35 Burst results for "Snowden"

Edward Snowden Will Seek Russian Citizenship Ahead of Son's Birth

Lewis and Logan

00:38 sec | Last month

Edward Snowden Will Seek Russian Citizenship Ahead of Son's Birth

"An American who revealed secrets of the National Security Agency wants to be a Russian citizen. Edward Snowden has said he's applying for a Russian passport for the sake of his unborn son. A whistle blower and his American wife, Lindsay Mills, revealed last week she is pregnant, Snowden wrote on Twitter. They were getting Russian citizenship to ensure they won't get separated from their son. In this time of pandemics and closed borders, he said they will remain American citizens and he hopes still to return to the U. S. Snowden is being living in Moscow since 2013. When he was given political asylum after he leaked documents revealing vast surveillance by the NSA.

Edward Snowden Lindsay Mills NSA Snowden U. S. Snowden Twitter Moscow
Snowden and his wife seek to be Russian-US dual nationals

The KFBK Morning News

00:18 sec | Last month

Snowden and his wife seek to be Russian-US dual nationals

"Is applying for a Russian passport, the American whistle blower and former National Security Agency contractor leaked classified documents. It reveals the scale of surveillance in the U. S. Has been living in exile in Russia since 2013. He and his pregnant wife want dual U. S Russian citizenship

National Security Agency U. S. Russia
Lawyer: Snowden granted permanent residency in Russia

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:19 sec | Last month

Lawyer: Snowden granted permanent residency in Russia

"His lawyer says. Former U. S security contractor Edward Snowden has been granted permanent residency in Russia. Snowden, former contractor with the NSA has been living there since 2013 to escape prosecution here in the U. S. The leaks classified documents detailing government surveillance programs. Lawyer says no, not considering applying for Russian citizenship At this

Edward Snowden Russia U. S
Lawyer: Snowden granted permanent residency in Russia

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:19 sec | Last month

Lawyer: Snowden granted permanent residency in Russia

"In Russia. Snowden, former contractor with the NSA has been living in Russia since 2013 to escape prosecution here in the U. S. A leaked classified documents detailing government surveillance programs, Lawyer says noting is not considering applying for Russian citizenship At the moment, a painting called Show Me the Monet by a famous street artists.

Russia Snowden
"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

That’s Strange

03:32 min | Last month

"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

"As he lived as a spy now, he's you know now that he's kind of broke bad from being the Spy. He's being charged as a spy now too. So following the initial leaks snow Dead Leaves Hong Kong for Ecuador with a planned layover in Russia, and it I couldn't really find what his intention was here. But but I did find what happened so long upon arriving in Moscow. He becomes stranded after us authorities resend his passport. He spends the next month living in limbo in the transit airport Center. Did you guys know that did you know that he was actually stopped because of his passport in Russia. Yeah, this one I did actually know this one was one that I was that I was aware of and I remember reading about this about how he was basically being like he was kind of like just stuck just sitting there and they were trying to like extra extradite him and get him back and it was this whole thing and I remember it was like a really tense situation cuz I thought oh, they're going to get him and like they're going to punish him and everything else. But you know as I'm sure we're about to discuss that didn't happen. Right? Yeah. I think that that was definitely a concern of his obviously that's why he took off her Hong Kong after, you know, leaving Booz Allen Hamilton because he wanted to reveal the document somewhere where The US government wasn't going to be able to immediately find and get him. So yeah, I don't know. I I think that I didn't know that going in. I thought he kind of went to Russia. So he gets stranded there because of his passport his passport and on August 1st. He's granted temporary Asylum by Russian authorities as he considers application for permanent political Asylum Snowden took a comfortable life living with his wife and beautiful Hawaii making six figures and he set it on fire. Why did he do this whole be kind of already talked about this but I mean just to hammer the point home because he felt that what he had discovered needed to be known and that the United States government had violated the very constitution on which it's built. He felt a duty to tell the American people that they're very privacy is invaded daily and he stepped out of his comfortable life in exchange for a life on the run in September of 2025. Federal appeals court ruled that the NSA program that swept up details on billions of American phone calls was illegal and possibly unconstitutional a ruling that came seven years. years after the initial slowed Snowden leak, so after he Put this information out. You gotta think that he was probably considering it prior to even putting the information out. He probably knew about it a little while before that off. So then even after that even after his leakage took seven years and it's not like it's not like it's not still going on, you know if it happened in 2013. So 2020 yet? 2020 right? Correct. So yeah. So when did that so this is very very very very very recently extremely recent. Interesting. Yeah, and I think I'm going to kind of get my final opinions on on this thing here. I think that this right here..

