35 Burst results for "Snowden"

"snowden" Discussed on The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

04:25 min | 3 weeks ago

"snowden" Discussed on The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

"Headline on New York Times. You know, because they hate big tech and then we're going to our stock's going to fall 10% because some person died. And then, you know, I'm sure that math found its way into the equation. Yeah, absolutely. And so once your self-driving cars, you can kind of eliminate that. Now, people are still going to, people die, you know, walking in a traffic looking at their smartphone, but you don't blame Apple. You don't blame Android. You don't blame clash of clans or whatever they're playing. They're on Twitter. So they got to make it where you see it and you're like, oh yeah, that's on the user. Yeah, what a Bozo. But if you're driving your car and there's actually usage, like, yeah, you know, this place has a sale and you turn your head to look at the store and the next thing you know, you crash into the car in front of you. So they're going to want to avoid any of that. But yeah, it's going to be cool when you look at a human being and you can see like their last tweet or their latest Instagram post or whatever kind of filter that you have. I was going to go in some spicy takes. Why are they smirking at me? One other thing I didn't see it mentioned there. Coming out of Apple today, I saw that Apple Pay has partnered with circle. Which is a one of those things I will just slide under the news right now. It doesn't seem big. Like Google and stuff. It's big. That is the last step in one of the last steps in my opinion for USD C getting fast track to becoming a digital dollar. Yeah, we've talked about this. It's going to happen because it happens on Google pay or Apple Pay. It's going to happen because that chip reader on your debit card, you tap it and it drains you of whatever stablecoin or maybe we're in a bull market and it's a peak and you do want to spend Bitcoin. I know there's a lot of people say never spend your Bitcoin, but you know what, when Bitcoin was above 50 K, it was a pretty smart idea to spend your Bitcoin. And I think there's going to be something like that. Every four years. You're going to start to see cell phones come with digital wallets like the last galaxy phones have started to do. You're going to see that with iPhones as well. I mean, they already do. You have an Apple wallet on there. So you're going to be able to pay with Apple Pay. It's going to be synced to USD C, you're going to be able to swap crypto through it. And basically, Apple will become in Samsung will probably become the most prominent crypto wallet. Big boy Wilson, here's my hack best place to turn cash into Bitcoin and withdraw immediately debit or ACH transfer. I use coinbase as my Fiat and off ramp, but I use my little coinbase hack, so coinbase charges to use your bank, but they don't charge for PayPal. So you can sell your crypto, move the cash to PayPal for free. They don't charge you for that. PayPal

Apple New York Times Google Bitcoin Twitter Samsung Wilson PayPal
"snowden" Discussed on The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

05:25 min | 3 weeks ago

"snowden" Discussed on The Bitboy Crypto Podcast

"Yeah. But, you know, I mean, for the most part, it's just the more it's almost like the more questions you ask, the more dirt you find, it's just layers upon layers. You start looking above FTX, you start looking above SPF, like they're definitely a piece here, but I don't think they were, I don't think he's the mastermind behind all of this stuff. So all wars are bankers wars or like a bank man. Exactly. Bank person, bank man. Yeah. Yeah, Eisenhower was right. I've said that multiple times. I don't want to get into what that means. Drew, drew's like standing and applauding right now. Eisenhower was right. All right, let's go to the coin market cap. Is this a crypto show or should I get tinfoil out? Bitcoin dominance up to 38.3 or I should say down down. Ethereum down to 18.1%, still less than half of Bitcoin's dominance there. The volume. 66 billion market cap 850 billion right there. The way down to 17, I think it was 19 just earlier. But if we look at the prices, a little bit of a relief bounce here, we have a Bitcoin still below 17,000. I would definitely ask Frank about some of these levels. Ethereum up slightly as well. B and B XRP obviously that Fox News rumor is clearly got people excited has had some nice nice movement. Yeah, I'm sure. We'll probably touch on it at the end and the XRP coinbase, but the big thing I saw was all those basically all those amicus briefs are being allowed, which is kind of unprecedented from judges that judge Torres basically the language seems to be favoring ripple in a lot of different ways. All right, people are saying, you know what, go to the tweet. Oh, I can't because Ben, I'm not gonna have been retweeted. I'm like, I would, I would. I just realized I'm not sorry. You have your phone in your pocket? I do have my phone in my pocket. You know what I will do? Look at some of these, look at some of these alts here. Cardano, not up as much. I mean, then we get into that 4% club up four and a half, four and a half, about 4%. So for cardano doge and polygon here, polkadot up a little bit Solana, having a little bit of a resurgence here of 7%, but when you look at that weekly, it's still cut in half where it was. So just a week ago, about a week ago, $29 uniswap up a little bit. If we go to the top gainers in the top losers, 26% for stacks, XRP in the number two spot. Algorand, AJ is going to be happy about that. The number 27 coin, all these are up in the double digits. If we go to the top losers, trust wallet, helium, convex, and bit Dao, so we're seeing some negative action, but then I would say the trust wallet up 70% on the week. So that's a pullback. Yeah, okay, yeah, I mean, the weekly there, obviously, telling the story, let me sign out of jpeg junkie. Let me sign in to mine. All right, let's get this tweet going. Bit squad, can you do something for me? All right, we're scrolling up, we're scrolling up. All right, I am retweeting it right now. Why not mention, oh, you know what? It looks like the bit squad already showed a little love. In that little bit of time, I've gotten 5 retweets. So it is the bit squad.

Eisenhower judge Torres Bitcoin Cardano cardano doge Drew drew Fox News Frank Solana Ben
Why Happened When Assange Was Holed up in Ecuador's London Embassy

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:11 min | 2 months ago

Why Happened When Assange Was Holed up in Ecuador's London Embassy

"Roth is here who is an attorney for some people that went to go meet with Julian Assange journalists and lawyers that were then spied on walk us through that. So he's in the Ecuadorian embassy. And then the equity embassy. Let me just make one comment on what you said. Even if my argument is, even if Julian Assange actually told these people to go out and get bad stuff, that's still not a crime. That's what the press does every day. But let's go to the embassy. Let's go to the embassy and that'll come out. And what I'm concerned about there is any investigative reporter who set the way with the lower perspective. Or in that part of the need that letter, that's not illegal, but let's go to the 5 case in particular. By corruption, but I think it's just being with between the press and investigative reporting and someone taking information Manning and Snowden did. So what would happen was while he was in the MSD for 7 years, people went to visit him. People went, his doctors, his lawyers, his friends, his colleagues, and when he went into the embassy, they had a protocol. You had to actually give the embassy security your following your tablet, your laptop, everything you had had to go to them before you walk in to meet Assange, which sounds okay. They don't want any kind of tip we're going to vice ver everything. That makes sense. So what we learned from a litigation in Spain was that the embassy wasn't just holding your cell phone, your tablet, your laptop, while you were in meeting, they were imaging it. So they literally imaged the entire. Phone laptop of people that went in and think about the Ecuadorian government did that. The equity overall, here's what happened. The Ecuadorian government hired a company called UC global. UC global had essentially formed became essentially an age of the CIA because what this UC global employee started saying is, listen, why am I doing this? And we have affidavits at UC global people saying, why am I doing this as setting it to Washington? Why am I imaging it? So you can watch it.

Julian Assange Ecuadorian Embassy Roth Ecuadorian Government Snowden Manning Assange Uc Global Spain UC CIA Washington
Edward Snowden Granted Russian Citizenship

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:36 min | 2 months ago

Edward Snowden Granted Russian Citizenship

"Ask you. News as of two days ago that the former KGB colonel in the Kremlin has provided Russian citizenship to Snowden. Your reaction, uncle Jim. Bye, Felicia. Why do we even care? That's the nice thing. I'm glad he's there. He's a traitor. That's what I want. People want to pardon him. He's a traitor who's dumped information. He didn't have any knowledge about was not vetted. He and Assange both and all of it. They didn't, they didn't blow a single whistle on a single crime. So this is the issue for me. If you see and look, we know bad stuff happened, right? NSA DIA, we know. The data farms and everything else. But if you've got an issue, it's like the FBI whistleblower we had on my show yesterday, Carl serf. You use the tools available. You don't go to communist China with the hard drives and then to Moscow if you believe in America, do you Jim, because that's what Snowden did. You think the Chinese might have copied that hard drive. I think maybe they got that before everyone else. And then you think Russia had it. And all of that, there was no way it would have taken hundreds of analysts a month or two just to figure out what was on there. And they just dumped it on the Internet so that all our enemies could read it. It may or may not have gotten anybody killed, but that's not how it works. We have inspectors general. We have whistleblower protections. And if you have an actual crime, which they didn't, then you have ways to do that. I hope he I hope he dies in Russia and never sees the shores of this country again. Unless he's in chains. And

Snowden Carl Serf KGB Felicia JIM Assange NSA FBI Moscow China Russia America
Bob Cesca on Republican Support for the Theft of National Secrets

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Bob Cesca on Republican Support for the Theft of National Secrets

"Couldn't wait to get you on today because of course Edward Snowden thing. I was just like, oh my God. Bob says, I tried to tell you how long you just said, right? Matt Gaetz said Joe Biden should pardon Snowden, and you said Republican support the theft and exposure of national security secrets. Period. Yeah. How long ago did we say this? Snowden is a traitor. 9 years. It's been 9 years. It'll be ten years coming up this coming up summer in June, I believe it is. When the first story Glenn greenwald dropped happened. And so this is not surprising to those of us who were following the story closely with a critical eye back in 2013 when especially and I wrote a piece about this back in 2013 about how as soon as Edward Snowden was shepherded from Hong Kong where he had a birthday party, a birthday pizza party at the Russian consulate, he was taken by WikiLeaks attorneys. Hi. See, all these names are so appropriate now. Have a new patina of weirdness about them after the last 5, 6 years. Yeah. And so he separated by WikiLeaks attorneys to Moscow, where, while camping out in the Moscow airport, he hires Russian attorney Anatolia. I think that's how you pronounce his last name. And anatoly kuchar Rena is a, or was a lawyer for the FSB for the Russian FSB. And those of us who have been falling from Russia all along what the very least watching the Rachel maddow show. We all know what the FSB is. The FSB is the modern day version of the KGB. Yeah. And one of their attorneys is the attorney who represented Edward Snowden in Moscow in 2013 when he was there in the airport. So this is no surprise to any of us that he is being offered Russian citizenship by Vladimir

Edward Snowden Snowden Matt Gaetz Russian Consulate Joe Biden FSB Wikileaks Glenn Greenwald Moscow BOB Anatoly Kuchar Rena Hong Kong Anatolia Rachel Maddow Russia KGB Vladimir
Putin grants Russian citizenship to Edward Snowden

AP News Radio

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Putin grants Russian citizenship to Edward Snowden

"Russian president Vladimir Putin has granted citizenship to former U.S. security contractor Edward Snowden I'm Ben Thomas with the latest Putin signed a decree making Snowden and 74 other foreign nationals Russian citizens Snowden has been living in Russia since 2013 to escape prosecution in the U.S. The former National Security Agency contractor leaked classified documents detailing government surveillance programs He was granted permanent residency in Russia two years ago and said at the time he planned to apply for Russian citizenship

Edward Snowden Snowden Ben Thomas Vladimir Putin U.S. Putin Russia National Security Agency
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

03:13 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"In 2013, Edward Snowden shocked the world when he revealed that the federal government was spying on millions of Americans. Snowden had been working as a contractor for the National Security Agency. He felt motivated to serve his country in the war on terror. And as a gifted computer programmer, Snowden found what seemed like a natural home at the NSA. But after stumbling on a highly classified document, Snowden faced a moral crisis. He learned that in the broader fight against terrorism, America's spy agencies were targeting regular citizens, collecting data from phone calls, emails, and other online activities. Snowden went on to leak a trove of government documents, revealing the scope of the NSA's programs. The news coverage that followed was an immediate sensation, and set off a heated debate about privacy on the Internet, and the tradeoff between national security and personal freedom. It's a debate that's recently picked up steam on a more local level, with a growing popularity of online platforms like next door and citizen. These crowd sourced apps allow residents to monitor their own communities and post information online. They're often billed as a way to keep community safe, but according to my guest, Matthew gore aglia, the apps also foster paranoia, racial profiling, and a skewed understanding of crime. Guariglia is a historian who studies police and surveillance. He's the author of the forthcoming book, police and the empire city, which looks at the history of New York City's police department. He also works as a policy analyst for the electronic frontier foundation, an organization that works on privacy and technology. In our conversation, we'll look at how platforms like next door have helped create a new paradigm of mass surveillance. And then we'll go back in history and look at some of the dire consequences when citizens lose their privacy. Our conversation is next. American scandal is sponsored by saatchi art. I'm lucky. Not only is my wife beautiful, funny and smart, she also has great taste that matches mine, which has made decorating our home together a delight, but how do we go about finding the art for our home? Well, we agree on that, too. Saatchi art. They have artworks from thousands of emerging artists around the globe in all styles, so you're guaranteed to find art that fits your style, space, and budget. Their view your room feature lets you visualize the art on your walls, and my advisers sitting was instrumental in finding our newest piece. Get 15% off your first order with promo code podcast. Just go to saatchi art dot com and enter code podcast at checkout. Find art you love today. Hey, I'm Mike Corey. The host of wonders podcast against the odds. In our next season, two cameramen fly over an active Hawaiian volcano to capture footage for a new Hollywood blockbuster. But when the wind shifts, the helicopter is engulfed in toxic fumes and crashes inside the volcano. The pilot and the cameramen are trapped, praying for miraculous rescue before they're consumed by smoke or lava. Follow against the odds on Apple podcasts, Amazon music, or wherever you're listening right now.

