35 Burst results for "Snowpacks"

A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

Environment: NPR

02:09 min | 4 d ago

A 20-Year Megadrought Threatens Hydropower in the West

"A twenty year. Mega drought in the west is threatening hydropower. For millions of people so the federal government is taking emergency action it sending water from other reservoirs to lake powell to help. Keep the power turbines. They're spinning. here's michael. Elizabeth sack is from colorado public radio at elk creek marina. People wait in line to back their trailers into the water to pull their boats out. And some like walter. Slut cough are frustrated. Resumes legua up and down many times. But we're not happy with it this year. Of course because we're all getting kicked out early and we pay for slips for the season. Blue mesa is colorado's largest reservoir. It's already less than thirty percent full. And now it's being forced to sacrifice more water to send to lake powell eric. Logan is head of operations at elk. Creek marina he had to shut down six weeks early because of the low water levels. It's a big hit for us for sure. There's a bunch of employees. That doctor would be employed into october and suddenly they're out looking for employment in middle of august. The deepening drought in the west has dealt a double blow to blue mesa this summer with climate change there's less snowpack and warmer temperatures increase. Evaporation so less water is making it into the colorado river and reservoirs like blue mesa and now the federal government is taking water from this lake into other reservoirs. If we were full it wouldn't be that big deal but since we're already so low and we're barely hanging on by our fingertips on trying to stay open. You take eight feet of water and suddenly we got shut the doors and move everything out to deeper water and there's nothing we can do about it. Lake powell on the utah. Arizona border hit its lowest level on record earlier this summer. Logan worries the reservoir will need even more water from blue mesa. If the drought doesn't improve the question is are they going to release whatever we get. That would become a very big problem for everyone around here. Blue may sat and the other reservoirs were built in the nineteen sixties for times of drought. It's a bank of water that the states can tap when they need. It says john macleod. A water lawyer in colorado. The water always goes to lake. Powell and this release is part of the plan. And it's using the reservoirs for one of their intended purposes

Elizabeth Sack Elk Creek Marina Blue Mesa Powell Eric Creek Marina Colorado Federal Government Powell Logan Walter Michael Colorado River Mesa Lake Powell Utah Arizona John Macleod
Farmers Are Feeling the Pain as Drought Spreads in the Northwest

Environment: NPR

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Farmers Are Feeling the Pain as Drought Spreads in the Northwest

"Nicole burg's wheat is so short and sparse. She doesn't think that combine can reach it without eating. Rocks combines don't like dirt and rocks at all like it. They don't like to eat them. They'll get indigestion. Berg is a dry land wheat farmer in the sweeping horse heaven hills of southeast washington state. She puts out one head amid a sea of wheat. See how the we had his curled like that and then you break into it you might have some berries down here but this will be empty all empty. There's no week in inside the we'd head. The berg's aren't the only one suffering. The region is bone dry from near the canadian border. Clear to the edge of nevada and the drought is spreading west over the cascades. Jeff mardi is a drought expert for the washington state department of ecology. He says despite good snowpack it hasn't been this dry since the nineteen twenty s. You know the story of the your gatien haves and have nots. Meaning those folks who Get their water from rivers or storage are probably going to be fine For their your gatien needs but the dry land users and the folks that have cattle that depend on forage on the ranch lands. They may be more challenged looking ahead. Marty says the warming climate mean more rain for the north west but also much less snowpack that melts sooner. That could stress water supplies even more this spring. It's also been windy here. Further drying out the landscape like a blow dryer on the east end of the columbia river gorge cattle rancher. Gary has is having a hard time to recently. Sold seventy mother cows with calves at their sides. To another operator out of wyoming. They had many more good cavs in them and he hated to see them go but he has no grasp to keep them.

Nicole Burg Jeff Mardi Washington State Department Of Berg Washington Nevada Marty North West Columbia River Gorge Gary Wyoming Cavs
Climate Change Is Messing With Your French Fries

Climate Connections

01:11 min | 5 months ago

Climate Change Is Messing With Your French Fries

"You want fries with that. Potatoes are very popular side dish. The most common potato variety is the russet burbank which is mainly grown in the pacific northwest. But as the climate there gets warmer and drier growing these tubers may become more difficult. Novi is with the. Usda agricultural research service in idaho. He has to water their crops. Many farmers in his state depend on mountain snowpack which melt slowly throughout the growing season. And so if we have less snowfall up in the mountains or earlier melting of that snowpack that can impact our irrigation. Going into the future hot dry weather can reduce farmers yields and it can make the potatoes grow unattractive bumps novi says another risk posed by rising temperatures. Is that more of the potato. Starch content will convert to sugar then when you fry that tuber. We've got a very dark potato chip or dark. French fry so not desirable by most consumers to help the industry adapt novi another. Scientists have been developing new more potato varieties so even as the climate changes. Diners can continue to order fries with

Novi Pacific Northwest Usda Idaho
Cloud seeding can boost mountain snowpack

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 7 months ago

Cloud seeding can boost mountain snowpack

"In the spring melting snowpack in the rocky mountains feeds the colorado river which supplies drinking water to forty million people across seven states but as the climate warms snowpack is shrinking prompting concerns over water shortages. One technique that can help increase precipitation is called cloud seeding is been used in some areas. Since the nineteen fifties a machine or airplane releases particles such as silver iodide into developing storm clouds. The particles attract molecules of water vapor. And if the conditions are right those droplets for more rain or snow. Mohammed mahmoud is with the central arizona water conservation district which is funded cloud seeding projects in the rocky mountains for years. The type of cloud seeding we're interested in is winter cloud city and what that does is enhance the snowpack so that ultimately in the spring that enhance no pack increase the runoff that water users rely on downstream. The practice remains controversial but researchers have found that cloud seeding can increase the amount of precipitation that falls the storm by up to fifteen percent so it can help reduce the impact of climate change on critical water supplies.

Rocky Mountains Mohammed Mahmoud Colorado River Central Arizona Water Conserva
California to see more days of rain, snow following severe winter storm

CBS Weekend News Roundup

00:56 sec | 8 months ago

California to see more days of rain, snow following severe winter storm

"Dealing with a massive winter storm with howling winds and in some places several feet of snow, and it's expected to continue all weekend from intense blizzards in northern mountainous areas. Rain That's triggered months, lights and debris flows in the center of the state. California is being bombarded with nasty weather, and officials across the state are urging people to stay home. It's great that we're getting smart precipitation when company needs the snowpack, but while in the storming, we just recommend that nobody drives through the area. The rain has already triggered mudslides in Monterey County and golfing at least two dozen homes and farms and sending two people to the hospital If you get too much water, too fat Yes, it just sheds off the ground very quickly in the mountains. Blizzard like conditions have buried the area in several feet of snow battle inch dangers Considerable right now and Pretty extreme. CBS is Chris Martinez

Monterey County California CBS Chris Martinez
Massive winter storm causing chaos for California

Dr. Lee Yardley

00:56 sec | 8 months ago

Massive winter storm causing chaos for California

"With howling winds and in some places several feet of snow, and it's expected to continue all weekend from intense blizzards in northern mountainous areas. Rain that's triggered month slides and debris flows in the center of the state. California is being bombarded with nasty weather and officials across the state are urging people to stay home. It's great that we're getting smart precipitation when company needs the snowpack, but while in the storming, we just recommend that nobody drives through the area. The rain has already triggered mudslides in Monterey County. Engulfing at least two dozen homes and farms and sending two people to the hospital. If you get too much water too fast, it just sheds off the ground very quickly in the mountains. Blizzard like conditions have buried the area in several feet of snow battle inch dangers. Considerable right now and pretty extreme CBss quits Martinez Coming up the meeting of President Biden's

Monterey County California Martinez President Biden
"snowpacks" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:33 min | 10 months ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on KCRW

"Both Russia and the U. K. Gentlemen, thanks to you both Ready to talk Steve in southeast Alaska. Climate change has meant more rain, warmer temperatures and melting permafrost and those are perfect conditions. From mudslides. Torrential downpours this week triggered several mudslides that have devastated the tiny town of Haines, Alaska. Claire Strimple reports from member station K. H and S. The mudslides washed out roads throughout town, and they left a dark smear down the side of Mount Riley. Debris from destroyed homes floats in the sea below a Coast Guard helicopter left at dawn on Thursday to resume the search for two missing residents. A local business owner, David Simmons, had a home on the mountainside. His dad. Randall spoke to him about two hours before the mudslide. He told me and I was letting me know that there's a lot of rain going on. And I said, Thank God you're up in them in the hills. You're not down with the flooding is gonna be and I figured he was safest could be a few hours later, Randall got a phone call. The house had been swept away. His son and his tenant, Local elementary school teacher Jinny Larson were missing. Search efforts were called off on Thursday at nightfall around 3 P.m. in Haines to resume at first light Friday. The slide was triggered by record breaking rain that fell onto the snowpack saturating the soil. Dan Stevens is elite geologist for the state of Alaska. She says there have been mudslides in this region for decades. But what could be happening? Go? Is that the frequency possibly maybe it functionally seems to be more common on Lee one road runs in and out of paints. It leads to the closed Canadian border. Emergency supplies must come by boat or small plane. More rain is expected in the area for the next week for NPR. I'm clear Strimple in hates coming up this afternoon on all things considered. Joe Biden wants to reach out to Iran. But recent attacks and sanctions against the country make warming relations with politicians. They're very difficult. Listen by asking your smart speaker to play NPR or your local station by name..

