35 Burst results for "Social Isolation"

"social isolation" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

03:10 min | 3 months ago

"social isolation" Discussed on Untangle

"Got to say, publicly, thank you for that content has been amazing. And that was like you said a year ago, and that was part of our very first endeavor into really, what can we do with meditation? What we can do with mindfulness and what can we do in a way that is really intentional. And so that was part of the main mental health awareness month in 2021. And so we started working with your team and we started working with mindfulness instructor to actually do live meditations every single day. And yeah, it was really wonderful. I think what we realized and we realized even before we took that step is that you look at Gen Z you look at millennials like I think that there's a lot more adoption in mental health practice today. And I think the older adult population, similar to when we think about cutting edge technology, that wasn't something that people talked about every single day. The idea of therapy, the idea of meditation, mindfulness, right? It was definitely more niche back then. Right, now it's everybody tip of the tongue. It's the tip of the tongue for everybody. And we realize that there is going to be a little bit of similar to when we started deploying VR, we were really going to need to make a commitment to education, or we're going to make a commitment to this might not work right away, but we're in it for the long run. We're in it to help build breakdown some stigma, break down some barriers and make people understand that the opportunity to come in and spend 15 minutes being mindful every day is it's a great thing full of benefits and we're going to show up and we just did it again for may mental health awareness month 2022. We did daily meditations and we're continuing to do a few per week and we're showing up consistently knowing that it's going to take some time to build the practice. But we've seen an uptick. We've seen people as recently as Monday. Somebody reached out and was like, hey, I didn't see the session on the calendar. Like, you guys are still doing this and we're like, oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. It made sure that they had access. I can vouch for the fact that it helps. I have a Friends, her mother who's 91 years old, has had one of our teachers Christina dufour, teacher. She lives near her in Connecticut and she comes once a week to teach her meditation. She's been doing it for four years. And it's had a huge impact on her. She lives in her own home, but she's like wild for meditation. She really thanks me every single time we get on the phone. So it's very funny. That's awesome. And gratitude or something beautiful about the time between people who practice mindfulness and meditation and express gratitude and that's actually one of the themes that we really focus on and because there's so much research that shows the positive emotional benefits of the expression of gratitude. Well, and it's especially important. I've done a number of interviews on aging of late with some Buddhists, some Parker Palmer, who has many beautiful books on aging with grace and it's very interesting because it's so important to inject joy and novelty because there are so many losses. And you want to balance out that equation. Yeah. And that's what we have the pleasure of doing every single day. You do. Thank you. Yay. Yeah, this was a delightful conversation. I'm glad we had time to talk about this. Yes. Okay,

Christina dufour Connecticut Parker Palmer
How Can Parents Push Back Against Chemical Castration Drugs?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 3 months ago

How Can Parents Push Back Against Chemical Castration Drugs?

"We as parents push back if our kids go to government schools on our kids possibly getting chemical castration drugs? I'm very worried about this. Thanks so much. This is something that's a huge problem. And it's happening more and more. Biden assistant secretary for health, Levine, said that we need to empower kids to go on puberty blockers. So let me be very clear. If America had a any ounce of sanity, Richard Levine would be court martialed and arrested and have to post bail for saying something like this. In fact, I believe Richard Levine should be arrested. For the widespread promotion of child abuse for saying this, play cut 64. So we really want to debase our treatment and to affirm and to support an empower these youth not to limit their participation in activities and sports. And even a limit their ability to get gender affirmation treatment in their state. How is that how is that any different than someone saying on television? We need to have young kids on cocaine and heroin. How is that any different? You are pushing life altering chemical castration drugs that show to increase depression, suicide rates, self harm, social isolation, outside of parental guidance and support. The direct quote is we need to empower kids to go on puberty blockers and get sexual reassignment surgery. You know the only community that really likes that pharmaceutical companies because that's a gold mine of the therapists, not doing therapy. They're doing affirmation therapy, which is the opposite of therapy, and kicking it on over to kids. Here is a bunch of drugs. Here's a bunch of chemicals. Yeah, you might want to kill yourself, be super depressed and anxious. Don't worry, we have Xanax benzodiazepines, and we have all these other drugs for you. But that comes later. It's a massive pharmaceutical cocktail that gets controlled by Pfizer estrogenic and Moderna and all the others.

Richard Levine Levine Biden America Depression Pfizer Moderna
Florida Was an Unbelievable Success Story During the Pandemic. Why?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:34 min | 6 months ago

Florida Was an Unbelievable Success Story During the Pandemic. Why?

"So Florida was an unbelievable success story. During the pandemic. By remaining open and defying federal government, pressure, Ron DeSantis, the courageous Ron DeSantis was able to keep Florida free, businesses from closing down. He was able to taper and hedge against mental health issues, depression, suicide, social isolation, alcoholism, Florida became kind of a Beacon of liberty and hope, and you see it with the real estate values around here. You see it with the new businesses that are moving here. It's almost synonymous with self government. Ron DeSantis deserves credit and Ron DeSantis has received some incredibly well earned praise for doing this. But the question is, why was he able to do it? The reason is in the structure of our government. We talk a lot about the United States Constitution here on this program. And James Madison, in the federalist papers, argued that the structure of the constitution was one of its defining elements. James Madison Alexander Hamilton and John Jay, the three authors of the federalist papers and one of the three most involved in designing our constitution, James Madison being the most involved. Why is America able to be free not because of our Bill of rights every banana republic has a Bill of rights? No, the structure of checks and balances and consent of the governed. Allows a bottom up structure, a grassroots centric way of governing.

Ron Desantis Florida James Madison James Madison Alexander Hamilt Depression America John Jay Banana Republic
Study: Rates of Anxiety and Depression Among College Students Continue to Soar

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

01:11 min | 1 year ago

Study: Rates of Anxiety and Depression Among College Students Continue to Soar

"Story out of lebanon new hampshire which includes the dartmouth college very high end college. That did a study on some of their own students that found that two hundred and seventeen students were tracked when they entered the school as freshmen in two thousand seventeen in the hopes of understanding how they behave students stress levels rise and fall usually in tandem with midterm and final exams but since the onset of the pandemic quote unquote rates of depression and anxiety have soared and show no signs of coming down. Said andrew campbell researcher and computer science professor. The research points to how the public health crisis they say is affecting young people and raises questions about what will be done to support them a group that struggled disproportionately with mental health issues for years before the pandemic set in the question is how long will they stay like. This said the researcher. The findings also added a growing body of research that or to a growing body of research that indicate the effects of the corona virus have extended beyond physical health and safety particularly as people deal with social isolation grief unemployment and uncertainty about the future.

Dartmouth College Very High En Lebanon New Hampshire Andrew Campbell Anxiety Depression
AARP's Paolo Narciso Explains How Voice Tech Is Helping Elderly Populations

VOICE Global 2021

04:08 min | 1 year ago

AARP's Paolo Narciso Explains How Voice Tech Is Helping Elderly Populations

"Of the programs. He put together very quickly Would premise started was a food assistance. Program i'll be delivered through a little over three point. Two million meals out within the timespan a may In july two Older americans who were struggling to be able to food in the pantry and we're able to respond very quickly one of the tools that us from technology perspective is in fact voice As many of you may know we have a platform connected to me which is built entirely on alexa. Google that allows for war a senior with their smart speakers and through with your programs. Where we i identify that folks were in fact. Struggling would be able to attitude into your access to the supermarkets for instance call early in march in april. A lot of these supermarkets started closing The ability to access food is very very difficult and boys. Technology was one of the even always allows identify folks The needed assistance in able to quickly deliver Those kneels to The folks that he did well certainly certainly necessary. Let's talk a little bit about the adoption. So when you're able to put a voice assistant in with a senior that has you know that the really has a need to be able to access services or goods or other other kinds of support. How has that. How's that process going. And how well our seniors able to adopt voice technology today and then let's talk about you know where where we'd like to see it. Go in the future so we were honestly very surprised as as As many organizations we have been a testing boy so looking for ways able use voice in that effort has gone on for several years now in the fourth year of implementing voice technologies in our solutions predominantly for social isolation. Be able to have seniors interact. Not only with advice like alexa also would each other at through voice adoption has been surprisingly so options. Double edged sword right it once seniors learn how to be able to use a device like alexa or being used voice on your phone. We find that that comes their preferred megan up communications and being able to use interact with with technology. We have seniors. Who the only voice they actually here is the voice of Alexa voice of out of google during the day which is which is sad but at the same time luring able to communicate those with with alexa or google. I'm literally they if we wanted to take those devices fact who could never get back so once name the technology it becomes very much permanent. Lives for many reasons right You know taxes. Small for instance state writings and opponent is effective in many ways but of voices certainly freeing from a from a string perspective also Need to use of your hands and being able to just use voice able to perform tasks to get updates to its fourth has been Has been a need of seniors. In recent fly day they thought technology the very very quickly It's also used for medicare giving perspective be checking in on loved ones notifications and google patients in alexa. Allow people to check in under loved. Wants to voice and he be able to tell their stories and once they have that free media i have the worry added devices. Typically that they have to look at We find that the seniors again very quickly. That technology

Alexa Google Megan Medicare
Social Isolation Is a Solvable Problem for People With Disabilities

Solvable

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Social Isolation Is a Solvable Problem for People With Disabilities

"My mom found an atari really really poor My mom money. She had bought me a used. Atari hurry from one of those used electronic stores and we ended up playing like burger master. Something you like. Put a burger together. When you're talking about burger type. I remember it now but it was. It wasn't adorable piece of machinery at the time. Nintendo was already out. We couldn't afford one of those She was just really thrilled. That i was able to operate the controller at all the earliest. When i played with super mario one and duck of course and then i had super mario three. But i never got super mario to. It's always bothered me. I played all of those although we have to touch on the fact that we shot ducks snowing. Dog often up in the middle your screen. And he's like my dad. We get angry. It'd be like why is that talk like right next to the tv. Tried to shoot the so to be clear. No dogs were harmed in the making of duck video game. not that i know of a outlet. You were diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy. Can you tell me a little bit about how it impacted you in gaming so spinal. Muscular atrophy is a sister disease to a less. So if you saw stephen hawkins' have you know anybody who is afflicted with a less than you kind of have an idea what i'm going through in my life. So essentially my muscles are getting weaker and weaker as time goes on where ellis is much quicker in its development. Sf can last for your entire lifetime. So you could live an entire seventy eighty ninety years And it might never take your life or you might only live for a couple of months past when i was born. I wasn't able to crawl like a child is supposed to x. amount of milestones. My mom's thirty noticing that was using my arms to pull myself around. My lower legs weren't pushing. They should've been

Mario Atari Stephen Hawkins Nintendo Spinal Muscular Atrophy Ellis
Would the rent-a-person idea work outside Japan?

Side Hustle School

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Would the rent-a-person idea work outside Japan?

"In a recent side-hustle school weekly recap email. You featured an article about a guy in japan. Who's started a business to rent a person who does nothing and then asked who will be the one to do south side japan. Well i want to be that person. My question is how can i frame this so people will take it seriously around here. I hope to have fun. With concept to concerned it would often be seen as a gag instead of a real endeavor that could benefit people. Thanks hey jennifer. Thank you so much for listening. Thanks for the question. I do hope that you'll be the person to figure this out. I'm not totally sure. I have all the answers. But i thought about this and let let's dive in Because remember it's important always not just in this situation but for any story that you hear about a side hustle whether it's on this podcast or somewhere else even if it sounds really wacky or unusual or just kind of like. Wow people can make money from that. There's almost always if not always a fundamental underlying need. that is being met. Okay so what is it. In this case. I think the needed meets like what this guy is doing. The need meets is social isolation particularly in japan. So let's go and actually look at article. I'm going to quote a bit from that story. And this guy is. His name is morimoto so people rent morimoto for various reasons at times he will participate in a gaming session to make up numbers. Turn up to send off people who are moving away. Accompany those filing for divorce or listened to healthcare workers who have become mentally unwell to their exhausting work morimoto commits to doing nothing. Basically just gives backchannel feedback when someone speaks to him and he says i don't like to be cheered on by others. I get upset when people simply tell me to keep on trying so when someone is trying to do something. I think the best thing to do is lower the bar for them by staying at their site so pretty unique thing here. Right question is does it work in particular because it is japan. That's the question. I think if it's implemented somewhere else it would definitely need to be localized but it's social isolation a problem in the united states or in canada or in some other western country. I would say

Japan Morimoto Jennifer United States Canada
Why Inner Work is THE Missing Link to Your Health with Dr. Mary Pardee