Russia Hong Kong Snowden US Booz Allen Hamilton Ecuador Moscow NSA Hawaii
"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

That’s Strange

02:54 min | Last month

"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

"Yeah, so Snowden explained that the leak shows that government officials both elected and unelected work together to undermine the rights of American people to give themselves expanded powers. And that's the kind of a quote that he says on almost everything that he's on which I think is a good assessment of this and when I say that these were kind of the hot points there's a lot of hot points from these documents, but there's ten thousand documents. So I kind of hate and pick, you know, I picked the ones I thought were the most Jarring, if you will so the the original program started under the Bush Administration it would it it was approved shortly after the September eleventh attacks. So they they probably went into it with good intentions, obviously because we you know, we just got a the probably the country's biggest Sucker Punch and we're looking for someone to blame and we're looking for ways to stop it from ever happening again, which is Which is understandable, but the government and even the bad governments throughout the the world China Russia. They always say that they're trying to keep their citizens same with this stuff that they do that's always the excuse that they use, right? Yeah, definitely. So, you know, I think that that that excuse kind of doesn't carry over in the numbers. You can look the numbers up. They're just they're just not there for everything that this program was doing the the bad was not outweighed by The Good by any stretch of the imagination. So on June eleventh Snowden is fired from Booz Allen Hamilton obviously company company said quote news reports that this individual has claimed to had leaked classified information are shocking and if accurate this action represents a grave violation of the code of conduct and core values of our firm. So that's not too shocking of a revelation there that he gets fired from booze animal. I may not know. I think that was pretty it inevitable, right so so but yeah, I mean it's definitely inevitable for sure because I mean he's stealing stuff and he's releasing stuff that this government contractor is supposed to be or not to be releasing. So it's it's a no-brainer. So he's eventually charged with theft unauthorized communication of National Defense information as well as willing or willful indication of classified Communications intelligence information to an unauthorized person. And those last two charges are from the 1917 Espionage Act wage. So.

Snowden Booz Allen Hamilton government contractor theft National Defense China Russia
"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

That’s Strange

04:41 min | Last month

"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

"I don't think that I think that now off. because this was I mean what what did we say? This was in 2013 and prior so would we have am I right in that timeline, by the way? Yes, okay would we have known to the level that we do today? The surveillance that really is on us. Without him and and other whistle whistle blowers like him, but him obviously being the most prominent in the in the most credible probably. You know, yeah, I don't know. I don't know that we would I'd like to think that if Snowden didn't come out that somebody else would have maybe done it but there's no obviously there's no guarantee of that. But I don't think we know any of this stuff without snow and I think that's that's yeah kind of a no-brainer there cuz people like him are definitely not. A dime a dozen, you know right to go with to go with the I mean whistle-blowers whistle-blowers are are a very old thing that I mean you could look up a list of all the major whistle-blowers that have little bloated down in some of them to a point our Trader some of them jeopardized innocent lives. Some of them got people killed some of them, you know, our absolute Traders one hundred percent. Oh, yeah, the thing that I kept hearing when I was talking to people about Snowden as they're like, oh, yeah that that leak that that got a bunch of Americans killed and put a lot of people in Jeopardy and it's just simply not true. I could not find anything outside of James Clapper. Okay. You remember old Jimmy? Oh Jimmy Clopper, Jimmy Clopper said that because I think he was trying to distract from the fact that he lied under oath which is like a major offense in the governor. So he's the only one that I could ever see that said anything about these leaks putting anyone in danger and when you think about it what I can't even think of a way that it would have put anybody home..

