a history of psychiatric disorder. They said, psychiatric efforts could be caused by the immune response to the virus itself. All by psychological stresses, such as social isolation, psychological impact of a novel severe and potentially fatal illness concerns about infecting others and stigma outpatient showed increase anxiety and sleep disturbances while perhaps surprisingly, the duration of hospitalization inversely correlated with symptoms of St Depression anxiety and OCD.

Psychiatric Disorder Covid Rafael Hospital Sleep Disturbances Journal Brain Behavior Social Isolation Cova Ptsd Milan SAN
Asia Today: Beijing reinstates virus controls as cases rise

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Asia Today: Beijing reinstates virus controls as cases rise

"China has recorded forty nine new coronavirus cases as of the capital Beijing reinstates measures to contain a resurgence of the new cases whether the thirty over in Beijing traced to a wholesale market that supplies much of the city's meat and vegetables the rise China's highest in two months this prompted Beijing to suspend the result of some classes and reverse the relaxation of some social isolation measures eleven residential compounds enabling the market under scrutiny have been put on lockdown ten of the other cases have been pulled from outside the country and three from the province just outside Beijing I'm Charles the last month

China Beijing Charles Social Isolation
Asia Today: Beijing reinstates virus controls as cases rise

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Asia Today: Beijing reinstates virus controls as cases rise

"China has recorded forty nine new coronavirus cases as of the capital Beijing reinstates measures to contain a resurgence of the new cases whether the thirty over in Beijing traced to a wholesale market that supplies much of the city's meat and vegetables the rise China's highest in two months this prompted Beijing to suspend the result of some classes and reverse the relaxation of some social isolation measures eleven residential compounds enabling the market under scrutiny have been put on lockdown ten of the other cases have been pulled from outside the country and three from the province just outside Beijing I'm Charles the last month

China Beijing Charles Social Isolation
Asia Today: Beijing reinstates virus controls as cases rise

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

Asia Today: Beijing reinstates virus controls as cases rise

"China has recorded forty nine new coronavirus cases as of the capital Beijing reinstates measures to contain a resurgence of the new cases whether the thirty over in Beijing traced to a wholesale market that supplies much of the city's meat and vegetables the rise China's highest in two months this prompted Beijing to suspend the result of some classes and reverse the relaxation of some social isolation measures eleven residential compounds enabling the market under scrutiny have been put on lockdown ten of the other cases have been pulled from outside the country and three from the province just outside Beijing I'm Charles the last month

China Beijing Charles Social Isolation
Helping Kids Cope With COVID Worries

60-Second Science

02:26 min | 3 months ago

Helping Kids Cope With COVID Worries

"Stay at home orders due to code nineteen have been in place for several months now for many parents, these requirements have led to a balancing act between working from home and attending to their children. Families have been forced to adapt unexpected disruptions in their daily routines, and kids have been isolated from their peers, all of which can affect their psychological wellbeing think even though everyone is having some experience of loss and grief over not getting to do the things they're used. Used to doing rhythms see a lot of individual differences in how kids React University of Washington psychologist, Liliana Lingua, she says a child's temperament has a big influence on how they respond to stressful events. Kids who are already prone to being fearful or anxious might be especially anxious about getting sicker about family members getting sick very sociable kids may struggle more with social isolation than others do and kids who are easily frustrated may become even more so but despite these. These differences linguists has parents can help their kids cope by validating their feelings. Validating really means hearing listening, recognizing with the source of the person's emotional experience is and recognizing the truth of it. It's also important to check in with kids about the very real fears, they face inviting children to talk openly, and sometimes our own vulnerability can be harmful in facilitating conversation for teens. Being cut off from friends can be especially challenging and I think all parents can do at. At that point is validate their youth. This is awful. This is hard i. know this is really a loss for you and just recognize those feelings and not dismiss them, but how can apparent tell if their child might be developing more serious mental health issues? Language suggests keeping an eye out for big changes from their normal cells. Is this gotten really so extreme that it's fearing with that child, functioning or their relationships for example, more intense and frequent emotional breakdowns. Inability to enjoy anything or withdrawal from the family. In those cases, language recommends seeking professional guidance, which could start with the family pediatrician as the school year finishes, and we head into summer. Uncertainty remains. We don't have an end point. We don't know what follows is going to look like.

Liliana Lingua Social Isolation University Of Washington
David Guetta prepares for virus relief concert

WBBM Late Morning News

00:21 sec | 4 months ago

David Guetta prepares for virus relief concert

"David Guetta ease enjoying social isolation because you can focus more on music and less on business he says he's being more creative than he has been in the last ten years that makes him question how he's living get a will raise money for health care workers in Kobe in relief efforts by performing at an undisclosed location in New York tomorrow and carrying the concert online

Social Isolation Kobe New York David Guetta
Mental health care in a time of social isolation probably involves an app

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:22 min | 4 months ago

Mental health care in a time of social isolation probably involves an app

"Mental health in a time of social isolation probably involves an APP from American public media. This is marketplace tech. I'm Ali would cova. Nineteen has opened up a conversation about remote therapy but online mental health care goes way beyond talking to a therapist over video conference APP analytics companies. They downloads of mental health and wellness. Apps are up almost thirty percent since the pandemic began. These include therapy services. Yes but also meditation APPs like calm or head space so first of all do they work and second. What are the privacy regulation concerns American public media's mental health reporter Lisa? Roth took this might make Freud turnover in his grave. There's an APP where you therapy with a robot. They're also APPs to monitor the side effects of medications APPs to help with PTSD and the list goes on and on. Now that doesn't mean technology is going to put your therapist out of Business John. Taurus is a psychiatrist who runs the Division of Digital Psychiatry at Real deaconess hospital in Boston. Algorithms not gonNA decide your care but he does use technology to help. Patients keep track of things that affect their mental health. Danielson is a freelance writer in Missoula Montana who has clinical depression an APP. He's using now. Tim Rate His mood with one being the worst and ten being the best. That kind of gives me a moment to realize that. This motion isn't me. I some counts there as many as ten thousand mental health APPS. So maybe it's no surprise that the prices are all over the map from free downloads to four hundred dollars for a lifetime membership at a popular meditation APP. Adam Powell is a healthcare consultant. Who says this means? It's hard to know how much the mental health APP business is. Actually worth some of the variation has to do with how that markets defined does it include wellness APPs or just strictly mental health APPs. Can they bill to insurance or not and so on? Stephanie's was is a therapist in North Carolina who got a grant a design and out for people with eating disorders but eventually gave up because a startup was doing it faster. That got her wondering how these should be regulated. Do we think of APPS as being like FDA approved drugs and we need to make sure that they're effective before the watch them to the market and because a lot of these APPs are being developed by companies. John Taurus. The psychiatrist says he's worried about what those companies do with people's data. What have you also gave access to your. Gps So knows where you sleep at night and you gave this access to your call and text records so it knows who your friends and contacts in. Romantic relationships are drug. Companies Marketing companies and insurance companies. Might all be interested in the data. You're sharing as of your mental health. Care though maybe not in your well being. That's American public media's mental health reporter Lisa Roth the. Us Census Bureau released data this week showing that roughly a third of Americans are showing signs of clinical depression or

Lisa Roth Danielson Companies Marketing Companies Reporter Social Isolation ALI Ptsd John Taurus United States Census Bureau Real Deaconess Hospital Division Of Digital Psychiatry Adam Powell Missoula TIM Montana North Carolina Stephanie
George T. Wilkerson on Crimson Letters: Voices from Death Row