Snowden Edward Snowden NSA Matthew gore Guariglia National Security Agency saatchi art federal government electronic frontier foundation paranoia America New York City Saatchi Mike Corey Hollywood Apple Amazon
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

03:31 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"Again. As of 2022, Edward Snowden is still living in Moscow, and giving talks about civil liberties and surveillance. He and Lindsay mills married in 2017. And in 2020, the couple announced they were applying for Russian citizenship. Laura poitras would go on to release the documentary, citizen four, constructed mostly from footage she shot inside Snowden's Hong Kong hotel room. It was critically acclaimed, and won the Academy Award for best feature documentary in 2015. Partner Glenn greenwald also won a claim for his work. The Guardian was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for service journalism and recognition for greenwald's reporting on Edward Snowden and the NSA. The newspaper would share the prize with The Washington Post, whose reporter Barton gellman reported the same story on his own. But still, years after he blew the whistle on the NSA, Edward Snowden remains the subject of fierce debate. Many Americans consider him a traitor, who harmed national security. Others believe his warnings were prophetic, and highlighted the growing erosion of privacy on the Internet, and in everyday life. While that debate may never be settled, one thing is certain. Snowden's leaks have had a large impact on the United States government. In 2015, Congress passed a bipartisan bill aimed at ending the mass surveillance programs revealed by Snowden. The bill supporters called it a balanced approach to surveillance, arguing it would allow the NSA to collect necessary information to counter terrorism. While still respecting Americans privacy, bill's critics argued the reforms didn't go far enough. From wandering, this is episode four of Edward Snowden from American scam. In our next episode, I chat with Matthew gore aglia, a historian who studies policing and surveillance in the United States. We'll look at how online platforms like next door have ushered in a new era of mass surveillance while giving Americans a skewed understanding about crime in their communities. If you like our show, please give us a 5 star rating and leave a review. And be sure to tell your Friends. I also have two other podcasts you might like. American history tellers and business movers. Follow on Apple podcasts, Amazon music or wherever you're listening right now, or you can listen to new episodes early and ad free by subscribing to wander plus in Apple podcasts or in the wonder app. You'll also find some links and offers from our sponsors in the episode notes, supporting them helps us keep offering our shows for free. Another way you can support the show is by filling out a small survey at wondery dot com slash survey to tell us what topics we might cover next. You can also find us and me on Twitter, follow me at Lindsay a Graham, Lindsay with an a, middle initially, and thank you. If you'd like to learn more about Edward Snowden, we recommend the books no place to hide by Glenn greenwald. Permanent record by Edward Snowden, and the documentary citizen four direct by Laura portress. This episode contains reenactments and dramatized details. And while in most cases, we can't know exactly what was said. All our dramatizations are based on historical research. American scandal is hosted, edited, and executive produced by me, Lindsey Graham for airship. Audio editing, my Molly Bach, sound designed by Derek Paris, music by Lindsey Graham. This episode is written by Austin reckless, edited by Christina malls burger, our senior producer is Gabe ribbon. Executive producers are Stephanie Jen's, Jenny Lauer backman, and Marshall Louis for wondering.

Edward Snowden NSA Lindsay mills Laura poitras Snowden's Hong Kong hotel room Barton gellman Snowden Glenn greenwald Matthew gore aglia greenwald Pulitzer Prize Academy Award Moscow The Guardian The Washington Post United States government Apple Congress Lindsay Laura portress
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

08:18 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"1st, 2013 in Moscow, Russia. Edward Snowden steps out of the main terminal of the airport, and lifts his head toward the sun, shutting his eyes. With a giant grin stone takes a deep breath of air, actual outdoor air, not chilled and recycled airport air, but heavy, and humid, smelling like garbage, real air. And for snow and that smell is almost a religious experience. Snowden runs a hand through his long, scraggly beard, and gazes out at his surroundings. Somehow he just spent over a month living inside an airport terminal. It was a looping nightmare that felt like purgatory. Snowden wasn't sure it would ever end. But then he got the news. Snowden was granted temporary asylum by the Russian government. He'd have only a year, but he was free, free to walk out of the airport. Free to fill his lungs with outdoor air. Snowden steps into a car, which is about to shuttle him to a secure location where he'll start his new life. He buckles his seat belt, and Snowden looks over at Sarah Harrison. The adviser from WikiLeaks, who's been with him this whole time. Kind of incredible, isn't it? Just being outside. I think after this, I'm gonna go on some kind of camping trip, you know? Commune with nature and get very far from any kind of fast food. You sure you don't want one more order of fries before we leave? I think it would actually literally kill me. Oh my God, me too. Snowden looks out at the window as the car speeds out of the airport. So, Sarah, sometimes I'm not good with words. Something wrong? No, nothing's wrong. I just. I guess I wanted to thank you. We're staying with me the whole time. Of course. I mean, all joking aside, it really was my pleasure. We had to make sure you got out of Hong Kong that you were safe. Yeah, well, I'm not sure I'm safe quite yet. My own government thinks I'm a traitor. They wanted to. I'm sure the CIA could just take me out. They could easily make it look like an accident. That's probably true, but I don't think that's the real threat. You know, Russia could always change its mind. Maybe they want to curry favor with the U.S. because of something unrelated. I don't know, some new tree or something. And then one day they could decide to just extradite you in some kind of deal. Yeah, I know. I'm not trying to get you down. I know you want to live a normal life like everyone, but I'm saying this because you're going back out into the real world. And you've got to be honest with yourself and honest about your situation. Oh, I am. I promise. But you know what's going to be hard is doing it alone. I don't have Lindsey or my family, and I won't have you. You've been by my side for 6 weeks, and Sarah, I can't thank you enough. Very few people in the world would have done what you did. Yeah, well, even fewer would have done what you did in. Your brave man. I'm honored to have played a small part in your journey. Snowden nod silently. It looks back out the window at the passing traffic. All this time, Snowden knew a life in exile was a possibility. But staring it in the face is something else entirely. He's about to be marooned in a foreign country, thousands of miles from home. And he doesn't know what he's going to do. How he'll pass the time. However, find a means to support himself. How he'll work towards a purpose. He's so far away from home, and everything he ever cared about. Its early 2014, half a year later. Edward Snowden sets down a bouquet of flowers on the dining room table and looks around his apartment in Moscow. It's a small and humble space, and even though this isn't the life he dreamed of. The apartment is at least starting to feel a little more familiar. It's a meaningful development, because when Snowden finally left the airport, he wasn't sure he'd ever carve out a good life in Moscow. But Snowden didn't despair. Over the past 6 months, he'd been trying to live deliberately and with purpose. He started giving talks on the Internet, and he's been speaking out about civil liberties and online privacy. It's a bit of a funny turn of events. Snow always thought of himself as a guy who just liked computers. But after giving talks to academics and intellectuals, Snowden has realized that being an advocate feels like a real calling. But he won't deny there's still a gaping hole in his life. Every day he pines terribly for Lindsay mills, the girlfriend he left behind. Over the last few months they've spoken online, but it's been stilted and awkward. Snowden would have understood if she never forgave him for the way he upended their lives. And he wouldn't have been surprised if she never wanted to see him again, but apparently their life together is not entirely over. Mules has agreed to come all the way to Russia to see Snowden in person. In any minute now, she's supposed to arrive. Snowden is rearranging the furniture in his living room. When there's a knock on the door. His heart starts racing. And suddenly, he feels like his feet are weighted down, stuck to the floor. But Snowden manages to will himself forward and open the door. And there, standing before him, is Lindsay mills. Her light brown hair is longer than before, but her eyes are still the same, striking shade of green. Snowden forgets to breathe as he looks at mills. And for a minute, neither of them says a word. Ben mills reaches out her hand and runs it down Snowden's face. Her touch sends sparks through his entire body. And before he can stop himself, he whispers that he loves her. But as soon as those three words escape from his mouth, Snowden feels the pang of regret. He shouldn't have said that. It's too much. It's too soon. He should have taken it slower. But that mills drops her bag and wraps Snowden in her arms. He stunned at first, but then he returns the hug, holding on to her tight. Two remains still in silent. For the first time in almost a year, Edward Snowden feels at home. A few months later, Edward Snowden glides onto a stage in Vancouver, Canada. He smiles and greets Chris Anderson, the head of the lecture series, ted-talks, then Snowden pivots, and looks out into the audience. He smiles a little self consciously, and gives a wave as the crowd breaks into a raucous applause. Snowden is about to address the audience, but there's a glitch, and he freezes. Snowden mothers occurs. No one can hear him, and he knows why. Snowden is not in Vancouver. He's appearing remotely from Moscow, using a device he calls the snow bot. It's essentially a computer monitor with a camera mounted on top of a robot. Snowden controls the machine using his laptop, and he can make it zip across the stage and turn 360°. It's a much better option when Snowden is giving a talk because it creates the illusion that somehow he's actually in the room. What the technology is far from perfect, especially when Snowden's Internet connections on the Fritz. So Snowden sets Tapping his desk waiting, hoping his connection comes back. Finally, it does, and Snowden can once again see the crowd in Vancouver. Snowden guides his robot remotely around the stage, and then he turns to Anderson, the head of ted-talks, and the two kick-off a conversation. Anderson begins by remarking that Snowden has been called many things over the past 9 months, a whistleblower, a traitor, a hero. How would Snowden describe himself? Snowden doesn't mince his words. Who I am, really doesn't matter at all. What really matters here is the kind of government we want. The kind of Internet we want. The kind of relationship between people and society. And that's what I'm hoping the debate will move towards. And we've seen that increasing over time. Snowden looks out at the audience and sees people listening, gnawing, thinking. And he smiles to himself. This was never about him. The point was to start a debate about privacy, freedom, and government transparency. It took a lot to get the conversation going, and Snowden's life will never be the same. But as he looked out over the audience, Snowden knows that all the risks were worth it. People are talking. The conversation is going to continue, and it won't stop until governments stop hiding their secrets, and the Internet is free once

Snowden Edward Snowden Moscow Russian government Sarah Harrison Lindsay mills Russia Sarah WikiLeaks Ben mills CIA Lindsey Hong Kong mills Vancouver U.S. Chris Anderson ted Anderson Canada
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