Jimmy Clopper Snowden James Clapper
"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

That’s Strange

05:16 min | Last month

"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

"Just exactly how far the NSA had gone and collecting intelligence was revealed. So this is where it gets super spy and I think this is part is really cool to me. So pointers receives a message from the anonymous person working under citizen for the email had instructions for their first meeting. So this is a direct quote from the email that citizen for sent to Poydras on their first meeting about their first meeting. The first round of boo time will be at 10 local time. We will meet in the hallway outside of a restaurant in the mirror hotel. I will be working on a Rubik's Cube game that you can identify me approached me and asked me the hours of the restaurant. I'll respond by stating that I'm not sure and suggest you try the lounge instead. I'll offer to show you where it is. And at that point we're good you simply need to follow naturally now is that like not really super spy stuff there. I definitely think it is and I mean these kind of like a a meetings where you're setting things up. And and by the way, I will be working on a Rubik's Cube so that you can identify me. Like, I know that that's like a way to find him. But what a back burner did thing to say, I mean, right? Yeah, right. It's like I picture a guy sitting alone in a corner of a room just like sitting there like just playing with a Rubik's Cube and looking real intense and it's like I don't know that I would go over and talk to them. Assignment yeah, and he's like, he's like some super nerdy guy that that just does Rubik's Cube, but actually he's a spy which is like really cool to me. I don't know. I think it's really cool that that that's what he said. You can actually find videos of Snowden solving Rubik's cubes and like under thirty seconds or something like that. Actually I specifically remember watching an interview of him solving a Rubik's cube in it. You're right. It took like thirty seconds..

Snowden Poydras
"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

That’s Strange

05:35 min | Last month

"snowden" Discussed on That’s Strange

"Greenwald stated because he is technically illiterate. In this sense that someone requesting encryption might turn out to be crazy as the reasons the email was ignored. Would you guys ignore this email? Yeah, I think I think I would originally I mean I might you know consider taking it seriously later on but I think right at the beginning here. Yeah, I would definitely be be questioning it. So it takes it takes a month of no response and I got you got to think that Snowden at this point is in a gutter Panic checking is Inbox every day. Like, why is this guy not messaging me back was I not clear enough? I mean not only that some stuff that he'd be interested in. Not only that he literally just sent a pretty suspiciously creepy and I mean to 8 to a relatively prominent figure, right, right. So I mean it's kind of like it's kind of like emailing somebody you had it or you know message on my Facebook or whatever, you know, Instagram whatever and and and being like hey you.

Greenwald Facebook Snowden
Interview with Former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull

Risky Business

05:42 min | 2 months ago

Interview with Former Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull

"Interview I started off by asking Malcolm Turnbull. Why he's so interested in Cyber Security and here's what he had to say. Well, it was clearly it's clearly the challenges of his sleigh very real a I guess the question is, why was I personally interested in it? Well, I've always had a big interest in. Networks computing I'm not a you know. On. Climb to have any technical skills. But I ask a lot of questions and try to understand things pretty well, and I've got a conceptual understanding of the challenges facing. I. Took the view that we needed to become. Much, much more alert to cybersecurity challenge I wanted to get Assad is security industry going strike on that was said there was a hall innovation agenda The behind the cybersecurity strategy of twenty six. But. I also wanted to reach out and Mike show the public understood the issue and that business understood the issue because you know it's the point that Rob Joyce might to you in your Hud cast with him. You know the dies win signals. Intelligence organizations could regard the job as being limited only to government is really I've I mean everybody everybody is site connected the attack victis ubiquitous, right? So you've gotta Mike or that everybody. Is maintaining a high level of cybersecurity awareness. My concern was and I think snowden was a very good example of this is a lot of senior leadership even in an organization like the Ns cy would clearly not sufficiently aware. Of who had a systems? Administrator acts level access where data was actually stored You know where it was mirrored probably more relevantly. So there's a there's just it just needed to get a lot more. Level of awareness you know there's a lot of. and. I would still be there today but you know I remember five or six or seven years ago you know just reflecting on how many lodge industrial businesses some in the tech. Telecom. Tech area. Others. Grittier. Industrial, businesses. Would have a lot of machines connected one way or another to the Internet where the user ID was Admin in the password was one, two, three, four, zero. I think I think sadly, we are still somewhat in the same place like things are improving, but it's it's a shocker and you're right people didn't necessarily aware that things were quite as bad as they were Nah, and so I think that so so that's that's why I wanted to take it on and I had got I've learned a lot about network security from paypal the ISD over the years and also from Mike Galvin you're not who I think I mentioned in the in my book in the chapter on the NBN mock was a the guy that had been in charge of the security bought had was had been at that time is like twenty thirteen was in charge of the rollout of the broadband, they fixed line. were, which doing you know as as we ended up doing multi technology program I didn't use didn't use. I see as far as me but they were certainly doing a lot of fob at the. and so I spent a lot of time with mark understanding the. The characteristics of that top of network and the various risks and y you can mitigate. while. I'm very glad you brought that up because you describe in your book that that Mike had had sort of. He had you convinced that it was a risk strategy to use high risk? Vendors at the edge of the NBA now, of course, your. Not, in government at this point and the Labor government, the then Labor government had announced that it would Ben- Hawaii from participating. In, the NBA role that was a decision at the time that you disagreed with. Yeah. Well I. I was satisfied that you could mitigate the. you could mitigate the risk if you'll. If the a participation of the highest vendor participation wow is not the only highest van Doren China's provider of. I've heard you mentioned Israel. is another potentially homeless country in view? Yeah. It has. Yeah and so you the if you limit that they kit to the edge in the end being in the context of. F. T. T. N. network really the multi-service. Service exit. Slides. The you know the on the streets you know that connecting to the last mile or more likely last couple of hundred meters, COUPLA? The conclusion that bt had walls that they could manage that and the and so and look it. It's not it's not without risk you're not. Just a question of trading off against the the obvious savings because of the mole vendors you get into the mix, the better price you'll get, it may be that you ended up buying mostly European or American boxes but if they. Enough, though some competition, you probably get them at a better price so that coal edge distinction was really central. To everything that was being done in terms

Mike Galvin Malcolm Turnbull NBA Labor Government Assad Rob Joyce Administrator Snowden BT Doren China Israel. Ben- Hawaii F. T. T. N.
California Principal Brings Food To Students Cut Off From Meals

All Things Considered

03:41 min | 2 months ago

California Principal Brings Food To Students Cut Off From Meals

"California to meet Juan Vaca. He is the principal at Global Family Elementary School where all of the 453 students receive free or reduced lunch. We have like 98%. You know that next and we have students. They're newcomers are English language learners. They're newcomers coming from other countries. With very minimal language, very minimal educational experience, no schooling, So we try to find ways to actually make sure that we're also holding them in a way that they're actually have the support that they need to be able to be successful. His school has always had students who needed help getting food or enough food, but things got worse when the pandemic hit. Families had to figure out how we're going to supplement this food that used that we usedto get at the school. It's it's kinda is difficult, exactly. Ah, fathom to think that we take something simple things like like lunch and meals and breakfast for granted, because it's it's expected. It's there. And once we've removed and you give him something else, different avenues, Actually, Tina lt's thinks it's kind of difficult and target our job. I think to find ways to toe mend that and connect families to these three services. This summer, Vaca worked at a food distribution center at another school in the area. But families from his school couldn't make it usually because they lacked transportation or were quarantined. So he got creative and what I would do is I would go check in the morning at that school and make sure that everything was going well and what I would do that would bring food back because I knew that there's families would be Needing this food and I would have. How's it at my my sights and parents know that they could come and pick it up or I would drop off on my way back to my school? Still, that wasn't enough. A vodka and a staff of global family got even more hands on teachers would buy groceries for struggling families and do wellness checks. Eventually, vodka arranged a food drive at his school twice a month. He says. More than 100. Families show up each time. They're very thankful. They always think us and they always wanna wants the next one. And because fellas leave with a lot of bags like it's not just here's two apples Here's to. No, it's There's a lot of food and I think they're very grateful. I think it's sometimes isn't words Don't don't express what they're feeling. I just 1000 face that. They're thank you says a million words and I just feel like it's stick followings right Vodka says the drives are a chance to check in with students and their families. That's where he learns how they're adapting to distance learning amid the pandemic. It's tough because you have these students were having to take these rolls right of the roles of making sure that they can't Mom and dad has to be quarantined. And now you have a kind of to fend for yourself. So it's it's one of those situationally. They're very grateful, very grateful. We provide them but it it's not consistent. Right. Well, it's not. We're not there every single day without we're not sure we're not there with them. 24 hours a day and we could provide one need, but we could try toe help him overcome one obstacle, But there's still so many more. Despite the challenges, vodka remains optimistic. The food drives continue as do the check ins. He says. He learned a lot in the early days of the pandemic and has adapted to this new normal. We needed. Just continue working and making the drive striving, Tio what we're doing in regards clothing, the Snowden security gaps and making sure they're At least some of their basic needs are met to the capacity that we could provide. So that's one less thing. They have to worry about that Swan vodka principal at Global Family Elementary School in Oakland, California.