PEN America Works of Justice

04:49 min | 4 months ago

George T. Wilkerson on Crimson Letters: Voices from Death Row

"Hi torch. Thanks for joining us today. I wanted to start by just asking you how you are I know the conditions are really fraud in a lot of prisons during the pandemics. I'll have things ben for you. That's a good question I've actually been asking myself that question since the pandemic began so as a writer. You know that's a poem to China. Capture is all these different little pieces and maybe try to bring it together If you'd like to hear it would love to. You don't mind sharing okay. I call this Imprison during Tova Nineteen Myself. Isolating family. No longer visits me. We must keep everyone arms flat in the curve of yearning for connection with strap on masks before exiting fill many of US shelter in place. Instead we switch away from those who call for sneeze the consequences of getting sick as a constant topic of conversation. Everybody knows the terms. Medical inattention only had it or sentences and prison. It's like a love marriage. We disguised a few cleaning chemicals. Get feeling mellow yellow steady green bottles with blue window cleaner pink four so clear incitement. They become contraband. If inside ourselves camouflaged amid our sodas we try not to accidentally drink again. We stockpile wronging coffee batteries. Soap and fantasy money from our families drives up last. Perhaps two months meal takes longer and longer to reach is week. Sometimes if press most of us would admit the feeling increasingly lonely abandoned forgotten nevertheless we check the news all day praying to recognize the names of people victimized while buying toilet paper and then the pandemic began and change some things. I approve. The prison prohibited all visitors. Now my family couldn't visit even if they try next to prison. Clothes ARE BARSHOP. So many of us would like mangy savages. Then the prison issued uniform math. The All of US flimsy black fabric on which we can relax veneers of indifference. We had kittens flexed on our faces to reward for not writing. The prison started playing movies from Netflix. Every day then posted a memo to warn us any non compliance with corona virus restrictions. We'll be punished. That is to get too close to anyone now. It's pay ten dollar five. Plus weeks and the whole the prison is enforcing not just encouraging the social isolation to gauge the mandate spacing. We may stand apart extending our arms toward each other. Fingers may not touch that succeed. The right distance is long Gravy de. That was beautiful. Thank you so much for sharing I really resonated a bad thing just like you know the isolation and the sphere and that constant want to check the news I think is really overwhelming you also I really love the line about. They're trying to reward you not writing and playing net flicks to keep you distracted so glad. You're still finding time to write like that. Think it's important that your documented for sure. 'cause you know one thing. I've seen out there. It's like all this emphasis on the Consequences of all the social isolation. And I've heard a lot of specialists women news on NPR describing just the detrimental effects of just `isolation. And I was like. That's what prisoners go to all the time Even before this pandemic so I wanted to like you know. Create this sympathy between two reader outside of prison than like personnel out of prison and just show like all these things that people can resonate with actually just the everyday way of life in prison and the pandemic just made

Social Isolation United States Fraud Writer China Netflix NPR
Plano Starts New Service to Check on Seniors

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

02:03 min | 4 months ago

Plano Starts New Service to Check on Seniors

"Makers when most people think of libraries they think of books but they're so much more he changed a lot libraries are very dynamic institutions in terms of looking at society and meeting the needs of what this society needs at that moment the need in this coronavirus crisis world was to check on the city's most vulnerable population they're seniors Brent Blakely is the manager of the mirabelle Davis library in Plano the idea to do senior Kerr calls and I think in the beginning of April and we would call them and just have a general conversation of what they would like to talk about the violin opportunity in kind of like the social isolation they might be feeling because they were asked to stay at home the seniors they talked to are from all walks of life many of the people that we've contacted actually were very active in the community and they were suddenly couldn't decision where they could be involved in those activities still and we also had people that were somewhat isolated already because of illness and different things in our lives that kept them at home the the goal is generally just designed to provide a social outlet for and so far the program has been a success we have had people as we started to repeat calls they made the comment to us that they were looking forward to hearing from us that we since we started we continue to have these sign ups and we're planning to continue the service at the mercy of a future Blakely admits his staff loves it too when you first start something like this you're not sure how the public's going to react or how the staff is participating and I I had several staff members tell me how much they enjoyed the calls that they make to the seniors and you know responses seniors today said nice things about them and you know and in some states started develop sort of a phone friendship that was somebody that they didn't know until you know nothing you have to go we're proud to call Plano libraries and their staffs this week's KRLD difference makers the library of false as society evolves around it and you know right now in the society that we're in this is a read that needs to be solved because these people are part of our city and we don't want them to feel left behind CZ series newsradio ten eighty

Brent Blakely Mirabelle Davis Library Plano Kerr Social Isolation Krld Cz Series
Don't Let This Crisis Go To Waste | Roshi Joan Halifax

10% Happier with Dan Harris

06:58 min | 4 months ago

Don't Let This Crisis Go To Waste | Roshi Joan Halifax

"Our guest this week is definitely not arguing that the pandemic is a good thing but she also believes that we shouldn't let a good crisis go to waste as they sometimes say in politics. This is a wakeup call. She says a chance I to really take a beat and ask ourselves what actually matters. How do we want to do this? Life both individually and as a culture her name is Rashid. Joan Halifax PhD. She is She's this is our second appearance on the show. She is a major figure in the in the American Buddhist seen. She's a Buddhist teacher. As an priest anthropologist a pioneer in the field of end of life care. She's the founder Abbot and head teacher at. Up Institute ends then center in Santa Fe New Mexico. She was speaking to us from her bedroom. There for this podcast and her motto for this crisis as you will hear is strong back. Soft Front. Chill. Explain what that means and much more. Here we go. Joan Halifax Super High Dan. Where are you? I'm in my wife's closet. I could make a comment about that. I mean you're in a safe place. You can make any comment you want. I. I am in a safe place but I have to watch out about my comments broadcast out there. I feel a little embarrassed sometimes. Fair enough fair enough. Let me start with a question. That may historically pre-crisis was perfunctory question. But actually now is a very interesting question which is how are you well? I'm actually fine. I was fine pre-crisis and in the race in the middle of this thing. I'm feeling very fortunate to be sheltering with twenty four people at the center and having a strong practice and also having the opportunity to cook food for homeless people which is delivered safely and also the kind of zoom world which I was not particularly involved prior to the crisis talking to the vacuum on zoom. It is really kind of bizarre situation. But I'm getting more comfortable sharing the Dharma to the zoom space. So it sounds like you're doing fine but what are your observations about the state of the world? That's a small question. Well this podcast. You can answer for as long as you'd like yeah. I'm very interested in what is happening. I will say that I feel like I was born to be in the middle of this mess. It's kind of charnel. Ground a global charnel ground and I also an anthropologist and a former lifetime so it's just for me an incredible process that we're in where we're reflecting the aspects that have been written about in terms of what is right of passage. We're seeing it at a global level and I don't know what the outcome will be one of the things that glassman she taught me was to really sit with not knowing and we're in this experience of radical uncertainty right now. There's just no way that we can predict what the outcome of all this will be. You know although there are intimations from and others about the possibility of a pandemic but I think you know there's a kind of global oblivion that has been operational for a little bit too long suddenly. We've gotten this invisible wakeup call and it is fascinating and it is frightening. And it is compounded by the fact that literally millions of people are in social isolation and it is as I said an opportunity for us to look deeply at our lives on our lives in relationship to people who are less Economically could I say stable affluent and also to look the effects of our lives the environment? So you know as I said Dad. This is like a right of passage where we're in the first phase of that rite of passage and rites of passage were described by. Arnold Van. Hannah who was a Dutch ethnologist. Who wrote a very important book? In the Nineteen Twenties on rites of passage and it became the model that anthropologists mythologised used to actually look at the contours of transformation and transformational processes that individuals as well as cultures. Go through and Ben Hannah Fascinating. Enough identified the first phase of a rite of passage as separation. And we're in it. I mean our experience of social isolation is an absolute perfect conditions for us to withdraw from our ordinary lives. Our normal lives to be put into solitude so to speak and to not have access to others or to our habitual ways of living and consuming. That have been part of our lives forever. So we're in the phase of separation and then then describes the second phase and that phase is called the threshold experience and the world the word threshold. There's the same feeling and meaning as the word thrash and I feel like we are globally. Being thrashed economies are being thrashed the corporate world. Not so bad. Maybe that it's being thrashed but also people who live in communities of poverty material poverty. They are being thrashed and our racism is becoming much more visible and as well. I think we're at a time where we are. In a certain way seeing the dissolution of a how you could call it exactly but the dissolution of a world that has been built out of an unjust economy that has had profound environmental implications.