Alaska Randall Haines Claire Strimple NPR Joe Biden Local elementary school Mount Riley Russia Jinny Larson Steve David Simmons business owner Dan Stevens Iran geologist Lee K. H
'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

All Things Considered

02:21 min | 11 months ago

'We are out of time:' Destructive wildfires in Colorado will grow worse as season lengthens, scientists warn

"Firefighters in Colorado are battling explosive wildfires at a time of year when things are normally quieter as NPR's Lauren summer reports, climate change is extending the fire season across the West. Mike Morgan is using the word unprecedented a lot this year, and that's after a 30 year career in fire. Fighting this year has just been unbelievable. We're just seeing fire girl just like we've never seen before. Morgan is director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control, the largest and now second largest fires recorded in state history are still burning. Normally in October. Cool, wet weather is tamping down the fire season. Most of our folks are usually trying to use up their vacation time to go hunting right now, and they're all out fighting fires. When Morgan started his career fires in Colorado's high elevation forest didn't spread much. The warming climate has helped change that. Unfortunately, none of this seems like a surprise. Jonah Pots of glue is a climate scientists at the University of California, Merced said. He says most of the West is in a drought right now, and hotter temperatures make it worse by drying out the vegetation even more. That's really sort of extending the fire season out and allowing fires to burn longer in places they don't typically burn this time of the year. It's sort of testing out what we sort of traditionally have thought of it in terms of fire season. Wildfires are also happening in places where they're not. Not comin like the damp forests of the Pacific Northwest. Erica Fleischman is a professor at Oregon State University. So historically, they've burned roughly every couple of 100 years. It takes really extreme conditions for those for us to burn because they are so wet this year conditions have been extreme. But even in years with a normal amount of precipitation, climate change can still extend the fire season. More rain falls instead of snow, which means a smaller snowpack that melts sooner, providing less run off through the spring and summer. All of that means that the same amount of water is not available to plants or soils for as long so that exacerbates the drought. And all of that is projected. Tio. Unfortunately, continue happening. Climate continues to change. Fleischman says The lesson is that communities need to prepare by clearing, flammable brush, improving houses and preparing evacuation plans. Because wildfires will keep

Jonah Pots Mike Morgan Erica Fleischman Colorado Colorado Division Of Fire Prev Lauren Summer Pacific Northwest NPR Oregon State University Merced University Of California Director Professor
California wildfires show "climate change is here and now"

Morning Edition

02:23 min | 11 months ago

California wildfires show "climate change is here and now"

"Says says the the urgency urgency of of climate change is motivating her generation to political activism. We hear the words climate change all the time on the news during debates. For many, it's faded into the background soft into something too far in the fugitive, any effect. If we're looking at the fax, that's not the truth. We see the effects of climate change every day. As a client becomes hotter, the snowpack decreases. Growing up in California. This relationship between climate and water has always been clear to me. State has been dropped within half my life. And it's not just rain that's affected by climate change. According to the rising temperatures are increasing the number and severity of wildfires. In this year alone, more than million acres burned in California. We all walked outside and seen ash gray sky, the sun of Pan Lauren circle just visible through the haze. Stand me at first, because in my little coastal town, the heir always seemed clean and felt the sense of redwood forests in our hills in the Pacific Ocean at our shore. I'm scared of what the world will be like when I'm in adult, And I'm thinking that now what about when the next generation are adults? We have a duty not just to today's world, but to all future generations to work hard to solve this huge problem we've created. Last year, I marched on streets and went to rallies filled with Children carrying signs saying climate justice now The thing is, you can and will make an impact, but nothing will change unless those who the power of voting elect those who will work hard for us all. We need leaders who will, in the words of the preamble to the Constitution, established justice, promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity by ensuring that Someday our posterity has a chance to live in a world where no one has to worry about smoke, Cohen skies or draft With the perspective on Grace Jones. Grace Jones is 14 and attends the Kirby School in Santa Cruz. Her perspective was produced by the learned for its Let's talk about the election 2020 Youth Media Challenge. Hear more student voices at learned d dot org's support for perspectives comes from Leaf,

Grace Jones California Santa Cruz Pacific Ocean Kirby School Cohen Skies
How B.C.'s Indigenous communities are facing climate change, and creating solutions

Unreserved

05:31 min | 1 year ago

How B.C.'s Indigenous communities are facing climate change, and creating solutions

"The signs of climate change are everywhere. Lighter snowpacks others rising water levels and the conversations around climate are shifting just two years ago the phrase. The green new deal was just a bullet point in political platform since then it's expanded into a worldwide phenomenon and a solution. Some feel will slow down. The human caused portion of climate change. Jillian brave noise cat is been there. Every step of the way he worked with elected officials to help draft the green new deal resolution. Julian is a member of the Canam Lake Ban to cast skin in British Columbia. Hi Julian welcome back to the show. Thanks so much for having me so first of all. What is the green new deal so the green new deal began as a resolution introduced by representative Alexandria costs? He'll Cortez of New York and Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts. It's a resolution with big ambitions to take on the dual crises of inequality and climate change but the discourse here because America's media market political scene often spills over into Canada and Europe and elsewhere has also been picked up by sort of more left leaning forces in other countries so the New Democratic Party. The Social Democratic Party in in Canada picked up the green new deal as part of their platform and has been talking about it in the Canadian context as well and use climate activists who are also sort of affiliated with the left wing and Canada have also been talking about potentially a a green new deal for Canada. What the green new deal is in. That is big jobs infrastructure investment. Sort of package so your listeners might be familiar with sort of carbon price and tax approach. That has been led by the liberal government in Canada and the distinction between that approach and the green new deal is that rather than sort of forcing consumers and businesses to have a off where they have to pay higher prices for gasoline. And things like that to sort of benefit the environment and to lower emissions. The green new deal says that we should invest in decarbonising a whole set of industries and sectors in a way that will create jobs and promote a more fair and equitable economy. Why is this important for indigenous people in Canada so I think that first nations and indigenous people in both the United States and Canada have played an outsized role in the fight for environmental justice over the last ten twenty years? Maybe even further back. If you look at the history of resistance to pipelines and Forestry and mining you know first nations have often been some of the loudest voices you know. Putting their very bodies on the line in front of pipelines and projects. That are going to damage the environment and public health. So I I would say that. A lot of the grassroots energy of the green new deal comes from first nations for example representative Alexandria. Cossio Cortez the politician who led the charge for green new deal here in the United States actually got started as a volunteer organizer. Supporting the move. Minute Standing Rock So I would say that. The indigenous movement both in the United States and Canada really has played a significant underlying role. That people haven't fully appreciated in producing the green new deal. I think the questions that first nations sovereignty and rights raise for the green new deal or not just the fact that communities are disproportionately harmed and polluted by the fossil fuel industry in particular and other extractive industries more generally but also you know what it might look like to in both the federal systems of Canada and the United States to incorporate first nations governments as equal partners in the federal system. That is that is pushing for action on climate change. What would it look like for first nations governments in in Canada and the United States to lead a transition to clean energy to create a lot of the jobs in their communities to be empowered as environmental stewards in protectors? And I think the examples that we should be looking to are things. Like the Guardian Watchmen program in the great bear rainforest. Other parts of Canada where first nations twenty thirty years ago stood up against logging and forestry and now today employ some of their own members as environmental stewards and protectors making sure that some of the most important carbon sinks in North America remain protected and can help us in the fight against climate change. So I think it's those kinds of things that we should be thinking about and then abroad or sort of intellectual and philosophical sense. I think that climate change really is an existential threat for humans and human societies around the world and of course you know first nations you know what it means to live. Through an apocalypse we lived through the apocalypse of of colonization. We lived through the apocalypse of our children being taken away to residential schools Canada and boarding schools in the United States and in a broader sense of human sort of confronting this enormous tragic upheaval to our societies. I think that you know indigenous people in Canada and and more generally actually have perspectives and experiences to lend to those set of

Canada United States New York New Democratic Party Julian Representative Alexandria Senator Ed Markey Canam Lake Ban Jillian Social Democratic Party Cossio Cortez Massachusetts North America British Columbia Europe Liberal Government
To Forecast Spring Flooding, NOAA Planes Fly Slow And Low

Environment: NPR

03:50 min | 1 year ago

To Forecast Spring Flooding, NOAA Planes Fly Slow And Low

"Forecasters are predicting significant flooding in the Midwest. This spring to be accurate. They measure ice and snow. That will eventually melt into streams and rivers so the National Weather Service Hester rely on pilots who fly low and slow to get that data Matt Sepik of Minnesota Public Radio went up with them. It's a clear and very cold morning at a small airport outside. Minneapolis as Lieutenant Conor Mcginn and Lieutenant Junior Grade Mason. Carol warm up their twin engine turboprop in rundown the preflight checklist back up there among forty pilots with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Commissioned Officer Corps based in central Florida besides measuring snow Noah pilots handle a wide variety of scientific missions from counting Wales to flying into hurricanes on today's flight. Carol sits at the controls while Mcginn scans the navigation charts were soon at cruising altitude but not for long a half hour. North of Minneapolis. Mcginn tells air traffic controllers that will be dropping down way down to just five hundred feet so the instruments on board can accurately measure the SNOWPACK for six put survey aircraft parts may ten miles south field setting up for a little survey. We're so close to the ground. That trees snowmobile tracks and the lettering on small town water towers come into sharp view. In the Bright Sun. Avoiding Birds Broadcast Towers requires intense concentration. The ride is a bit. Bouncy is Carol follows the rolling landscape up and down with a large tablet. Computer Mcginn activates the radiation detector in the plane's belly that's at the heart of the nation this box. The size of a large suitcase picks up natural low level gamma rays emanating from the soil because water blocks. This radiation Mcginn can determine how much water is on the ground by putting today's measurements side by side with readings taken in the fall river. Do now those numbers go. How much water back snow can be fluffy or compact or anything in between so forecasters rely on a figure called snow water equivalent. That's what's leftover when everything melts after measuring a nine mile by thousand foot strip of land McGinnis computer reveals that the snow pack contains about three and a half inches of water but hydrologist on the ground need much more data so we fly for another three and a half hours measuring nine more of the survey areas marked on the map dipping down low each time many of these spots were established forty years ago before. Gps navigation they're typically near railroad tracks and other easy to spot landmarks and away from large population centers. The crew also shoots photos to provide a visual reality. Check on the numbers. We get halfway to Canada before heading. Back TO MINNEAPOLIS. At the hangar. Mcginn handoff thumb drive to carry. Oh heiser from the local weather service office. Who's excited to see the new data? She says it'll help. Smooth out the bumps in measurements still taken the old fashioned way on the ground by volunteers with rulers you have observers that take point observations and you might have someone who is like. Hey I see bare ground. I'M GONNA go report zero and you have another observer that's like hey I'm going to go see how deep snow I can find. This actually takes an average so it takes into account those extremes Mcginn and carol will fly up to the DAKOTAS and over to New England do similar surveys. Their work is already yielding results. Manned is helping communities along the Mississippi and other rivers prepare for possible flooding this spring for NPR news. I met epic in