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

04:24 min | 1 year ago

Why Inner Work is THE Missing Link to Your Health with Dr. Mary Pardee

"Mary. Welcome back to the podcast. Thank you good to be back for folks. That didn't hear our first conversation Will be linking to all that in the show notes. We did a really good interview with you. That a lot of people really appreciate it. Which was if you do a modern day. Physical if you're gonna go through a modern day. Physical what are the additional test and also. What are the optimal numbers that you want to be hitting when it comes to vitamin d or like a mega three. Two mega six ratio. Telomeres like you basically walked people through a modern day. Physical is pretty in depth. I think it was like a two hour interview. People really loved it and so they can check that out on the show notes. That was a really fun. One this one is going to be a little bit different. We have a whole host of topics we want to get into. Vaccines wanna hear your perspective as a functional medicine and naturopathic doctor. We're gonna chat about gut health and a few other topics to To come up so. I'm excited to get into it before we jump on the topic of vaccines. I want to ask you where in la. You live in los angeles. I live in los angeles And it's been california's been one of the most strict sort of lockdowns. Although now things are starting to ease backup. You couldn't even do outdoor dining before but now that's kind of easing up a little bit. How has the last year. Like twenty twenty. How is that for you from like a social interactions standpoint. You at least as far as i know you live alone at the moment. Danso for you. And i'm asking you because i know that in addition of functional medicine naturally the medicine. You're super into this whole aspect of mental health and i think that mental health has been one of the things that we have not balanced out the repercussions of strict strict. Strict lockdowns love california. But that's definitely been one of the places how has been the last house twenty twenty for you from a social standpoint and mental health standpoint. Yeah i think this is a great topic. I was talking to omid our mutual friend. Dr omid naim. Yep and he's been on the podcast as well but just yesterday. We had this conversation and we were talking about how you know. We've had a lot of deaths from covid and that's something that we need to focus on for sure but i think that there is a little bit of an exchange that's happening were not realizing the impact of mental health and the deaths. That are gonna come from that aspect of it so we were talking about. relapses of addiction. That are happening right now. Right and we're seeing people relapse at much higher rates because of social isolation most probably they don't have people to reach out to they don't have places to go in person and have that contact And so i think it is something that we're not really looking at as closely as we should be for me. Personally it's been. It was a tough year for sure. living by yourself not being married you know being single in an apartment by yourself without roommates a whole different thing and for me. Personally i had a small group of friends. Rise that i'm going to see these people still And i think that you have to do something like that for your mental health. If you don't have family that are local or you don't have a significant other or a roommate that you live with. You have to kind of make your family And so that's how i went about it and I don't know how. I would have done it differently because i think if you do full solitude isolation and that can be really scary for somebody totally. Was there anything that you tapped into any new rituals or things that you were doing that you hadn't really done as much of in the past. Yeah absolutely it was a big year of Tapping into my spirituality. They the last twelve months. I did more like soul searching and digging than i've ever done in my life And i've heard that being a common theme for other people to really figuring out like what is important to me Was a big was a big part of twenty twenty There's a lot of time to do that. There's a lot of quiet time There wasn't as much travel for me. Either so i was kind of grounded in l. a. and have the time to do that soul-searching but yeah getting in touch with spirituality and figuring out like what is true authentic self. Like what do i want for myself was Was really significant for me this past

Danso Dr Omid Naim Los Angeles California Mary LA
"social isolation" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

09:00 min | 1 year ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"And, you know there might be a modern, modern monitor in there where they can still see what's happening on the stage and some sensory, tactile things possibly up there, too. But, um it's been a tremendous success for us. You know, we what Dan and I often times say is it's It's sort of when you look at like a wheelchair ramp. And you think about that. And you think about what does this represent in a wheelchair ramp doesn't necessarily mean it's only for folks who are in wheelchairs, right? It's just about opening the door wider, more people are considered. In the production. What we're doing Okay. Relaxed? Yeah. No, I like the idea of having a chill room to Ah, sort of calm space. Because again being the at home parent. There are those moments where one child could be more than fine just sitting there, but the other one just is needing tol. Not be around so much stimuli. Right on. We find it extremely rewarding as artists to look out into the audience and really see an audience that really represents more of what the world looks like outside us as well to see more people from different walks of life who feel Good in that space that it's really moving to see, Of course, of course. Um Your assistant also sent me a link to a U. C l, a music event that you guys participated in. It takes a little signing up, but there's no cost involved. So it's the cap U C L A Tune in festival and it looks like you guys made a bunch of original music for this that made it had original videos as well. Is that what I'm? Yeah. Um, I'm interpreting this correctly. You are. When we're invited to the festival Theory Journal plan was that we go out and perform and then covert hit, and Christy Edmonds, who is the director of capital C L. A. Um, game is some up. You know, she said, What would you like to do? We still we still wanna have you? We're still gonna do the festival. You can come out and do something and it will be streamed and or if you don't wanna travel. Let's think of other ideas and we said How about if we way definitely don't wanna travel? How about if we stay in Baltimore and make some videos of original songs that we wrote during the social isolation song Syriza's And, uh And so Christie was right on board with it immediately and you know, we can't. We can't say enough about the vision that she's brought to Captain's C L A and, you know, she's really considered one of the great purpose. Arts presenters in the world, and so to give us that opportunity was really it was really important to her that she take care of her artists. And she did that and allowed us the Chance to really find a vision for this thing and do it in the way that we wanted him and we're so excited, you know, And it was exciting for us, too, because you know, we have been here in Baltimore for just over a year and part of our desire. Being here is to collaborate and to connect with other creative minds, Activists artifice with artists who are doing meaningful work out here, so Was wonderful to collaborate with the people we did, too. But the music only way one of the one of the artists you brought to the Gimme five is a Baltimore artist. Actually, I've noticed so one of the artists you you've contributed to the five songs you're gonna be playing here is a Baltimore artists. I believe right ease, Jackson. Yes. Yes, it is. Easy, easy. I am notorious. I'm not I'm the DJ. He's notorious for reading and name wrong on the air, So I will I will handle being corrected. So used to it at this point. Can we talk about those, uh, those five songs You guys chose? Sure. Yeah. Okay. First of all, thank you for for contributing five songs to the Give me five. I love this part of the because I want to get folks to talk about The stuff that the moves them. First choice, a very popular tune. Probably the most well known of the five closer to find by the Indigo Girls. That would be me. I am a huge Oh, my goodness, A huge, huge, huge Indigo Girls fan. I was introduced to them in high school. And from the moment I heard them, I just loved the first of all the subject matter that they were writing about and singing about, But most importantly to me was their lush and delicious harmonies. I love the way they sound together. I love that The melodic line doesn't always go to where you think it's going to go. But there's these just delicious, tight harmonies that Just make me come alive. So close around him to find has a lot of meaning to me because it's one of those songs that if you are in Indigo Girls fan, you know that tune. And so Dan surprised me a couple of years ago and brought me to and Indigo Girl concert out and I don't know Connecticut and remember where we were Jersey Jersey and it was a total surprise and the house was packed and they would play these favorites and closer I am to find was one of those songs that they played and everybody In the building. Except for Dan, You know the court with me. With all the lyrics and it was just such a heartwarming It was like a spiritually experience to see all these people who I have no connection to outside of the Indigo girls per se, but that we all could connect in that moment with that song. Well, that's really our of music, right is to connect us all through that moment and have that moment we're unified. Be it being in a room or or However, the situation but it is yeah. Yeah, And the next one is easy. Jackson. With a really cool to the most recent of them all from 2019 called Be great. Mm hmm. Yeah, he's gonna be on our new record. He's coming in to do a rap on one of our songs and way were, he said he's an important figure in the hip hop and just overall cultural And on the cultural landscape here in Baltimore, and I think we must listen to this song about a dozen times and eventually realized it was just the sin fads doing pocket bells, cannon and easy Jackson. On top of that there was nothing else going on. And it's It just goes to show you really, you know, you don't need 20 people letting their hair on fire to make a song really great. It's it was in the video, you know for anyone who cares to look for the video for this one. It's It's very, very moving and beautiful. And it shows you about tomorrow and also just shows you that. You know, the black perspective and the black experience here, you know, one glimpse and it Zaveri movie. Yeah, I think one of the things I really love about it to his dance set is talking about cannon. But it's this melody that we are all familiar with. It's repetitive. But then what's beautiful is you really focus on these Powerful lyrics that he's pouring out in this song, so there's no other distractions. You got the sympathy. You got all that going on, but you can really hone into this beautiful message that he's putting out to the world and I think everyone can find some some joy in what he's singing about. Definitely a wonderfully positive affirmation going on in that. You're the video is very nice. I did see your link on Facebook, and the cinematography is beautiful because sense of beauty of how it's just everything is frames. Very lovely. Listeners if you if you carried a co seek it out. Easy, Jackson. Be great, but don't do it until after this show. Next is Liz right song called Barley. Mm. Yeah, well again, Liz, right for me is just everything her sound her production her Tambor with the way she approaches a song, And even if she's not singing originals, she just has a way of making any song sound original to her. On D I think she just has one of those voices. Where once you hear her, and once you get her sound in your head, you can. You just need three seconds of a song And you know that's a Liz right too. Um, but yeah, that's that's one of those songs that we, Dan and I have played on repeat so many so many times the message the feel of the song the pace of the song it Z so beautiful to us. Yeah, well, I'm sure being a fellow jazz singer. It speaks to you in a lot of ways as well. Yeah. Oh, And then next was precious Bryant, who? Ah, song called last time. From What I can tell this album came out was their second album, and it came out after she turned 60. Yeah, I think she she was. I think she got more more popular in later in life. I think the rest of.

Baltimore Jackson Dan Indigo Girls Liz festival Theory Journal Facebook Indigo Girl social isolation Bryant director Christy Edmonds Christie Jersey Jersey Connecticut
"social isolation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:16 min | 1 year ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Y C. NPR Rex in collaboration with WGBH radio in Boston last week on the show. We discussed the tweet. I sent out about quote the pandemic wall. I was hitting from the burnout of parenting during the pandemic. Without proper childcare, constant work flow, nonstop news and social isolation. And the response to that tweet was overwhelming. I'm far from the only one suffering right now. Thousands of you say you've also hit that wall. Well, it seems counterintuitive to do less right now. My next guest says there's lots of power in resting. Catherine May is a writer and author of wintering the Power of Rest and Retreat in Difficult times. Captain. Thanks for joining us. So much for having me Catherine, We're tired. Very tired. It's been we've got 2020 was gonna kind of end and things, but But it's not letting up. 2021 has a lot of similar energy is 2020. A lot of people are using the word burnout. But you use a concept called Wintering. What is wintering? So wintering is the idea that throughout our lives, we have these moments when we kind of fall for the trap the cracks, So that might be I mean, I've never wrote the book to predict a pandemic, but it might be because off some kind of a life event, it might be mental or physical illness. However, it comes along. It's this really unpleasant time in our life. But it's also this crucible of change, and it's often the place where we begin to really rethink her priorities and wonder about the next phase for us. Could that be something that we do alone? Is it something when I was reading parts of the book I kept thinking is that this is almost like saying it's OK to say I'm not okay right now. Oh, absolutely. And I honestly think that particularly this stage in the game as you say, we're burnt out. We've hit a wall. Is so important for us to be able to say I am not okay with any of this because it isn't okay on. I think it's as you were pointing out before is particularly not okay? For parents who have dived in to rescue absolutely everything right now, you know where doing childcare with doing schooling. We are trying to work full time jobs were worrying about older relatives were worrying about our own health. It just is a very, very heavy burden to carry And that doesn't mean to say it's going to go away. But I don't think we do ourselves any favors a tool. If we try and pretend that everything's fine and just whistle through it. So what does wintering in tail? First of all, and second of all does it only happen in the winter? Or is that a concept that you created? No, absolutely wintering can happen at any time in the year. Although I do think that sometimes in the actual winter the season of winter, it could be particularly bad. I mean, I think we're all feeling restricted at the moment as well, not only because of pandemic stuff, but also because the weather is keeping us indoors. You know, there's no Opportunity to relax and kick back. I think at least in the summer, it maybe felt a little bit like we had some fun options. All the fun options. They're gone. The kind of character of winter is this big cocktail of emotions? Really. There's a lot of loneliness and isolation, frustration, boredom, feeling kind of left out feeling like everybody else is carrying on and we're not. I mean, I think at least in a pandemic we maybe you'll fill in the same boat. But even then I think there's a sense that when we're doing this all individually, we're not in this together because we can't be on. That's what's making this particularly hard. So how does one begin to get into a wintering phase? Let's say you we've hit the wall were burned out where we're standing on the precipice of Who knows what at this point Um, what do you recommend? You're saying that people should actually lean into that feeling they should do less. Maybe. Yeah, absolutely. I mean, this is a time to take enormous care of yourself. You know, we've been banding this self care phrase about for a while, and it's been diluted to mean something. Quite kind of commercial, you know, like, have a nice bubble bath. Buy yourself a scented candle. The roots off self care come from the disability movement, and they are so relevant to all of us at the moment, because what we need to do is meet our own needs, which is something that we so often fail to do. And that means adjusting our priorities right now. We cannot do everything that is. I mean, I think we've busted that myth a while ago. I hope we have because it simply isn't possible to carry on with every element of our lives as normal and something has to give And if it doesn't it's us who give. It's our health that suffers. It's all mental health itself. Family relationships. So this is a time to radically re prioritize what we can possibly do on. Do you know that counts for employers to they've got to begin to really listen to people about the strain there under right now. Yeah, We cannot do everything The kids will be okay. As long as we look after their mental health, they will catch up with the stuff at school. They will manage without knowing. You know the sort of intricacies of algebra this year or whatever isn't it happened? I have to stop you. You sound like you're telling people to do less and to be okay with that You're telling Americans to do that? Oh, my goodness. We have that same problem in important. Okay, so it's across the pond. So you're telling people to do a radical thing, which is Relax. Yeah. I mean, I think relax might be a bit of a tall order at the moment, to be honest, but actively rest if we can, And that means, you know, not pushing ourselves not to get enough sleep, for example, to try and fit more in like prioritizing stuff like Taking five minutes to read a book, You know, walking around the block if we can. I've got so many friends who are parents at the moment who are not leaving the house because they just feel so under pressure. And actually, I think if we can take 15 minutes a day to prioritize our own health, we're going to survive this a lot better. And yet, you know, Americans need to learn it and the Brits need to learn it to this is this is a moment that we're being taught something. No. I guess the one thing I would say is that a lot of people are might be confused about how to do that, or whether they should do that. It almost feels like you're saying that we should have some compassion for ourselves. When they're in again. These air these air mind blowing concepts for I think a lot of people who just go go, go, go go, and you might even be suggesting that we are a little bit easier on ourselves in this moment. No. I love the incredulity in your voice there. Yeah, I'm trying to. I'm trying to get this into my head. But I think it's wonderful. It is time. You know, we over the last 30 40 years have pushed ourselves harder and harder. And filled in every single little hole and corner in the day. You know, even when we have a moment of downtown, we pick up our phones and before we know it, we're in our emails, and there's another task in our mind..