08:16 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"Security adviser, Rhodes knows that Castro is central to one of president Obama's plans, trying to normalize relations with Cuba. The two countries have been estranged for over 50 years, and Obama made it priority to chart a new course. But it's a tall order after decades of hostility between the two countries. But the whole project became even more difficult when Edward Snowden entered the picture. There have been rumors that Cuba is considering letting in the American spy, and that would shield Snowden from extradition and allow him to remain free. The Obama administration does not want that to happen. Snowden is responsible for stealing government secrets. As far as the administration sees it, the former NSA contractor is a menace, and perhaps a traitor. He jeopardized national security and complicated American relations with China and Russia. So the administration is determined to hold Snowden accountable for his crimes and have him sent home, where the government can try his case in court. But to make that happen, advisers like roads are going to have to work the diplomatic back channels to make sure Snowden isn't granted political asylum in any other country. After everyone has settled down in the conference room, rose corners Alejandro Castro and asks for a private word. The Cuban nods, and then the two walk out into the hallway. When they're out of earshot of the others, Rhodes says he has something delicate he has to discuss. Castro smiles and wonders aloud if it has something to do with a certain young intelligence worker. Currently trapped in an airport in Moscow. Rhodes pauses, trying to measure his words. He can't explicitly tell Castro to refuse Edward Snowden's entry into Cuba. That's not how diplomacy works. You can't tell a sovereign nation what to do. So Rhodes takes an indirect approach, saying he has a message from president Obama. The president wants to remind Cuba that some people in the United States are opposed to a new path forward, that they don't want to restore relations between the two countries. And of course, the status quo is doing nothing for Cuba's economy road says. President Obama would like to normalize their relationship, allowing Americans to travel to Cuba and for the two countries to trade with each other. But Rhodes says in order for the president to continue with these negotiations, he needs Cuba to show it's a good partner, and building that trust will be a challenge if Cuba accepts an enemy of the United States. Rhodes pauses, waiting for Castro to reply to this implied threat. If Cuba welcomes Snowden into their country, Obama will scrap the plans to normalize relations. Castro smiles and knots. And then he says he'll take the information under consideration. It's a vague answer, but Rhodes knows that Castro is well burst and diplomatic doublespeak. He's not going to commit to anything on the spot. But roads two is well versed in diplomatic double speak, and believes he has a read on Castro's response. Cuba is not going to allow Edward Snowden to enter their country, and soon the so called whistleblower is going to be trapped in Russia and out of options. It's July 1st, 2013 in Moscow. Edward Snowden bites into a Burger King whopper, leans back and takes in the scenery at the city's major international airport. It's the same as it was yesterday, and the day before, and the day before that. People walking around with luggage, babies crying, travelers trying to get from one place to another as quickly as they can. Snowden can only dream of being in that position, able to move freely and go where he wants. But instead, for the last week, he's been stuck at this airport in Moscow. He was unwilling to cooperate with Russian intelligence, and refused to hand over any government secrets. And so the Russians played hardball. They refused to let him out of the airport, not without a U.S. passport, or entry papers from another country. So for days, Snowden has been living at the airport. Homeless and surviving on cheeseburgers from Burger King. It's been a bit grim. And Snowden can't figure out a way forward. He applied for asylum in over 20 countries, including Ecuador. But every one of them has said no, either outright or by saying he has to apply in person. Snowden is not sure what to do. And neither is Sarah Harrison, the adviser to WikiLeaks, and Snowden's partner in this journey. So for now, all Snowden can do is just pass the time in the airport until something happens. Snowden takes another bite of his burger and turns to Harrison. Sarah, yeah. You know, I appreciate everything you've done. And I can't tell you how hard this would have been without you. But you know you can go home. You don't have to stay with me. Well, except I do. I told you before I'm helping you out because it's the right thing to do. So I'm sticking by your side until someone grants you asylum. But I can't figure out a plan. I mean, how long is it gonna take? How many more days am I just gonna sit here in this no man's land eating weird Russian fast food? I mean, it says Burger King, but I can tell you it's not. And we'll figure something out. I promise. But I don't have a passport. I don't want to make a deal with the Russians. No one wants me. What do I do? How do I get out of here? Snowden fixes his eyes on Harrison, feeling frustrated and angry. Like, he can't hold her gaze. She's distracted, looking at a TV. Add this could be it. Well, I'm sorry, what? Your ticket out of the airport. Way to make your free man. What are you talking about? Look, look, right now. You see the TV? That's the president of Bolivia, Evo Morales. He was here in Russia. It was a regular trip, but but here's the thing. Morales is one of your boosters. He spoken out and says he supports you, and that pissed off in U.S. government. So how's that helping me? It helps you because now you have leverage. Apparently, the president oblivia was in the air, but the U.S. and its allies refused to let him fly over Europe. So they grounded his flight and started searching his plane. And you know why? Because they thought you might be on board. Of course you're here eating counterfeit cheeseburgers in an airport, but the whole thing is a huge embarrassment for Russia. Well, hold on because they can't conduct diplomacy with anyone who supports me. Exactly, and that's the plan. You don't need to trade government secrets to Russia. You just have to convince them it's in their own self interest to give you asylum. It's less disruptive to their country. And maybe they wouldn't mind playing hardball with the United States. Snowden choose his lip as he thinks this over. Can he really convince Russia just to let him be? Convince them that as a free man, he'd be enough of a thorn in the side of the United States to be worth it to give him asylum. Without having to trade government secrets. It's the night of July 2nd, 2013 in Honolulu, Hawaii. Lindsey mills grabs a can of lighter fluid and approaches a metal trash can. Inside the bin are the last of Edward Snowden's possessions. It's not much. Some socks, a few photos, a Rubik's Cube, the FBI took everything else that mattered, including Snowden's computers and papers. Anything else that could fetch a few dollars mill sold at garage sale. It's been a bizarre time. She's been staying with a friend in San Diego, trying to live a normal life, but at some point, she knew she'd have to come back to Hawaii, and end this chapter of her life, before heading back home to Maryland, trying to start again. So mill shakes out the bottle of lighter fluid onto Snowden's belongings and grabs a match. She strikes it and drops it in the bin, sending a billow of flames leaping into the air. Mill steps back and watches as fire dances and crackles. Plumes of black smoke rising into the night air. It's a cathartic experience, saying goodbye to everything that might remind her of her life with snow. She thinks it's a step she needs to take to move on. But even though mills is trying to start a new life, if she's being honest with herself, she can't stop thinking about Snowden. She still wondering what's going to happen to him, whether he'll survive, or whether he's really going to spend the rest of his life in prison.

Snowden Edward Snowden Cuba Rhodes Castro Obama administration Russia Alejandro Castro Moscow United States president Obama Obama Sarah Harrison NSA Harrison President Obama oblivia China WikiLeaks Ecuador
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

07:10 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"Sitting around a conference table or a half dozen men with buzz cuts and military uniforms. At the center of the table is a folder with a gleaming insignia, showing two golden eagles and a sword and shield. Snowden knows that image. It's the symbol of the FSB, Russia's intelligence agency. All at once, Snowden realizes what's happening. Russia's intelligence agency is about to offer a deal. They're going to ask Snowden to hand over top secret U.S. intelligence and in exchange, they'll give Snowden asylum in Russia. Snowden knows that if he accepts the deal, he might be a free man, but living in Russia. He still has designs to take his passport, get back in line and continue on to Ecuador. So he just has to figure out how to tell the FSB, no thank you. Noticing Snowden's hesitation, one of the Russian agents, gestures toward a chair. Mister Snowden, please take a seat. We're happy to have you in Moscow. Well, thank you for the welcome, but I want to be clear. I know who you are. And I have no intention of cooperating. No, no, no, please, we would never ask you to do that. We want to help you. That's very kind, but I'm just trying to make my flight to Havana. Your flight, oh, you haven't heard. No, heard what? The Asian exchanges a look with his colleagues. Mister Snowden, your passport is no longer valid. No, no, that's not right. I don't believe you. Well, it's true, John Kerry, your country's Secretary of State, revoked your passport, and all of the airlines have been told not to let you fly. That can't be true. Snowden turns to Harrison with a look of shock, and immediately she takes out her laptop and starts looking for information. A minute later, she turns the screen to Snowden and shows him a news report. It's true. His U.S. passport was canceled. Russian agent smiles. So, mister Snowden, what will you do now? Well, again, I'm not cooperating with you. Look, I've been granted safe passage to Ecuador. It doesn't matter if I have a U.S. passport. I would like to leave this room and board my flight to Havana. Well, before you do that, maybe there is a small piece of information you might want to share with us. No, no, I'm sorry. I can't do that. Well, then mister Snowden, perhaps we need to just sit here a little while longer. And maybe you will change your mind. Snowden turns to Harrison, hoping she has some kind of plan, a way out. But she looks just as flabbergasted and confused as he does. Snowden doesn't get it. Why would the United States government leave him stranded in a country like Russia? He has a trove of government secrets, exactly the kind the Russian government would love to get its hands on, and if Snowden did trade with the Russians, he could deal a serious blow to America's national security. It doesn't seem to add up. But no matter what the real explanation might be, snow is sure about one thing. He is out of options. And he's not anytime soon, getting on a plane to Cuba. 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American scandal is sponsored by the free to download mobile game, June's journey. I love mysteries, but in that very statement is one itself. Why? Where did my love for whodunits come from? I thought back and I decided it must have been the early PBS mystery shows. I'll never forget the Edward gorey animated intro and host Vincent Price, so I love mysteries. And if you do too, June's journey is a game full of them. It's a hidden object game that has you searching for the clues needed to solve mystery after mystery across thousands of vivid scenes, and with new chapters every week, there's always a new case waiting to be cracked, but there are new features, too, like the detective club that allows you to chat and play with or against other players, or even join a detective league to really put your skills to the test. And then there's the new memoir feature. 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Snowden Mister Snowden Russia mister Snowden America FSB NFL Ecuador Havana Russian government Harrison nutra John Kerry Moscow United States government Virginia Jenny Craig Cuba
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