Joan Halifax Ben Hannah Fascinating Social Isolation Abbot Rashid Santa Fe New Mexico Nineteen Twenties Founder Glassman Arnold Van DAD
Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

SoberSoul Recovery: Addiction, Sobriety, and Beyond!

06:56 min | 4 months ago

Fighting Loneliness? Try Friending Yourself.

"Hey all you sober people hand anyone else. Who is interested in listening to me talk about mental wellness? Some of you might remember that my word for the year is clarity and especially with. Cova did that word has not changed my journey. This year is very much about taking the noise out of my daily life and boy has that been difficult in this time of lockdown and isolation and loneliness which is why. I'm GonNa talk about loneliness today and what it means. Not only to me but to you all as well. The statistics are growing. Not only because of covet but prior to Cova. We are becoming more and more lonely. And why is that and more importantly what can we do about it? I live alone and if I am feeling the loneliness even though I have people built into my daily work. I can't imagine how other people are feeling who don't work any longer or don't necessarily engage with people daily in their line of work before Kovin. I liked living alone. I enjoy the peace and quiet and frankly I like my relationship with myself but now that I'm confined an had been confined by the way. I'm still very much. Laki myself down except for a walk that I take almost daily with some friends Monday through Friday but we social distance or physical distance during the walk. I carry a mask with me so although I'm getting Interaction I still spend most of my downtime. My non work time by myself and it's become more difficult. I only imagine how difficult it is for some of you who live in bigger cities and can't get out to walk every day on walking past like I do. It has to be really tough. Interestingly the rate in which we are living alone has been on the increase for the last fifty years Grand Julie Aching up to about twenty eight percent in two thousand nineteen of our total population here in the US which means at thirty five point seven million people here in the US live by themselves in a recent study by CIGNA which is a health insurance company here in the US of twenty thousand people. Us adults they found that half of Americans feel like they are alone. Only slightly more than fifty percent of the respondents said they had meaningful in person. Social interactions on a daily basis and fifty percent said that sometimes or always they feel that the relationships are not meaningful and that they're isolated from a smaller but still surprising number of people. Twenty percent of the twenty thousand said they never or rarely feel close to people and eighteen percent felt like they have no one to talk to and this same study by Cigna revealed that Young People Age Eighteen to twenty two are far more likely than senior citizens to report being lonely and Import Health. Making them the loneliest generation and well loneliness itself is not an diagnoses or a mental health disorder. It goes hand in hand with many of the diagnostic criteria in the DSM. Five diagnostic statistical manual. That most of us in the mental health professionals zone us. Furthermore there's no accepted definition of loneliness. Sometimes it gets jumbled together with social isolation but the two concepts are very different social isolationism indicator of how much contact. Somebody has with other people. Whereas loneliness is the subjective feelings of isolation and there is no agreed. Tipping Point at which acute loneliness transitions into a chronic problem with long term mental health and physical health ramifications. Alone doesn't necessarily mean that you're lonely nor does being around people mean that you're not loneliness is a very subjective. Feeling loneliness is a feeling that only you the person experiencing it can truly identify the fancy schmancy definition of loneliness is the distress that results from discrepancies between ideal and perceived social relationships. That's according to the Encyclopedia of human relationships. What that means is that loneliness is a feeling and a perception. It involves a wave seen ourselves and the world around us. We can feel lonely. In a wide variety of social settings and circumstances. It doesn't take being alone. Some studies have shown that people who struggle with loneliness may actually perceive the world differently. Does that sound familiar to some of us. I know it sounds very similar to the world that I grew up in the world that I created for myself through my perceptions and certainly when I was drinking boy did I create A world within a world one researcher even found structural and biochemical differences in what he labeled the lonely brain. Okay and I'm going to murder his name. I'm sure John Casio Gosh. His research revealed that a lonely person can experience more difficulty recognizing positive events and have more trouble picturing the thoughts of others known as mental ising.

Cova United States Social Isolation Cigna Kovin Encyclopedia Of Human Relation Import Health Researcher Murder DSM John Casio Grand Julie
Turning Social Isolation Into a Creative Outlet With Martha Alderson

Live Happy Now

05:53 min | 4 months ago

Turning Social Isolation Into a Creative Outlet With Martha Alderson

"This is Paula Phelps. And this week we are going to tap into our creative side. Using our creativity is a proven way to increase our personal well-being. It can put you in a positive mood and that starts an UPWARD SPIRAL. That makes you feel more creative. And thereby further increases your happiness for somehow life creeps in and takes over the time. We'd love to spend exploring creatively before we know it. We feel like we've lost touch with our creative side entirely. This week's guest is an expert in tapping into creativity. Martha Alderson is an author who also works with bestselling authors Hollywood directors artists and performers all over the world to help them find their creativity. Now you can try this at home. Her New workbook boundless. Creativity is a one month exploration into your creative side. So let's hear what Martha has to say about it. Martha welcome to live happy. Now thank you for inviting me. I'm thrilled to be here. This is such a great work book that you've written for us. And what a great time for us to work on our creativity. It seems like it. I know that a lot of people are under enormous stress for all sorts of reasons because of the virus but if people do have free time and they're looking fill it creatively. I think by going through the program in the workbook. It's just a great way to let go of. That's happening around us. All the news all the problems of the world and just sink into your creativity and into really your spirit sh and who you are at your core beyond all the material things the problems and everything else so. I think it would be a great place for people to spend some time. We'll obviously when you wrote it. He didn't say hey. I think everyone's going to have a couple of months you know. So what was your decision behind writing it in the first place? Well I been a plot consultant for about thirty years for riders every story whether it's a memoir scream player. A novel has to have a plot and I'm passionate about empowering women's voices and women traditionally have had a lot of trouble with plot because it's a very linear logical progression and of Women. Writers are highly creative somewhat disorganized and are very interested in character development. But they don't really get plot in so. I just became passionate about teaching everybody but it seemed like it turned out to be the majority of women and then in doing that. It soon evolved into working with all kinds of creative people because what I found is we're all sort of on the same universal path. It's a universal story. That has certain markers in them that we pass through along the way. And what I found is that it's great when you're in the creative muse and everything's flowing in your feeling that euphoria of feeling like a conduit or a medium for the creative news to come through you. But at some point we stumble and all of a ten. We read over what we wrote. Are we look at the painting we painted and think? Oh my gosh you know. It's not what I thought it was going to be. And we started to doubt ourselves and self sabotage come up with sorts of reasons why we should put the project aside or give up or whatever and this is especially true for anyone who has perhaps suffered what. I call a backstory wound. Which is something that has traumatized them? In some way you know it can be a divorce or apparently being when you're a child or some kind of abuse or whatever and that really influences what we say to ourselves about our worthiness in our capabilities and our potential and that really interferes with the creative flow. All of a sudden that flow is stymied and our spirits. Can't really get through to be able to give us the support and the encouragement that we deserve. I wanted to write a workbook to be able to help people to become unblocked it to be able to get rid of all this self doubt and insecurities and unworthiness and to really live a life of passion and excitement and happiness joy and that really is something that I'm devoted to and with this workbook. You really prepare us for what we're going to do. It does such a wonderful job of asking these deep thoughtful questioned. Where did that come from over the course of time? Did you develop that? These are the questions that are going to help drive us into our creative selves. Well I think it's just sort of evolved over the last thirty years or so probably my whole life to tell you the truth but when I came up with the idea of the universal story I had a really hard time bringing it down to the concrete was very cereal and spiritual in all of that but once I started writing more about it and seeing these parts you know the beginning the middle and the end it really correlates with the Hero's journey that Joseph Campbell came up with but I take it a step further and called the universal story because I see it in not just what we move through as humans on our human path but nature you know the seasons of the year the moon cycles plants growth animal cycles. All these things have the same beginning middles and ends. And if you're aware of where you are on that journey and what's expected of you. It just makes the journey easier.