Catherine social isolation WGBH Boston C. NPR Rex writer Um
Pandemic Self Care with Jondi Whitis

The Healing Place Podcast

03:55 min | 1 year ago

Pandemic Self Care with Jondi Whitis

"Hey everybody i always tells me that. We're preparing we are now. We're live on facebook so welcome back to our conversations on pandemic self care then. We'll go into some other care. Discussions as well and i'm very excited to have with me today. John d. bias. So welcome john thanks. I'm glad to be back. Yes i'm i'm happy to have you here. We had a little chat before we hit a record or not record going live which is so awesome. going to talk a little bit about some self care and then kuo regulation. And yes but i tell let people know what it is that you are what you do great. My name is john d. And the last name johnny whitest. Nobody remembers that anyway. But you know not having reached share. Proportions johnny widest. And what i do. Is i go around and i help. People feel better fast so i have a private practice. Yes of us probably listening. But also i'm a trainer on the master trainer of trainers with the oldest original and registered charitable educational association. Way too many words. What does that mean. It's a noncommercial Association of people like myself that train if turkey and tapping professionally and we do it at the highest standards that we can and were even a registered charity so it is not a smokescreen noncommercial kind of place non profit. We actually mean. And so what are we try to do. We try to stretch gary craig's original tapping Diaspora into an even greater than his own eight or nine million across the globe. We try to keep that going. It's a it's a legacy and a privilege and what does that mean. It means that this tool which we know from our last conversation if you missed that real quick. It's it does three kinds of care. Which is why it's so wonderful and i call it the people's toolbox self-care crucial and non negotiable. It's perfect peer to peer care. We all need that. That's the connection that ends isolation and we all need that perfect and then at deeper levels like an iceberg. Those of us who are skilled in doing it because of practice and certification and accreditation and all the things we go through to make sure that we give the public the finest we have to offer. That's when we use it at the deepest therapeutic care level for traumatic relief and release and things like that. But look i'll three of those things are so wonderful. Somebody is going to get some great relief out of any one of those levels and all over possible. So that's what i do. Yeah well thank you. And i love it that you said connection because i'm not kidding when i say you're maybe my fourteenth live of past podcast guests and i think the word connection or connect has come up in every single one of them and how critical that is at this time was what we're going through especially these times right because social isolation you know physical social isolation is not good for most of us. We're not paying too bears. In our not polar bears we are heard like critters and we do. Best thrive best in connection with others. And when that's impossible or the flip side of that little too much connection but we're not used to. It don't know what to do with it. That's also very very unsettling because now on top of being uncomfortable we have all these uncomfortable feelings about. I shouldn't feel that way about my family. My roommate my uncle whatever it is right and so inside double whammy.

Johnny Whitest Johnny Widest Oldest Original And Registered John D KUO Gary Craig Facebook John
Is WA overreacting by locking down so much?

Coronacast

04:13 min | 1 year ago

Is WA overreacting by locking down so much?

"Hello this is. Corona cast a daily podcast. All about the coronavirus. I'm health reported teigen. Tulloch position journalist alter norman swan. It's monday the first of february. That's right and yesterday. We were mocking the longest stretch. Nationwide without any luck transmission since february last year was fourteen consecutive days. But we've seen that stretch broken With a case announced in western australia yesterday norman male cortel quarantine security guard in his twenties. Who was working at the sheraton four points quarantine hotel and w i has not surprisingly jumped really hot on the web announced a really tough five lockdown basically. No one's going anywhere for five days until they figure out what's going on so one case and a really tough five day lockdown. Is this an overreaction. Or is this the right level of reaction. No i think it's the right level of reaction and the mandatory masks as well and they've just done everything to get this under control. It's one person but this person's been to a lot of different areas potentially a lot of contacts. Luckily so far his flatmates were are negative and they would be the people most at risk so the may well be very little if any spread here. But you just don't know and it's possible that he's got the uk variant of the virus since the uk very was on. That was on the floor of the people. He was speaking after him so one of the things they're doing is they're canceling weddings for the next five days like you say this Mosques are expected to be in place and a lot of other measures that have been put into place in norman. You've said basically since the very start of this podcast. If people can bear the cost him on set far back that the way to get on top of these fires is to go in hard into going to ease their limit to the hardness and early. Nece that you are prepared to endorse. This is still within your your realm if you want to control this virus. There's only one thing that works when you really when you when you don't know where the virus is and that is a longtime which stops people coming in contact with each other and running the risk of spreading the virus. You got to keep the virus away from other people. So the lockdown is what works now. There's no question. As new south wales has shown that guerrilla good contact tracing high testing ritz contact tracing. An isolationist required does make a difference and can get under control. But that's taken weeks in new south wales when there's been no uk variant the uk variant as people listening to chronic will know eddie homes on from the university of sydney a little while ago. Is that the wuhan. Virus spreads from one person to about two point five the uk variant spreads from one person to about three point four. That's probably the best way of thinking about it. Robin the percentage is a fifty percent or seventy percent more contagious so it is a lot more contagious and remember. This is a virus that spreads in clusters rather than evenly spread through the community. That's why these venues are so important to come to actually pin down get tested. Who were at those venues at those times published by the west australian government so it could be like southeasterly korea and queensland where it turned out to be a fisher on nice vizner to have and they're able to lift the lockdown early and that's great but a three four or five day locked on is much better than some stopping and starting not controlling the the virus which is what they've done and look what happens and the other problem and w. unlike new south wales and unlike victoria is they haven't had any community spread for ages knives since early be early last year and so people had returned to normal soon. Can't expect them to kind of do half of a social isolation process. You've really got to pull the whole population back. And then just your sees it up for five days and the you know the good news is likely to be that there hasn't spread but it's possible has in which case just got to give under

Teigen Norman Swan Sheraton Four Points Quarantin UK Tulloch Nece New South Wales Western Australia Norman West Australian Government University Of Sydney Eddie Robin Queensland Korea Victoria
"social isolation" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WGN Radio

"So the Cubs may get Jack Peterson not official yet, right? Not official yet pending a physical, But that's the word Ken Rosenthal reporting that this morning and So it basically that's Kyle Schwarber's replacement, I guess well and Peterson women, he's Yeah, he's now fielder outfield Left handed hitter. Yeah, he's young guy 28. Not home run hitter, So maybe maybe he's possible. Lead us Got some power, Does he? Yeah, He's got some power 36 homers two years ago at home run in. I want to say Game five of the world's Syriza's the Dodgers this year. But he didn't like a lot of guys. He didn't put up his best numbers on the pandemic shortened season, which is unusual. We'll find out more about him, including why his nickname is dizzy. So that I don't know, but but he actually it's interesting because early on, it was thought that he was gonna end up with white socks. And now he goes to the Cubs. Apparently, the Giants were As of a few days ago look like they were going to sign him, so apparently he's got to deal with the Cubs. All right. Well, let's Ah, I'm surprised you dead. They hadn't asked you about consulted with you lately I've been hearing about is you know this one? Go on that one. Go on. Lester's going So nice to have. In addition, as you said there was more have been going the other way. Yes, I know anybody have cove insomnia. The That's the name. Now they're giving the sleep disturbance caused by the cupboard 19 health crisis And apparently, neurologists say this is Very common. It's being reported and treated not only in people recovering from covert 19, but in the far larger number of people whose lives have been turned upside down by fear and social isolation. In other words, sleep disturbances affecting everyone. And there's a story in the news, Um, quoting a professor in Denver. And he says, essentially covert. Sania results from interference with our daily patterns. People who once commuted to work maybe working longer shifts like health care workers. Working from home or not working at all. Many are unemployed..

Cubs Giants sleep disturbances Jack Peterson Kyle Schwarber Ken Rosenthal Lester Dodgers official Sania social isolation Um Denver professor
"social isolation" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

07:25 min | 1 year ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WJR 760

"Governor in your letter to are you state quote to be direct winter contact Sports need to start And I thought your choice of words was interesting. Why need and not want? Why is this so important? Because it's important to our student athletes on do you know as superintendent on and a school district. We talk always about students first. In fact, it's one of our core values. And that means that you always listen. The students you may not always agree with them. But you listen On your reflective about what you're doing or not doing on their behalf. And I think this example about at this point winter sports not moving forward and students to Natalie's not being able to play. Silencing their voice on day. So at the minimum, it's regretful that there has not been clear responses to student athletes. But Don't be on that. I believe sports sports are an extension of school and sports make up students identity it allowed for self esteem to be developed confidence, perseverance, teamwork. And in this pandemic, I think we're all struggling with social isolation and and as the governor rightfully called for return for in person learning that has to become with sports and sports is a way for students to start to get on the other side of the pandemic. On Remote learning. And so I think the mental health component is an important one. How important is it from an academic standpoint in terms of their engagement, showing up, ready to learn and and attendance in this case online attendance? I think if we you know, we all can go back to when we were high school. And I think that there were some of us that a minority of us that were motivated every day to go to school because we're excited about math or or literacy or matters. You are science social studies. It doesn't mean that we didn't care about academic Most of us were most excited about going to school because of the social aspect. Probably elected is an extracurricular, including sports. So often those other activities motivate us to then focus on the core work of school. That is not always as interesting or sometimes. Persons more challenging, and I think we're losing that opportunity to create more motivation and engagement on discipline to them. Do the core work. The other thing that's troubling me outside of not a clear responses. There's really absolutely no data research behind the reason not the play. You can't think of a context for that is more of a contact sport and football. It was played in Michigan. We had some hiccups, and we're gonna have two cups independent positive. We had very few outbreak. Students were disciplined. I would say there were more disciplined than not athletes. Non football players on even when we tested over 99% were negative, so What is it about basketball? That's leading us not to play now. You know, people say, more breathing. You know, Mork, close contact. Um, but, um, basketball is being played in 80% of states throughout The country are some of our players have been playing nationally for sometime. They're leaving Michigan and playing in and and mainly in Toledo, Ohio, and we're not seeing this. This fear of safety on for the adults. They're consenting the participated coaches. So when we talk about greater impact in the society, Of course, if you're in a home with a grand parents and or other elderly individuals are medically fragile young people. And there needs to be thoughtfulness around contact and exposure. But that's the same thing that we should be talking about. High school students just going high school every day never lets about sports, so it's starting to feel political against the association. Andre. At the minimum. All of us mainly student athletes deserve clear metrics to say we have to be under this number. When we're above this number. It should be suspended. But at the end of the day if schools are open sport should be played. Well, And the irony is that 80% that are having contact sports. I would bet that they have higher hospitalization rates in case rates, and then we do because we're in the bottom 10. That's why there's just this disconnect. In the logic of this. I wanted to ask you. It is you, um, head back to in purses and classes. Soon we saw what happened. In Chicago. With that the teachers union staged what could be called a strike. Where is your district in terms of support from teachers on returning to class and getting things back to normal? So we created a letter of understanding with Detroit Federation of Teachers are our teacher's union to give preference to teacher so every corner there four quarters throughout. The school year. Would they take a survey and they tell us whether they want online learning or in person learning, so luckily for the most part, we've been able to match family demand for in person learning with the willingness of teachers to do that now, you know, we have over 100 schools in Detroit. So There's a lot of diversity when it comes to the type of school number schools, great level considerations. So there are some exceptions, where a certain grade level of a certain school We haven't been able to match that. But for the most part, we've been able to match that. But you know, when we did the survey at the beginning of the year, 20% of teachers were willing to work in person. Our most recent survey for the third quarter, we're now walk to about 40%. It's great. We have families. You know, it was about 2025% that felt comfortable with in person. Learning That number has not reached 50%. So, um, this is I think a positive trend and I think we'll be able to match family demand. The teacher willingness and hopefully we can start to move faster than the other side of the pandemic to the vaccine, more awareness and education that in person learning a safe on we can move forward with larger numbers that we go into the spring warmer months on into the summer into the fall. Very quickly before I lose you. The state superintendent requested a federal waiver exempting us from conducting standardized tests. The M start and basically all the assessment test. They're out there. What do you come down on? That? Is that a wise choice, Especially when we're trying to assess what learning loss has been over the pan them. Yes, on I'm probably in the minority on this issue, but I tend to be in that position sometimes, um, I believe are humans should test I do not believe, though it should be used for accountability for them and individual students, meaning I don't think you should be prevented from graduating. I don't think they should be retained. I don't think schools should be closed or sanctioned based on the test course. I don't believe it should be a part of the teacher evaluation. The principal evaluation, But I think we always need to know where Children are at academically, and I think that jeopardize test allows us to know. You know, beyond the attic total there..

superintendent Michigan football basketball Detroit Federation of Teachers social isolation Natalie Chicago Mork Toledo principal Ohio Detroit
"social isolation" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"L NEWS at 702. I'm Steve coming. The January 6th violent protests of the capital may be to blame for an outbreak. May be to blame for an outbreak of covert 19 among Capitol police officers. It's still unclear whether officers were infected during the attack. But 38 officers have tested positive for the virus. In the aftermath, Health officials warn the corona virus could be spread among the crowd of mostly unmasked people. Several lawmakers have also tested positive for covert 19 after sheltering with unmasked colleagues. The pandemic is taking a toll on kids mental health, especially those engaged in remote learning, according to psychologist Dr Jessica Hansen With Quince Orchard psychotherapy, we notices increases in depression and anxiety and stress that are occurring and social isolation. Just exacerbates those so to be able to have some form of inter in personal or in person. Interaction would be really beneficial for these kids, mental health and also the adult sitter there as well. Dr Harrison is part of the coalition of Maryland parents and students. Praising Governor Larry Hogan's call for students to return to some in person learning March 1st, she says. If your kids are suffering, make sure they have some form of non screen based socializing, whether it's with you or socially distance get togethers with friends. There's good news and bad news when it comes to the region's gas prices. First, the bad news filling up your tank this weekend will mean you're spending more than last weekend prices across the metro area currently ranging from 2 41 to 59 for a gallon of regular gas, but the Triple A says it's only up a penny from last week, which is the good news..