08:12 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"When Edward Snowden went public with his revelations about the NSA, he immediately became a target of the federal government. Snowden believed he was acting in the public's interest, but federal officials made the case that he'd broken the law and that he deserved a stiff penalty. Snowden knew that if he returned to the United States, there was a strong possibility he could spend the rest of his life in prison. It was even a chance he could face the death penalty, and with government officials working to have Snowden extradited to the U.S.. The whistleblower decided to go on the run, beginning a journey that he hoped would lead to South America. This is episode four, exile. It's the morning of June 23rd, 2013. On a city street in San Diego, Lindsay mills is driving around the block looking for a parking spot. Mills richer teeth as every spot is taken. If she doesn't find something soon, she'll be late for her exercise class. So mills hits the gas and turns a corner, looking for a spot somewhere on another block. Mills continues to scan the streets, looking left and right. But when she glances in her rearview mirror, mills goes rigid with shock. As a black sedan, trailing two cars behind her. It's the same kind of car that's been following her for days, one that almost certainly belongs to the FBI or something. Mills speeds up, trying to lose the tail. But the sedan keeps following her, always staying just a couple of cars behind. Male shakes her head. She's tired of this. She can't believe this is what her life has become. Just weeks ago, everything was normal. She and her boyfriend Edward Snowden were in a happy relationship, living what they felt was an easy life in Honolulu, Hawaii. But everything changed. After Snowden leaked government secrets, almost overnight, mill's life was turned upside down. Her photo appeared in the news. FBI agents began watching her 24 hours a day. They even brought her in for questioning, convinced that she was a co-conspirator, and Snowden's so called espionage. Mills denied having anything to do with the NSA or any government secrets. But no matter what she said, the government remained convinced she was tied up in Snowden's activities. Ever since federal agents haven't stopped following her, monitoring her every move. And if that weren't bad enough, the press got a hold of some photos, mills posted online, trying to look sexy. The Internet immediately went wild. People started posting a flood of spiteful and mean comments about her and her appearance. Altogether, it's been enough to make mills feel like she's losing her mind. It's the reason she signed up for this acrobatics class in downtown San Diego. She needs to let off some steam and clear her head. She's hoping that after she's gotten some mental distance from everything, she'll be able to start piecing her life back together. So mills continues driving down the street, watching the government car trail behind her. She's about to gun it to try to lose the car when her cell phone rings. It's Wendy. Edward Snowden's mother. Mills has always liked her. But over the past month, they've grown incredibly close. Bonded by the experience of being connected to the world's most wanted man. So mills answers the call. When Snowden's mother asks how she's been doing, mills doesn't hold back. She says she wants to be able to grab a coffee without being recognized. Wants to be able to drive down the street without being followed. She's worried that her house has been bugged. Maybe even this phone call is being recorded. It's all too much. And mills is struggling to understand how Snowden could have done this to her. Mills can hear Snowden's mother choking up on the other end of the line. Maybe mills laid it on too thick. She knows that Snowden's family is suffering just as much as she is. But after a long pause, Snowden's mother says she understands exactly how mills is feeling. It's been a very hard time. But Wendy Snowden says mills needs to remember what's most important. Her son wouldn't have done this if he hadn't thought it all the way through. He's careful and deliberate. He must have decided the risks to himself and his loved ones were worth it. Mills knows Snowden's mother's right. And she's glad everyone is talking about these secret government programs. But mill still can't shake the feeling of betrayal. She's proud of Snowden. What her life also feels like it's been ruined. Meals admits all her conflicting feelings just Snowden's mother. And then before she can stop herself, she starts to cry. As mills wipes away her tears, she can hear Snowden's mother sniffling too. For a moment, the two women remain quiet, lost in their shared grief. But Wendy Snowden breaks the silence. She reminds mills that there's something to be thankful for. They have each other, and they're not alone. It's June 23rd, 2013 in Hong Kong, and Edward Snowden is sitting in an airplane, gripping his arm rest. The plane still parked at the gate, and snowed in the staring, nervously, as the other passengers board the plane. Snowden feels like his body is in revolt. His mouth is dry, his stomach is in knots. He knows that every second they remain parked at the gate, he could be arrested, hauled away and thrown into prison. It's a miracle that hasn't already happened. Snowden managed to make it through check in and passport control and boarded a plane bound for Moscow. There are no direct flights from Hong Kong to Ecuador, so Snowden has to take a circuitous route. He plans to fly first to Russia, then to Cuba and then Venezuela. Finally, he'll fly on to Ecuador, where he's hoping he'll be granted asylum. But that multi step plan all depends on first getting out of Hong Kong, and Snowden isn't sure that's going to happen. Snowden turns to the neighboring aisle seat, where Sarah Harris is flipping through a catalog. Despite his initial misgivings, snow's Glaad, Sarah's joined him. As an adviser to WikiLeaks, she's been an invaluable source of information, giving him updates about the Obama administration, and their plans for Snowden if he ever returns to the United States. But he won't be going back if this plane would just take off. Snowden keeps Tapping his foot, waiting for the gate to close. Everyone is seated, he doesn't know why the plane isn't moving yet. And at that moment, Snowden falls into a terrifying daydream, the police driving down the tarmac, storming the plane, throwing him in handcuffs. It's enough to send Snowden into a mile panic attack. But then without any fanfare, the flight attendants close the door. They welcome the passengers on their flight to Moscow, go over safety procedures, and then the plane lurches back from the gate. The engines start to whine, and the plane jolts forward, going faster and faster down the runway. Snowden shuts his eyes, feeling the vibrations through his seat. And finally, the plane pitches into the air, and Snowden feels a strange, disembodied joy of being free. Later that day, Edward Snowden squints as he makes his way through the airport in Moscow, Russia. Snowden is following a customs agent through a first class lounge. It's empty and quiet. Nothing out of the ordinary. But as they walk through a long hallway and pass through a set of double doors, Snowden suddenly gets a bad feeling. Just minutes ago, Snowden was standing in line with Sarah Harrison, waiting to get a stamp on his passport. Just a simple step in the long trip across the world from Hong Kong to Ecuador. But while Snowden was in line, one of the customs agents approached him and Harrison, and led them away. Snowden assumed the agent was just going to check their bags and send them back in line. But now, as the agent leads them into a brightly lit room, Snowden realizes this is nothing ordinary.

Snowden mills Edward Snowden Mills Lindsay mills Wendy Snowden NSA FBI United States San Diego South America federal government Hong Kong Honolulu mill Hawaii Ecuador Wendy Sarah Harris Obama administration
"snowden" Discussed on Opening Arguments

Opening Arguments

02:25 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on Opening Arguments

"Him. He's about to carry out a dangerous plan. Snowden is going to blow the whistle on the United States government. He's going to reveal that the NSA has been conducting mass surveillance on American citizens without their knowledge. Snowden firmly believes the public deserves to know the truth that American democracy could be at risk if the country's intelligence agencies are left unchecked. But Snowden is also aware that doing the right thing could land him in prison. So he has to be careful. He has to get back to his office with this old PC, a computer that's central to his plan. And if he sees anyone, Snowden has to make sure they don't ask too many questions. Snowden rounds a corner when suddenly he spots a director of IT. Snowden looks left and right, his heart pounding. But there's nowhere to escape. Hey Ed, I was just looking for you. Hi. What's up? Calling nothing serious. You've been running you a little sweaty. Ron, no, I'm allergic to exercise. Okay, but you're doing all right? Yeah, I'm fine. I'm just a sweaty guy. All right, well, anyways. I've been getting reports of an Internet slowdown. Just wanted to know if you guys were having issues too. Just fine. I think, you know, thanks for checking, though. See you around. Snowden begins to walk forward, but the IT director lays a hand on his shoulder. Well, hold on, hold on. What do you got there? One of the old dells? Yeah, yeah, actually it is. I thought we got rid of those when we upgraded. But it's funny, there's a whole closet of them. Why is that funny? What are you doing with it? Oh. You know, just no one's mine, races, trying to come up with a good response. Stealing government secrets. The IT director pauses, giving Snowden a long and skeptical look. And for a moment, Snowden is certain he's about to get caught. But then the IT director bursts out laughing. Ed, you. You are a weird one. All right, I'll see you around. The director collapsed Snowden on the shoulder and walks away. And once he's out of sight, Snowden exhales and relief. That was close. Snowden was certain his plan was about to go up in flames. But somehow, he survived. And now Snowden just needs to finish carrying out the plan. Snowden shifts the computer in his forearms and hustles to his office. There, he shuts the door and sets down the old desktop machine. Snowden gazes at

Snowden United States government NSA Ron Ed
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

08:22 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"10th, 2013 in Hong Kong. Edward Snowden is standing in front of a mirror, staring at himself, his heart pounding. He looks like a complete stranger. His facial hair is gone, his head is shaved. His eyes are a different color. Thanks to the pair of contacts he just put in. Snowden knows that if he ran into one of his friends on the street, they may not recognize him. But a disguise is not a plan. And that's a problem. Because with the pressure mounting to escape from the hotel, Snowden is going to need a way out. Something more than just a rudimentary disguise. By now, the entire world knows what Snowden looks like. They know his name, his backstory, and everyone knows that Snowden has been hiding out in Hong Kong. He revealed everything on camera. He wanted to be transparent and explain why he did what he did. But his honesty came at a cost. Members of the press immediately fanned out across Hong Kong, figuring out where Snowden was staying. Since then, they've been staking out the hotel, waiting for a chance to interview the now infamous whistleblower. This whole time, Snowden has remained tucked away in his hotel room. He knows that if he even walks out into the hallway, he could quickly be arrested and extradited to the U.S.. If that happens he'll almost certainly face charges of espionage. But he also knows he can't spend the rest of his life hiding in a hotel. Somehow he's going to have to get out and avoid the press and the police, then get somewhere safe. He figures out his next move. So Snowden walks away from the mirror and flips open his laptop. He begins chatting online with Glenn greenwald, who's hiding out in a hotel room of his own, along with two attorneys who agreed to represent snow. But greenwald says he has a plan that could allow Snowden to escape unnoticed. It's a simple plan greenwald said, but risky. The press has somehow managed to get green walls room number. And now there's a horde of journalists standing outside greenwald's room, waiting to get an interview. Every time greenwald opens the door, he's assaulted with camera flashes, but greenwall tells Snowden. They can also use this situation to their advantage. They can create a diversion that would allow Snowden to escape from the hotel. Green wall will open his door and step out into the hallway. The press will swarm around him, and greenwald will then walk down to the hotel lobby, leading the pack of journalists down with him. Once the coast is clear, the two attorneys will head over to Snowden's room, and together they'll sneak out of the hotel and head to a bridge that leads to a mall next door. Once they're safely hidden, anonymous in the crowd of them all. They'll make their way out onto the street and get somewhere safe. Snowden bites his lip. It does not sound like much of a plan, and they could very well get caught. But greenwald asked Snowden if they have any other options. The attorneys have a car waiting for them and they've arranged for Snowden to stay at a safe house. They just need to get out of the hotel and right now before it's too late. Snowden lets out a deep breath. Greenwald is right about that. He can't wait any longer. Otherwise, he's bound to be arrested and hauled off to prison. So Snowden tells greenwald that the plan is on, and it's time to move. Four days later, Edward Snowden stretches out on the floor of a crowded apartment in Hong Kong. He crosses his eyes and sticks out his tongue, and as he pitches his voice with a silly warble, a young girl across the room erupts in laughter. Snowden grants. It's been a rough few days, but this, making a little girl laugh as a bright spot. Snowden contorts his face, getting more giggles out of the young girl. And as he leans back against a wall stone looks out over this ramshackle apartment, a maze that his life has changed so dramatically. Right now, Snowden is tucked away in a safe house in one of the poorest neighborhoods in Hong Kong. His lawyer found the spot and said Snowden would be safe there. So far, the plan seems to be working. Everyone is looking for Snowden and 5 star hotels. They don't suspect he's living in a place the size of a shoebox, or that he's huddled together with 5 roommates from Sri Lanka and the Philippines. Like Snowden, these adults and children are waiting to see if Hong Kong will grant them asylum. It's a difficult state of legal limbo. And as someone who plans everything down to the last detail, Snowden is struggling with his current situation. He knows he has to apply for asylum as a political refugee, but before he can do that, the American government has to charge him with a crime until that happens, all Snowden can do is sit around and wait. Snowden makes another face at the little girl and gets another big laugh. Even though the lodging is poor, he likes these people. He relates to their pain. Snowden sticks out his tongue, and is about to make another cartoonish noise. When his phone rings, it's his lawyer. Hey, Robert, what's the latest? Hey, I've got some news. The government has now officially charged you with three felonies. Theft of government property, unauthorized communication of defense information, and the third is unauthorized communication of classified intelligence. Basically, everything we expected. Okay. Yeah. I mean, I got to admit it feels a little different when it's actually real. So what's their next move? They're going to try and get Hong Kong to extradite. No, not yet. And that means we've got some time. So I think we need to plan. Now, obviously, you could return to the United States and face trial. No, out of the question. I've already admitted to the crimes they've accused me of. They'll just lock me up. Well, and I wasn't advocating for a trial. I'm just presenting the options. Okay. Yeah, sorry to snap. What's option two? Option two is we apply for asylum in Hong Kong. We'd argue that the U.S. is charging you with a political crime, and therefore you're a political refugee. In that case, you could not be extradited. But I have to admit, it's a long shot. Still worth a try. And if that doesn't work? Well, we're reaching out to other countries. Trying to see if anyone's willing to grant you asylum. That sounds like a long process. Yeah, it may be. What do I do in the meantime? Well, for now, just sit tight in the safe house. Try to get some rest. But Ed, I wouldn't be doing my job if I didn't say something to you. You need to start getting mentally prepared. If Hong Kong denies you asylum, they will honor an extradition request. And if that happens, we're going to have to move very fast. Snowden nods, trying to absorb this grave possibility. His lawyer isn't saying it explicitly, but if Hong Kong won't grant him asylum, he's going to have to go on the run. He's facing a potential life sentence back in the United States, and he's not yet ready to give up and march into a prison. So right now, Snowden's only option is to wait. He hopes at least one country will stand up to the United States and make a definitive statement about democracy and the importance of whistleblowers. But if that doesn't happen, or if this continues to drag out, it's known may have to take his chances and flee, going somewhere far from Hong Kong, and somewhere even farther from the United States. From wondering, this is episode three of Edward Snowden from American scandal. In our next episode, Snowden flees Hong Kong, he faces unexpected complications as the U.S. government works to bring him to trial. If you like our show, please give us a 5 star rating and leave a review. And be sure to tell your Friends. I also have two other podcasts you might like. American history tellers and business movers. Follow on Apple podcasts, Amazon music or wherever you're listening right now, or you can listen to new episodes early and ad free by subscribing to 1° plus in Apple podcasts or in the wonder app. You'll also find some links and offers from our sponsors in the episode notes, supporting them helps us keep offering our shows for free. Another way you can support the show is by filling out a small survey at 1° dot com slash survey to tell us what topics we might cover next. You can also find us and me on Twitter, follow me at Lindsay a Graham, Lindsay with an a middle initially and thank you.