Martha Alderson Paula Phelps Joseph Campbell Consultant
Coronavirus may lead to 75,000 "deaths of despair," study says

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

01:03 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus may lead to 75,000 "deaths of despair," study says

"Deaths of despair and these are just brought about by drug and alcohol abuse as well as suicide new study suggests covert nineteen may greatly increase the problem even before the start of the pandemic so called deaths of despair were on the rise in this country a study by well being trusted national foundation projects perhaps seventy five thousand additional deaths of despair due to the social isolation brought about by a covert nineteen clear it's an additional seventy five thousand on top of the deaths of despair that we already anticipate stock to Benjamin Miller with well being trust and one of the authors of the new study hi to me and the employment issue the unemployment specifically added also the multiplier effect will complete might be at risk so that the despair are at a higher risk right now Dr Miller and others point out that now is the perfect time for people isolated due to the pandemic to reach out to others by phone social media whatever works so as not to feel as much alone Charles Feldman can extend seventy

Social Isolation Benjamin Miller Charles Feldman
Coronavirus may lead to 75,000 "deaths of despair," study says

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 4 months ago

Coronavirus may lead to 75,000 "deaths of despair," study says

"News new research estimates how many more people will die from drug and alcohol use and from suicide as the result of the pandemic and its effects the national mental health foundation well being trust says what it calls deaths of despair could range from about twenty four hundred additional deaths to more than one hundred fifty four thousand over the next decade and peers Yuki Noguchi reports two of the biggest factors known to contribute to deaths of despair or financial stress and social isolation the pandemic has forced both realities on millions of Americans which has mental health experts sounding alarms the study looked at past economic shocks and disasters and projected different death tolls scenarios depending on the unemployment rate and the speed of recovery from the pandemic it also analyze the potential effect by region the most vulnerable demographics include non Hispanic whites in their fifties and sixties and those living in western and southeastern

Yuki Noguchi Social Isolation
Extroverts and Introvert Survival Guide

The Chalene Show

08:09 min | 4 months ago

Extroverts and Introvert Survival Guide

"I'm sure you've been seeing all of the memes about how this is just the ideal time for introverts okay. I've collected a few of my favorites. Let me read these to you. Daniel Howell says social distancing. Please I've been training for this pandemic my entire life introverts rise up we are finally valid. Brit Burnett said the hardest. Invert thing right now is getting yourself off of a lengthy zoom when your friends. No you have nowhere else to go Randy Rainbow said with all the social distancing and take out food. My life is about to be dramatically. The Same Jen. Grandin said introverts colon flattening the curve since forever. Here's another one. Oh now everyone wants to know what introverts do for fun. Sarah Sarah Carp said I really need all of this time for social distancing to prepare myself for all the quote. Yeah we should get together once. This is all over plans that I have agreed to. That's hysterical here's another one. My favorite part of social isolation is that I no longer have to think of excuses. Why can't come to your party? Biggest wakeup call of the pandemic introverts realizing they've been in quarantine for fifteen years or more. Okay then I tried to find some funny memes for extroverts. But they're not funny. They're all just really sad. Like most of them are just pictures. Like a picture of a person sitting on a couch looking blankly off into the distance like they're about to cry and it just says extroverts during quarantine. I think it's really true. And you know there are a lot of memes about it. We've been joking around about it. And I know many of the introverts we assume all introverts are really happy about this but the truth is not necessarily so and it's not a joke for some people with certain psychological characteristics. I mean all of us have psychological characteristics that make us more vulnerable or more triggered or more uncomfortable in certain situations. And there's just no way around at the extroverts are probably the most uncomfortable and the most vulnerable right now during this whole lockdown how we adjust isolation to a life. That's been shrunk down to the confines of your home to uncertainty too dramatic change to the amount of people that were around is really important and frankly I think we've been doing a little too much generalizing. I think the assumption is that all introverts are thriving and that all extroverts are dying and that might be true for some but for most of us. It's more complicated than that. I should also mention that there is such thing as an ambivert right. Most of us are probably somewhere on the spectrum. You're not fully introverted or fully extroverted. Most of us are somewhere. In between in certain circumstances can make us feel more introverted or more extroverted. I have coined the term for myself outgoing introvert. That means I tend to get more energy. I need a lot of alone time. I need a lot of time to think and talk to myself and be alone. I need I need not just people not around me. I need silence however when I'm around people I really get into it and I'm outgoing and I like to be the person who's keeping people talking and asking the questions and I wanna get to know people and I'm not afraid of a big crowd. I like a party. I don't mind being the center of attention but those kinds of things I can only do in pretty small doses and there are certain groups are certain types of social settings that I cannot do. I literally feel like I'm dying. If I'm with a group of phony people you know the type y'all or like where it's maybe it's not phony people maybe just like a group of people no one is really like being real and everyone's like pretending or being pretentious or making everyone's making small talk or everyone's trying to impress each other. I would rather barf or where people are like fighting for attention. Like if you're in a group of a bunch of Alpha males or Alpha females and there's just like a group of them collected I can't like shoot me in the head. I cannot I just so but if you put me in a group of the right kind of people people who are authentic and real and are willing to go there or just don't need to impress you or prove themselves to you like that doesn't drain me so for many introverts you know we like to retreat to our home space. That's where we have control over our schedule. It's where we can have control over our routine. It's where we get to decide who we want to be with and how we want to be with them. We get to control the volume level in our homes and frankly introverts and extroverts have lost the ability to turn up or turn down whatever it is that they get energy from so for me in order for me to get energy after turned down my social interaction. But I don't have that choice right now as you you know. I've been talking about like what like home? Life is like here in the Johnson Home. And there's a lot of people even my own husband because I'm an introvert there every single day before the pandemic I could count on like three or four hours where I could do my interview thing. I could be quiet and I could think and I could process daydream and I could create. And I can't do that not only that I've had my daughter and my son and their significant others here too and I love them. Love them all but there's kind of always someone here so for me. I've really had to figure out how to find that time even when people are here and it's possible but I do think without question. This situation is probably much easier on introverts than it is extroverts. I have heard from so many of you who've said I I don't want this to end. I love it. I love it so much. I don't have to all the MEMES. I read in the beginning but true introverts are like this is kind of how my life always and so. I really am enjoying it and I don't have to make up all of the reasons why I don't have to go out and meet people Those who are often inviting me to go to coffee or to do social things like I don't have all that associated guilt that I normally do trying to figure out a reason why I like you. I like you a lot but I just. I don't want to get together really with anyone I mean. That's an extreme introvert but some of us are extreme introverts. I'm pretty far on that extreme side. I really am. I mean when I do get together with people. It's pretty rare. I'm a homebody so I wanted to talk about my extroverts because I do think y'all are struggling and that struggle is very real and it is really hard for you to you. Can't sneak away and socially I mean I guess you could but for an introvert you can. You can sneak away and find your alone time. You can go outside but for an extrovert. It's that social interaction. The physical touch that thing that you get that gives you energy unless you've got a lot of people in your home and I don't know even if that is the same for you because I think for most extroverts unique kind of new people around you a lot of the time to.