Dr Harrison Dr Jessica Hansen Capitol police Quince Orchard Steve Larry Hogan social isolation Maryland
"social isolation" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Issued leases for oil drilling. In the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge taken handling of Alaska public rate media reports. Usually it takes about two months to finalize oil leases after a sale. But in the case of the Arctic refuge in northeast Alaska, it took the Trump administration less than two weeks. Biden has said he opposes drilling for oil in the Arctic refuge, which is home to polar bears, caribou and other wildlife. For NPR News. I'm taking Hanlin in Anchorage. After today's inauguration, Biden is expected to sign an executive order putting a temporary hold on all oil and natural gas leasing activities in the Arctic refuge. This is NPR Live from KQED News. I'm Brian what San Francisco Health experts are warning that eating disorders among young people on the rise during the cove it crisis. Pediatrician Jason Niigata says the number of teenagers admitted to UCSF because of eating disorders has doubled since the pandemic began. He says factors related to the surge include social isolation. Anxiety about the pandemic and disruptions to daily routines and excessive social media use, especially instagram or Snapchat, partick talk or certain social media that are mostly picture based or video based. I think that there is a lot of focus on one's body image. The goddess says anyone struggling with an eating disorder should talk to their doctor. The city of Alameda is paying local restaurants to feed the city's most vulnerable residents. KQED Emily.

Arctic National Wildlife Refug Biden NPR News Alaska Jason Niigata social isolation KQED News Alameda Hanlin UCSF San Francisco Health Anchorage instagram executive partick Snapchat
"social isolation" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on KOMO

"The 2300 block of 104th Street Court deputy chief Hallie McCurdy is with the West Pierce fire and rescue. What they do is they make polyurethane codings as well as phone so truck bed liners is kind of their specialty. That process involves a lot of different hazardous materials. The Pierce County Hazardous materials incident, teams of the smoke from the fire was considered to be very toxic. Fires out now, and people got all the all clear to return a nearby homes and businesses caused the fire is still under investigation. Bipartisan pair of senators are hoping to legalize sports betting in Washington state. Republican Curtis King and Democrat Marco Leo's have introduced SB 52 12, which would legalize such gambling. Sports betting was allowed to tribal casinos starting last year after the U. S. Supreme Court struck down a federal ban in 2018 Supreme Court ruling really is going to force states to deal with this, and so that's another reason why I kind of making sure it's carefully regulated that there is, you know that transparency and oversight, Senator Leah says Some of the regulations in the bill include a ban on betting on collegiate events involving Washington teams. And a complete prohibition on East sports Gambling. Jeff Pooja, Look come on you. It's unclear how much of a role the Covic shut down plays in it. My King County has reached a grim record. Jell O King County Public Health, says 42 People died from overdoses in the two week period between December 27th in January. 9th that's the most they've ever seen in 14 days. Current events in the nation's capital seemed be having had compounded the stress and anxiety and so many Americans already feel because of the cove. It 19 pandemic. It was. Suzanne Fong has what one mental health experts saying about when it's time to get professional help. Doctor Mylene Dong is a practicing clinical psychologist. She's seen a big demand for help. The level of calls that I get from people seeking treatment is more than I've ever seen in my entire career. Over the past 10 months, mental health experts have seen more people experiencing anxiety and depression. Some mental health providers are inundated with patients seeking treatment. For some people, the social isolation and the stresses of living with covert 19 have been a huge factor. And now seeing what's happening in the news in our nation's capital and our own capital is compounding the stress and uncertainty for some people. We're all feeling very anxious right now, because the world is just uncertain in some level of that is to be expected. But if you're starting to notice that it's really interfering with your life like it's causing you to worry too much. During the day you having trouble falling asleep or you're seeing conflict and you're moody.

Doctor Mylene Dong U. S. Supreme Court 104th Street Court King County Public Health Pierce County Hallie McCurdy West Pierce King County deputy chief social isolation Curtis King Jeff Pooja Suzanne Fong Washington Senator Leah Covic Marco Leo
"social isolation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"And whether this time authorities will take it seriously. Candle LAMP NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Isolation from the pandemic has led some struggling with addiction to relapse. It has kept others from getting help and overdose deaths last year are expected to be a record breaking 81,000. Greenhouse with Wisconsin public radio reports after their son died in January, Jackie and Robert Watson found a stack of Popsicle sticks in his Milwaukee apartment. He'd written an affirmation on each one. I'm a fighter. Don't sweat the small stuff. My kids love me. 31 year old Brandon Collins had been working with a drug counselor who advised him to write the messages to himself. Picking up the Popsicle sticks. The Watsons were able to see how hard their son had wanted to kick his battle with cocaine. They wondered why he hadn't asked for help. You know, we saw him losing weight and acting differently, and we will approach him and talk to him bothering, you know again, it was always a denial. He was like No mom, and that I'm not doing that. You know, everything's fine. Collins died in January 2020 from a mixture of cocaine and fentanyl. He was found by a maintenance worker in his apartment. Collins had three Children and a contagious smile. His death came after years of fighting his addiction. It doesn't seem real because Like I said, he was so full of life and so happy. You know what he was trying. He really was struggling but trying to get better and in trying to fight that Collins struggle mirrors what's happening nationwide as the pandemic has amplified mental health and financial issues and social isolation has increased the risk of dying. From an overdose. You know, I know of several individuals who had been in recovery, and they lost their structure, their support network and really struggled, then with one into the villa. That's Dr Michelle Maloney, who heads addiction services for Rogers Behavioral Health. The system has locations in nine states, including Wisconsin, Minnesota in California, when people are using substances there often hiding it. So even in normal circumstances, family struggle to understand what's going on addiction support organizations say That's because addiction is a disease of despair. Paul Early is the president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, he says. Staying in contact with somebody who has a substance use disorder is so important during this time, even if you're angry, or you think they're in remission now is not the time for We used to call tough love. That is not the approach to use during this difficult time at all, because you run the risk of if they're using specialty using injectable drugs that they could overdose and die. Just Keith is with the addiction advocacy group shatterproof. She was living with her brother. When he died of a heroin overdose in 2015, she says, all families go through a grieving period, asking themselves what they should have done differently. Brendan Collins overdosed twice before he died, but those times he wasn't alone. His parents have asked themselves if they were wrong to support his decision to get his own apartment. Keith says, giving a person with a substance use disorder. Independence demonstrates love when our loved ones are going through this. We want to baby sit them in these ways and we wanted, you know, keep your eyes on them all the time to make sure they're gonna be okay. And a lot of times. People going through substance use disorders can feel like they're treated paternalistic Lee. It's been almost a year since Collins died. His parents have had to acknowledge his birthday and celebrate Christmas without him. Collins Popsicle sticks with his messages of affirmation were displayed during his funeral and empty sticks were available for people to write their own words about Collins. The Watsons now keep those at their house to remember their son. For NPR news. This is Corinne has thistles, all things considered from NPR news. On the next radio, last big, fat middle finger to the hockey established hockey fans take back the vote. Let's really drop a stink bomb in the room. But somebody in who just does not giving the league's most hated player. This guy is a credit. I'm gonna put my fist through your face objectively bad at hockey, his Cinderella moment. Everything else goes away and you just start playing hockey That's on the next radio lab. Country. Your lab. It's tonight at eight on 90.3 Key. Easy, you and K. Easy, you, Donald. But before that, and still to come on all things considered journalist Imara Jones talks about how increased transgender representing representation in media and politics impacts the trans community. That's coming up next.

Brandon Collins NPR Wisconsin Robert Watson cocaine American Society of Addiction Keith Milwaukee hockey Dr Michelle Maloney social isolation Rogers Behavioral Health Imara Jones Jackie K. Easy heroin Paul Early
"social isolation" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on KCRW

"Whether this time authorities will take it seriously. And Allen NPR news You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. Isolation from the pandemic has led some struggling with addiction to relapse. It has kept others from getting help and overdose deaths last year are expected to be a record breaking 81,000. Greenhouse with Wisconsin public radio reports after their son died in January, Jackie and Robert Watson found a stack of Popsicle sticks in his Milwaukee apartment. He'd written an affirmation on each one. I'm a fighter. Don't sweat the small stuff. My kids love me. 31 year old Brandon Collins had been working with a drug counselor who advised him to write the messages to himself. Picking up the Popsicle sticks. The Watsons were able to see how hard their son had wanted to kick his battle with cocaine. They wondered why he hadn't asked for help. You know, we saw him losing weight and acting differently, and we will approach him and talk to him bothering, you know again, it was always a denial. He was like, No, mama that I'm not doing that. You know, everything's fine. Collins died in January 2020 from a mixture of cocaine and fentanyl. He was found by a maintenance worker in his apartment. Collins had three Children and a contagious smile. His death came after years of fighting his addiction. It doesn't seem real because Like I said, he was so full of life and so happy. You know what he was trying. He really was struggling but trying to get better and in trying to fight that Collins struggle mirrors what's happening nationwide as the pandemic has amplified mental health and financial issues and social isolation has increased the risk of dying. From an overdose. You know, I know several individuals who had been in recovery and they lost their structure, their support network and more struggled then with one into the lock. That's Dr Michelle Maloney, who heads addiction services for Rogers Behavioral Health. The system has locations in nine states, including Wisconsin, Minnesota in California, when people are using substances there, often hiding it. So even in normal circumstances, family struggle to understand what's going on addiction support organizations say That's because addiction is a disease of despair. Paul Early is the president of the American Society of Addiction Medicine. He says. Staying in contact with somebody who has a substance use disorder is so important during this time, even if you're angry, or you think they're in remission now is not the time for what we used to call tough love. That is not the approach to use during this difficult time at all, because you run the risk of if they're using specialty using injectable drugs that they could overdose and die. Just Keith is with the addiction advocacy group shatterproof. She was living with her brother. When he died of a heroin overdose in 2015, she says, all families go through a grieving period, asking themselves what they should have done differently. Brendan Collins overdosed twice before he died, but those times he wasn't alone. His parents have asked themselves if they were wrong to support his decision to get his own apartment. Keith says, giving a person with a substance use disorder. Independence demonstrates love when our loved ones are going through this. We want to baby sit them in these ways and we wanted, you know, keep your eyes on them all the time to make sure they're gonna be okay. And a lot of times, people going through substance use disorders can feel like they're treated paternalistic Lee. It's been almost a year since Collins died, his parents have had to acknowledge his birthday. And celebrate Christmas without him. Collins Popsicle sticks with his messages of affirmation were displayed during his funeral and empty sticks were available for people to write their own words about Collins. The Watsons now keep those at their house to remember their son. For.