Snowden greenwald Hong Kong Edward Snowden United States Glenn greenwald Greenwald American government Sri Lanka Philippines Robert Ed Apple Amazon Lindsay Twitter Graham
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

01:37 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"Guardian. Mills suddenly goes weak with fear. She doesn't know what's happened. But judging by her friend's voice, it sounds like something terrible. Mills races into the bedroom and crabs her laptop. She finds the newspaper's website and when it loads, she gasps. There at the top of the page is a photo of Edward Snowden. He looks pale and tired, but there's no doubt it's him. Mills clicks a video and watches a Snowden explains why he blew the whistle on the NSA, and his programs of mass surveillance. I'm no different from anybody else. I don't have special skills. I'm just another guy who sits there day to day in the office, watches what's happening and goes, this is something that's not our place to decide. The public needs to decide whether these programs or policies are right or wrong. Mills continues watching the video stunned. She can't make sense of this. The video, the news coverage, it's also surreal. And soon her phone begins to buzz with another call. Mills ignores it. But then the text messages start coming in. One after another, an endless torrent of chiming notifications. Mill turns her phone on silent and continues staring at the face of her boyfriend, who's sitting in some hotel room, far away in Hong Kong. It's too much. And while mills is proud of stuff, she's also furious and scared. Snowden just confessed to a crime. She thinks it's moral and righteous, but it's still a crime. And so large an event making international headlines. There's no chance their lives will ever

Mills Edward Snowden Snowden NSA Mill Hong Kong mills
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"June 3rd, 2013, early in the evening in Hong Kong, and Edward Snowden is standing by a window in a hotel room staring out at the city. The sauna setting over the horizon, and down below traffic has begun to grow snarled, with cars honking and pedestrian swarming through the streets. Snowden turns away from the chaotic city life, and gazes across his small hotel room, which has grown messy and chaotic in its own ways. On the other side of the room, the documentary filmmaker, Laura poitras, is packing up her camera gear, spread all across the floor littering the ground. Next to her, Glenn greenwald, reporter for The Guardian, is hunched over his laptop, typing rapidly, only pausing to take a bite of something from room service. Snow just stands there. He's exhausted. At this point, there's not much more he can do. All day, he's been sitting with greenwald, getting interviewed on camera. The two have been discussing why Snowden smuggled out top secret documents from the NSA, and leaf them to these two journalists. Overall, Snowden thought he did a good job. He explained the citizens deserve to know the truth about their government. That the NSA surveillance of regular Americans is a threat to their freedom and democracy. The interviews went on for hours, but were a culmination of a plan that was months in the making. But now it's all done. As he paces around the hotel room, Snowden realizes the story is largely out of his hands. Poitras is going to stitch together a film, and greenwald is going to write and publish his stories. The world is about to know the truth about the NSA, but Snowden is not entirely ready to step aside, because he still needs some assurances from the journalists. He wants to make sure they're going to do their job responsibly. Snowden steps over a tray of dirty plates, and sidles off the green wall. So Glenn, we covered a lot. What do you think you're going to write about first? Wow. I'm going to write three or four articles, I think. Send them off to my editors. Then we'll figure out what we're going to publish first. All right. That makes sense. But look, I want to remind you, I reached out because I trusted you with his story. Oh, I know that. I mean, you're both good journalists. You both have good ethics. Well, thank you, Ed, but where is this coming from? What's going on? Snowden taps his hand against his chest as he prepares his next word. Well, Glenn, I just. I want you to promise me that you're going to vet all the documents I hand it over. Oh, you don't have to worry about that. We'll do our job. I'm serious. The public has to know the truth, but I need a promise. This information can't put any innocent people at risk. And I'm telling you, don't worry. I've dealt with sensitive material. I know what I'm doing. Okay, but I don't think you should be so cavalier. No one has ever dealt with anything like this, not at this scale. We can't afford any mistakes. And we're not going to make any. No, no, you have to listen to me. If we don't do this right, real people could get hurt. And if that happens, it wouldn't just be a tragedy for them. It would kill the story. The government could justifiably say I endangered people's lives. And then everyone's attention will suddenly shift. No one's going to care that the government is violating the constitution. Not when they think I did something reckless. I hear that. We're on the same team. You have my word. I'll be careful. Okay. Fine. But also, this can't drag on forever. Officially, I took medical leave to come here, but my bosses at the NSA are already emailing me, trying to figure out what's going on. Pretty soon, they're going to realize something's up. I want them to get a jump on the story and find some way to discredit me. Greenwald's size. Ah, well, I understand the urgency, but had listened to what you're saying. You want me to be careful, but aggressive. Thorough, but fast. I know. It's a lot. Of course it's a lot. And I'm sure you're full of a million emotions right now, but you have to remember something too. You can trust us to do our job. We'll do it the right way. Yeah, okay. And hey, ad, look at me. I want you to do something. Take a deep breath, okay? Look me in the eyes, and tell me, honestly, do you want to do this? Are you ready? Snow invites his lower lip as he gazes at the reporter. Greenwald is right. He's full of a million conflicting emotions all at war all leaving Snowden feeling dizzy and overwhelmed. But Snowden didn't come this far to back out. So he nods tell screen Walt, he's ready. Greenwald rises, claps nodding on the shoulder. It's game time. Soon, the guardian is going to start publishing stories, and when they do, millions of people around the world are going to wake up to a shocking truth.

Snowden NSA Edward Snowden Laura poitras greenwald Poitras Glenn greenwald Glenn The Guardian Hong Kong Greenwald Ed government Walt
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

04:48 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"Before the police find him and lock him up. Snowden turns over in bed, as mill bats at the clock without opening her eyes. Managing to turn it off. As she drifts back to sleep, Snowden slides over and wraps his arm around her. And you're squishing me. Oh, I'm sorry. I'm just gonna miss you. It's only a couple days. I know, but you're the best person I've ever met in my life. Mills opens her eyes to crack and squints its Snowden. What's up with you? I'm just been difficult to be with lately. I know that. It's okay. I'm used to it. I know, but I am sorry. And what's going on? Are you sure everything's okay? Yeah, it's fine. I just love you. You know that, right? No matter what, I love you. I do know that. And I love you too. Mules rises and kisses Snowden on the cheek. But I gotta get up or I'll miss my flight. Let me give you another squeeze. Add seriously, you gotta let go. I gotta get ready. You're the one who said I deserve some time away with my friends. I did. I did, and you're right. Get up, go. Have a great time. I will. And I'll see you when I get back. Mills gets up and starts getting dressed. And as he lies in bed watching, Snowden tries to hold it together. He still can't believe he's doing this. A few minutes later, mills is ready to go. She heads to the front door and says goodbye. Snowden tells her one last time that he loves her. She says she loves him too. And then mills opens the door, steps out and walks away. Snowden shuts his eyes, and before he can help it, he erupts into loud, wrenching sobs. He's done a lot of hard things over the past year, but this was the hardest. His old life, the life he loved, is over. And in two days, Snowden is going to start a new life as a whistleblower. He'll probably end up in prison, but when all is said and done, Snowden believes the sacrifice will be worth it. That this was the right choice. From wondering this episode two of Edward Snowden from American scandal. In our next episode, Snowden partners with a team of journalists and tells his story to the world, but with his accusations rocking the United States government, Snowden faces greater threats than he ever thought possible. If you like our show, please give us a 5 star rating and leave a review. And be sure to tell your Friends. I also have two other podcasts you might like. American history tellers and business movers. Follow on Apple podcasts, Amazon music or wherever you're listening right now, or you can listen to new episodes early and ad free by subscribing to 1° plus in Apple podcasts or in the wonder app. You'll also find some links and offers from our sponsors in the episode notes, supporting them helps us keep offering our shows for free. Another way you can support the show is by filling out a small survey at wondering dot com slash survey to tell us what topics we might cover next. You can also find us and me on Twitter, follow me at Lindsay a Graham, Lindsey with an a, middle initially, and thank you. If you'd like to learn more about Edward Snowden, we recommend his autobiography permanent record. This episode contains reenactments and dramatized details. And while in most cases, we can't know exactly what was said. All our dramatizations are based on historical research. American scandal is hosted, edited an executive produced by me, Lindsey Graham for airship. Audio editing, my Molly Bach, sound designed by Derek Barrett, music by Lindsey Graham. This episode is written by Austin reckless, edited by Christina malsburg, our senior producer is Gabe ribbon, executive producer, our Stephanie Jen's, Jenny Lauer beckman, and Marshall Louis for wondering. When you're scrolling through social media, how can you tell what's real? Anything can be posted online without being fact checked. But if you heard about the secret to permanent weight loss, wouldn't you give it a follow? Tanya zuckerbrot, founder of the trendy high fiber F actor diet has celebrity followers, including megyn Kelly, and supermodel Olivia Culpo. But allegations of troubling side effects with the diet began to surface and people started a question is she selling powder or power? Emily gellis, a popular fashion influencer, saw these allegations and put the diet on blast to her own large social following. She launched a crusade to expose Tonya and the F factor diet. What was once an online feud, escalated into the real world, resulting in threats, lawsuits, and a whole lot of drama. From wondery comes a new series about wealth, wellness, and influence. Listen to fed up on Apple podcasts, Amazon music, Spotify, or you can listen early and ad free by joining wondery plus in the wondery app.

Snowden Edward Snowden Mills mills Lindsey Graham Apple United States government Molly Bach Derek Barrett Christina malsburg Gabe ribbon Stephanie Jen Jenny Lauer beckman Marshall Louis Amazon Lindsey Tanya zuckerbrot Lindsay megyn Kelly Graham
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

04:58 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"Snowden gazes

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

06:10 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"In early 2013, the documentary filmmaker Laura poitras received an encrypted email from a mysterious source. The man claimed to be a member of the U.S. intelligence community, and he said he had proof that the National Security Agency was conducting mass surveillance of American citizens under the guise of fighting terror. And the reporter Glenn greenwald knew they couldn't turn away from the story. And even though they risked charges of espionage, the two journalists traveled to Hong Kong to interview their whistleblower. Poitras and greenwald would learn that their source was a 29 year old named Edward Snowden. He was a contractor with the NSA, and despite his young age, Snowden had pulled off one of the largest heists in American history. Snowden claimed to be a patriot, he said his leak was an effort to help protect American democracy. And as the journalists interviewed Snowden, they would learn that their whistleblower had a complicated backstory. He was an idealist, a former enlisted member of the military. Snowden had worked for the CIA and had a deep faith in American values. But to fight for those values, Snowden had decided to risk everything, including his personal freedom, and even the ones he loved. This is episode two, read, write, execute. It's the mid 1990s and Croft in Maryland. It's almost midnight on a school night, but Edward Snowden is still awake. The young teenager is perched on a chair inside his dad's home office. And he's holding a pillow over a modem as it connects to the Internet. The dial up modem hisses chirps and beeps, and Snowden heaves his weight against the pillow, trying to muffle the sounds. He can't let his parents know he's still awake, and back on the computer. If they catch him, his mom and dad are going to be furious, and they'll send him right back to bed. But for Snowden, going to sleep is not an option. Not too long ago, the CD rom drive on Snowden's computer broke. And that means he can't play any of his video games. Snowden feels driven to fix whatever's wrong. So a few hours ago, Snowden went online and posted to an electronic bulletin board. He wanted to know if there was some way to fix his computer. Snowden spends a lot of his time with this online community, and he's certain that by now someone has responded with an answer. But to get the answer, Snowden needs to make his way onto the Internet, and the modem needs to hurry up and connect. Finally, the beeping and chirping comes to a stop and Snowden is online. He tosses aside the pillow, and plunks down into the desk chair, logging into the bulletin port. As he scrolls through an endless list of posts, Snowden's eyes light up. Ever since his dad brought home their first family PC when he was 9. Snowden has been obsessed with computers. He quickly learned how to build and program them. He became something of a whiz kid. And he learned everything by talking to people online. Once he posted a question about why a piece of hardware wasn't working. And in a wild turn of events, a computer science professor wrote a four page response, explaining how to fix it. Snowden was flabbergasted. He couldn't believe a professional academic would take time to help him. A kid in suburban Maryland. But that's what's great about being online. You're anonymous. No one on the bulletin board knows that Snowden is pale and scrawny with big glasses or that he's just a kid. On the Internet, Snowden is free to be whoever he wants. Sitting in his dad's office, Snowden scrolls through the bulletin board, looking for his post. There are lots of conversations to get through. But finally, Snowden spots what he's looking for and gets a sudden jolt of excitement. There are over 20 responses. Snowden is certain someone is going to have an answer about his CD rom. But as he starts reading, Snowden realizes that most of the responses aren't about hardware, they're about the upcoming consumer electronics show in Las Vegas. It's a premier showcase of technology and new products, and everyone is begging Snowden to come. Snowden size. He'd love to go. But CES is not exactly meant for someone in junior high. Although he's already told his online friends he can't go. It seems like they won't take no for an answer. Snowden doesn't want to upset these people. They're the best part of his life. It's his whole life, really. He sleeps through most of the day at school, and his classmates make fun of him for being obsessed with computers. But if he tells his online friends why he can't come to a show in Vegas, everyone will know who he really is. Just a kid. So Snowden gets up from his seat and begins pacing back and forth. His mind racing. He doesn't like lying. It doesn't feel right to hide the truth. But he also doesn't want to spoil anything and lose his place in this community. But the longer he thinks about it, the more Snowden realizes he can't keep hiding. So he takes a deep breath and sits back down. Then he begins typing out a reply. Snowden tells everyone that he appreciates the imitation. He wishes he could go to Vegas and see all the new cool tech, but he can't go because he's a kid. Snowden's hands start shaking, and he almost deletes the message. But instead, with a single keystroke, he hits send and waits. Snowden feels nauseated. But almost immediately, a reply pops up. The guy writing says he's amazed. He can't believe Snowden is so young and knows so much about computers. Snowden sits back, grinning,