Social Isolation Randy Rainbow Sarah Sarah Carp Brit Burnett Daniel Howell Johnson Home Grandin
"social isolation" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

09:23 min | 5 months ago

"social isolation" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Hello and welcome back to science weekly where we're following the corona virus outbreak and addressing. The questions. You'll sending our way. We have plenty to explore but do keep them coming in. Just use the foam. We've set up at the Guardian Dot Com forward slash. Kobe nineteen questions. One word recently. Still Janos in London right in expressing his anxiety about the possibility that government might enforce. Strict lockdown measures. Stop people going out. He told us all of my friends. Live away from me so I'm worried about my mental health in the days ahead. The impact of social isolation mental and physical health is something. That's concerning many of us. So that's what today's episode is. All about. I mean this is probably the most stressful situation for most of us in across the last couple of generations. So although I'm worried as a psychiatrist I'm also at least Reassured that that there is some resilience in the general population. I'm in sample science editor at The Guardian. You're listening to science weekly. My Name Is Academy Santa Professor of Biological Psychiatry at these two psychiatrists psychology neuroscience. King's College London. A large part of the world's population and now in lockdown socially distancing from people not in their households and working from home. Tom I what do we know about? The long term impact of isolation on our bodies so social isolation is basically agreement to a chronic stress quite powerful chronic stress so is as bad as poverty. Bereavement discrimination is just a powerful social stress source inside it does to the body. Stress Does so increase for example our immune system. It makes it more hyperactive with potential negative consequences on cardiovascular function a increase our stress hormones which that has an effect on the brain and on our metabolism so the way we control our Shugart and our fought it's increased blood pressure So everything distressed US. Social Isolation also does Does have an impact on the brain as well or is it really just. The body is such division impact on the brain so again we know from studies on social isolation and also from animal studies the brain basically star suffering the animals forms last new brain cells or more brain cells die is interesting because they also in cabins that socialization increase the risk of dementia and cognitive decline. The people a lot of the studies have been conducted on on the concept of socialization as in long term conditions where people have reduced social contact and a very small or absent social networks. So they don't have any friends they don't have a partner Relatives more as a conditional. Bah long-term situation rather than an acute change in life. So in general for most people quarantine is not gonNA be like this. It's first of all is shorter. Compared to feel like amounts of lifelong experience of being socially isolated and a lot of us can connect to people to existing friends and relatives however having said that we have people who fulfilled equity of social relation especially older people. That perhaps already coming from situational reduce social networks and these are the people that are more vulnerable for the impact on both mental and physical health. I presume in the short term. The thing a lot of people will be worried about is the impact of the lockdown on mental health whether Darrow or those of others and whether those others already have sort of vulnerabilities in the area and we saw a study from the University of Sheffield showed there was a spike in the number of people self reporting depression and anxiety following the announcement of lockdowns. What do we know about the effects of the kind of isolation where going to be experiencing on mental health in general again social isolation does increase the risk of mental health problems Moore as a chronic condition so we know the social isolation increase the risk of the Prussian anxiety and suicide in again quite powerful we also know the quarantine so there are few studies done from other people from previous Epidemic Situation That can mirror Khloe where we are experiencing it. We know that people who are confined for quarantine tend to experience more anxiety fear anger and frustration. And so they will be negative consequences now. This a couple of pints that are interesting to make stood that has been picking Zion depression right after announcement of the quarantine and the restriction of social contact. However even if the number of people reporting depression or anxiety spike from twenty percent to forty percent is still means that the majority of people are not at least. South reporting depression and anxiety. And that's actually shows that is quite odd the resilience in the general population. I mean this is probably the most stressful situation for most of us in across the last couple of generations. So although I'm worried as I am also at least reassure that there's some resilience in the general population. Do you have a sense of when these problems might really start accruing? I mean it feels to me just talking to colleagues and friends who in exactly the same situation as as as the rest of us. It's already hard but we may be here for many months And I wondering where we are likely to be mentally Two months down the road three months down the road. Yes I share your concerns and from the data that we have on previous quarantine experience and everything longer than ten days seems to have a negative effect. And that's where the the different styles to be quite evident and of course there will be additional problems of people finance financial situation changing and people becoming more and more progressively more worried about that and we also know that what really makes a difference in terms of mental health during quarantine. Pedia is information in also sense of altruistic experience so we need to explain to people why this is important to really save lives across the whole World Sa- giving giving an altruistic and aspect of our sacrifice will have a positive impact on our mental health because he uncertainty itself becomes stressful. Absolutely uncertainty is worse than knowing the something bad is happening in a way a lot of the messaging around the lockdown. And how the nation's going to come together and the messaging sometimes invokes the the sort of you know the bullet spirit and all the rest of it and I'm sure that is effective for some portion of the population but I'm also sure there will be other people who really don't feel that blitz spirit and for them. This is probably just terrifying and lonely. A and I think that's when the strength of whatever community support is available can really make a difference. People who are isolated quarantine may feel that the being forgotten so when important point is to remember docked perhaps the most vulnerable group are the health professionals because of course in addition to the to the stress and burnout situation of their of the intensity of the work. They are scared about getting infected. And they're scared about bringing infection back home to the relatives. And then there'd been issues of insignias and we know from previous experience of quarantine in other areas affected by infections. They stopped the king. Kostov the Kuantan actually won the develop really long term psychological consequences.

social isolation science weekly Kobe US Academy Santa Professor of Bio London Kuantan Janos King College London Tom Shugart editor University of Sheffield partner Darrow
"social isolation" Discussed on From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

09:43 min | 6 months ago

"social isolation" Discussed on From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