Conor Mcginn Carol Minneapolis Midwest Matt Sepik National Oceanic And Atmospher Hester Minnesota Bright Sun Commissioned Officer Corps NPR Wales Canada Mcginnis Florida Mississippi Dakotas New England
National Weather Service Predicts Significant Midwest Flooding

Morning Edition

01:29 min | 1 year ago

National Weather Service Predicts Significant Midwest Flooding

"Forecasters are predicting significant flooding in the Midwest this spring to be accurately measure ice and snow that will eventually melt into streams and rivers so the National Weather Service has to rely on pilots who fly low and slow to get that data Matt sepic of Minnesota public radio went up with them it's a clear and very cold morning at a small airport outside Minneapolis as lieutenant Conor McGinn and lieutenant junior grade Mason Carol warm up their twin engine turboprop and run down the pre flight checklist rather of whether to pay it back up there amongst forty pilots with the national oceanic and atmospheric administration's commissioned officer corps based in central Florida besides measuring snow no pilots handle a wide variety of scientific missions from counting whales to flying into hurricanes on today's flight Carol sits at the controls while McGinn scans the navigation charts soon and cruising altitude but not for long a half hour north of Minneapolis McGinn tells air traffic controllers that will be dropping down way down to just five hundred feet so the instruments on board can accurately measure the snowpack four six fertilizer aircraft miles up the field setting up for a little survey we're so close to the ground the trees snowmobile tracks in the lettering on small town water towers come into sharper view in the bright sun

Midwest National Weather Service Matt Sepic Minneapolis Conor Mcginn Florida Minnesota Mason Carol Officer
California to get much-needed rain, snow after dry months

CBS Weekend News Roundup

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

California to get much-needed rain, snow after dry months

"Parched California is getting a much needed dose of rain and snow during the weekends more portent a potent storm is expected to follow the National Weather Service says moderate snowfall is expected in the Sierra Nevada with light rain elsewhere all the major reservoirs are in pretty good shape after a very wet twenty nineteen a dry winter has left the current snowpack below average this is CBS

California National Weather Service Sierra Nevada CBS
Low Snowpack In California Mountains May Mean More Wildfires This Summer

Environment: NPR

03:03 min | 1 year ago

Low Snowpack In California Mountains May Mean More Wildfires This Summer

"This month is shaping up to be one of the driest February's in California's history state. Water officials said today that snow pack across the Sierra Nevada is measuring less than half of. What's normal for this time of year? That matters to skiers and snowboarders but more critically sunny skies in the winter could mean more wildfires. Come summer and fall from member station K. Q. E. D. in San Francisco. Peter Cooney reports armed with aluminum survey polls and electric sensors hydrologist in California flocked to the Sierra Nevada. Each winter to measure snowpack. That's because about a third of the state's annual water supply for drinking and agriculture gets stored as snow than when the south starts to melt in the late spring early summer. That water will hopefully slowly meltoff and replenish the water. That is Held IN OUR RESERVOIRS. Chris. Orrick is with the California Department of Water Resources. He says the dry winter is in stark contrast to last year there was probably one of the wettest. February's we've ever had some areas in the Sarah accumulated up to fifty feet of snow whereas this year in the majority of the Central Valley Northern California. We had a little to no measurable Precipitation Silver Lining Or. It says is that the state's reservoirs still have plenty of water. Thanks to all the snow and rain from last year while officials aren't ready to declare a drought a dry winter can signal an early start to California's wildfire season which has devastated parts of the state in recent years. The massive car fire Mendocino complex the atlas tubs fires campfire is now the most destructive fire in state history given two fires that are close enough to one another that essentially is one incident and this fire is a monster it is the low snowpack is an important insurance policy to protect against wildfire says. Jonah bots glue. He's a climatologist with the University of California merced set so that snow melts provides a gradual source of moisture keeping those fuels in our forces areas Wet later into the spring and early summer so when we don't have the snowpack in place when we have a subpar snowpack. Those fuels are allowed to green up and actually dry out earlier in the year and that says about to glue sets the stage for an early start to fire season so California's certainly has seen longer fire seasons lasting both later in the fall and starting early in the spring and unfortunately the lack of precipitation across the state. We've basically struck out during the two wettest months of the year. A spokesman for CAL. Fire the agency responsible for fire. Prevention in California says that the current dry windy conditions have already contributed to more wildfires than usual this winter but fire officials and water managers point out that California's wet season isn't over yet. They're hoping for a repeat of twenty eighteen when a series of March storms. Replenish the snowpack in time for the spring runoff

Central Valley Northern Califo California Department Of Water Sierra Nevada University Of California Orrick Peter Cooney Chris San Francisco Mendocino K. Q. E. D. CAL
Wildfires could exacerbate water shortages

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 1 year ago

Wildfires could exacerbate water shortages

"As the climate warms the western. Us faces more intense wildfires water shortages and is one problem gets worse so good the other. Kelly's into Portland. State University says that after a wildfire snow that falls in the burned area melts faster and earlier in the spring when a forest burns the canopy tends to get burned away and so there's less shading on the snow. Pack and more sunlight does makes its way through the canopy to snow surface. What's more burned? Trees Slough off and black bits of bark and needles those particles darken the snowpack surface and because the snowpack is darker absorbs a lot more that additional sunlight energy gleason or team have found that on average snowpack disappears five days earlier on forest that have burned. She says the effect persists for at least a decade following a the fire occurrence. So it's extensive and it's persistent across the West many communities depend on slowly melting snowpack for water during the dry season so if the snow melts too fast. It can mean dry conditions in months to come.

Kelly State University Portland
High Avalanche Danger Out West Affects Transportation And Ski Areas

Environment: NPR

03:49 min | 1 year ago

High Avalanche Danger Out West Affects Transportation And Ski Areas

"To another story now. It's been a chaotic couple of weeks in the rocky mountains where large avalanches have closed highways ski resorts a single storm near Salt Lake City. It triggered a record forty eight slides as NPR's Kirk siegler reports. The increased avalanche risk comes at a time when more and more people are hitting the slopes in the high country. God probably Craggy Teton Mountains of North West Wyoming steep and deep Jackson hole is as a magnet for extreme skiers right. They're buddies goading them on on Matt Beauregard. And Rick lawler drop a fifteen foot cliff in this glade. Area called the tower three shits as just a melody honestly. You were just rep around rounded bounce. Skiing inbounds inside. The patrolled boundaries of the ski resort generally thought to be safer when it comes to avalanches. That's because all season skiers. I've been packing this snow down and stabilising it. But Matt Beauregard knows that's no guarantee we've actually triggered small slides on this exact face. They may duck a rope and ski ski out of bounds into the back country. But even here at the resort. They're wearing avalanche transceivers and safety gear. Just in case education's probably the most important thing. Rick here's wearing an air bag for added protection so in the case that he is stuck inside an avalanche you'll be able to pull this cord and hopefully float to the surface inbounds or in the back country. Avalanche danger is high across the mountain west. An unusually snowy early season followed by drought than dry powder. Storms then a punch of heavy wet snow last weekend in Utah. Today's storm dumped six and a half feet in Little Cottonwood Canyon home to the snowbird and Alta resorts awards and it ended up closing little cottonwood for fifty four hours and forty eight. Avalanches were reported one of those hit. The Road Mickey Champion is a forecaster here at the Utah Avalanche Center. She recorded wind speeds up to a hundred miles an hour on Ridge tops that further destabilize the already volatile snowpack in the Wasatch satch mountains. And then you put a big wrong heavy load or a wind load on top of that it just kind of upside down. It's like a pyramid when you take out the Baser Django when you remove one of the pieces says there were no fatalities reported in Utah. But last month skiers were buried and killed in avalanches within patrolled terrain at resorts in California and Idaho. Oh all of this is putting the round. The clock work. People tasked with keeping these mountains safe under the microscope Jackson Hole. Ski Patrol Director Drew Neilan stepping into his bindings above. You can't see it in the fog now. But there's a big cirque above us here and that's Casper Bowl. All and all that terrain is avalanche terrain every morning at dawn before the tram and the Gondolas Starts Spinning Army of Nielsen's patrol or detonating explosives lives to intentionally trigger slides. Now so skiers don't later and some of these can even be detonated remotely thanks to new robot like trolleys that reach even more dangerous surest remote places. Obviously we worry about avalanches coming down into the heavily congested areas. So that's one of our biggest concerns to get that work done early. Another big concern is simply that more. People are venturing out further into areas. They normally wouldn't have thanks to improved equipment. I think people assume that we're able that. We have the ability to completely eliminate the risk of avalanches within the scary. And that's just not the case but avalanche forecasters say along with the increased risk. It comes a new cachet becoming cool to say. You've taken avalanche courses and Dir as prepared as you can be Kirk Siegler N._p._R.. News Jackson Wyoming.