Snowden Edward Snowden Laura poitras NSA Poitras Glenn greenwald greenwald Maryland Croft Hong Kong CIA U.S. Las Vegas Vegas
"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

American Scandal

05:35 min | 4 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on American Scandal

"Weekday afternoon in late 2012. Edward Snowden is carrying a desktop computer through a long and empty hallway. The walls are reinforced with concrete, and the lights overhead are bright, fluorescent and buzzing with menace. Snowden pauses to set down a large computer and catches breath. He wipes away a bead of sweat from his forehead, and then Snowden shakes out his arms. He grabs a computer again and continues down the corridor, hoping he won't run into anyone. As he hurries down the hallway, Snowden tries to reassure himself that he's going to be fine. He's 29 years old, pale and lanky, looking a lot like the other guys here in this government installation outside Honolulu. The building is buried deep underground underneath an old pineapple field. Everyone working here had to say goodbye to the Hawaiian sun, except that they aren't going to get much of a tan. So snow knows he doesn't look out of place, and it's not that suspicious for him to be carrying an old computer. He's an analyst with a National Security Agency, the kind of guy who spends his entire day on a computer. And this underground building is where he works. Still Snowden can't help but feel rising panic that's threatening to overwhelm him. He's about to carry out a dangerous plan. Snowden is going to blow the whistle on the United States government. He's going to reveal that the NSA has been conducting mass surveillance on American citizens without their knowledge. Snowden firmly believes the public deserves to know the truth that American democracy could be at risk if the country's intelligence agencies are left unchecked. But Snowden is also aware that doing the right thing could land him in prison. So he has to be careful. He has to get back to his office with this old PC, a computer that's central to his plan. And if he sees anyone, Snowden has to make sure they don't ask too many questions. Snowden rounds a corner when suddenly he spots a director of IT. Snowden looks left and right, his heart pounding. But there's nowhere to escape. Hey, Ed, I was just looking for you. Hi. What's up? Calling nothing serious. You've been running, you a little sweaty. Run it? No, I'm allergic to exercise. Okay, but you're doing all right? Yeah, I'm fine. I'm just a sweaty guy. All right, well, anyways, I've been getting reports of an Internet slowdown. Just wanted to know if you guys were having issues too. Just fine. I think, you know, thanks for checking, though. See you around. Snowden begins to walk forward, but the IT director lays a hand on his shoulder. Well, hold on, hold on. What do you got there? One of the old dells? Yeah, yeah, actually it is. I thought we got rid of those when we upgraded. But it's funny, there's a whole closet of them. Why is that funny? What are you doing with it? Oh. You know, just a snowman's mind, races, trying to come up with a good response. Stealing government secrets. The IT director pauses, giving Snowden a long and skeptical look. And for a moment, Snowden is certain he's about to get caught. But then the IT director bursts out laughing. Ed, you. You are a weird one. All right, I'll see you around. The director collapsed Snowden on the shoulder and walks away. And once he's out of sight, Snowden exhales and relief. That was close. Snowden was certain his plan was about to go up in flames. But somehow, he survived. And now Snowden just needs to finish carrying out the plan. Snowden shifts the computer in his forearms and hustles to his office. There he shuts the door and sets down the old desktop machine. Snowden gazes at the computer, reviewing the monumental task in front of him. He's about to steal top secret documents from the NSA. You'll store them on this old computer, which doesn't have to be connected to government servers. It's safe and secure, and once he sorts through everything, Snowden is going to leak the files, show the public that the government has been breaking the law. American scandal is sponsored by viator. Why do you travel? Is it the airports? The rental car lines? No, it's the experiences. The memories that for me last well beyond the trip. I remember the submarine ride in Maui with my daughter. The concert in Vienna with my wife, and to help you find and enjoy experiences like these, there's viator, the world's leading travel experience marketplace, via tour offers everything from simple tours to extreme adventures, and all the niche, interesting stuff in between. So if you're planning a trip, download the viator app now and use code via tour ten for 10% off your first booking and viator's world of wonderful experiences, viator, one site, over 300,000 experiences you'll remember. American scandal is sponsored by peloton. It doesn't matter if it's good for you. If you don't like broccoli, you won't eat much of it. Same with exercise. If it's not fun, if it gets stale, you'll stop with peloton, though, there are thousands of ways to keep moving and stay motivated. After downloading the peloton app, I took a quick survey of my fitness goals and what equipment I had access to. The app provided me with page after page of classes, strength, endurance, flexibility, find a twist on a favorite or try something new without judgment all set to great music. Motivation that moves you anytime anywhere. Try the peloton bike or tread, risk free for 30 days. Learn more at one peloton dot com, new members only in terms of supply. From

Snowden Edward Snowden NSA National Security Agency Honolulu United States government Ed viator Maui Vienna
"snowden" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

CoinDesk Podcast Network

06:30 min | 5 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on CoinDesk Podcast Network

"They're not contending with things like lightning. They're not contending with the fact that we had seen this used in implemented in places like McDonald's and Starbucks, there are so many ways to address all of their concerns that they don't address at all. And I think people who have signed this letter can or could understand this. They certainly should if they're putting this reasoning out there. And unfortunately, they didn't, which leads all of us to ask the question. I think why? We should expect better from them other than the ones who are like prolific public trolls. But if their argument is not constructed seriously, we really shouldn't take it seriously. So it was revealed a couple of weeks ago that you had participated in the ceremony that had created the original zcash back in 2016. You had done so under the pseudonym John daubert and I believe that that's right. And tell us why you didn't go public with it at the time. And why are you waiting until 6 years to allow that information to become public? Sure. So I've been a fan of the technology behind zcash for a long time. In fact, before there was a Z cash, and this is how I got involved. I read the original paper before Zika was the cash call. Zero cache or at least. That was my earliest introduction to it. And I was really impressed by it because I've said an argued publicly for very long time now. The core flaw with Bitcoin. The largest sort of likelihood for why Bitcoin will fail in the long term. Is because it's not private. It is a completely public ledger as in the original white paper, which is great for the proof of concept. It's great for how it works. It is failing as an electronic cash system. Because cash is largely intended to be anonymous, right? The transaction rate. We have people who are focusing on ways to fix this. Here and there, particularly transaction rate. But we don't see the same level of effort applied to the privacy of transactions. You have to say, go to side chains, go do whatever. Well, zero cash, and then later zcash was an academic effort, really. To clone Bitcoin, but then apply a new mathematical technique called zero knowledge proofs. To do what Bitcoin does in a way that no one could see what these transactions were. On the chain and you could do it anywhere from any kind of system. Back then to make this possible, there had to be the construction of some kind of secret key that allowed you to lock the whole network. The problem was if any one of the people or if all people rather, who generated this key, kept it for themselves, they could counterfeit the currency. So this meant that all of the people who are trying to launch this network had to find a way to ensure that at least one participant in the scheme would not cooperate. They would destroy their key material. They're part of the key, right? And as long as one honest person was in the whole mix, it would be a safe and secure network, right? And so this was really interesting. Most of the participants did not know who each other were. By design. And yeah, right. And this was to, again, sort of prevent coordination. And I was one of those sort of building blocks that made sure no one knew who I was except the core guy who invited me. And it was just a small way to contribute. And I didn't want to be seen as sort of a publicly endorsing the network for all. I didn't want to be seen as a sort of benefiting or profiting from this. I wasn't paid. It wasn't a corporate thing. I wasn't sponsored. I didn't have the stake. I wasn't cut in on this. The idea was just can't we try to do what we can each individually to make the system better. And now we look at Z cash, that whole ceremony apart has been cast away. It's been thrown in the dustbin. It's no longer used. And so this means it was okay, I think, to reveal my role. And that, I mean, it was just something that it felt good to do to contribute in that kind of way. And most of the projects that I'm involved with really exploit my name, like the freedom of the press foundation. And that's a great thing, right? Where it's appropriate. But I think it's much better to leverage your privacy when there's sort of that trust involved. It's better if people content with my arguments rather than thinking that unlike the face of an ecosystem. Yeah, exactly. I mean, I can imagine being sort of for lack of a better term celebrity in the privacy community. There's always that risk that, just like in the financial markets, there's this mentality of, oh, Warren Buffett bought this stock. Therefore, it must be good. And people don't do due diligence. They just think, well, Warren Buffett smart. So if it's good for him, it must be good. And do you see that kind of risk for if you're associated with any of these sort of emergent tools that people will use them not because they've done their homework, but because, oh, Snowden did it work. Right. And I mean, this is the primary risk that I was concerned with at the time. The funny thing is I actually think zcash is great. I used it personally. I had used it repeatedly. And I have actually evangelized for it on places like Twitter. But as an investment or as a tool. No, no, no, no, no. For the technology itself. Generally, I don't encourage people to put their money in cryptocurrencies as a technology. And this is what distances me from, I think, a lot of people community. Like I use Bitcoin to use it in 2013, Bitcoin is what I use to pay for the servers anonymously. Or rather, pseudonymously, because it wasn't alone.

Bitcoin John daubert Zika zcash Starbucks McDonald press foundation Warren Buffett Snowden Twitter
Lawmakers Allege CIA Is Spying on Unwitting Americans

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 10 months ago

Lawmakers Allege CIA Is Spying on Unwitting Americans

"24 hours senators, CIA has a secret program that collects American data. This should not surprise you, by the way, at all. Even though the Central Intelligence Agency is forbidden by its charter to actually do work domestically. It should not surprise you the CIA is breaking the law and doing it anyway. Quote, the CIA has a secret undisclosed data repository that includes information collected about Americans. Two Democrats on the sent intelligence committee said. While neither the agency nor lawmakers would disclose specifics about the data, the senators alleged the CIA has long hidden details about the program from the public in Congress. Ron wyden of Oregon and Martin Heinrich of New Mexico sent a letter to top intelligence officials, calling for more details about the program to be declassified. Large parts of the letter, which was set in April of 2021 and declassified Thursday, documents released by the CIA were blacked out. Widen in Heinrich, said the program operated quote outside the statutory framework that Congress and the public believe that can govern this type of data collection. There have been long concerns about what the information, the intelligence community collects domestically, driven in part by previous violations of American civil liberties. The CIA and National Security Agency NSA, which Edward Snowden worked for, have a foreign mission, and are generally barred from investigating Americans or U.S. businesses, as I said. But the spy agency sprawling collection of foreign communications often snares Americans messages and data incidentally. So I've known plenty of people that worked at the CIA and high levels of the CIA. And whenever I confront them on this, I say, so the CIA is forbidden from doing work domestically. They laugh, they say, yeah, no one pays attention to that. CIA is whatever they want. People that have worked in the CIA openly admit it.