Brandon Collins American Society of Addiction Wisconsin Allen NPR cocaine NPR Keith Milwaukee Robert Watson Dr Michelle Maloney social isolation Rogers Behavioral Health Jackie Paul Early Lee heroin president fentanyl
Family Trio Makes Marvelous Mask Magnets

Side Hustle School

05:00 min | 2 years ago

Family Trio Makes Marvelous Mask Magnets

"Like so many in mid twenty twenty. Hey eckhart was feeling. The effects of coronavirus lockdown was already accustomed to video calls with his sister and their mom living in three different cities and that was fine but the social isolation from everyone else made things rough of course life itself had changed dramatically among other things everyone interacted with outside his home wore a mask. And it's this mask that uncovered his side hustle story has diligent square and so is his mother and sister but they found most mass. Design's pretty bland and boring. Of course there were the custom design. Ones like those sold on oetzi but those are often very expensive so the trio devised a way to brighten up your average mask. That was simple cost effective and interchangeable between masks. The idea was magnetically backed. Charms stick to a shirt or backpack. They envisioned a range of designs with different colors shapes and logos making them custom personal for the where. They were positive. This idea would work and move quickly springing into action. The first thing they needed was a name and they settled on mask mags. Luckily hank had some technical skills so he took charge of building a website using shop. Advise the platform sourcing magnets on the other hand. Wouldn't be so easy. I had to come up with those designs for that. They sat down and brainstormed. Eventually landing on ten favorites are thinking was the simpler the better. They chose designs like the american flag. A snowflake and wine glass things they thought would have brought appeal once. They had their designs. They needed to get their magnets manufactured to do that. They searched for businesses that made similar items swag for events and companies pins badges. That sort of thing. They had a list of five of those companies. They reached out to get quotes. They look for the right mix of cost quality and timeliness eventually finding all three in one supplier invested two thousand dollars and their products in hand and just two weeks additional five hundred dollars were set aside for packaging and a bit of it for marketing which they intended to start right away but since they weren't experts they weren't sure what to do so they turned to their own network. Told anyone who'd listen about their new business and the sales started to trickle in on top of that. They tried facebook and google ads but while those channels drove traffic they didn't convert many sales to improve the momentum. Hey tried something. He'd heard about social media influencers. His tactic was to contact those with followings in the five to twenty thousand range you thought they probably weren't inundated with offers the way more popular influencers were and could therefore be more receptive to mass. Max turns out he was right for the most part influencers with that size. Following five to twenty thousand were attracted to the idea of getting some free product in exchange for promotion since the cost of it all was very minimal. It was a big win for the mathematics team once again. This all happened very quickly. We started in august twenty twenty by the time. September rolled around. They sold five hundred dollars worth in october. They were presented with a new surprising opportunity. The company sister works for heard about mathematics and ask for the option of a custom order since the team already had the manufacturer and knew the costs involved they agreed. We're able to produce a fully customized mass magnet in a matter of weeks more importantly it opened their mind to the potential of customization. They spread the word in their local community and ended up with custom orders from schools. Salons clubs it all helped the bottom line which continued to grow the customization pivot was incredibly beneficial because it solved another problem which was excess inventory when ordering the magnets. There was no way to know in advance. Which would sell which wouldn't meaning. They have a lot of unpopular designs leftover by adding more customization revenue. They can rely less on preorder designs and guarantee. They aren't racing money which is good since they have no intention of flying half mask so this is an example of a project that you can start quickly like really quickly and in response to a problem you notice and guess what first of all great example. Congratulations to the mathematics team. And guess what. We're all going to be wearing masks for quite a while. Like i think it's pretty clear at this point Fortunately help us. On the way hope is on the way in the form of a vaccine and everything else but at least a lot of parts of the world. We're going to be wearing masks for at least several months. So this has the potential to really ramp up and i also think even though it's smart that they did this pivot of going from the p- redesigned options to the customization for various schools. And such. i think that's smart for them. But i still think there's actually room for somebody to do the redesign ones. So if you're looking for an opportunity maybe think about face masks one form or another. Because as i said i think it's going to continue to be thing

Eckhart Hank Facebook MAX Google
"social isolation" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on KPCC

"Jenn White. Today on one, a loneliness long before social isolation was the norm More than 1/5 of all, Americans said they often or always felt lonely. We're bringing in a new year, but many of us they're doing it by ourselves and our homes or apartments. The U. K says isolation is a silent public health crisis and actually has a minister of loneliness to treat it will meet her soon. But first we asked the host of hidden brain how to fill together even while we're apart. Today's show is on tape, but we're here to keep you company that's ahead on one end. Life from NPR News in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston, The Republican controlled Senate has overturned President Trump's veto of a more than $700 billion annual defense bill. NPR's Kelsey Snow reports. It's Trump's first veto defeat of his presidency. The Senate easily surpassed the two thirds majority needed to override the veto of the National Defense Authorization Act. The annual defense bill is a bipartisan staple in Congress. The legislation has been approved with the support of huge majorities for 60 years. Trump vetoed it over a completely unrelated demand. He wanted Congress to repeal a decades old law that social media companies used to limit their liability for content post on their platforms. The New Year's day vote comes as control of the Senate for the next term remains undecided. Republican senators Kelly Leffler and David Perdue are facing runoff elections on January 5th in Georgia. Kelsey Snell. NPR NEWS Washington A Facebook executive who led the tech giant's controversial political advertising policies has left the company NPR's Bobby Allen reports from San Francisco before the November election, Facebook faced a barrage of criticism for allowing misinformation to spread widely on the social network used by a quarter of the world. Facebook was also slam for choosing not to fact check politicians in the run up to the November election. Rob Lowe, Thurn was the public face of that policy and Facebook Subsequent rules around political ads, But now he confirms the NPR that he's leaving on good terms for an unspecified new opportunity. Facebook, meanwhile, has still temporarily paused most political ads after the election over the risk of potential abuse, But it did make an exception for the upcoming Senate runoff races in Georgia. Bobby Allen, NPR NEWS San Francisco The demand for the cove in 19 vaccine is exceptionally high in some parts of Texas, the state has authorized the shots for people over the age of 65 those with chronic conditions like diabetes. Texas Public Radio's Joey Palacios reports..

President Trump Senate Facebook NPR NPR News social isolation Congress Bobby Allen Washington Jenn White Georgia Rob Lowe Kelsey Snell Thurn Kelsey Snow Texas San Francisco Windsor Johnston Joey Palacios
"social isolation" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WTOP

"Over Christmas Eve celebrations around the world, including the little town where it all began. CBS News correspondent Robert Berger reports from Jerusalem. Palestinian Boy Scouts playing bagpipes marched past the Church of the Nativity, kicking off a subdued Christmas Eve in Bethlehem. Missing is the usual throng of pilgrim's and locals. The Palestinian Authority has banned the public from Christmas celebrations due to the Corona virus, and Manger Square is a lonely place. Robert Berger, CBS NEWS Jerusalem Pandemic has made people more vulnerable to social isolation, especially older adults. Is the campaign. Working to combat that's home for the holidays is an annual campaign organized by the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging. The campaign encourages discussions of issues affecting older Americans. But the cove in 19 pandemic has caused the campaign to shift its focus a bit. We really focused in on the importance of ensuring that there have social connections for older adults at the community level CEO since Mark Woods says. Everyone is at risk of loneliness and isolation this year, But older adults are more at risk. It's to encourage them or their caregivers to ask some questions. It's kind of probe on whether they are socially isolated, and most importantly, if they are what to do about it Occasion James W. T. O P News Christmas Lights have been in high demand this year, even as people who don't normally put them on their homes decided they need some holiday cheer, but sometimes setting them up. Doesn't always go with planned. When you make Christmas lights you're going to inevitably get the call when something goes wrong. John to Cosmo, the president of the Ultimate tree company has gotten a lot of those calls were working with this customer, the better part of 30 minutes, and they're really trying to get the lights set fixed. Sometimes that solution can be pretty simple when we said to them. Are you plugged into power? It was only then that we could help them fix the lights. And sometimes the problem could have easily been prevented right away because the plug was on the wrong end. John Doman. W T o P News just ahead in sports Wizards loss but a good showing by Westbrook It's 11 44. The following is a paid commercial message..

Robert Berger John Doman CBS Palestinian Authority Manger Square social isolation Jerusalem Bethlehem Mark Woods National Association of Area A Westbrook CEO James W. T. O Ultimate tree company president Cosmo
"social isolation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:32 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Here, so pack up your gear. Yesterday is stepping Anderson. She's a CEO of recovery centers of America here in Indianapolis, and we're talking today about social isolation. It is a complete lack when you're coming lack of contact with an individual. Um and, uh, society. Stephan, let me ask you how the social isolation differ from loneliness. I think that the best way to explain this is, uh, it's zah purse a pattern. Loneliness is something that people feel from time to time. And that's a pretty normal, um and regular feeling that we all can have. But with social isolation, your patterns become pretty regular and frequent in that you just are avoiding Social contact on Dure, avoiding those tough questions. You may become defensive when somebody calls you out on it. Um, whereas somebody who is lonely may really appreciate the outreach from a friend. Someone who's experiencing extreme social isolation may become very agitated. Very defensive. Um and And really not understand their own emotions and feelings related to what's going on with, Um how about the impact on young adults and Children? Some? Assuming it's a little bit more, maybe a little more challenging with young with young people are or baby, not for that matter. I think that young people, we often don't recognize it. So younger generation spent so much time on Electron IX and in their phone and really connecting through electronic platforms that when we see them doing that, it seems normal toe. But it's just a severe in a younger population as it is in any generation that need to connect with their peers is so significant. I have young Children of my own, and that period of time where they were not in school, Um and we're socially isolated. They were really challenged in trying to figure out How to connect with other human beings on band feel emotionally stable. They they tend to just really also have those moments where they need to be with other human beings and learn appropriate social interaction. Let me ask you, this is Social Social states become more challenging at this time of year. And absolutely does. I think that people have a lot of emotions that are tied to the holidays, both good and bad on as we tend to interact with our families in a normal year, Um, the idea of connecting with family that may have hard emotional moments with us causes people to want to isolate, Um, in a pandemic year we tie in there, the fear and the anxiety that's tied with The potential contraction of covert 19 on so people have their normal fears related the holidays and connecting with their families and the fears of what it means to spread or be around their family and potentially spread covert 19 2. Others got a couple minutes left here in the program part from professional help, which is what you folks do it up CEO Recovery Centers of American Annapolis. What are some of the things that a person who may have socializes isolation? What some of things that they could do to sort of maybe mitigate that condition. So there's lots of resources out there, including free 800 numbers. I know our governor has put quite a bit out there for resource is for mental health recovery Centers of America were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We do not close, and that's true for most resource is for behavioral health in the state. So we're here to help. And just calling those 800 numbers is a really great place to start. Talk to somebody who can help guide you and support you in that moment if you're not comfortable calling a stranger calling in reaching out to a trusted confidante, um, is another great way to stop that pattern and move. Toss up behavior. Um, I know for myself even having that zoom call with individuals after months and months and months of social isolation. Forced through their pandemic. It was a moment of tears of happiness, just having that connection, But it's taking that first step and reaching out for help. And connecting to the resource is that are out there for help question people who are suffering from social isolation. Watch the news. That is a weird question. I think it's really dependent on the individual. Um, for some people that I know watching the news triggers emotions that they cannot control and Increases their anxiety for other people gathering information, knowing the facts, knowing the data is power to them, and power means empowerment and getting past that social isolation. So I think it's very important that people become aware off how they how that news impacts on both before and after washing it because the main reason I ask is because one thing I noticed during the pandemic when I was actually home. Was watching out of the 24 hour news. I was like what? I can't do this anymore. This is getting on my nerves. Yes, you know, I remember years ago when we right After 9 11 happened. I watched 24 hour news constantly on. I found myself very anxious, depressed, overwhelmed because there was nothing I could do to control the world around me. And that's a pretty typical emotion that people will feel by walking and gaining toxin data. In retrospect, Er in contrast, really, you know for me now I love getting my new Highlights and looking at the data of where we are with coded numbers. It helps me understand what's going on around me and feel more in control. And I think that that's true for everybody. You have to just find that balance anything. An extreme can be really unhealthy. But if you find the balance in your life, and you're very aware of what you're watching and how it impacts you, that's that's the best. That's the best prescription. All right. Well, I guess the other program has been Stephanie Anderson. She has a CEO recovery Centers of America here in Annapolis of mental health and addiction expert actually talking today about social isolation up Stephanie somebody, maybe half social isolation, Or perhaps they know someone they want to get them to help. How can they reach out to your folks? Recovery Centers of America were available 24 hours a day, seven days a week by simply calling 1 800 recovery. We have specialists to answer the law..

social isolation Um Centers of America Stephanie Anderson CEO recovery Centers of Americ CEO Recovery Centers CEO America Stephan Indianapolis Electron IX Annapolis Dure
"social isolation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"37 downtown. I'm Kirk Darling, Here's what's trending at 8 30. President Trump is not happy with the Koven relief bill that Congress passed on Monday. Well, they are now planning to send back to my desk is much different than anticipated. It really is a disgrace. Trump, claiming that the bill gives too much money and aid to foreign countries. He also wants you to be getting direct payments of $2000 a person, not $600. As it says in the current bill Trump is on not is not outrightly threatening to veto it. Indiana Senator Todd Young says he still dubious about providing state and local budget help in a third pandemic relief package, but it's but he says it may happen. Eric Berman reports relief bill, which passed late Monday night also doesn't include Republicans. Priority of Liability protection from businesses. Young says A principled compromise may include some state and local assistance, he notes. This bill does include some targeted help for states, including $54. Billion for schools. Eric Berman, 93 WNBC Mobile Me, Some Pa's granting a full pardon to a former campaign aide who pleaded guilty in the Russia investigation. George Papadopoulos was one of 20 people Trump pardoned on Tuesday, Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI during the investigation into Russian election interference. Social isolation is a serious obstacle for many people this year, Donny Burgess explained. This year, the concept of social distancing has become the norm. But when it's taken to the extreme, it's called social isolation, and it could be dangerous. They find the more and more isolated. They get the more and more isolated they become on DAT leads to things like depression, substance use disorders. Stephanie Anderson, CEO of Recovery Centers of America in Indianapolis. She says. One way for people to break out of their isolation is to keep reaching out to trusted friends. Don emerges. 93. W I. B. C Mobile knew the Salvation Army and Evansville is looking into the price of some ivory. Someone donated some ivory figurines and silver coins to the Salvation Army this month there and they're says they're said to be that the coins in the figurines were all the donor had I'm Kurt Darling on the level on the go and on Twitter.