Kirk Siegler Rick Lawler Matt Beauregard Utah Utah Avalanche Center Craggy Teton Mountains North West Wyoming Salt Lake City Little Cottonwood Canyon NPR Skiing Forecaster Jackson Hole Wyoming Casper Bowl Drew Neilan Nielsen Alta Director Idaho
David Mikkelson on Creating Urban Legends Website Snopes.com

Oh No Ross and Carrie

12:54 min | 2 years ago

David Mikkelson on Creating Urban Legends Website Snopes.com

"Very happy to have a David Mickelson if you don't recognize that name you will likely recognize the site that he created and runs it's called slopes slopes dot com and I think we all Oh David a great debt of gratitude thank you thank you for being here you're welcome thanks for having me for being on owner Rossen Kerry today's just Ross ended and our friend Spencer and Charles were here at Sei con twenty nine thousand nine you've been to either this conference before similar ones way back when the amazing meeting being used to go to I probably passed in the hallways and they had no idea that you were the one solving all of my online battles actually I used to go with a friend of mine who lived here in Vegas and we thought US kind of Bari Pie be more interesting to go to the other side and go to the UFO convention and the vicar convention what the true believer Oh you're talking my language well that's what I do with the other skeptical crowd rather than the Arthur's or what have you so maybe WanNa join us on a future investigation or something let's tell our audience a bit about slopes in case for some reason they don't know I don't know what working to hide under for the past twenty five years or how to have not heard of snow but you started in the year of the lion king that's how I see nineteen ninety-four IC- yet what got snow going what started this I wish I could claim I had the foresight twenty five years ago to recognize you know the Internet thing fake news going to be a big problem come the twenty first century so I'm going to get a head start on it but no Not really that visionary it was just kind of a hobby that got out of control I worked for a very large computer company so you're kind of hooked in the Internet before most people had heard of the Internet back in the old ninety ninety four that's the very early days people are on netscape navigator for in back in the the usenet newsgroup days and there were no blogs even at that point no search engines no youtube yeah yeah alter Vista Dog pile of the company that made Alta this over really is okay I'm letting people go back K. situate themselves were in nineteen ninety four the Big Bang theory episode whether the doing favorite nonexistent search engine if I'd been involved in newsgroups about urban legends Disney and when the first graphical browser came out from Wola SORTA started writing up little Disney related urban legends okay this is kind of fun because carry my co host her other podcasts is called hit Mickey's and she talks about the deep seedy underbelly of Disney and did very investigation of the rumors around Waltz head it turns out he actually was interested in cryogenics but he didn't have his head frozen or any part of him actually that was one of the first investigations we realtors going out to force lawn and actually photographing the burial site or at least the martyr they are for anyone who wasn't able to access the -Fornia or Glendale at least give them a vision of of his grave and kiddingly trying to round up people on the Internet Tawhid in Forest Lawn overnight off the spot exactly what was this is the deep kind of investigative digging that's nope isn't even before it snaps and so I talked about with you before you know it kind of like figuring out a way to get into club thirty three the big mystery because it wasn't only Internet I just sort of you know the the basketball court in the matter homer and all those sorts I have been in there all the the hidden supposedly hidden risque stuff in Disney movies that's really where snow started a house and then when I ran through all the Disney legends I could think of branched out into different categories and then my wife the time started chipping in intending it to be kind of like a Wikipedia for Urban Legend Yeah not with the wikki part of everyone editing of it just sort of this authoritative Encyclopedia Urban Legends that's why it was originally called the wheel the urban legends reference phages and urban reference or legend Urban Legends Reverend pages right earlier yeah that doesn't roll off the time that does not I'm going to work so hard not to go down the rabbit hole of wanting to talk about Disney civic stopped I worked for Disney to mention working for big companies and love that kind of history so we'll talk about it some other time other podcasts so quickly took a left turn because as we were just discussing this was way back before search engines even yacht who was hand compiled yet just in index directories of websites did you get on that index but notes all word of mouth really kind of quickly became this place where everybody emailed anything questionable they came across on the internet or even in the real world and so it was all dying children trying to collect the the largest number of business cards birthday cards at Christmas cards and lots of computer virus warnings many which were hoaxes and missing dialed appeals many of which were hoax is you know before they were kind of clearing houses for all that stuff right now that was and there was no wikipedia the time so so which came first kind of the website format or the name snow pts well I started using the name snowpacks way back in the pre webbed as okay or yeah once the origin of this term slopes is the name of a family of characters that appear throughout the works of William Faulkner I'll and that has absolutely nothing to do with anything other than just way back when I was familiar with falters work so I doc named my cats nope site had personalized plate that said snowpacks and so my college roommate's called me that and when I started posting on the old newsgroups on the Internet the Stott there's you know whatever twenty million David's out there who's going to remember David I need like uh-huh Dinette so using snow pts and it really just were doubt fortuitously now it's become a verb yeah it's kind of like is Amazon Gogol it's short it's catchy distinguishes us from competitors 'cause everybody else in our spaces fact something or something check or something and we're the ones who are not yet we did a similar thing at least with our podcast is called owner Rawson Kerry because there's no indication from the name itself what the podcast about so slopes itself at least has just become a household name so okay so it wasn't anything to do with snoops the character from the rescuers which is what what my crazy conspiracy believing cousin Catherine calls it she snoops we actually did once getting Anki irate email from someone who threatened to report us to the Faulkner Foundation or so really not realizing that there are a number of people the world who actually have the surname snow he invented it's not like we called ourselves Sherlock Holmes or something as soon as you settle with me those families then you can come after me that's funny it reminds me of I think goes Murray Gelman who named the quirk after a James Joyce Reference yeah three quirks for muster mark so he made that his new particle name anyway will you know what to step back even a little bit farther again let's say somebody at this point is still not familiar with slopes haven't been there what's the basic format so you come to snaps if you've heard an urban legend or someone shares a claim that could be true or false yes and they get to see synopsis telling them either it's true it's false it's mostly falls somewhere in between and then an explanation right yes about we're doing these days unfortunately as political that's what's consuming everyone in the era of fake news and Yeah and Post Truth and all of that as lawyer work is cut out for him yeah so you you know someone's forty you this screed about some company is funding you know genocide eight of gay people in some African country or just something that sounds really horrible are hard to believe or you know Nancy Pelosi is going to become vice president trump resigns or some vaccine question right and so then somebody just has to add on their online debate forum while the to do is go to another tab and just type in snoops and then that key phrase that company and they get a handy article they read it very quickly and then instead of them having to do a ton of re research and share it with their crazy cousin they just copy the link and say please go read this note article so early on how many of the articles were you writing was it all you are did you have writers from the beginning at the very beginning when it started it was just me road all the Disney stuff the first few categories as I said than my wife at the time Barbara started chipping in in writing but said we started this back in nineteen ninety four it wasn't until twenty years later Haute very recently relatively recently back to doing it on my own and one of hired a couple of contract writers and then as the twenty sixteen election proved to be the most contentious in US history roundup with more more writers or editors so maybe you can help me out is it true that the pope endorsed Donald Trump for president. it's not true yes not wanna Vatican City as yeah how how do you differentiate all of this language around fake news versus is hoax or parodies how do you kind of internally classify all these things well one is we we avoid the USA fake news really now just because it's been completely co opted practically meaningless us like urban legend used to be just a a synonym for false or anything that you neal's they don't lie leave just call it fake news and also news doesn't have to be fake to be Eh misleading like you can create a one hundred percent accurate article only tells one side of a story you know it's like imagine a criminal trial where the prosecution put on a case of just stop there and it went to the jury the lies by omission yeah it'd be highly misleading so fake doesn't cover it all so we're still kind of calling it junk news item apparently our president has moved onto corrupt news media yes we're not quite calling it that yet tell me a bit about your process first of all how does an idea become eligible force a bunch of people submitting forms online saying please is a settle this for me or is it something you take interest in now our topic selection methodology is we tackle whatever the most people are asking about her questioning at a given time we do that through a variety of metrics what people are emailing us what the searching for on our site what's trending on Google what people are posting on our facebook pages what's what's on the front page of read it kind of there's a whole lot of inputs that gets synthesized and we don't make any judgments about the stuff is too silly or CBS or unimportant rust cover you let the interest level Kinda dictate house exactly sometimes it's kind of distressing but people are interested in to the exclusion of things are actually more substantial or important subjects to a lot of criticism where people complain you were debunking obvious satire must be there's nothing obvious out there and if we're if we're writing about it it's a whole lot of people had ask about it because they didn't get it will

David Mickelson Rossen Kerry Ross Spencer Charles Twenty Five Years One Hundred Percent Twenty Years
Alaska Villages Run Dry and Residents Worry 'If This Is Our Future of No Water'

Environment: NPR

03:47 min | 2 years ago

Alaska Villages Run Dry and Residents Worry 'If This Is Our Future of No Water'

"Number of communities in Alaska spent the summer worrying. They were about to run out of water in one native village water crisis is leading residents to drastically caustically questioned their community's future for member station K. BBI Rene Gross has more non. Wallich is located south of Anchorage on the southern Keanae Peninsula. It's only accessible by boat or plane and it's home to members of the soupy tribe mean a catas- Makarov cough stands over a large puddle water on her stove top boiling. She uses a smaller pot to scoop the boiling pulling water into a large bowl of cold water. This makes perfect water. I sponge bath. Something ca vast. Nicole isn't looking forward to you. It doesn't feel like you're clean sponge. Baths are one of the many habits. Her family has adopted since the village began running low on water last month. Non Wallich officials started shutting the water off for twelve hours every night and the state has issued a boil water notice John avast Nikolov is non on wall ex-chief and Nina's brother-in-law he says the village of roughly three hundred residents realize the water in its reservoir was running earning lower about a month ago due to lack of rain and low snowpack. We really didn't have a plan but then we started calling these AIDS and look. We're running the water. Local agencies communities and the borough government have flown embarks Jin water to the village Ca Vasna Cov says the water water has gotten low before but it hasn't caused an emergency since two thousand three KVASS knockoff adds that the villages growing population and old leaky pipes are helping or all in line to get a new water water system to replace the old beat up water line but we have no. He says the village is also looking at increasing the size of its reservoir and raising funds to buy reverse osmosis machine so they can drink drink water from the ocean ric. Thomann is a climatologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The warming climate will mean that we will want to be prepared in the future for these kinds of events. Thomann says this summer areas across the state have seen record heat and dryness Alaska's Department of Environmental Environmental Conservation pointed out that six communities dealt with water shortages this summer more than any summer in recent memory non on Wallet Resident Ivana Ash is almost as concerned about water for fish as she is about water for drinking ashes getting fish near a stream while her mother catches them nearby. I WanNa stay on help my parents because I haven't been home for quite some time and would like to spend some time with the elders back. She says if she can find a jabot swear she'll take it also do want to be in a place where there is awesome water. Feel bad about drinking or shower. Some non Wallich residents including Meena Ka Vasna Cov are considering sitting moving. KVASS Mikhalkov says are stook culture is deeply tied to this land but this summer changed things for her if this this is our future of no water what's going to happen to everybody. The village hopes that foam rain will bring reservoir levels back to normal until then they plan to keep on boiling water for N._p._R. News. I'm renee gross in Non Wallich Alaska.