"To stay grounded and to stay healthy during this time of isolation and social distancing and Anything if you want to pick up a notebook and a pen right now. We're even just use the notes on your phone so you can write some things down. Please please do anything that resonates feels like. It's GONNA stick. I would love to invite you to add it to your day and it's little things little pieces of Advice Mall Actions Practices that I have realized is what's what's saving me right now. It would be so easy for each us in this moment to absolutely end up in some sort of depression. Oh for sure for so many of us. We have lost all sense of of structure right now that regular scheduled that we have going to work going about our day picking up kids from like all of that is out the window were just home and of course you know in in a in a perfect world we could all try to look at this time is like. Oh like a steak ation and you know what a beautiful opportunity to spend time with our kids and get back to basics. Take care of ourselves in a in a perfect world. Yes that's what we would all feel but actually we are feeling this huge sense of fear and panic right now and when feeling fear and panic. It's hard to look at this as anything than than other than what it is. Which is a quarantine right out of the fear of everybody's safety? We have to stay at home. So how can we honor those fears find ways to process our emotions adhere to the rules? Stay home I self isolate. Make sure that we flatten the curve. Try to really do our part in keeping the rest of our society as safe as possible while taking good care of ourselves so number one on this list this some calling this the social isolation survival guide. Or I'm calling this the Corentin I don't know should I call it Kovic? Nineteen survival guide. That would that would only apply if you're actually six. Obviously this is not a play for people who are sick but people who are isolating I think social isolation survival guide is good number one. Do the Yoga do the Yoga guys seriously. If you don't have a matt you don't even need them out like hardwood floor. Works carpet works. Just you just need your body. That's it if you have a matt rolling it out every single day if you want to do the classes with us on the site. They're free and beautiful from me about that is that we can all feel connected that we're doing the same thing so it's like we're part of a whole not alone. I love that but some sort of dedicated movement on your everyday lease anchor into that if you look at it that way. Maybe you feel like you've been disconnected from your practice for awhile. This could be a great time for you to really find that home practice for the first time in your life where you find the habit of getting on your Matt every day to the point of it becoming part of your day where it's not hard anymore. It's not this thing you have to do words just you wake up and you practice right. And that's when we see the practice actually begins to improve our lives in more ways than the physical so yoga every damn day. That is my number one tip right now and you choose a kind of practice. That really fits you so the classes that we've chosen on the site. There were different teachers different kinds of clauses. We've had super restorative calming classes classes to fight anxiety we've had some dynamic clauses to make you sweat everything in between so modifying in ways you WanNa modifies what fits your body coming to your body to breathe set an intention to be as the most important part so do the Yoga and then I want you to get up in the morning and do at least one thing that nourishes you and I want you to do it right away. Like right away. It really is a big thing. How we set the tone for the rest of the day especially if all days begins to blend together and just look and feel the same like. I don't really know a data's today. I don't know if anybody knows what data's today really that you wake up in the morning and not that you don't reach for your phone immediately to look at the news or to go to social media or to you know or that your like a Zombie waking up and going to the couch to sit down that you do something immediately when you wake up that not plea nourishes you and it's up to you to figure out what that is because of course it's going to be different for each of us for me in the morning. I wake up. I take a big jug of filtered water and a squeeze half a lemon inside and I have a some mineral drops that I use and I laid a candle. I drink my water and we make breakfast. That's our big thing in the morning. We make breakfast not just like throwing things on the table but like we like handles. We Cook Breakfast every morning. Pancakes or something big and we sit down as a family and we enjoy that breakfast everyday. And it's actually. It's something that we normally do and I and I've taken it for granted a little bit or not realized how important that moment of connection is that we have that quiet time. We listen to some jazz in the morning. Like candles lit sitting around the table beginning date together. Like that nourishes me. Because we're together right. Were not in front of a screen or TV or to get to someplace or no. It's just work preparing breakfast and breathing together. So that for me is really important so for you. Perhaps it's if you have the ability to go outside. Watch the sunrise in the morning. Take a very conscious dock with your with your dog. Can you go doll? Quick with your walk right up. Walk with your dog like a conscious walk with your dog every morning. Making a gratitude list as you wake up. Meditating going straight to your Yoga Mat something nursing journaling for a little bit like something that fills your cup and that you make sure to do that. F- every morning every morning like really beginning your day with that something that nourishes you deeply. And we don't want to forget about the basics. The basics right now are more important than ever basics. Meaning that you drink enough water right you stay hydrated you drink more water than you normally would. The bathroom is like five feet away anyway. So drink up drink goodwater all day long that you eat. Nourishing foods like of course. I think it's super normal for each of us to you know. We're probably not eating as healthy as we normally do there. It's hard to get the kind of groceries and the produce and things that we normally can get so cutting ourselves some slack like it's okay if your diet isn't what it normally is if you're eating more sugar or drinking more wine or whatever it is you're doing in moderation pray right not drinking a bottle of wine every night you know not eating a whole thing of talk like cake every day not falling into that unconscious place where we're no longer aware of the actions that we're taking but trying to really nourish yourself with food without being too hard on yourself. I think that balance is really important for anyone. Things like ooh great opportunity for me to lose a bunch of weight. Great opportunity for me to detox. I really don't think that this is the time for that. This is the time for us to survive. Seriously it's time for us to not fall into depression at the time for us to take care of our mental health right. We only have so and we gotta take care of our family. We gotTA TAKE CARE OF. Our hearts nourish ourselves. Try to stay sane right now so any of those harsh demands that you've put on yourself thinking that now is a good time to change improve. I would put all that down like really back to basics right now taking care of yourself in that most important basic basic basic basic housing good right eating nourishing food. We have been eating a ton of soups and stews and curries and chilies. There's something so nourishing for me about an. I actually haven't cooking at eleven in the morning every day like I do. This live at nine am every day. And then I'll what do I do after that? Oh Yeah I water the plants I go to the garden with a baby and we play and we take care of the plants outside and then run eleven everyday like all put some things for for. Let's paint or some crafts on our kitchen island and I chop all veggies for today's meal. And I've been making double batches of either big soups or like making a lot of doll and Vegan chilies and things like that and It's been so good just to know that we have big stock of stuff in the fruit in the fridge. So if I'm having a low moment and one hundred Oregon eat. There's always something there I can just heat it and we're good and what I've been doing as well as making double batches and half of it. I'm freezing knowing that this is nourishing food filled with healthy produce and beans and lentils Greens. And then I let half of it cool. I put it in Ziplock bags and I lay them flat in the freezer so it freezes like a little sliver doesn't take up any space and for me that's just been a very calming thing to do. Just knowing that we have healthy foods in the freezer you know if any day there's shortage of food like we're going to be okay that flat for me. The cooking part has been important. But you eat good food right food. That fills you up food. Makes you feel whole those basics. Basics part of the basics is being outside if you're an absolute quarantine. You're allowed to leave your house sitting by a window breathing. Fresh air everyday. Hopefully hopefully you still have the ability like we have over here to walk your dogs outside. I'll we can still go to the beach if we remain in complete isolation not seeing anybody but for me just even going outside in our little street we live on a dead end road road with no one here walking the dogs in the morning feeling subtle. My skin you know those basic things breathing fresh air at some point every day. Make sure you.

depression social isolation Matt anxiety Oregon
"social isolation" Discussed on From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

08:54 min | 6 months ago

"social isolation" Discussed on From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