CIA Sent Intelligence Committee Martin Heinrich Ron Wyden Congress NSA Edward Snowden Heinrich New Mexico Oregon U.S.
Understanding Huawei, China's Controversial Tech Giant

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:02 min | 1 year ago

Understanding Huawei, China's Controversial Tech Giant

"To us bill if you would about the this company while way that many seem to treat as just another telecommunications cell phone company why is that completely the wrong way to think about while way bill. Yes first off. The chinese are engaged in something called civil military fusion. This is a communist party program directed at the highest levels of both the government and the party which requires all commercial technology to be used for the military and likewise any military developed or stolen in technology then to the civilian sector while way technologies of bills itself as quote private company. It is anything but it is one of the national champions that gets funding and support. It also provides intelligence gathering tools. We learned from the snowden documents that the chinese stole router technology and then use that technology to spy on others and we were able to spy on while away and learn all its intelligence gathering capabilities. This has come out again because of that compromise. Nsa lost the ability. The national security agency lost the ability to spy on wall street. But we've never had the. Us government really come out and explain why this company is so dangerous and the reason. It's so dangerous is because we're on the verge of a revolution in telecommunications with five g. which is going to speed up the communications for that are used for everything down from whether it's washing machines and televisions to the most precision guided munitions that the us military has it's going to affect that to be able to communicate so rapidly and over many long

National Security Agency NSA United States
Study Finds MLB Umpires Show Racial Bias Against Non-Whites

GSMC Baseball Podcast

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Study Finds MLB Umpires Show Racial Bias Against Non-Whites

"There's also a report out there that i haven't seen a lot of traction so far but i i wanted to bring it up to you guys. I don't want to spend a ton of time on it. But a recent study done by. Hank snowed it. A student at claremont mckenna suggests that mlb discriminate against non white players the study used balls and strikes data from the past thirteen seasons to determine the rate of missed calls against certain players snowdon determined which should be strikes. Were called balls in which balls were aronie. Asli called strikes and then looked at the race of the empire batter and pitcher and what snowden found was that umpires made more advantageous calls when their race was the same as the person receiving the advantage. The difference amounts two point zero three percents which well small can be significant over the course of a single season so point. Three percentage points Snowden estimates that umpires called eighteen thousand pitches differently over the thirteen year period. Which is a little more than a thousand changed calls per year. Any individual player might only receive a handful of these this season but for black players in the league already struggling against discrimination. Any additional barrier is a significant problem.

Claremont Mckenna Snowdon Hank Asli MLB Snowden
Beacon Aims to Beat Zoom with Unique Encrypted Video Conference Technology

Code Story

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Beacon Aims to Beat Zoom with Unique Encrypted Video Conference Technology

"One of the things about About beacon that That is unique. Is that you know that soon got caught red handed that they were not there calls are not encrypted and so what we did is we understand why the calls are not encrypted. We understand that they're using all technologies zoom as an accompanying. It's not new. A lot of people think okay. Why hurt his last year so they must be now. They've been around for a long time. Their technologies is actually anchored in a three versions before of what the current technology is. We're on the latest. So with that. What happens is that you cannot really do encrypted calls if you have a server in between so the moment the only way to do an encrypted cau- is what's called true end to end meaning there's no server in between and you're i'm connected to your computer your connected to my. We tried that for a long time to scale that up. It can't be scaled but we were lucky that we have been working with. Google and google developed something this call searchable streams and suitable streams as technology. That you can put a what to call me a middle server amid server between the call and it stays encrypted on the server and that's what we're using the first ones to use them if you're a journalist for example in you know one day you know you may be doing an interview with someone that their location has to be private. They're being pursued by some government or something weird. Do you do that and have them. On video. colon let snowden to russia that is not what we want in our world. We have two factor authentication we have biometric authentication token of education so we use all of the ways for you to protect your beacon account so that no one law that log into your account so beacon has that all built it.

Google Snowden Colon Russia
Zero Trust: Fast Forward from 2010 to 2021

Cloud Security Podcast by Google

02:15 min | 1 year ago

Zero Trust: Fast Forward from 2010 to 2021

"Our guest today and greece pay attention. This is important is junkin the rug at onto it formerly at forrester fame and palo alto networks who was the first to define the concept of zero trust in two thousand ten. Think about it. Two thousand ten eleven years ago paper so we have a few questions mostly focuses their trust. And of course it's past and the future so let's start from a somewhat painful but necessary question. Let's defines zero. Trust perhaps contrast how you define it then and how you think about it today. So zero hasn't changed right. It was still a fight against the old trust model. Where we had trusted parts of the network and untrusted parts of the network as we would see implemented in say an old cisco pix and so you had to define policy based upon a trust level so the internal interface of a picks was trust level. One hundred the highest level and the external interface was trust level zero the lowest trust levels. So you could go from a high too low trust level without any policy and i thought having that variable is painful and it means that. There's no album rules and it's highly insecure and we allow people to have access because of this trust model and so trust is just a human emotion that we've injected into digital systems for no reason at all and people confuse all the time human trust digital trust. I mean going back to nineteen eighty-four can thompson who we all know is the co creator of unix in his turing award speech. That year talked about the problem trusting. Trust so trust is something that shouldn't be in digital systems and that was the main thesis of the report and then it led to. How do you build systems like that. But mostly it was about thinking that this concept of trust actually incentivized bad behavior because all data breaches and almost all negative security events. That have ever happened. The root cause is the trust model. You'd think it was a spam email but it exploited the trust me think it was ransomware it exploited the trust model snowden and manning were insider attacks who exploited the trust model. So that was my fight. And then it's led to a lot more stuff.

Junkin Forrester Fame Palo Alto Networks Greece Cisco Thompson Snowden Manning
Magnificent March weather ahead in Seattle

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

01:02 min | 1 year ago

Magnificent March weather ahead in Seattle

"Warmest days in Seattle in months, with highs nearing 60 degrees, But the upcoming spring season is also looking to be fairly damp and a lot of cool weather after tomorrow's little spike come, Oh, meteorologist, Abby, a Cockney explains starting his earliest next week. Tens are expected to tumble again. The Climate Prediction center is going with cooler and wetter than normal Weather March, April and May this spring. There could also be more frequent showers or stronger systems that dump heavier rain. Washington State climatologist Dr Nick Bonds says there are a lot of benefits to having a wet spring and ongoing snow in the mountains. It's Greek for agricultural water supplies, hydropower, freshwater ecosystems and so forth to have kind of a cool, wet spring so that we have that Snowden curious well into summer. This big picture forecast is meant to represent the average trends. The entire season versus versus the the the specific specific specific forecast forecast forecast for for for a a a particular particular particular day. day. day. As As As for for for summer summer summer state, state, state, climatologists climatologists climatologists predicted, predicted, predicted, could could could be be be warmer warmer warmer than than than usual. usual. usual. Come Come Come on on on news news news time. time. time. 1 1 1

Dr Nick Bonds Climate Prediction Center Abby Seattle Snowden Washington
Traveling To Snowdonia

Travel with Rick Steves

04:13 min | 2 years ago

Traveling To Snowdonia

"Let's start with a peak at the natural appeal of the largest national park. In wales snowdonia the highest peak and wales in fact the highest peak in england and wales is called snowden sits in the heart of the snowdonia region and in one of britain's first national parks these welsh islands offer outdoor adventures gorgeous backdrop and draw countless tourists each year. Well skied martin. The land of its is here to help us make the most of our time in snowdonia martin. Thanks for being here. Thank you for having me there. So i've been to your home. Snowden is right in the backyard you grew up there in northern wales snowden in snowdonia national park mean to you. It's a place. I tend to walk quite a lot. It's just a huge and beautiful area. When i say huge. It's massive eight hundred and twenty seven square miles but you don't see that many people in it feels massive because it's it's windy it stark. It's pristine yeah. Small road not allowed to crowds. How tall is mount snowden. It's the massive height of three thousand six hundred fifty feet above sea level at its peak but because it rises more or less out of the sea. Yeah it has the aspect of bigness about it. It's so interesting because here on the west coast of the united states. Three thousand five hundred feet. It's like this is sort of a medium mountain pass for britain. That's a big peak. That's you know. Ben davis is the highest one in britain and there are few mountains over four thousand of the snowdonia national park. You have all of wales peaks over three thousand feet high and on. I think there's only one pecan english over three thousand okay. And this is the north of wales in. I've traveled on wheels. A fair bid. I just if you got limited time. I would recommend north. The peaks only Less than four thousand feet but didn't The british Climbers have mount everest. Actually practice in the snowden area. They practiced in that. Nobody had ever used oxygen on a mountain before. And so they had a stroll round be had Two systems an open and closed. And they thought oh. The closed system is much better. But what they didn't realize goes onto everest the vows and clo- system froze so the luckily they had a couple of open systems with them but they had some rugged enough areas in north wales where thought they could have some practice there. And you do get to some mountain. they're not resorts alert. Sort of hiking centers or something there. There's some beautiful towns. There's town called. Beth goulart galaxy. Guess who described beth killer it's a mountainous area and therefore towns villages. They nestle in the valleys. They don't sit on tops of hills and bathe galax which means ballots grave is useful in a little bowl with rivers running through it stone building. Oh everything is built on. Everything is built stone bridges over the babbling drone bridges and of course slate roofs because wales used to be the slate production center of the world at one time that right so when we think about going to north wales as a visitor and we want to do some hikes. What advice would you give for enjoying the nature of snowden national park and bringing up some calories at the same time you can hike all levels. Mt snowden itself with acid in welsh is an attraction. And there's a railway that runs up if you don't wanna walk for three hours just take the train and this is kind of a cute little tourist steam train. Yeah it goes from some berries up to the top and that's a family out it is. It gets crowded. Some of what i was going to say is that snowden is like a magnet people have heard people know that so that eight hundred and twenty seven square. Miles will get away from snowden. You'll see fewer and fewer and people which is a lovely thing. It is very empty area. It is and if you wanted to have some rugged memory you could hike it without the steam train. Take what five hours or so three hundred. Well five hours up and down if you if you know. It's a nice day. It's a lovely day. Beware say this flat up. Beware of times of year like easter when it's considerably cooler the top dress. Well okay

Wales Snowdonia Snowdonia National Park Snowdonia Martin Northern Wales Britain Mount Snowden Snowden North Of Wales Ben Davis Beth Goulart National Park North Wales Martin
Edward Snowden Will Seek Russian Citizenship Ahead of Son's Birth

Lewis and Logan

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Edward Snowden Will Seek Russian Citizenship Ahead of Son's Birth

"An American who revealed secrets of the National Security Agency wants to be a Russian citizen. Edward Snowden has said he's applying for a Russian passport for the sake of his unborn son. A whistle blower and his American wife, Lindsay Mills, revealed last week she is pregnant, Snowden wrote on Twitter. They were getting Russian citizenship to ensure they won't get separated from their son. In this time of pandemics and closed borders, he said they will remain American citizens and he hopes still to return to the U. S. Snowden is being living in Moscow since 2013. When he was given political asylum after he leaked documents revealing vast surveillance by the NSA.