Non Wallich Alaska Alaska Thomann Kvass Mikhalkov K. Bbi Rene Gross Meena Ka Vasna Cov Ca Vasna Cov Wallich Anchorage University Of Alaska Fairbanks Keanae Peninsula Renee Gross Kvass Nicole Department Of Environmental En Nina John JIN Ivana Ash
"snowpacks" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"And you look at the reconstruction. They're two years after crumbled because of the rain and forced downs. People. Get you know, be evacuated because of catastrophic flooding possibilities and water flow down the spillway into the feather river storms this week melted. Snowpacks swelled the lake behind the dam in the Sierra, Nevada. Foothills, of course, the. Engineers the department of California Department of water resources are scrambling because you've spring storms and wintry. Wet stuff that coats the mountains with snow pack, and it's not good. 'cause this main spillway was supposed to hold up. And apparently, it's not holding up house seventy the original spillway seven hundred seventy foot High Dam. All right. Stay with us. Advertising by marketing three zoom, reverse a reverse mortgage is not alone and not a government benefit mortgage will be on primary residences. Only homeowners must live in a home in payroll taxes insurance and maintenance zoom, reverse is not affiliated with any state or federal agency and does not provide reverse mortgage adviser help are you over sixty two. There's a US government insured mortgage program for homeowners over sixty two that can give you money for retirement medical bills travel, whatever zoom, reverse of safe, flexible mortgage,.

California Department of water High Dam US feather river Nevada Snowpacks seven hundred seventy foot two years
"snowpacks" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Science Friday

"We've had hearings on the status of global environment. And we had hearings on education and weather. We ready to go into the future. We building this talent for the next generation. And what we find is that on this administration. They've caught out much of the hell that much of the education component of NASA. Nasa has been one of the most inspiring agencies for young minds since its beginning. And you mentioned president Johnson. President Johnson was one of the major leaders and getting us the major research where we are now and also focusing on education. We have got to make sure that I young people are oriented to stem education from preschool all the way through the rest of life to make sure that we're getting the critical thinkers we. Are making good of imaginations and given opportunities, but all the allegations that we have already done. But all those that we must do to remain competitive. We about to lose competitive edge in the world. I'm determined that. We should not do that. Well, I wanna thank you very much for taking time to be with you. You're the first chair the committee come on in six years on our show. So I it's been a long drought. Eddie, Bernice Johnson, who's chair of the house committee for science based and technology. Thank you. And you're welcome to come back anytime you'd like so much. I'm sure I will back. Thank you very much. You're welcome. We're going to take a break. And after the break, we're checking in on that spectacular super bloom out with have you seen go to our website. You can see this incredible bloom of flowers that are going on lots of that rain turning into flowers, and we're to also talk about the state of the Sierra snowpack, which we do this every year. We'll fly over the snowpack. And while the scientists talk about what he sees and talk about predictions for when it's all going to Melton. What happens stay with us? We'll be right back after this break on my replayed. Oh, this is science Friday from WNYC's studios. This is science Friday. I'm my replay. Oh, the hills in desert's of the southwest have been putting on quite a show this spring, a super bloom that's better than some areas have seen in generations, our producer Christopher and Kellyanne headed down to Walker canyon in lake Elsinore, California, where a bloom so spectacular is going on that there have been traffic jams freeway closing closures and swarms of frenzied flowers seekers trampling through the orange poppy fields a situation the city has called and a poppy lips senior producer Christopher Intel at that paints. The word picture. When I first arrived. It looked like a music festival. Big traffic jam lines of cars parked on the shoulder. Streams of people walking along the road towards the big event, then pass the highway patrol barricades in porta-pottys in ice cream trucks. I saw the main attraction remember wizard of is going through the fields is like that oranges and purples yellows and lick Dr Seuss in real life. Powdered cheese everywhere. It's on fire. But in a really good way, our mother nature just vomited thousand flowers this year is bloom has lit up, California and the southwest laying down huge fields of flowers on desert's plains and hillsides here in riverside. I've seen it for fifty years. And this is the best I've ever seen which would mimic is an ecologist and meteorologist at UC riverside. He wrote a book called California's fading wildflowers super, although all the other media tried to say what what defies super. I said, it's an. The boulder in while super may be subjective. The fact is big blooms like these don't happen. Every year. It's sort of like playing a slot machine. Three factors have to line up. Just right in order to hit. The super bloom jackpot, the first, of course, is rain.

President Johnson California NASA Sierra snowpack Christopher Intel WNYC producer president Dr Seuss UC riverside riverside Melton porta-pottys Eddie Walker canyon lake Elsinore Kellyanne fifty years six years
"snowpacks" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Science Friday

"Visit we plan to move in concert with our basic researches and listen to that research. So that we'll have a clear path. We know that we're dealing with much of of climate. Change globally. It didn't get this wheel night. And we're not going to clear it overnight. But we own the path to address it we need to. We are the only way we can save dollars with all of the damage. We're experiencing is to do the research and implement, but I'm chairwoman. Does the committee? Take a stand on the green new deal at all. Or you just sitting and waiting for more of it to be to see what comes out of it. The committee has not taken a stand on that green new deal. There's a select committee on environment that is charged with that responsibility. However will work together with all of the committees that are looking at the climate change. And what we need to do to address the issues we experiencing it is global. We can't do it all along. But what we are noticing is that we got gotta catch it with China. They're investing heavily while. I'd ministry. Nation is pushing back we can't afford that. We've got to address it when you think of all the dollars. It costs us to clean up behind. These major weather catastrophes. We must learn how to prevent it. And we must learn how to withstand it, you know, we got to deal with resilience of materials, we've got to predict better when we expected we've got to plan how we going to build, and where are we going to build we, and we also have got to make sure that all this water. That's calling these calls in these floods. As also water we made for drinking. So we've got a lot on I played, but we can do it. If we have administrations that will put people in place in these agents says that move ahead with research and not try to stop. It are denying it replaced. Science Friday from WNYC studios talking with the chair of the outside. Committee. Eddie, Bernice Johnson. You know, you come from Texas. You'll remember Lyndon Johnson. And and and the space programs got it's right there in Houston. Do we have how how can I put it? Anyway, do we have the wheel and the way to create new big programs that are going to take a decade to finish? Without you know, politically being chopped up along the way. Well, I hope so, but that's been one of our problems. We move ahead. And then we get push back. We were moving ahead onto the last administration. We felt nothing but pushback under this one, but we cannot cave into it. We are a major branch of government that have direct responsibilities of the citizens of this nation. We must move ahead. We cannot afford to sit here and let all this happen without addressing it without looking for answers without looking for ways to bring it about without breaking the Bank. But also without destroying I totally is that we just sit back and do nothing. We can see what all of this damage will do with these massive floods all of these fires. We've got to address these issues we cannot wait for them to just go away because they're not going to go away. They'll get worse unless we address it. We have a basic responsibility to the world until I nation to do it. And I'm determined that as the committee a having a much of the responsibility for these measures. We're going to get there. We're also working with the other committees at addressing some of the same issues, we're dealing with energy and commerce as well as natural resources and any other committees. A where we overlap we intend to be serious about the people's business of dealing with health and all the risks that we take when we ignore what's going on. Do you? Do you have a priority set? What would you like to work on? I it's so much here to work on. How do you decide? What comes first it's difficult. Sometimes we'd know this. We know that one of the number one part is challenge. Look at where we are and challenge where we. Have to go. We've already had hearings on the status of science..

Lyndon Johnson WNYC studios China Houston Texas Bernice Johnson Bank Eddie
"snowpacks" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Science Friday

"And congratulations in January. You became the first woman and the first African American chair of the house committee, but you're not a new member. Right you. So what drew you what you will you to the house science committee when you first came to congress so many years ago? Well, I'm from a science background. I'm a nurse, and I was interested in this on Tiffin research, and at that time that was very open to me. And so I- this side it to accept the invitation and Jill, and and I've been fascinated by the committee in content all of the areas that onto the Jewish section of this committee. We've had some dynamic chairs and leave had some interesting chairs, we just. Finish six years of a science denier. But I think that we're gonna get on track. So far we have begun to move ahead. We've had the status of science hearing. We've had the status of climate change comment science and the state is of stem education, which has been a longtime interest of mine because I think that is the future. What are you a million follow up on that stem education? I know there's something called the stem act. The building blocks of stem act is in a Bill introduced by congresswoman Hayley Stevens from. The Detroit I think and congressman Jim Baird of Indiana and the house, and she writes had Stevens rights will strengthen early childhood stem education lead to more effective policies and practices to increase the number of women in our stem, workforce, you agree with all of that. All indeed is a matter of fact, that's been on focus a longtime. I'm delighted to have her. She's very enthusiastic as a matter of fact, we have a very energetic committee. That's very interested in getting started. And I'm excited to work with all of them. And they and you seem to be having bipartisan support in some of these somebody's bills that is something refreshing. Is it not and date? It is you know, I don't know what happened, but I can say that so far we're not getting the push med that we were accustomed to have in the last six years. The chairman of the the Reagan member. Congressman Lucas from Oklahoma. And I worked on this committee on number of us together. We shared trips to go to research labs around the world. And I think he is a little bit more open and pragmatic and and accepting outside typic- findings. He happens to be a farmer from Oklahoma. But he is not a negative person. I'm delighted that we've been able to make some plans to work together. And you know, you're familiar with the news this week that suggests President Trump has been resistant and giving congressional committees information, they're asking for will you think do you think you'll be running up with that same kind of resistance, or will you have more success with your committee requests? We'll we'll see one one thing. I can say about the president. He's made sure that he's recommending cuts almost everything. Trying to do on this committee. We've got to discuss that with him. So we we hope that he will have people valuable to us to explain. He wants to shut the door to the future. Can you give us an idea of what kinds of cuts you're talking about? Well, you know, we have the jurisdiction of Noah that does all the weather reporting, the National Science Foundation EPA the department of energy AP as funding has been recommended to be cut severely and even rollback some of the changes that have been made to move us full with the National Science Foundation has been very irritated by the interference with the scientific grants that go out that provides us with the research that we need so badly to move forward. We we have an educational responsibility to educate the president and his cabinet in these particular areas, and we hope that we'll be given the opportunity to do that. Do you think because you are a science committee, and you have to have a wide ranging? Impact with science to you. Do you have to educate your committee members about science in many ways? Yes. But we have a number of scientists and persons with typic- backgrounds that have joined the committee, which helps a great deal..