"So which meant that you know the moment. Our government took action and decided to to shut the country down. So we've had no one week of borders completely closed. No flights going out. No flights coming in everything completely shutdown. Everyone is an isolation we have a curfew with a thousand dollar fine if they catch on the street. All businesses closed all schools closed. Everything's closed the one measure that they could still take but they haven't taken that Nature's open and we have a very small population and normally it's you know it's like I don't know if it's twenty or thirty times population that's present with tourism. So when we have no torres the island is is like a ghost lights so quiet. It's so empty. All the hotels shut down overnight which means thousands and thousands basically the whole population of Aruba because everybody works in hospitality. Everyone was sent home without pay. So the only thing that's open though is that our our beaches are open. We can still go to the north shore and walk her dogs. I'm so grateful for and I think the reason that that still open as because we have so much space and it's absolutely possible. I still do that while being an isolation I can take an hour walk with my dogs and see no one meet. No-one a come across a single car. Person Nothing so ya. That's the one the one If they're going to tighten up `isolation that's the one thing they could do. Of course we can go to the grocery store than is going once a week to vegetables and fruits. Lucky we still have some so Aruba's GDP dropped by by fifty percent like almost overnight. We have a deficit of one point. Six billion it's it's a all of this happened so quickly you know and it's it's it's really made me realize just how unbelievably fragile and vulnerable. We were and I have been talking about this over the past couple of months which I find so interesting since we started our own vegetable garden here a couple Louis started vegetable garden in November. When talking about that a lot like we are not a self sustaining island. If something happens and I said that in podcast I said to friends like if something happens to us. We can't take care of ourselves. Aruba doesn't have a single industry that sustains the islet that solve sustaining right we we are causing Lee busy serving other people serving foreigners serving tourists serving people who come here and visit and then they leave right where completely reliant on food being brought in from the United States and from Holland all of our food. You know there's a one or two tiny little farms that have some sort of you know you can find some lettuce and things like that Not on a big scale not to a scale that CAN SUSTAIN THE ISLAND. And that's it you know there is no farming. There's no food production. There's nothing on the silence and I spoke that out loud so many times like it scares me that what if something happens we would be. We're we're literal islet like we. There's no place for us to go. We don't have groundwater we can't drill into earth and do that well enough and then get freshwater. No we have a desalination plant that takes the salt out of this out of the ocean water. You know if something would happen here like if something would happen to that one source of water that all of us have we. We won't survive right if other countries stop exporting goods because maybe all of a sudden they don't have enough for themselves right. Does a very likely scenario right now. We won't have food you know and I have had this in the back of my mind for a while and I've spoken about it and just had this urgency of like we need vegetables. We need to at least for our family here like we need to have some sort of you know. We need to be able to take care of ourselves so long with that. This is also super strange. That this you know that this not strange is making sense now. But I'm just connecting the dots. We installed solar panels on the top of our house. This was done as his idea. Months ago he's been talking about it for years environmentally that you know. We live on an island. Hus Like three hundred and sixty five days of sun a year you know. Obviously we're the. We're in the Caribbean. It's hot and sunny every day. The fact that you know we. We have a really high electricity bill and We have an oil refinery on the island. That's now closed. But just environmentalists have solar panels makes so much sense and then he did enough research to to to figure out like okay within three and a half years we can pay back we will. It will have paid for itself as what we normally pay and electricity because our electricity bill will go down by ninety percent. We are still on the grid Which is which is which I don't like but that's how it works here. You're still on the grade. You're still in the network of the island. You feed electricity that you produce back into the grid and then you buy it back or they buy it back for ten percent. Yeah we we have ninety percent less cost for that and and he fought for this. That is for a long time. It was a really big investment for us and we went back and forth and then suddenly you know when we started with the vegetable garden. I said Yeah you know what? Let's do it like you're right. We need to do it for the environment in three years. It's for itself so it's just time right and three years. Let's do it and we did that. It finished right before this pandemic started and now if we want to connect the battery and be off the grid we can do that. Meaning if if the whole island brood collapsed lose electricity at the very least here we have. We have a solar panels that can bring us electricity and we have a little vegetable garden so I kind of had this feeling like intuitively. We've we've known I don't know because we have taken weird action that now all a sudden I am so grateful for can't even really explain it. The biggest thing I think and this has been hard for me to communicate because there's so much suffering so much struggle. It's very hard. I think to communicate anything you know. Oh this is so good you know. I'm glad something happened for me. You if you listen to this podcast you've heard me speak for almost two years now about the fact that I had a burn out Pat October twenty eighteen. I got sick. I stayed sick for so long. I was so so so ill and being suffering through that burnout. Which for me was the hardest thing of my entire life like twenty nineteen was one of the worst years of my whole life led to the decision to cancel or to not put on the schedule for twenty twenty a single yoga retreat. A single euro teacher training know program. Notorious no workshops. No traveling nor tweets not trainings and I shared on this show before how hard it was for me to make that decision. First of all our whole center axis of our entire business are these programs right. That's how that's how that's how I put food on the table for my kid is that I lead teacher trainings and retreats like that's really the main source of of cash flow for our entire business so getting to a place in two thousand nineteen where I had to go sit with my team and say hey I need a break. I don't WanNa do it? I need a break. I can't do it anymore. I need at least a year but in the back of my head I kinda thought I don't know maybe it will be two years like I. I just need space and all of two thousand nineteen. I kept like I was on my knees when I was so ill so sick pushing myself through these tours and big classes and commitments and it was so hard for me to was really like. I was hanging on by a thread and I was praying. I can't wait for the time. Right can just be home with my family. I was praying with all of my might to be able to just be home right to not have to travel to not. Have you know anyone relying on me for anything to to not have big responsibility to not have work like that and making that decision to not put what we normally put we we normally sell? We normally sell retreats retreat. Some teacher trainings eighteen months in advance. We put them on the calendar. They all sell out immediately and were a regular business like we worked with our regular cash flow. If that was the case we would have had all those programs sold and paid and done done for prepared. We would have probably been out of business overnight. You know imagine spending half of the year immersed than programs and groups and then having all of that be cancelled immediately indefinitely hundreds of people meaning to refund hundreds of people were having already paid lodging and food and salaries and you know for these groups. It's like we. It took me a long time to actually acknowledge this because I had the realization when this happened of like Oh my God thank God. We don't have retreats and trainings for this year. What a coincidence I was like. Oh my God but then every day it's sunk in more and more. Oh my God. Oh my God. That burnout was.

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"social isolation" Discussed on From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

03:52 min | 6 months ago

"social isolation" Discussed on From the Heart: Conversations with Yoga Girl

"From isolation speaking to you in isolation I am Rachel breath in and welcome to the show. I I kind of like wish I could have something different. You know to share like a big change like now this podcast because of Kovic. Nineteen because of Corona virus because of quarantine. This show is now recorded from my house. This show is always recorded from the comfort of my home and not much has changed on the podcastone standpoint. In other news the entire world has changed. I feel like the world. Has We knew it is over sons? The last week's episode where I shared that we had to take my daughter into get tested for for Krona virus. Found out that she tested negative. Thank goodness otherwise I think our reality right now would be very very different. Probably but she's okay and I couldn't even really listen to last week's episode because it was so hard for me to process and talk about. I always the cried. All the way through was really really hard and traumatic and now I feel like we are all kind of moving through different stages of grief. Personally I have okay. An Owl just almost flew into the window in front of me. Wait wait so I'm sitting what I'm sitting in my guest bedroom at the top of our house. An owl like you know when when a bird is about to fly into a window flew right toward me pause. A couple of inches from the window turned around an owl. I feel like I need to look this up immediately. The spiritual meaning of owls okay. I just googled spirit guide or the spiritual meaning of owls. The OWL as a spirit guide is emblematic of deep connection with wisdom and intuitive knowledge. Wow when the spirit of this animal guides you you can see the true reality beyond illusion and deceit. The I'll also offers for those. Who have it a personal totem inspiration and guidance necessary to deeply explore the unknown and the magic of life the symbolic meaning for how our intuition the presence of the OWL announces change the traditional meaning of the Ol- Spirit is the announcer of death? Most likely symbolic like a big life transition the end of the old era and change. Okay Okay I. I'm also the kind of person where whenever I'm going through. Something difficult challenging dramatic horrible. I Look for spiritual deeper meaning and absolutely everything that comes my way and if you look for signs enough you will find them. That is absolutely true. I also think that the universe puts little signs on our all the time but we have to be present enough to really notice them and when we are moments of trouble we tend to be a little bit more present in life overall so okay so we are in the obviously new life and of an end of an era new chapter. Big Transition and intuition. That's that's where we are right now and I think that's what this podcast is going to be about. So I have journeyed through all the stages of grief I mean. I've definitely been in denial. I have been bargaining. I've been really angry crying a lot and I've settled today on some sort of strange mood where I'm kind of hysterically laughing. One moment some moments it feels like it's normal some more months. I'm just like all my knees and total despair of what the fuck is happening. And I'm pretty sure you feel the same. So welcome to this episode. Today I'm going to I'm going to share a couple of things that have been really helpful for me to make isolation and we're going to take a moment to ground but I wanted to share.