President Trump bill Trump Senator Todd Young Social isolation Eric Berman Kirk Darling Salvation Army George Papadopoulos Congress Kurt Darling Stephanie Anderson Indiana Twitter Evansville Donny Burgess B. C Mobile Don FBI depression Russia
"social isolation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:30 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Stephanie Anderson. She's the CEO of Recovery Centers of America and Indianapolis. And we're talking today about social isolation. It is a complete lack when you're coming lack of contact between individual Um and society. Um, seven. Let me ask you how the social isolation differ from loneliness. I think that the best way to explain this is, uh, it's zah purse a pattern. Loneliness is something that people feel from time to time, and that's a pretty normal on regular feeling that we all can have. But with social isolation, your patterns, um, become pretty regular and frequent in that you just are avoiding Social contact on Dure, avoiding those tough questions. You may become defensive when somebody calls you out on it. Um, whereas somebody who is lonely may really appreciate the outreach from a friend. Someone who's experiencing extreme social isolation may become very agitated, very defensive, um and and really not understand their own emotions and feelings related to what's going on with, um How about the impact on young adults and Children like some, assuming it's a little bit more, maybe a little more challenging when dealing with young people are or may be, not for that matter, I think with young people we often don't recognize it's a younger generation spent so much time on Electron IX and in their phone and really connecting through electronic platforms that when we see them doing that, it seems normal to us. But it's just a severe in a younger population as it is in any Generation that need to connect with their peers is so significant. I have young Children of my own, and in that period of time, where they were not in school on Dwyer, socially isolated, they were really challenged in trying to figure out how to connect with other human beings on and feel emotionally stable. They they tend to just really also have those moments where they need to be with other human beings and learn appropriate social Interaction upsetting. Let me ask you. This is Social Social states become more challenging at this time of year. It absolutely does. I think that people have a lot of emotions that are tied to the holidays, both good and bad on as we tend to interact with our families in a normal year, Um, the idea of connecting with family that may have hard emotional moments with us causes people to want to isolate in a pandemic year we tie in there, the fear and the anxiety that's tied with Potential contraction of covert 19 on so people have their normal fears related the holidays and connecting with their families and the fears of what it means to spread or be around their family and potentially spread covert 19 to others. We got a couple minutes left here on the program part from professional help, which is what you folks do it CEO recovery centers of American Annapolis. What are some of the things that a person who may have socializes isolation? What some of things that they could do to sort of maybe mitigate that condition. So there's lots of resources out there, including free 800 numbers. I know our governor has put quite a bit out there for resource is for mental health recovery Centers of America were open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We do not close, and that's true for most resource is for behavioral health in the state. So we're here to help. And and just calling those 800 numbers is a really great place to start. Talk to somebody who can help guide you and support you in that moment if you're not comfortable calling a stranger calling in reaching out to a trusted confidante, um, is another great way to stop that pattern and move. Toss up behavior. Um, I know for myself even having that zoom call with individuals after months and months and months of social isolation. Forced through the pandemic. It was a moment of tears of happiness, just having that connection, But it's taking that first step and reaching out for help. And connecting to the resource is that are out there for help question people who are suffering from social isolation. Watch the news. That is a weird question. I think it's really dependent on the individual. Um, for some people that I know watching the news triggers. Emotions that they cannot control and it increases their anxiety for other people gathering information, knowing the facts, knowing the data is power to them, and power means empowerment and getting past that social isolation. So I think it's very important that people become aware off how they help how that news impacts them both before and after washing it because the main reason I ask is because one thing I noticed during the pandemic when I was actually home. Was watching out of the 24 hour news. I was like what? I can't do this anymore. This is getting on my nerves. Yes, you know, I remember years ago when we right After 9 11 happened. I watched 24 hour news constantly on. I found myself very anxious, depressed, overwhelmed because there was nothing I could do to control the world around me. And that's a pretty typical emotion that people will feel by walking and gaining toxin data in in retrospect, Er in contrast, really, you know for me now I love getting my new Highlights and looking at the data of where we are with coded numbers. It helps me understand what's going on around me and feel more in control. And I think that that's true for everybody. You have to just find that balance. Um anything an extreme can be really unhealthy. But if you find the balance in your life, and you're very aware of what you're watching and how it impacts you, that's that's the best. That's the best prescription. All right. Well, I guess the other program has been Stephanie Anderson. She has a CEO recovery Centers of America here in Annapolis of mental health and addiction expert actually talking today about social isolation up, Stephanie. Somebody maybe has social isolation. Or perhaps they know someone they want to get them to help. How can they reach out to your folks? Recovery Centers of America were available 24 hours a day, seven days a week by simply calling 1 800 recovery. We have specialists to answer the law..

social isolation Stephanie Anderson Centers of America Recovery Centers of America CEO CEO recovery Centers of Americ Indianapolis Annapolis Electron IX Dwyer Dure
"social isolation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Rest Ye Merry gentlemen. Let Holly she's mayor of the public health issues out. Another one is social isolation and so join us to talk about that. What it is and how it can be treated as Stephanie Anderson. She is the CEO of Recovery Centers of American Indianapolis. Stephanie Thank you very much for being with us. We do appreciate it. Thank you so much for having me today. Not a problem. Also help us out here. What exactly is social isolation? Well, social isolation is really this concept that people are alone. They're spending their time. More and more specifically with this pandemic away from social supports away from their family away from coworkers and spending time in their environment, all by themselves, And as that happens, people become more and more lonely, more and more destitute. And make decisions that, um further further degrade their mental health and they're functioning now. You would think that even though we are kind of no Sort of in a pandemic with things like Zoom, you know, with with telephones, Internet folks might still be able to maybe stay in touch with friends and loved ones and co workers. Absolutely. I mean, we've seen an increase in how people connect Elektronik Lee and through electronic platforms, but nothing can replace that face to face eye contact that warmth of a touch or a hug or you gonna handshake so many situations. Now, when you do meet people, you look at each other in this awkward moment of Do we do the chicken wing Do we don't shake hands. How do we introduce ourselves? And I think for many people what they realized through this pandemic is while our access to electronic stand to connect through electronic medium is fantastic. It really does leave an absence. Um in our hearts when we can't connect with people through physical touch and face to face interaction, because My wife and I were kind of sort of different personalities. My wife is very introverted. So she's happy to be at home on the couch watching Dr Phil where it was me. I got to get out of the house. I got to go interact with people. Yeah, I think you know. I see that. Everywhere we go. I have to interact with people, too. That's why I'm in the social Services field. But even my partner, um it's also very introverted. And through this, I think we've both realized how much we crave human interaction and how we're how we've been starved of it. We're talking to Stephanie Anderson. She's a CEO of recovery centers of America here, Uh, Indianapolis. We're talking about socialized isolation. Seventies, the middle health and addiction expert. So tell me something. What are some of the signs of social isolation? So I think you'll see people not responding to text messages. Um, or phone calls. They're slower to disrespect and in general to any sort of outreach that you have. I think a person experiencing social isolation may find themselves unmotivated to do some of their daily normal tasks, even something as simple as bathing or making meals or running errands. They find the more and more isolated. They get. The more and more isolated they become on Dat leads to things like depression, substance use disorders and and going outside of healthy. Patterns to maintain functioning and to maintain a sense of stability. Now, how do you tell the difference between someone who's going through socialized isolation versus someone who was just in a funky mood? Well, that's a great question. I think it's hard to tell. And sometimes it's both. Um oftentimes, social isolation is a pervasive pattern, meaning it goes on and on. Um I'm not your your outreach or your attempts to just shake it off. Don't seem to go go away. I think also, you're going to start to see patterns of unhealthy coping strategies. And I alluded to that before. Maybe you're drinking a little more alcohol. Then you normally would or you're drinking at times in the day that typically you wouldn't even think about having an alcoholic beverage or using some other form of substance. You're sleeping more than usual and again, you're avoiding any social interaction with others, even through electronic medium. And we'll have more with Stephanie Anderson and just a bit. She has a registered nurse talking about social isolation this morning here on 93. W I, b. C it is 6 41 will be right back. 77 year old vet survived. Wars survived polio, the wrong demo to get coronavirus. It's that guy and he beat it twice. There is lots of good news out there on the way.

social isolation Stephanie Anderson CEO of Recovery Centers of Ame Holly polio Elektronik Lee Dr Phil Indianapolis depression partner America
"social isolation" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"social isolation" Discussed on WTVN

"The first few weeks in January, but we've heard from so many Americans. You say that relief is simply not enough and Democrats urging lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to return back to the negotiating table At the start of the New Year, ABC is Rachel Scott. A final vote on the package is expected Monday, followed by President Trump's signature. Ah growing list of European Union nations and Canada have banned travel from the UK on word of a new strain of covert 19 sweeping across southern England. Whether you know far has no restriction, and New York governor Andrew Cuomo was outraged. Right now, this variant in the UK is getting on a plane. And flying to JFK. He says the U. S. Is making the same mistake from the start of the pandemic, allowing foreign travelers to bring the virus. Over. Meantime, the first shipments of the newly authorized Moderna vaccine in route to some 3700 locations in all 50 states, FedEx and UPS handling the delivery. The shipping companies tell us Without a doubt, vaccine deliveries are the priority. Now that means Some of your holiday packages may arrive just little bit late. But really this year, there's just no way around A B. C's job. Anita is essential frontline workers and people over 75 getting the shots up front President Trump adding more fuel to the talk of him trying to declare martial law enforce new elections and battleground states. He lost. He's welcomed and ousted conspiracy theorist back to the White House. Sidney Powell. Reportedly pitching the president and executive order to seize voting machines in an effort to discredit the November vote. You're listening to ABC News Over 19 is creating an epidemic of social isolation in America. A survey by AARP Foundation in the United Health Foundation found two thirds of adults felt socially isolated and had high levels of anxiety since the start of the pandemic. Lisa Marsh Ryerson is president of Air P Foundation. Our survey shows that social isolation is taking a toll on a growing number of.

President Trump Andrew Cuomo president social isolation UK ABC Rachel Scott ABC News AARP Foundation Lisa Marsh Ryerson New York FedEx European Union nations Anita Air P Foundation Sidney Powell JFK United Health Foundation White House
COVID-19 Fuels Surge in Overdose-Related Cardiac Arrests

Ric Edelman

00:32 sec | 2 years ago

COVID-19 Fuels Surge in Overdose-Related Cardiac Arrests

"Social isolation brought on by the pandemic has likely triggered an uptick in other serious medical issues the Corona virus pandemic, It could be the reason why there is a surge this year in the number of overdose related deaths of study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, says that between March in August of this year, the number of drug OD cardiac arrest calls to E. M s agencies peaked at twice the rate of recent years. And remain nearly 50% higher at the end of the studying period. Fox is Evan Brown.

Journal Of The American Medica E. M FOX Evan Brown
How Are Your Kids & Teens Dealing With COVID?

The Gee and Ursula Show

05:47 min | 2 years ago

How Are Your Kids & Teens Dealing With COVID?

"How are your kids and teens faring during Cove it and what can we do to help Children and parents who are struggling? We want to talk with someone who knows And joining us now is Alex, smallest in A marriage and family therapist. Practice owner in university place. Good morning, Alex. Hi. How are you? Good. Thank you so much for joining us. So we know that this pandemic has taken such a huge toll in terms of the deaths and illnesses. We also know so many businesses and people in general are having a hard time staying afloat financially. We don't talk enough about what this pandemic is doing to our mental health in particular on Children. What are you seeing in your practice? So in my practice, I'm seeing a lot of increases in anxiety and kids well, and everyone to be honest, but in particular talking about kids and teens on increasing anxiety An increase in depression. There's been a lot more social isolation, obviously, so we're seeing the impact of that on kids and their mental health on dawn families as a whole as well. And so when you are seeing that, what kind of things can you tell your and I know you can't get too specific. But let's just talk in general. If we see what what are some of the signs first of all. That kids are struggling before they even get to, you know, not everyone can afford to have a therapist or go to a therapist or know that they're in trouble. What? What science should we be looking for in our kids? So I think that one of the things you think about is especially for younger kid of much younger kiddos is psychosomatic symptoms. Sometimes you'll see that in the form of headaches or stomachaches, also withdrawing from from typical activities. Obviously, we're not able to engage in all of our typical activities. But when you see your kid not enjoying your things that they used to enjoy that something that I've noticed a lot with kids as well. For example, a kiddo who No longer really wants to leave the house or feels anxious about pretty basic things, even just visiting the store. Those those are some of the things that I've noticed that I've seen some of the parents of my kids, but I work with notices well. One of the things that we talk about is how this pandemic is impacting people in different ways, sometimes is those who don't have the financial means and sometimes is those that do have the financial means. Talk to us about the kids that are having a hard time Is this and all over problem whether you're poor rich or anything, talk about that. Yeah, sure. So, um, so in lower FPs, the socioeconomic status families, Um, you're seeing a lot of basic needs not being met, and that's really concerning as well. Um, I mean a lot of kids on free lunch program. They're reduced breakfast programs. And so, um, School is not just being out of school is not just for academics. That's also a safe, warm place for kids to be right. To get their needs met, But even for other populations, like from the populations that I work with Kids you have educated or well resourced families. We're seeing life trajectories change in ways that are unimaginable right from strange marriages or financial struggles to even miss scholarship on differ. Teens, especially there's an increased rate of suicide, aladi and suicidal ideation as well. It's affecting kids across the board. Well, OK right now. I'm a parent at home. I have, um Ah young Child School age. Let's just say junior high who Is not able to be with their friends because of Cove it Theo. Only interaction they're having with their friends and or their teacher is through the computer on Zoom. What are some ideas that you can give us to maybe help our Children that are going through this right now, and that specific thing that are struggling, not seeing their friends. Personally. Sure. So. So this is this is more of a global trauma, right? And we know we know from the field unprecedented. We're not even familiar with the level of trauma that this has been from a global. We've had devastating wars We've had Natural disasters, But this feels like it reaches all different parts of the world, right. There's a study that came out that was from 46 different countries and all kids. They're reporting increases of Depression, anxiety and decreased well being. So then the question is is well, How do we keep those kids connected? Because we know while this pandemic is unprecedented, the research on trauma is not. We're familiar with charm, and we're familiar with what helped heal and that connection and relationships So in regards to parents. I think it's important for them to remember that that connection with their friends is paramount, especially for preteens and teenagers. S o to be able to encourage that as much as possible. I think that we're resilient of humans. I think that people forget that their kids are resilient. And so what? How do we? How do we build resilience? Well, we have to get creative right and Some of the innovative ways of connecting the technology has been really cool to see. So as a parent myself and to those who are parenting, even teens and preteens, I would say to you do your best to increase connection and relationships as much as possible. Um, you know, I've seen some really cool creative ways from doing like online together do tours because there's tons and tons of these across the country that have Webcams right now, or, you know, joining in with a family member doing free? You know, there's a freak, you know online. I've even had some of my family's was some of the preteen boys. Really enjoy doing an online game of like roadblocks or something right with their cool uncle of their fun, aunt or something, so any sort of connection like that? We know it's something that mediates trauma and the impact of trauma.