Congressman Lucas President Trump Hayley Stevens National Science Foundation president Oklahoma congressman Jim Baird Tiffin research congress Jill Detroit chairman Indiana Reagan AP Noah EPA six years
"snowpacks" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

The Conspiracy Farm

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on The Conspiracy Farm

"Lord by the state of Nevada the purpose was snowpack augmentation. Snowpack augmentation. All these mountains. You see here. The purposes the cover the mountains in snow during the wintertime, so they run from October to March of each year. The rocky mountains is running rather modification to have more snow. Yeah. And what they do is they use these things called ground-based clouds eaters. So I'll show you all of those real quick bring those up. Bam. Bam skip over the harp. Slow. What those are forest. Fires. No. These are not forced forest ours. These are ground based cloud seeding generators, those red flame looking things. That's what they are. Yeah. I'm gonna show you them all real quick. That's like all over the west coast. So does that obviously? Question two. They have something to do with the fires. It's been going on out there. So well. Yes. And no because like I said if you oversee this guy you can cause drought conditions. I'm more concerned with all of them in the mid west. That is pretty heavy right here. Oh, no. That's west of us. Okay. So what do we have on the east coast? We have torrential floods. We have basketball size hail. We have all these tornadoes and since nineteen Forty-six this stuff is only exploded. So that's how it works though. The weather starts there. And then the or stream the Gulfstream moisture comes up meets the weather coming off the Rockies. From around the left or right to left, and then whatever weather's modified modified over on the west they're east Israel across the country in west east. Yeah. And this is what a ground based cloud seeding generator looks like on the right hand on the left hand side. You got the fancy version this is from Wyoming. It's got a solar panel Berner head temperaturepro. Satellite communication. It's remotely operated. It's got two big propane tanks. Like you'd see near a mobile home at the bottom. If there are any. I'm sorry to interrupt you. But if there are any farmers out there who are listening to this and are seeing this if we could possibly have one of those arrive here in Iowa just show up somehow disappeared off a mountain somewhere, and it can show up in the midwest that we could do some tests cloud seeding machine that would be that would be wonderful. Oh, they've done many tests. We want to do Do that. the tests that wants to the weather over here by law, brother. That'd be great. And your little cloud with seem. Completely random, dude. Because at the end of the day with you know, several million dollars in trying to prove the National Academy of sciences wrong. They did the Wyoming weather modification pilot program, and what they ended up learning was we can't prove that we did a damn thing. And you know, I have the article right here. It's called cloud. Seeding gambling with your weather. And basically the quote goes like this. I'll scroll down to it analysis showed that cloud seeding produced a three percent increase in precipitation with a twenty eight percent probability that this result happened by chance. Right there most scientists and statisticians wouldn't accept that level of uncertainty. So after sixty freaking years of doing clouds eating billions of dollars. This is what's going to happen yet? Millions of dollars spent by individual groups like Sacramento municipal utility district. You're paying your water Bill, and their modifying the weather, and you can see that, you know, all along California is down in San Diego. I mean, any one of these these clouds eating generators are operating every October to March of every year and just two people can who are watching and not listening listening and watching but working they find this information..

Wyoming Nevada basketball National Academy of sciences Sacramento Iowa California San Diego twenty eight percent million dollars three percent
Desalination Could Cause Ecological Sea Change

60-Second Science

02:33 min | 2 years ago

Desalination Could Cause Ecological Sea Change

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. Winter storms have Wallops California this year and snowpack is piling up. But just a few years back. The state was wrung dry by a record breaking drought and more dry. Spell's will surely come. I think everybody agrees that we need more water resources Edina Peyton an oceanographer at the university of California Santa Cruz. She points out that her home country. Israel wants face the same problem real had border issues for ever and ever, and they don't have water problems anymore because they converted pretty much ninety percent of water use to diesel ination ocean. Desalination hasn't enjoyed as much traction in California due to its cost and because of concerns that the plants would damage coastal ecosystems. Both win the sea water sucked in and win. Leftover super salty Brian's are released now writing in the journal water Peyton inner team have. Fest. The environmental impact of the nation's largest plant the Carlsbad deceleration plan north of San Diego. Here's the good news scuba dives revealed that the communities of starfish snails seek you comers and other creatures that live on the sandy ocean. Bottom offshore have not budged since the plant opened in twenty fifteen but the bad news, the plume of salty runoff stayed intact. Much farther out than models predicted rather than easily blending with closer seawater. When you have a pool of salty water that doesn't make it prevents oxygen from penetrating which can cause lower oxygen levels close to the bottom. And obviously all the organisms that need box. Dejan are not going to be happy. You can systems offshore from the Carlsbad plant where are ready disturbed by cooling water discharge from a power plant at the same site. She says which could explain why the marine life was unfazed. But it more pristine sites, especially those rich in biodiversity like kelp forests assault. T- plume might do. More harm, the states already planning more ocean desalination projects up and down the coast and Peyton says her lesson is this there's tons of water in the ocean, and we can use it. We just have to do it responsibly. First step updating our models of how salty wastewater behaves offshore to ensure that our thirst for drinking water doesn't cause an ecological CJ. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Yata Carlsbad California University Of California Santa Peyton Christopher Don Israel Dejan San Diego Assault Brian Sixty Seconds Ninety Percent
"snowpacks" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Handle on the news. Addition. Tonight. I am asking you to defend Bill Handel out of love and devotion to our fellow citizens and to our country. And now here's Bill Handel. So nice. It was very nice of him to say that all right Handel and the morning crew coming up Brian suits at nine o'clock with tax cola Thursday and then at nine thirty. I want to talk about the border wall negotiations that are going on right now. I think I have the answer. And I mean legitimately. I'm not being ridiculous. Let's the answer. Everybody kill themselves. Kind of thing. It is. I think there is a realistic answer for this. I'm going to share that with you at least my idea, and that's at nine thirty. And I certainly believe that's worth listening to even if you don't. Okay. Let us start with handle on the news late edition. Jennifer, Jones Lee, Wayne, Resnick and me lead story. Let it snow. Let it snow. Let it snow. Yeah. We interviewed or I interviewed Frank Gerke stick man this morning and the guy who gives us snowpack report stick man, and he didn't give us that was just fun interview. It's worth on the podcast. Understood. What's no pack is all about a lot of it. I didn't understand. So now, I it was really cool. I learned quite a bit as you did. Hopefully anyway. The bottom line is it's gonna be cold. You wanna take a little bit more than that? Jennifer. I'll go a little bit further. So there's no pack now is at one hundred twenty five percent this next storm. That's coming in Friday and Saturday probably is going to be far stronger in northern California. Then southern although we're still gonna get some rain, but the bulk of the snow is going to be in the Sierra area. And that's where they're saying eighteen to twenty four inches possibly, and I mean, they've already got more than they can handle up there. They've closed highway eighty between the area in many spots and had up into the Sierra. So it's just going to be a mess. But did you see to seven point six seven inches of rain fell over the past week in Pasadena, six points in magical rock Beverly Hills five point? You know that old saying, you know, when it rains it snows. Okay. The Senate Judiciary.

Bill Handel Jennifer Senate Judiciary Frank Gerke Beverly Hills California Resnick Pasadena Brian Jones Lee Wayne one hundred twenty five percen twenty four inches six seven inches
"snowpacks" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:50 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"We go more handle on the news that coming up at seven o'clock ready to go through the speech. It was fascinating. What happened last night? The theater was tremendous. And we'll go through that starting at seven o'clock. All right. Let's go on with more handle on the news. The mystery deepens around the pilot who crashed his plane into a home in Yorba, Linda. Yeah. It was widely reported that the pilot and Tonio pristinely of Nevada was a retired Chicago police officer. Now, they're saying the badge and the papers that they found are fake now that doesn't connect to anything other than they are fake. And we'll see certainly not connected to the crash. It's just weird and Corbin Carson is joining seven thirty I who's diving into this a little deeper. I mean, this guy had changed his name so weird. He edited the Chicago PD is actually the one who called the investigators instead hold on. You guys are reporting this guy as a Chicago police officer. Nah. Yeah. His license. Was valid license. Was valid. All right handle, you're gonna be so happy because not only are we going to talk about rare snow falling on San Francisco's twin peaks. But I've got a snowpack report for you. Let's do that. After the next story. Okay. Because that's when it is appropriate. Explain why Wayne just going to the next story and just go for it. All right. Well, we have a way to measure tornadoes. We have a way to measure hurricanes. And now we have a way to measure these atmospheric rivers that brought all this rain to California. And so it just gives us a better idea in terms of not just the inches of rain. They're coming down. But also the beneficial aspects like. Snowpack? It's time for another Bill Handel show snowpack reports when last week checks California's snowpack in this era was at one hundred eleven percent today. It has risen to one hundred fifteen percents, that's helping that's helping and I heard I heard that you have an interview with stick, man. I do today. I'm recording an interview with stick man at eleven o'clock, and then we'll obviously play tomorrow stick man interview today. Oh, yeah. Can't wait for that. The. Is no idea what he's getting into. That's the funniest part. Actually, I'm going to be I'm fascinated by it. So I'm not going to be ripping him. At all. I'm I'm gonna be asking the the technical aspects of of putting a stick into the snow and then going, okay? And then looking at whatever level it is in feet and inches. That's I mean, there's a world to that. He's been doing it for thirty years thirty years, right? And. LA county has been exposed to two hundred fifty percent more pollution from cars than the bay area has John. That is a simplistic statement simple. Because what sixty seventy percent of pollution comes from vehicles in the bay area. Very few people certainly in the city even drive cars because they zip. Yeah. Yeah. And no one can afford cars anymore, unless they need a new home. And then they Canada Dry. They can't afford gas. They just parked the car and lived there and LA. It's all about cars. So okay. Thank you so much. Yeah. Right. Because more cars, okay? As brilliant a assembly member from Santa Monica has introduced a Bill that would modernize the state's blood banks for your pets a cat. The only state you that does not allow voluntary setting collection of blood from animal now, I have a question in terms of voluntary blood donation from animals. Well, how how do you ask them? Do they do the paw up in the air saying okay by me? Well, they get a little they get the little dot on their driver's license there. You are exactly daisy gives high fives on demand. But this is the the serious part is from what I understand with this story is that blood donor animals are kept in cages, and that's where they live, and they pull blood out in that that's inhumane, and that's months or years that they can be in those. Yeah, that's tough. I'm gonna go to the Pasadena humane society and talk to them about this today because I didn't even know this was the way it were. And I'm assuming there's blood typing with animals like there are with human beings. Guess types of blood, the universal blood. I have I have no idea and. Instead of checking for aids or hepatitis have to check for rabies..