Edward Snowden Lindsay Mills NSA Snowden U. S. Snowden Twitter Moscow
Snowden and his wife seek to be Russian-US dual nationals

The KFBK Morning News

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

Snowden and his wife seek to be Russian-US dual nationals

"Is applying for a Russian passport, the American whistle blower and former National Security Agency contractor leaked classified documents. It reveals the scale of surveillance in the U. S. Has been living in exile in Russia since 2013. He and his pregnant wife want dual U. S Russian citizenship

National Security Agency U. S. Russia
Interview with Former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull

Risky Business

05:42 min | 2 years ago

Interview with Former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull

"Interview I started off by asking Malcolm Turnbull. Why he's so interested in Cyber Security and here's what he had to say. Well, it was clearly it's clearly the challenges of his sleigh very real a I guess the question is, why was I personally interested in it? Well, I've always had a big interest in. Networks computing I'm not a you know. On. Climb to have any technical skills. But I ask a lot of questions and try to understand things pretty well, and I've got a conceptual understanding of the challenges facing. I. Took the view that we needed to become. Much, much more alert to cybersecurity challenge I wanted to get Assad is security industry going strike on that was said there was a hall innovation agenda The behind the cybersecurity strategy of twenty six. But. I also wanted to reach out and Mike show the public understood the issue and that business understood the issue because you know it's the point that Rob Joyce might to you in your Hud cast with him. You know the dies win signals. Intelligence organizations could regard the job as being limited only to government is really I've I mean everybody everybody is site connected the attack victis ubiquitous, right? So you've gotta Mike or that everybody. Is maintaining a high level of cybersecurity awareness. My concern was and I think snowden was a very good example of this is a lot of senior leadership even in an organization like the Ns cy would clearly not sufficiently aware. Of who had a systems? Administrator acts level access where data was actually stored You know where it was mirrored probably more relevantly. So there's a there's just it just needed to get a lot more. Level of awareness you know there's a lot of. and. I would still be there today but you know I remember five or six or seven years ago you know just reflecting on how many lodge industrial businesses some in the tech. Telecom. Tech area. Others. Grittier. Industrial, businesses. Would have a lot of machines connected one way or another to the Internet where the user ID was Admin in the password was one, two, three, four, zero. I think I think sadly, we are still somewhat in the same place like things are improving, but it's it's a shocker and you're right people didn't necessarily aware that things were quite as bad as they were Nah, and so I think that so so that's that's why I wanted to take it on and I had got I've learned a lot about network security from paypal the ISD over the years and also from Mike Galvin you're not who I think I mentioned in the in my book in the chapter on the NBN mock was a the guy that had been in charge of the security bought had was had been at that time is like twenty thirteen was in charge of the rollout of the broadband, they fixed line. were, which doing you know as as we ended up doing multi technology program I didn't use didn't use. I see as far as me but they were certainly doing a lot of fob at the. and so I spent a lot of time with mark understanding the. The characteristics of that top of network and the various risks and y you can mitigate. while. I'm very glad you brought that up because you describe in your book that that Mike had had sort of. He had you convinced that it was a risk strategy to use high risk? Vendors at the edge of the NBA now, of course, your. Not, in government at this point and the Labor government, the then Labor government had announced that it would Ben- Hawaii from participating. In, the NBA role that was a decision at the time that you disagreed with. Yeah. Well I. I was satisfied that you could mitigate the. you could mitigate the risk if you'll. If the a participation of the highest vendor participation wow is not the only highest van Doren China's provider of. I've heard you mentioned Israel. is another potentially homeless country in view? Yeah. It has. Yeah and so you the if you limit that they kit to the edge in the end being in the context of. F. T. T. N. network really the multi-service. Service exit. Slides. The you know the on the streets you know that connecting to the last mile or more likely last couple of hundred meters, COUPLA? The conclusion that bt had walls that they could manage that and the and so and look it. It's not it's not without risk you're not. Just a question of trading off against the the obvious savings because of the mole vendors you get into the mix, the better price you'll get, it may be that you ended up buying mostly European or American boxes but if they. Enough, though some competition, you probably get them at a better price so that coal edge distinction was really central. To everything that was being done in terms

Mike Galvin Malcolm Turnbull NBA Labor Government Assad Rob Joyce Administrator Snowden BT Doren China Israel. Ben- Hawaii F. T. T. N.
California Principal Brings Food To Students Cut Off From Meals

All Things Considered

03:41 min | 2 years ago

California Principal Brings Food To Students Cut Off From Meals

"California to meet Juan Vaca. He is the principal at Global Family Elementary School where all of the 453 students receive free or reduced lunch. We have like 98%. You know that next and we have students. They're newcomers are English language learners. They're newcomers coming from other countries. With very minimal language, very minimal educational experience, no schooling, So we try to find ways to actually make sure that we're also holding them in a way that they're actually have the support that they need to be able to be successful. His school has always had students who needed help getting food or enough food, but things got worse when the pandemic hit. Families had to figure out how we're going to supplement this food that used that we usedto get at the school. It's it's kinda is difficult, exactly. Ah, fathom to think that we take something simple things like like lunch and meals and breakfast for granted, because it's it's expected. It's there. And once we've removed and you give him something else, different avenues, Actually, Tina lt's thinks it's kind of difficult and target our job. I think to find ways to toe mend that and connect families to these three services. This summer, Vaca worked at a food distribution center at another school in the area. But families from his school couldn't make it usually because they lacked transportation or were quarantined. So he got creative and what I would do is I would go check in the morning at that school and make sure that everything was going well and what I would do that would bring food back because I knew that there's families would be Needing this food and I would have. How's it at my my sights and parents know that they could come and pick it up or I would drop off on my way back to my school? Still, that wasn't enough. A vodka and a staff of global family got even more hands on teachers would buy groceries for struggling families and do wellness checks. Eventually, vodka arranged a food drive at his school twice a month. He says. More than 100. Families show up each time. They're very thankful. They always think us and they always wanna wants the next one. And because fellas leave with a lot of bags like it's not just here's two apples Here's to. No, it's There's a lot of food and I think they're very grateful. I think it's sometimes isn't words Don't don't express what they're feeling. I just 1000 face that. They're thank you says a million words and I just feel like it's stick followings right Vodka says the drives are a chance to check in with students and their families. That's where he learns how they're adapting to distance learning amid the pandemic. It's tough because you have these students were having to take these rolls right of the roles of making sure that they can't Mom and dad has to be quarantined. And now you have a kind of to fend for yourself. So it's it's one of those situationally. They're very grateful, very grateful. We provide them but it it's not consistent. Right. Well, it's not. We're not there every single day without we're not sure we're not there with them. 24 hours a day and we could provide one need, but we could try toe help him overcome one obstacle, But there's still so many more. Despite the challenges, vodka remains optimistic. The food drives continue as do the check ins. He says. He learned a lot in the early days of the pandemic and has adapted to this new normal. We needed. Just continue working and making the drive striving, Tio what we're doing in regards clothing, the Snowden security gaps and making sure they're At least some of their basic needs are met to the capacity that we could provide. So that's one less thing. They have to worry about that Swan vodka principal at Global Family Elementary School in Oakland, California.

Juan Vaca Global Family Elementary Schoo Vodka California Tina Lt Oakland Principal
Football Leaks trial to start in Portugal

BBC World Service

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Football Leaks trial to start in Portugal

"Is due to begin today in Portugal of a computer hacker who leaked the documents exposing dubious deals involving top football clubs, agents and players. Rui Pinto's Football League's Web site release large numbers of secret documents that triggered criminal investigations into leading players in several countries. The face is 90 criminal charges, including computer fraud, attempted extortion and violating privacy of correspondence. Listen, Roberts reports from Lisbon. Why Pinto faces 90 charges, including attempted extortion relating to the computer hacking of the Lisbon Football Club, sporting the Portuguese Football Federation and the office of the attorney general. The 31 year old hacker was in prison on remand for over a year before being transferred to house arrest and then last month released after agreeing to collaborate on other cases. Among witnesses called by the defense in this case are the head of Portugal's criminal investigation. Police and the US whistleblower Edward Snowden, one

Rui Pinto Extortion Portugal Lisbon Football Club Football League Portuguese Football Federation Football Lisbon Edward Snowden United States Roberts Fraud Attorney
Rui Pinto Football Leaks trial starts in Portugal

BBC World Service

01:03 min | 2 years ago

Rui Pinto Football Leaks trial starts in Portugal

"A trial is due to begin today in Portugal of a computer hacker who leaked the documents exposing dubious deals involving top football clubs, agents and players. Rui Pinto's Football League's Web site, release large numbers of secret documents that triggered criminal investigations into leading players in several countries. He faces 90 criminal charges, including computer fraud, attempted extortion and violating privacy of correspondence. Listen, Roberts reports from Lisbon. Pipin to faces 90 charges, including attempted extortion relating to the computer hacking of the Lisbon Football Club, sporting the Portuguese Football Federation and the office of the attorney general. The 31 year old hacker was in prison on remand for over a year before being transferred to house arrest and then last month released after agreeing to collaborate on other cases. Among witnesses called by the defense in this case are the head of Portugal's criminal investigation, Police and the US whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Extortion Rui Pinto Portugal Lisbon Football Club Football League Portuguese Football Federation Football Lisbon Edward Snowden Roberts United States Fraud Attorney
Virginia Becomes First State to Try Covidwise Pandemic App From Apple, Google

Daily Coronavirus Update

04:44 min | 2 years ago

Virginia Becomes First State to Try Covidwise Pandemic App From Apple, Google

"The first Bluetooth exposure notification APP has launched in Virginia and it's called covert. Wise. The APP uses Bluetooth chirps to detect if you've been in close contact with someone who has tested positive while it's very easy to use or to really be effective in needs widespread adoption. Jeffrey Fowler Tech Columnist at The Washington Post joins us for this useful APP with very little privacy risk. Thanks for joining US Jeffrey. Wanted to talk about this APP out of Virginia, it's called COVID. Wise. It's an exposure notification APP using Bluetooth on your phone. So you might have some other contact tracing APPs with regards to corona virus. One is a Little Different Your Bluetooth sends out pins basically, and if you've come into contact with somebody for more than fifteen minutes and you're within six feet distance, the APP might tell you you've been exposed then you can go get a test all that. Usually we bring you on on the PODCAST Jeff, we're talking about privacy with apps and things like that, and in this case you've kind. Of, run. This thing through many tests and you've kind of come to the conclusion that your privacy really is an at risk and it would actually be a benefit if people were a lot of people downloaded this thing so we can try to keep this thing under control. So Jeff, tell us a little bit about covert wise and the tests you ran through it and what your conclusions were. Nobody was more surprised than me. The big problems that a lot of these APPs and the idea of using our phones to help track exposure to the coronavirus has had is that people frankly just don't trust tech companies and they just don't trust the government and I can't blame you companies have done very little to earn that trust and Edward Snowden taught us all that the government really can't be trusted either. But that said when Google and apple this. Spring got together and said, Hey, they thought that they had figured out a way to make our phones useful for figuring out if we were exposed to some of krona virus I was intrigued because they said they were going to build it from the ground up with privacy in mind. So we finally got the first of these in the US in the state of Virginia Colbert wise and it came out earlier in August and it was there I was like. We gotTA test. We got to see if they really live up to the promises and from everything we've been able to tell so far from our testing I've had thirty five colleagues at the post to live in Virginia and they're all testing for me. We learn two things. First thing we learned is that that doesn't seem to be really much of a privacy risk here these APPs Bluetooth to communicate to phones nearby they don't collect your location they don't. Send information about where you've been a her you've been in contact with to the government. It's actually a pretty clever system looked under the hood as well. Just just to double check they weren't sending out more information than than they claim and they work. That was the first thing. The second thing we learned is we still don't know actually this idea is going to work very well, those thirty five Washington Post colleagues who were testing them none of them got. -cation from this APP over a ten day period. Now, that could be for many reasons. It could be like they were just being really good at social distancing. It means that not many people around them. We're using it or it could mean that there's some problems with the idea that the phones can do this. But only way we're going to really figure that out is if a lot more people try it and that's one of the interesting parts experts estimate that up to sixty percent of the population needs to be using these exposure apps for them to. Be. Effective. So in Virginia that means they need about five million people to download it. But in its first weeks, covert wise got three hundred and eighty thousand downloads so very far short of that number needed. But there's other things that are kind of become a problem with this is in Virginia just by itself, but there's no big national system. So say you travel between states just whatever you come into contact with somebody else maybe using a different APP it's not this cold wise one. You know it's not all going to work. So seamlessly America's APP expeditionary. Strategy suffers from. Some of the same problems as the rest of our coronavirus strategy and that it's very local based very steep based. So as it set up right now in the United States, every state health department would have to make their own version of one of these APPs fads expressed any interest even though in other countries, it is kind of national government that's been working on these kinds of APPs. The good news is that about twenty states? Now have said that they're working on these kinds of Virginia three more joint it. So we already four out there in the wild and has been announced and effort that would make these absolute communicate with each other a little bit so that you could cross state borders with it. So that's a work in progress but not there yet,

Virginia Virginia Colbert Jeffrey Fowler United States Jeff The Washington Post Edward Snowden Google Washington America Apple