OWL Rachel Kovic
"social isolation" Discussed on What's The Matter With Me? Podcast

What's The Matter With Me? Podcast

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"social isolation" Discussed on What's The Matter With Me? Podcast

"Welcome to what's the matter with me season three episode six social isolation. In which I deal with social isolation. Get interrupted by real estate broker. I money Spiring come out against this ability porn. I realize I need a scooter again. And the national MS society support will help. My name is John. I'm thirty nine years old, husband and father of two small business owner radio DJ podcast or in have multiple sclerosis. So I made this podcast share what I'm going through. What's the matter with me is in MS bond casts in? It's also about other things past episodes can be downloaded on apple podcasts from what's the matter with me or G or wherever you it? I'm not a medical professional. Don't take this for medical advice. If you need medical advice, ask your healthcare provider..

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"social isolation" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

Waking Up with Sam Harris

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on Waking Up with Sam Harris

"Against your beliefs about what your feeling are scary will then those symptoms can be admitted to be told that that Aken your stomach is almost certainly indigestion or it's very likely cancer. Right. I mean, those those are just ideas, the sensation don't change, but one experience would be impressively change by the framing another. I guess even more extreme example for me does come from meditation. And it offers a kind of edge case too, many of the things we've been talking about. So for instance, I totally concede the importance of connection in our lives and the quality of your life. It seems to me is in most people's cases is almost entirely defined by the quality of the relationships in it, right social isolation for most people. Most of the time is just perfectly correlated with degradation in the quality of their life. But. It is also true to say that some of the most ecstatically happy and wisest people I've ever met have spent a good portion of their lives in total isolation in some cases, literally in caves for years at a time. Right. And so it it is possible to be completely isolated and isolated in a way that most people would consider the realization of their worst nightmares. This is a point made before that it's telling that solitary confinement is considered a punishment even inside a maximum security prison and most people prefer the company of rapists and murderers to being locked in a room with alone with their minds, and yet it's possible to in the context of 'isolation, experienced profound wellbeing and the difference. There is being able to meditate or not and meditation in this case is really just being able to notice. What the mind is like when you're not continuously identified with and lost in thought. And you know, so much thinking is negative the character of one's identification with ought is almost entirely painful, but meditation e kind of in the in the normal range of people's experience. Forget about isolation in caves for moment. This can happen. Very very quickly. I mean, literally in in.

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"social isolation" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

The EVRYMAN Podcast

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on The EVRYMAN Podcast

"I'm going to start this week's episode with a question, and I'm going to invite you to take a moment and think about the men in your life. That specifically, I want to see if you can identify any men who might be struggling, struggling with anything struggling with struggling with their career, struggling with their relationship, struggling finding enough time to take care of himself in the midst of the rest of life. Struggling with depression, struggling with lack of friendship or loneliness, and I just want you to to Mark that into to pay attention. And I do this all the time everywhere I go and I and I pay attention to people that I meet and I ask them this question, it's remarkable how many men are struggling, and it's also remarkable how few places there seemed to be for men to go or at least that's what they think. I've been working really. Hard to really, really pare down and simplify what it is that we do at every man through this podcast and two are group's and our weekends and our wilderness expeditions all of it. There are two main things that we are battling against that is emotional suppression and social isolation. And those are just fancy terms to say that men tamped down most of what they feel, and we don't have that many relationships that are deep and meaningful enough for us to feel connected and healthy. And the amazing thing is that science right now is showing the primacy, the how most how this stuff is the most important that we need deep, meaningful human connections, because we're wired that way because we evolve that way simply because of who are physiologically. And so our work at every man go straight to the heart of these two issues. We simply come together. We learn to. Open up and as we open up to each other, it's like a knife to the heart of both of these ways of life. These maladaptive ways of life of keeping things in and being isolated. And all of a sudden we stand up from this group of.

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"social isolation" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"She and her husband wrote a book in two thousand nine titled the lonely american drifting apart in the twentyfirst century great to have you jacket thanks for coming in thanks so much to what led you to write the book the lonely american so we appreciated that uh people like people who are shy would feel embarrassed about the fact that they were naturally sort of uh outside of things and that they felt so bad about being lonely that they would come to us in the office and instead of talking about the loneliness they would talk about what they're thought their diagnosis was in the way of anxiety or depression and so we were always talking around the issue of loneliness because people were embarrassed about it and we thought we should bring it out of the closet so tell us how loneliness and social isolation drive mental health problems well you know when people feel lonely even if they are surrounded by people or they are socially isolated they don't have the company and sounding board of other people to regain perspective so it so easy to lose perspective and when you lose perspective you start to be in a kind of twilight zone where you can't quite uh grab hold of what's really happening so we has a species need other people to help us regain perspective and therapy frequently works by just that method of once you talk to somebody you start to have a a better feeling about your inner thoughts because you've told them to somebody you know an increasing proportion of our population in this country now experiences isolation regularly more people report living alone today than at any other time since the census began collecting that kind of data were geographically separated from people from family from friends him in that plays into this a lot does it not dr old.

social isolation
"social isolation" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"And then doing the research for the buck eichel i discovered a harvard study that said that if you have more than six france i i'm not endorsing this study i'm telling you what it said if you have more than six you'll live to and a half years longer it looks good but that's what you'd imagine it you might seven who knows i could live forever but the point is that you know what we wanna do is we want to be engaged and now we get to a very big issue and that is the issue of isolation i can't believe that that's something you have been touched on in the issue of geriatric mental help isolationist got big issues particularly in new york because we have to be a little careful in defining isolation oh fairly often studies about isolation use as a measure that people are living alone and that's not a good way to understand isolation because there are plenty of people who live alone who have friends and who get out and about ten are they really are not isolated on isolation means people who are significantly cut off from other people and uh significantly cut off from activities that too i give them satisfaction uh and of course isolation is both contributed to and a consequence of depression and anxiety so the link between uh no social isolation and mental disorders uh his is very important earlier about at one of the fundamental facts that seems to be is that almost the most important thing to do with somebody who is the press is to help them get connected even uh connected to two it's called in to death ice the kind of isolation that you're talking about and yeah i think it is true and and i think that you see this is why it's such a holistic and connected issue the aarp has a and that is a map called the age friendly communities it's all over the country and and different communities trying to show you improve to you why their age friendly and most of it has to do with the gamble to walk meeting people having these connections now a lot of it is on the on the web you can.

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"social isolation" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

CBC Radio - Spark

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on CBC Radio - Spark

"Assumed that older canadians would have issues with loneliness or social isolation but that younger people and millennials do seem to experience socialize isolation is that something that you found any research yeah so the the last couple studies and social isolation the big ones were done in like 2013 thirteen haven't seen uh at much since then so this what we did here was a we didn't look at social isolation specifically but we just ask about um your motions um let you experience nowadays and we also looked at the emotions of people experienced when they were in their childhood which we think can be very uh revealing so when we asked millennials what negative experiences that they they might recall from their childhood i get compared to other generations there are more likely to social eight or to remove recall feelings of sadness of embarrassment of boredom of ah worry shame inadequacy and the disappointment and and loneliness too but forty percent said loneliness again the doesn't apply to all millennials but they a much more than other generations were more likely to recall those kinds of emotions i'm in is still needs to be unpacked frankly the the going sir answer right now or or explanation rather is it a helicopter parents of sort of created a sense of anxiety among their children there's a lot of articles and you know some pop some scientific that sort of point to the influence of stressing your kids out by um constantly hovering over it over and over them and i'm not allowing them to take risks and being very careful with the way they behave and the way you raised them in that sort of create two cents.

social isolation forty percent