Alex Anxiety Depression Headaches Theo Cove
A Special Breathwork Session To Help You Sleep

My Seven Chakras

05:02 min | 2 years ago

A Special Breathwork Session To Help You Sleep

"What's up action trade. Ag year host and founder. Of my seven jukka. My seven chucker dot com. The place where we help you calm your mind. Relax you nova system and expedience. Deep states of bliss andres episode. I wanted to give you a glimpse into war responsible through work as many of you know. I conduct breath work healing circles on zoom every week on sunday mornings and wednesday evenings in these sessions have really been helpful in helping people cope with what's going on in the word right now but also reduce stress to calm their minds relaxed inova system and open up more possibility but there are so many more of you out there that can potentially benefit from these sessions but maybe a wondering waters breath work and whether breath for israeli as effective as people say it is right. That's why today we're going to do a breath work session with the music with the breadth with me guiding you through the process. But before that. I wanted to quickly talk about what breath work does for your body and a device that has recently caught my attention lately. There is helping me switch off my negative stress. And then we'll begin our session together all right so firstly stress. Activates your fight or flight. Sympathetic response leaves you feeling distracted overwhelmed and makes it difficult for you to get sleep. Stress also plays a key role in our evaluation sometimes especially to run away from a predator or to solve it challenging problem. You need the energy to make it happen. That's when your heart rate increases your cortisol levels rise and your blood shoots to your limbs but this is like stepping on your gas pedal of your car and it's not really sustainable because you need to at some point switch off your stress and start relaxing so their energy can be used for other functions like digestion and sleep and creativity when that switch off does not take place. Your body is constantly releasing stress. Hormones like cortisol making your breathing shallow and fast and sending your heart rates up and your heart rate variability down. What does hundred variability h. r. e. which is most reliable invasive biometric of stress measures the balance between your batta sympathetic rest and digest nova system. And you're sympathetic. Which is your fight and flight branch of your nervous system. A high heart rate variability gender lee indicates a strong guardia vascular system and low levels of stress being in a constant state of fight or flight makes it physiologically harder to focus harder to meditate. Relax sleep or even exercise because your body and your mind think that you are under threat and needs to be escaping danger and not sleeping not focusing on your work now like i said this does of abyss. But when it's left unchecked this chronic stress increases your risk of developing insomnia anxiety depression and chronic been and this in general makes you feel tired. Sluggish unhappy of causes. You've been and might even lead to some kind of illness. now breads workout. You switch off your negative stress and switch on your rest and relax branch off your system. And i'm going to show you exactly how to do that today. Now on top of that. I'm always on the lookout for other ways other devices. That will help us do the same so we can amplify this process of relaxation now. Recently company or apollo neuroscience sent me that device guard the apollo neuro which is a fascinating mention. Now this device. Which i'm wearing right now. Works on dutch therapy. And it creates these gentlemen waves vibration. That stimulates your rest and digest batta sympathetic nervous system response and it restores balance to your body. Now this is cutting its technology action tribe because this is the latest data about you but it's also influencing your stress levels at physiological level. This device stimulates touch. And i'm realizing the touch might be more crucial to our health and survival than we think it is in the midst of this crazy pandemic and social isolation you and me. We're not getting all the touch that we need and touch is a powerful sense from an evolutionary standpoint. It is the most important way that mammals communicate safety and love and assurance to one another different forms of dutch vibration. Heat gored a soothing massage along hug or even a pat on the back can change how you feel in ways that can be measured biologically now researchers found certain frequencies of are found to be soothing and significantly. Increase your better sympathetic dawn. Others can be more energizing and can increase your heart rate and other measures of sympathetic activity. So

Andres AG Insomnia Anxiety Depression Apollo Neuroscience
Exercise classes can reduce loneliness, social isolation in seniors

Travis Holcombe

01:02 min | 2 years ago

Exercise classes can reduce loneliness, social isolation in seniors

"Exercising during the Corona virus outbreak is good for the body and the mind. That's the funding of a new study by researchers at Cedars Sinai, who tracked a group of people who took exercise classes before and continued during the pandemic. KCRW's Larry Parole has the details. Researchers tracked hundreds of people whose average age hit around 76 years old and found almost 7% showed a decrease in loneliness and more than 3% had better social connectedness. So how they do it, Participants were enrolled in various exercise and health management classes for seniors at several sites in Los Angeles neighborhoods with AH high number of low income older adults. They met with a health coach who guided them through the process, which researchers noted was especially crucial during the pandemic to help them get connected online. The number of adults over the age of 65 in the US is expected to reach more than 70 million people by 2030 double what it is now, and researchers say it is particularly important to find ways to help that population thrived as they age or There will be widespread consequences

Cedars Sinai Larry Parole Los Angeles United States
Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

All Things Considered

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Data Begins To Provide Some Answers On Pregnancy And The Pandemic

"All considering our health more during the Koven 19 pandemic, But women who are pregnant as the Corona virus circulates through society may have even more concerns. Are they more vulnerable to the disease? And what about their babies? But in the early days of the pandemic, there was very little research to provide answers. Now a number of new studies and CDC reports are out and the picture is beginning to be more clear. Dr. Denise Jamison is the chair of obstetrics and gynecology at Emory University. She's also a member of the Kobe task Force of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Dr Jamison. Thanks for joining us Thanks so much. I want to start with a big overview. So many women were concerned early on if they were pregnant or just had a newborn of what this could mean for them and their babies. How worried if at all, should pregnant women and mothers of newborns be about Coben 19 at this point based on what science tells us Well, I think these recent findings over the last few weeks should be somewhat reassuring to pregnant women and their families. However, I still think there are many reasons to be vigilant about covert 19. It's still really important that pregnant women take measures to protect themselves, and it's also really important that pregnant women have access to cope in 19 vaccines as soon as they're available. Let's talk about some specific concerns Women had there was a fear that if a pregnant woman was covert positive, she might pass that along to her baby, either in utero or during childbirth. Do we know if that happens? Well, it seems to be able to cross the placenta and infect fetuses during pregnancy. However, the good news is that this doesn't seem to happen very often. And there isn't evidence that when this happens, there's an association with birth defects. The way we found with viruses like Sica, and those babies are generally okay despite being infected for the most part, the babies yes have done well. Pregnant women in general are more susceptible to respiratory infections and Koba 19 is obviously a respiratory disease. Do we know if Kobe has exacerbated respiratory issues and pregnant women? They're probably more likely to have severe disease if they're infected with Cove it But this increased risk is not nearly as dramatic as it is with some other respiratory infections such as influenza. Which seems to be something that it applies to the general population as well. People who are in some way have compromised health often find themselves more compromised when they get Cove it that's correct. Some of these studies are small. What caveats would you have to say about the limitations of what we know so far, Although we continue to learn more every day, I think they're important challenges to all the data. The biggest problem is that most of thie reports don't have an appropriate comparison group, so you have to be able to compare either. Pregnant women with Cove it to non pregnant women with Cove it or you need to be able to compare pregnant Cove it positive women too pregnant Koven negative women. And for many of these studies, they don't have an appropriate comparison group. There were some women wondering if they should avoid getting pregnant during the pandemic. Would you advise that toe? Wait till it's over. To try to have a baby? I would not recommend to delay in pregnancy. I think women can take measures to avoid Cove. It During pregnancy and to protect themselves during pregnancy and when to get pregnant is such a personal and complicated decision on this pandemic will probably be with us for a while, I would not advise delaying pregnancy solely on the basis of the covert pandemic. Dr Jameson and your job. Do you still work with patients? Yes, I am on labor and delivery. Today you are. Have you found that the experience of being pregnant or having a baby during the pandemic has Compromised or reduce the joy of pregnancy and delivery for any women. I hope it hasn't substantially reduced the joy of having a baby. But I do worry that with restrictions on visitation in the hospital and then also the social isolation after women go home from the hospital, I do think it's fundamentally change the experience of having a baby in a way that you wish it hadn't It sounds like yes. I look forward to a day when the pandemic is over, and we have a safe, available effective vaccine and we don't have to social distance. That's Dr Denise Jamison of Emory University. Thank you for coming on the program. Thank you for your interest in this topic.

Pregnant Cove Dr. Denise Jamison Emory University CDC American College Of Obstetrici Kobe Dr Jameson Social Isolation Sica Influenza
Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

Outcomes Rocket

12:07 min | 2 years ago

Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw Marquez here. Today I have the privilege of hosting Loren Driscoll. She's a healthcare strategist and entrepreneur and founded project well to support health plan's efforts to address critical non-clinical needs of their members nutritional and social isolation. Lauren is also a senior adviser in the strategy practice of partners, a health intelligence firm founded by former secretary of human health, and Human Services. Michael. Abbott Prior to partners Lawrence, served as corporate director of Oxford Health plans. Medicare business learns also co chair of the United States of care entrepreneurs. Council Lauren is also a board member at health works a healthcare organization that addresses the root causes of illness, poverty and neglect in Burundi. Africa she served as the Acting Executive Director of village health works and has also member of the University of Virginia College of Arts and Sciences Foundation Board. Lauren grew up in Baltimore Maryland, she received her bachelor's in University of Virginia, her masters in public health from. University today, we're GONNA be diving into the topic of really health through what you eat and the work that they're doing it project well as fascinating food as medicine and Lauren. is going to be helping US understand how they're helping people stay healthy and thrive with what they eat or in such a privilege to have you here today. Saw Thank you so much for inviting me to talk with you absolutely now, I love the focus of food are you and I had a chance to connect before the interview and it's near and dear to my heart might my family's heart what we matter so much before we dive into the value prop you guys have. I love to learn more about what inspires your work in healthcare. Sure. Yeah. There are really three things. So that have really told me end healthcare I would say I is just my beliefs that older adults really deserve better. There's just so much sort of preventable hardship and suffering with respect to health and you know I guess I feel like it's just super unfair that after spending their lives doing the best they can and often nurturing sort of next generations that we aren't doing a better job out with respect to the crowd disease that. So many of our older adults southwest so that that's number one number two I would say is just the unfortunate inefficiency of our US healthcare system. Part of me I, almost think I might have been a process engineer or something in another life that drives me crazy to not take the shortest path between two points and so I look at situations in our US healthcare today especially say with dual eligible 's the care for those who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid and therefore sort of among the most vulnerable in our country, and yet there's just there's so much inefficiency with these two payments streams and the two sets of rules really creating just you know perverse incentives that. End Up causing these folks to sort of Ping Pong around our system and Drive exorbitant costs and not even particularly good health outcome. So I would say it's inefficiencies like that that. You know really draw me into healthcare. and. Then the final one is you know you you introduce which is just I am such a believer and food as medicine I. Think it's very simple. Good food leads to good health and so as simple as that sounds and sort of even elegant. It's clear that there's just a sort of glaring missed opportunity and our country to really leverage the power of food. So it's really a combination of these these three things that inspired me to start project well. Get for you and You captured some heavy stuff there lauren, you know older adults deserve better and you know we're inefficient and food candy medicine and it is. So let's dive into this. You know what? What exactly is project well, and how you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure. So our mission out. So to start out by explaining project, well, tell your mission. Is really just to improve the lives of those who are suffering with with chronic disease. Often food insecurity and loneliness, and to bend the healthcare cost curve as we do it. So our solution is centered on food and. Look, at food and. Medicine but also as an anchor for socialization and Education Man's the end of the day we know people come together around food. and. So we are a young company. So we are really starting with home delivered meals and meal kits for those who really have sort of the most nutritionally sensitive chronic disease. So thank diabetes and heart disease and we're starting they're both because these are the people that have the greatest level of need we can help them us. But also because are proof of concept pilots drive results there must quickly.