officer Chicago California Bill Handel stick Corbin Carson San Francisco Yorba Pasadena humane society LA county Linda Canada Santa Monica Tonio pristinely Wayne LA Nevada John thirty years
"snowpacks" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Snowpack in the Sierra right now, all the snow that we've received in the last couple of weeks or so doing a lot of good water resources department says the snowpack jumped from just sixty nine percent of normal on January first to one hundred and fourteen percent this week, thanks to that series of storms. That is more than four times the snowpack California had this time last year, making water shortages unlikely the summer, unless of course, it stops raining and snowing entirely an investigation is underway. After a man was found dead inside a Sacramento apartment. The unidentified victim was found about five thirty yesterday evening at an apartment complex on Lampe SaaS avenue fire crews responding found high carbon monoxide levels inside that unit, but they have not released any other details. Northern California gas station owner is offering free gas to furloughed federal workers. The owner says that his Valera. Station in Fremont started making the offer. After federal a federal employee told him that she wanted to go to work despite not getting paid. We'll see you on a part of this. And we have to do we have to help as much. We can drivers will have to prove that they actually live in Fremont. And that they are a furloughed federal worker in order to take advantage of that free gas offer. All right, traffic and weather together right now, we're getting over to Brian Noble's for an update. This report is brought to you by Sacramento area sewer district. Got some slowing westbound I eighty from Sierra college to rocklin road went to get past highway sixty five Roseville to the capcity splits. Just nine minutes all the rest of our freeways are incident. Freenet the limit the sewer system is probably the last thing on your mind, but at the Sacramento area sewer district hits their first priority. There the region's largest sewer utility problems. Call them first day or nine nine one six eight seventy five sixty seven thirty learn more at sack sewer dot com. I'm Brian Noble's..

Sacramento Fremont Brian Noble California Sierra college rocklin Roseville sixty nine percent fourteen percent nine minutes
"snowpacks" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:50 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on KCRW

"Coming up, California's snowpacks shaping up pretty nicely. So far, it's eight o'clock. Good morning. President Trump says he will delay the state of the union speech. After speaker Nancy Pelosi denied him the room the latest effects of the partial government shutdown on morning edition from NPR Survey showed the president's approval rating is slipping I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm Steve Inskeep. What are voters saying Don gonyea has been on the road in Ohio, the shutdown is affected the owners of food trucks? And we hear an argument for beginning impeachment proceedings. Key House Democrats have not been eager to start. But a writer for the Atlantic argues it could reduce the chaos instead of adding to it. It is Thursday January twenty fourth this day in eighteen forty eight James w Marshall discovered gold nuggets by a stream in California, the gold rush began as soon as word got out. The news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm korva Coleman. President Trump has abruptly reversed course, saying he will now wait until after the partial federal government shutdown ends to deliver his state of the union address as NPR's Dan Keith reports the announcement came via late night tweets in tweets sent just after eleven pm. President Trump said speaker Pelosi's decision not to allow the state of the union to be delivered in the house chamber until after the shutdown ends is her prerogative. He added that he isn't looking for an alternative venue to deliver the address because quote, there is no venue that can compete with the history tradition and importance of the house chamber. I look forward to giving a great state of the union address in the near future. Pelosi responded saying she hoped that phrase near future meant Trump would accept the democratic Bill being voted on in the Senate to end the shutdown that seems unlikely just Wednesday President Trump headed tempted to call Pelosi's bluff saying he intended to. Deliver the address as planned January twenty ninth only to accept her position. Several hours later tamra, Keith NPR news. This is day thirty four of the government shutdown. The Senate is scheduled to vote on two bills today that could end it. One proposal backed by Republicans includes President Trump's demand for a border wall. Both bills are expected to fail. Meanwhile, the TSA is asking its officers to volunteer to move to other airports to cut long security, checkpoint lines NPR's, David Schaper has more after ten percent of airport security officers nationwide called out is unable to report to work Sunday. The TSA put out a call for volunteers to leave their home airports in order to fill in at other airports. That are short staffed the absentee rate has fallen a bit the last few days. TSA officials worry it could climb. Again. If employee's miss a second paycheck at the end of this week NPR's, David Schaper, the digital news and entertainment site, BuzzFeed says, it's laying off fifteen percent of. Its workforce NPR's. Elizabeth Blair says the job cuts were announced by founder Jonah, Peretti Peretti's memo begins. I'm writing with sad news. He goes on to say that after examining trends and the evolving economics of digital platforms executives plan to consolidate teams and focus in on the content. That's working since BuzzFeed was founded in two thousand six the competition for clicks and digital ad revenue has increased significantly with small companies and behemoths like Facebook Peretti's has details on the cuts will be announced by Monday at the latest. Buzzfeed news, recently published an explosive story alleging that President Trump urged his ex lawyer Michael Cohen to lie to congress, Elizabeth Blair and PR news following that. Buzzfeed report the office of special counsel. Robert Muller issued a statement disputing elements of the article on Wall Street, the Dow Jones industrials are down two points at twenty four thousand five hundred seventy four you're listening. To NPR news. And from KCRW, I'm Cheri Glazer way state and local headlines, it's been a very wet twenty nineteen so far here in California. A conveyor belt of storms has drenched both northern and southern parts of the state and has KCRW Saul Gonzales reports new numbers from the state show. That's been very good for California's water supply. It's estimated recent storms have added five hundred eighty billion gallons of water to California's reservoirs since January first with many of them likely Paris in Riverside County now near full capacity and the Sierra snowpack, which is so critical to California summer water supply is measuring one hundred fifteen percent of average that's four times greater than the snow pack this time last year, the state's water managers more winter storms will top off many of California's reservoirs, but at least for the next week a high pressure zone in the Pacific is pushing storms to the north meteorologists also cautioned that droughts can return quickly. After what period so water? Conservation is always a good idea. Rain or shine for KCRW. Absol Gonzales Gavin Newsom says it's a disgrace that one million Californians do not have access to safe drinking water. So the new governor's proposed a drinking water tax in his budget. The tax would help clean contaminated water in disadvantaged communities. It's based on a similar idea the died in the legislature last year. Here's how it would work. Property owners would pay a ninety five cent tax a month in order to raise one hundred ten million dollars a year. Jonathan Nelson is with the community water center. He supported last year. Spill we need to act as quickly as possible. Because again, we've been debating this issue now for years, and this isn't some abstract issue children and families health are at stake. Nelson says it'll take a hundred forty million dollars a year to fix the problem. Protests from water interest helped to kill the Bill last year. The LA county district attorney's office has unveiled a new mental health division is KCRW. Eric Roy reports the new division is designed to get help for defendants with mental health issues who do not necessarily belong in jail or prison. The new division is billed as the first of its kind in a California prosecutor's office and possibly been nationwide. It will bring prosecutors together with defendants who have been declared incompetent to stand trial or are seeking alternative sentencing due to mental health problems, Los Angeles County DA, Jackie Lacey, says the idea is to expand opportunities for treatment and other services for people in the criminal Justice system who have emotional issues, but do not pose a danger to public safety. Prosecutors working in this division will get training from LA county department of mental health on the intricacies of working with people who are living with mental illness. The new mental health division will.

President Trump California NPR president KCRW Nancy Pelosi BuzzFeed TSA Steve Inskeep Jonathan Nelson Senate Don gonyea NPR Survey LA county Rachel Martin David Schaper LA Absol Gonzales Gavin Newsom Ohio
"snowpacks" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"All right. How about the snowfall numbers? I mentioned yards feet and yards of snow forecast for the higher elevations. It's could tremendously boost the snowpack, which then of course, becomes much of the state's water supply when you get into the warm season snow from this past weekend into the middle of this week. We'll be measured as I said in yards over the high country of the northern Sierra Nevada the cascades and the peaks of the Olympics as much as eight to ten feet of snow may pile up on the ridges and the peaks of the northern Sierra between well what they've seen thus far and into Wednesday evening the freezing level, obviously get a very with each storm, and that will have a profound effect on travel over some of our summits Donner summit. The siskiyou summit in Oregon Snoqualmie pass there in Washington. This time we're expecting rain and not snow over the grapevine in southern California with this series of storms. But during the storm but mid week there there should be too much warm air aloft for snow with the siskiyou summit. So any rain at the onset should quickly change to snow and treacherous conditions over Donner summit. Promptly going to be looking at some major delays possible closures would venturing out through some of these passes this week White House likely with each store over the passes in the high country. The most dramatic sudden change from wet to blizzard conditions and strong winds over the high passes will be the storm that comes in Tuesday night into Wednesday. The winds as just as the case was over the weekend. A got to be a concern gust over some of the passes may hit ninety miles per hour with these storms you combine that with heavy snow the varying snow levels, it's going to be the risk for avalanches has got to be increasing snowboarders. Skiers snowmobilers going to have to use extreme caution. If you're doing any of the off trail adventures over the rugged terrain. Localized winds may be strong enough with any of these storms to bring down trees and more power outages gust in coastal areas from northern California on up into Washington could be in the sixty mile per hour range, so strong gusty storms as this proverbial Parada storms continues in travelers weather a service of our friends at travelcenters of America. TA.