Lauren United States Oxford Health Loren Driscoll Acting Executive Director Of V University Of Virginia College Marquez Social Isolation Michael Senior Adviser Ping Pong Burundi Secretary Baltimore University Of Virginia Maryland
Turning video game tech into accessible tools

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:28 min | 2 years ago

Turning video game tech into accessible tools

"Why can't we just or Wilshire up to an XBOX and play it? Why can't we just drive up and be able to control a drone in the sky or vehicle, and that's where this adapter that we developed. The freedom link came from is orthopedic. And Bill Binko Co. and a lot of people who are in those medical spaces have been saying to us for awhile you should be able to take these highly specialized highly customized devices that make ends of hours in order to put together thousands of dollars and just use them on different algae without having to reinvent the wheel every single. Let's talk about e sports a bit obviously. Sports are increasingly popular. Are there tools that maybe some of these competitive game players are using to get an edge that then could funnel in to accessibility technology even for non? Gamers. Lot of items that are not intended for the. Community that end up working out just great For example, this ord is the latest and greatest in audio technology everybody who's a Gamer everyone who's a player as a discord account and this just a program you put on your phone in order to play in talk to each other during the Games. But now people use it for interviews I use scored more often than I use zoom these days. So Zuma's just inherently inaccessible. I use a program called Dragon Naturally. Speaking to be able to type. So if I'm you the call in Zoom, it beauts my entire computer. So therefore, I am Mel rendered completely unable to communicate with anyone else while that's muted. So that's why programs like this corridor better because they've already fought about accessibility and have included it where you know plays, legs zoom still have some catching up to do you know there's there's things like, for example, one of my most recommended a trawlers is called a track I. Are Right and it's a controller where you put a hat on your head with a little infrared cliff and there's a camera that sits on top the your monitor and when you move your head around down left right it can see that and it was originally intended to be art of Microsoft flight simulator. So you can look around the cockpit of an airplane like pretty down there but we discovered that you can use that same technology and make you keyboard inputs so. That now I can hear letters with just moving my head and that allows you to games. So what you're constantly doing if you're a disabled is re purposing and re engineering things so that they can be used in everyday settings. So maybe there is a controller that can push three buttons at the same time, and in fact, there are and you can use these in eastwards if they let you now not every eastport allows you to do this kind of thing. There are oftentimes where they consider this against the rules it's cheating etc etc, and there really hasn't yet been an opportunity for years with disabilities to really get into eastwards arena and you know that's one of those projects that we continue to work on his hottest work out could aren't we make it fair for people with disabilities play while at the same time, not giving a superior edged people who are already very, very good with a standard controller. So you know, it's just a matter of working out the fairness and figuring out eastwards fits in the disability community. But that brings up the point that accessibility in gaming is more than just about playing the video game itself. Absolutely. Yeah. you know we always say gamers is that it's just an attempt to allow people to have that way to on that social isolation though inside charities mission purpose is on vessel isolation, foster inclusive communities, and improve the quality of life for people with disabilities, and we do that like connecting you to other human beings, your family members, your friends, your community you can get back out into that and not be alone. Using video games and you know some people will be like, oh, video games are not important or I'm not a Gamer I. Don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa play. It's like we're trying to explain but this is just the tool they were using. It's like your car, right so you may not care about what you drive, but you just need a tool to get you from your house do hanging out with your friends and that's the same thing. The video games can do. We can get you to an area where you have a purpose of going in providing or your guild mates and and having that real sense of purpose. Gamers was really fortunate a few years ago to work with Walter Reed Army Hospital, and we were able to find that in instances where someone is coming back and they have had an injury that they were more than eighty percent less likely to consider self harm. If they had that close knit units the same experience of being over there with their army units. Over here in video. Games Steve Spawn Chief Operating Officer at able gamers charity he told us there were about forty six million potential players with disabilities in the US. Of the people reaching out to his group in particular have a physical disability that limits their ability to use traditional

Walter Reed Army Hospital Bill Binko Co. Wilshire Social Isolation Zuma Microsoft Chief Operating Officer Steve Spawn MEL United States
Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

The Takeaway

12:36 min | 2 years ago

Public Health Officials Are Increasingly Facing Threats

"Threats for me and my family and harassing my daughters to the point where I have to get security is just I mean, it's amazing I wouldn't have imagined in my wildest dreams. That people who object to things that are pure public health principles are so set against it and don't like what you and I say it, namely in the word of science. That they actually threaten you. That's Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation's leading expert on infectious diseases, speaking to CNN's Sanjay Gupta, about threats he and his family have received because of his work. And Dr Fauci is not alone. Public health officials across the US are also receiving threats from people who are against the policies they put forth to combat the corona virus. Things like recommendations to wear masks and practice social distancing. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and she's been researching this exact topic. Michelle, Welcome to the show. Happy to be here. Shall you wrote an article about the attacks on public health officials during covert 19. What was it that prompted you to even look into this? Well, it happens that one of my bosses that Stanford is married to our Santa Clara County local health officer here in the Bay Area, So I do have a personal connection to somebody who's experienced these kind of attacks. Tell us a little bit about what kinds of attacks were talking about. All across the country. We've really seen a number of things that made your audience seem pretty shocking and are unusual even in the American context we have seen, you know the usual Internet trawling, but the attacks have taken on a highly personal and almost violent dimension. Across the country. We've seen health officer subject to dock, saying the exposure of their personal information like their addresses or loved ones, names on the Internet. Angry and sometimes armed protestors showing up at their private residences, vandalism of their offices and homes, lots of harassing telephone calls and even death threats to the point of having to have private security details assigned to their families. Michelle, one of the things that prompted me. I'd saw the research here and then saw that Dr Anthony Fauci has needed to get his own extra private security because I believed his family had been threatened. Are we primarily talking about high profile figures like that, Or are we talking about? Anyone who's sort of on the front lines dealing with Corona virus cases. In particular, we're talking about people who ordinarily are about his low profile. As you can get local public health is thean visible angel that keeps us all healthy. But most of us until this pandemic you never heard of or seen our local health officer. They have been in the news lately on television and newspaper a lot, so they're no longer such private figures. But these are not high profile figures. They're not national figures. In most cases, they're not. They don't have a political agenda. There are doctors trying to do their jobs. Who are making these threats. Well, it comes from a variety of quarters. Ah, leader in Catalyst in this movement has been the anti vaccination movement here in the U. S. That has all of a sudden pivoted from their usual agenda of attacking public figures who advocate vaccination to going after health officers who are advocating masking and the extension of state home or business closure orders, But it's not on ly these groups. They've been joined by thousands of people across the country who are just really disgruntled and incredibly stressed. By the long term economic impact and social isolation that has stemmed from public health orders during the pandemic. Medical professionals are take a Hippocratic oath to serve whoever it is that needs their help. So like this, this feels like doctors and nurses didn't necessarily sign up to be. In such a political battle, You know, it's interesting the politicization of first responders because those on the front lines were actually caring for covert patients have been politicized as heroes in this pandemic. But the same groups of individuals, doctors and nurses who are working in the public health sector have been demonised as villains. They're all working toward the same goals, and we need to understand that, although they execute their objectives in different ways, they're all working towards a single and so are we. So it's really striking to me that there's been this polarization and how folks have viewed First responders and public health doctor's Michelle. Stick with us. We'll be back in a moment. This is the take away. On the next. All of it, looking for a job thinking about switching to a new one will discuss how to navigate the remote workforce in our series, the future of work, and we meet the director of the new documentary Boy State, which goes inside the weeklong mock government exercise that gathers more than 1000 high schoolers to create their own state government. I'm Alison Stewart. Join me for all of it weekdays at noon. We're back and you're listening to the takeaway. I'm tansy. No Vega. Michelle Mellow is on the line with me. She's a professor of law and a professor of medicine at Stanford, and we're talking about recent threats against public health officials all around the country. Michelle. Have we heard anything from the Trump Administration or other politicians at any level of government about this? Because recently in New Jersey, there was a federal judge whose family was attacked. Now there are talks of increasing protections for federal judges. And I'm wondering if this is now transferring over to medical professionals and health professionals. Well, yet we have to distinguish between medical professionals who are on the frontline response like the ones who are working in hospitals and the ones I'm talking about. Are those were working in public health departments. I'm not aware of specific problems involving the folks who are working in hospitals other than nobody wants to stand next to them at the grocery store. But the public health officials really have had to have protection stepped up. Unfortunately, most of our elected officials to the extent that they're speaking to this issue at all have been joining in the attacks. You know, there are folks who are making their name for themselves politically. By joining in the chorus of attacks against public health officials. In some cases, their own public health officers, you know, saying things like their anti Democratic their tyrannical when in reality, those same health officers are the only people in that state who can issue these orders. They're executing. Planning done by other elected officials, who then sort of hide behind this rhetoric, So it really is, in my view, despicable that instead of offering support to these hardworking, underpaid under attack health officers State and local officials. And in some cases, congressmen and the president have joined in the attacks, and the president himself has been the foam enter and chief here Retweeting such statements as everyone is lying. The CDC media Democrats are doctors, everyone we're told to trust That kind of statement fans the flames. Michelle did your research show whether or not there was a difference in health officers who are in red states versus blue states or our folks that work in these positions across the board, subject to this type of harassment. You know, we really have seen it in all kinds of communities. Certainly there is a red and blue divide in willingness to accept public health measures like masking and to the extent that you're leading a community that's more red than blue. You might have a larger segment of the population going after you. But some of the people who have been under attack are in heavily blue communities were actually most of the population really supports what they're doing. Polling is very much in their favor. But there is a vocal extreme of vocal minority that is dominating attention. Is there anything that public health officials Khun do to protect themselves? You know, to protect themselves. Many of them do need security details, and they need elected officials to stand up and indicate that when these actions crossed the line into illegal forms of harassment, they'll be subject to prosecution in terms of self defense strategies. You know, I think it may be late in the game for this, but there are some things that I think We know help to cultivate public trust and buy in to coerce of public health legal measures. Polling shows us that when people feel that they have a say in public health policy agendas when quote unquote people like me can influence agendas in public health policy, they're more likely to accept laws, even the ones that they don't love. So I think there are opportunities for some health officers to double down on the transparency and candor in their public communications. We do have examples of where this has been done Extraordinary. Well. I think it helps to humanize health officers to telegraph that they're really struggling with these decisions. They don't take them lightly, and also that they have the support of consultation of a number of other people. Well, they're not acting alone and imposing these orders. Do you know of any health officers who have decided to leave? Ah, the job as a result of this because it doesn't feel like you know, the virus is not going away. Assume as many of us would have liked, and people are going to have to make policies and an implement policies until we've got some clarity on where what the next phase of this is so have folks that you know, decided to leave their jobs as a result. Absolutely. I think the count is up near 30. Now, health officers who have either resigned or been forced out by their elected officials since the start of the disease pandemic because of the politicization of their orders. And that includes Oxiris Barbeau, who was the New York City health commissioner. It includes Nicole Quick, the health commissioner of Orange County are most affected County in California. In terms of covert cases it includes West Virginia health officer for the state had the slam so lots of folks who are dealing very, very difficult situation simply, it's just not reasonable to expect them to go on month after month. In this kind of climate, especially when they're not getting any support from other officials mentioned Oxygen's Barbeau and I know that was a big issue here in New York, particularly because she clashed with Mayor Bill de Blasio. Are we seeing a lot of that? A CZ? Well, just internally among Officers and public health officials, and also just, you know, the other officials that they're dealing with. It feels like I don't know if that was very specific to New York City politics or if that's also happening across the board. I think that is happening in a lot of communities. Yes, where you have a schism between elected branches of government that represent communities that have a particular ideological bent and help officers who have been serving you know for many, many administrations many many years and you are You're acting on the science a TTE this point of the pandemic. People are fed up with the science. They want a balance of between health concerns and economic and other concerns. And again. Some health officers have been very good at explaining how public health orders balanced. Those concerns and others who are maybe less transparent, really have been confronted by a lot of attacks from Ah, elsewhere in government. But, you know, responding to local political pressures themselves you mentioned earlier. We we are having to differentiate between threatening health officers and health officials and making and threatening frontline workers like doctors and nurses. But Our doctors and nurses subject to any type of politicization and threats right now, because of the role that they what they could possibly represent, or have they gotten off Have they sort of not been in the cross hairs? If you will. You know, I'm not aware of those kinds of attacks. I think it's more just that What we hear from them is the difficulty that they have in their personal lives Because people know they work with sick people. They don't want to be around him. They don't want to be around their kids. So it's the usual story in any pandemic, where You're the child of somebody who's working with an affected patient. Nobody wants their kid in school with you. I think that causes some difficulties for them, but it's a different quality and caliber of attack than what we've been talking about with public health officers. Michelle Mellow is a professor of law at Stanford Law School and a professor of medicine at Stanford University. School of Medicine. Michelle. Thanks so much, Thank you.

Michelle Mellow Officer Stanford University Dr Anthony Fauci Professor Of Law Professor Of Medicine United States Sanjay Gupta Bay Area CNN Santa Clara County Stanford New York Alison Stewart New Jersey CDC Social Isolation Vandalism