Donner summit siskiyou California Sierra Nevada Washington White House Olympics America Oregon ten feet
"snowpacks" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

04:10 min | 3 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Climate Cast

"You know what Peter Glick was saying back in the eighties about California's climate in particularly affected of temperature on floods and droughts and California and California. We're very dependent on snow pack as much of the western US is we rely on our snowpack for about thirty percent of our water storage give or take. And what that means is we also rely on snowpack for flood. Can. Trolls. So what we know what Peter Glick was predicting back in the eighties was that as California warms, the snowpack would come less reliable. We'd get more run off in the winter, creating greater occurrence of of episodes where our dams and reservoirs filled up and and the need to release that water with greater flood risk. And then because of that lack of snowpack in the spring and summer water deficits in the warm season, coupled with higher temperatures. And this is exactly what has come to pass over the last thirty years. The interesting thing is in that illustrate that that indirect can shared this future was twenty fifty. That was the future that was laid out in this situation and we are seeing it unfold here in California. You know, before even even even twenty twenty. So you know, we have had about a degree celsius of global warming where experiencing impacts already from that degree celsius of global warming. If we get to degrees of of of. Global warming like the United Nations has stated as a goal. We can expect further intensification of those impacts as that additional global warming unfolds and you talk about California. I mean, let's be real. California's already sort of a boom bust climate. Right? And now it seems like we're getting wet years. We build more fuels quickly changed to drought and heat, isn't that only getting exceleron the fuel aridity and wildfire behavior going forward? I live in California. I lived in California most of my life with the exception of a five year stint in the midwest. When I was at Purdue University, I can tell you the California has a great climate. And it's a, it's a big reason. We have such a vibrant agricultural sector. It's a big reason. We have such a vibrant economy degrees. We have such a large population in so many amazing different kinds of of of thriving ecosystems. So we, we have a, we have a wonderful climate here in California, and we have a climate that's changing. We have a climate that is already warmer than it used to be. It's it's a climate that because of that warming is is has a greater risk of of protracted warm, dry periods compared to win our our water system was designed and built fifty one hundred years ago. And at the same time we're in a climate now where where when we do get wet episodes, they're more likely to produce a greater flood risk because of that lack of stories from snowpacks. So the good news is that that our leadership in California's very proactive about not only catching up with the climate change that's already happened, but getting ahead of the climate change that we will encounter in the. After you work in extreme weather event attribution, what can we say about individual fire events? Like the ones we're seeing in California. Do you think we'll ever be able to assess a climate contribution to this extreme fire behavior? Well, so that's something that our research group is working on. Literally right now, we submitted an abstract for a conference today, in fact. So it's an area of active research, not only in my research group, but also in a number of different research groups around the world. You know, there's been a real explosion of research over the last fifteen years or so to develop methods for testing. I bodies about ways in which global warming could influence individual extreme events. You know, we have very robust results for hot events. Our research shows that the record hot event has been influenced by global warming at more than eighty percent of the globe look across the whole world as those already. A clear fingerprint of global warming on extreme hot ovens for wet and drive ins..

California snowpacks Peter Glick US Purdue University United Nations fifty one hundred years eighty percent thirty percent fifteen years thirty years five year
"snowpacks" Discussed on Climate Cast

Climate Cast

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Climate Cast

"Right? And now it seems like we're getting wet years. We build more fuels quickly change to drought and heat, isn't that only exceleron the fuel aridity and wildfire behavior going forward? I live in California. I lived in California most of my life with the exception of a five year stint in the mid west. When I was at Purdue University, I can tell you the California has a great climate. And it's a, it's a big reason. We have such a vibrant agricultural sectors. A big reason we have such a vibrant economy degrees. We have such a large population in so many amazing different kinds of of of thriving ecosystems. So we, we have a, we have a wonderful climate here in California, and we have a climate that's changing. We have a climate that is already warmer than it used to be. It's it's a climate that because of that warming is is has a greater risk of protracted warm, dry periods compared to win our our water system was designed and built two hundred years ago. And at the same time, we're in a climate now where where when we do get wet episodes, they're more likely to produce a greater flood risk because of that lack of stories from snowpacks. So the good news is that that our leadership in California's very proactive about not only catching up with the climate change that's already happened, but getting ahead of the climate change that we will encounter in. Future you work in extreme weather event attribution. What can we say about individual fire events? Like the ones we're seeing in California. Do you think we'll ever be able to assess a climate contribution to this extreme fire behavior? Well, so that's something that our research group is working on. Literally right now, we submitted an abstract for a conference today, in fact. So it's an area of active research, not only in my research group, but also in a number of different research groups around the world. You know, there's been a real explosion of research over the last fifteen years or so to develop methods for testing hypotheses about ways in which global warming could influence individual extreme events. You know, witness, we have very robust results for hot vents. Are research shows that the record hot event has been influenced by global warming at more than eighty percent of the globe look across the whole world as those. Pretty clear fingerprint of global warming on extreme hot ovens for wet and drive ins. We find that human fingerprinted about half of the of the surface area where we have reliable observations. So we're already in a climate where we're individual events are being influenced by global warming. For wildfires, you know, they are complex events and they arise from confluence of different ingredients. The good news from a scientific perspective is we're able to analyze those ingredients individually and together. So we can kind of pull those different threads that come together to create an individual wildfire and ask questions post Hypo scientific hypotheses about each ingredient. You know a couple that we're interested in right now, are this fuel aridity how much dry fuel is there on the landscape? How dry is it? And then also the winds, you know, certainly in in both those Napa fire southern California fires last year. Those were situations where there were very strong. Wins from the regional atmospheric circulation. Interestingly, this car fire in the last week up in reading as a case where it appears to be primarily fuel driven fire where there were very, very strong winds, essentially the descriptions and and the signs of the of the wind damage essentially are are what we would see in a tornado. But it wasn't really from the regional atmospheric circulation. It was from the intensity of the fire itself. So these it it, it's going to be interesting from a scientific point of view to to compare and contrast these these different events in a really, you know, systematic hypothesis driven way. I realized that that's a little bit a little bit detached and objective from a scientific. You know, as a scientific perspective, certainly our our, our primary concern is is with the families that are being affected by these buddies disasters? Sure. And it was phenomenal to look at the ambient synoptic scale wins mostly under ten miles an hour in the area, and then see that essentially. F. one or so tornado tornado like damage from that rotating, huge fire world..

California Purdue University snowpacks Napa two hundred years eighty percent fifteen years five year
"snowpacks" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Here & Now

"Low snowpack in the southern rocky mountains but there's another factor that could make things even worse dust as luke runyan from member station k unc in greeley colorado reports scientists have recorded a dramatic rise in the amount of dust being deposited on snow and it's causing a lot of problems for the water supply and more jeff dairy is digging a snow pit high up in the san juan mountains in southwestern colorado dairy is director of the center for snow and avalanche studies if you dig deep enough you see the entire winter's story but today we're just looking for dust you know you go out you look for you dig look around you see what you see and then we see it barely think of it like the rings of a tree about seven inches down is a beige colored band of dust though you're seeing i'm seeing so why is this important will eventually this snow will melt an empty into the colorado river watershed which provides water for some forty million people in the south west and this tiny little strip of dust has the potential to completely up end how we manage water here's how it works when there's no dust on the snow it's brilliantly white it reflects the sun and melts off slow and steady like a drip from a faucet this is what water managers love it's predictable but when you add in dust the snow gets darker and it absorbs more sunlight meaning those drips the runoff speeds up.

luke runyan jeff dairy san juan mountains director colorado river colorado seven inches
"snowpacks" Discussed on Triangulation

Triangulation

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Triangulation

"That's going to be one of the biggest challenges of the twentyfirst century so i'm i'm setting myself up to do that now make my bet now and i'll look like a genius well and it's and it's a good thing that you were there obviously a lot of this his you know looking back and recent very recent history seems to come in large part from facebook or rather facebook is seeming to feel a lot of the heat and as a result recently was this is probably about a year and a half ago facebook enlisted snowpacks to help identifying fake news on its platform how like just kind of checking in on how that's working how did that come to be in how is that going right now how is that relationship of course we're not the only i mean they listed us but other fact checking organizations well you know it it it's mostly at least now it's a platform for just to help facebook matchup are fact checks another partners fact checks with new material that's being on posted on facebook i mean really our involvement ends at writing articles and you know just sort of addenda fighing in a database what they match up to of course we don't have any control what facebook does with them and you know they shifted their approach as the processes of ball you know some initially you know if we are other fact checkers rating something false they would display a warning to users that a particular article was disputed and provide links to corrective information that is fact checks i think they found that process.

facebook
"snowpacks" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

The Right Time with Bomani Jones

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on The Right Time with Bomani Jones

"Now nobody is said to me but i think it's logical to deuce but mani that the league is not going now steve zico elliot disciplines well jerry jones being inducted to whole fame so that all his press conferences tete week when he said before the cameras rolled out as equal elie particularly we back in a while so i think we get something tomorrow or friday or the league decides to wait until after the hall of fame ceremonies in game and we get it the week of say august seven but to me next week is a non starter in my mind now i could be proven wrong but i think what i'm saying is logical plausible are we're talking to adam schefter vsb here on the right time now switch gears just a little bit we're here not a debra broncos give the pact alleges look great almost like a different person would you be surprise abuse the opening day solder i would be now again they have all summer to let him do what he's going to do and try to win that job and he's look there's no denying that he's got the talent he's got a huge arm he's got huge ability but but that position is about more than talent and ability and if he can go out when that job i'm sure they'd be very happy they booked up in the draft to go get him was a firstround pick in and they believe a lot in him but i just think that when you look at trevor semi in the intangibles the leadership de popularity in a locker room the respect he commands among his teammates i i think that trump's maximilian snowpacks list you've got the advantage of being a firstround pick i think it a perfect world love to have on what the job but i just think the trevor simeon is that tough pretty guy that can be tough to shake off and if i'm handicapping it.

trump trevor simeon mani steve zico jerry jones adam schefter debra maximilian snowpacks
"snowpacks" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"snowpacks" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"This this is a raging river two years ago the sierra nevada snowpack the source of this water was just five percent of normal this year the snowpack was pushing to 100 percent was one of the largest snowpacks ever recorded and as temperatures have risen the river has reacted inkind two years ago i look as my teenager that was just sitting on the couch doing nothing now it's my raging teenager that is just all over the map more says that's been good for business whitewater recreation after all is far more lucrative when there's actually whitewater but it's also come with a price at the bottom of the current river canyon where it hits the flats near the city of bakersfield there's a sign by the road that says that we've lost two hundred eighty licensed 1968 occurred river this is sergeant zach biddle with kern county search and rescue that was updated the friday before memorial day and since then we've lost six so next year we're going to add at least six to that site six and possibly seven now at least one other man has since gone missing upstream some were wrecked rating some just went out for a wade biddle says that people need to know this is not the same river the you may visit last year the water is moving with ten times of four said it was a year ago biddle says riverbanks for less stable hazards are submerged and this isn't unique to the current rivers up and down the sierra nevada and throughout the west her experiencing flooding with the snow melt aided by recent hot summer days homes have been evacuated by the king river further up california's central valley and water experts like david rosario with california's department of water resources aren't sure how much snow melt is still yet to come most of the snowpack has melted off but what we noticed even during the heat wave.

sierra nevada snowpack current river canyon bakersfield zach biddle nevada king river california david rosario kern county two years five percent 100 percent