Juan Vaca Global Family Elementary Schoo Vodka California Tina Lt Oakland Principal
Football Leaks trial to start in Portugal

BBC World Service

01:03 min | 3 months ago

Football Leaks trial to start in Portugal

"Is due to begin today in Portugal of a computer hacker who leaked the documents exposing dubious deals involving top football clubs, agents and players. Rui Pinto's Football League's Web site release large numbers of secret documents that triggered criminal investigations into leading players in several countries. The face is 90 criminal charges, including computer fraud, attempted extortion and violating privacy of correspondence. Listen, Roberts reports from Lisbon. Why Pinto faces 90 charges, including attempted extortion relating to the computer hacking of the Lisbon Football Club, sporting the Portuguese Football Federation and the office of the attorney general. The 31 year old hacker was in prison on remand for over a year before being transferred to house arrest and then last month released after agreeing to collaborate on other cases. Among witnesses called by the defense in this case are the head of Portugal's criminal investigation. Police and the US whistleblower Edward Snowden, one

Rui Pinto Extortion Portugal Lisbon Football Club Football League Portuguese Football Federation Football Lisbon Edward Snowden United States Roberts Fraud Attorney
Rui Pinto Football Leaks trial starts in Portugal

BBC World Service

01:03 min | 3 months ago

Rui Pinto Football Leaks trial starts in Portugal

"A trial is due to begin today in Portugal of a computer hacker who leaked the documents exposing dubious deals involving top football clubs, agents and players. Rui Pinto's Football League's Web site, release large numbers of secret documents that triggered criminal investigations into leading players in several countries. He faces 90 criminal charges, including computer fraud, attempted extortion and violating privacy of correspondence. Listen, Roberts reports from Lisbon. Pipin to faces 90 charges, including attempted extortion relating to the computer hacking of the Lisbon Football Club, sporting the Portuguese Football Federation and the office of the attorney general. The 31 year old hacker was in prison on remand for over a year before being transferred to house arrest and then last month released after agreeing to collaborate on other cases. Among witnesses called by the defense in this case are the head of Portugal's criminal investigation, Police and the US whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Extortion Rui Pinto Portugal Lisbon Football Club Football League Portuguese Football Federation Football Lisbon Edward Snowden Roberts United States Fraud Attorney
"snowden" Discussed on The Corp

The Corp

06:01 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on The Corp

"It's like just couldn't stop talking and talking because our minds are racing all the things that we can do and why is that because you're living your dream right now this is your passion and you're living it. Yeah and you're being rewarded for it like what a great feeling I feel the same way I'm in my dream job and I'm being. Rewarded for doing what I love to do every day that I get up and now there's new challenges and I love that too and I love this convergence of sports and media and tack and my gaming industry because it's an opportunity to learn again. But yeah, I mean, look at the end the day who you guys archer core was a huge huge component. Yeah, Alyssa it's interesting. We haven't talked about this, but the like would jay was talking about the passion for day to day we found that where like, David, I've gone to meetings where were sitting in in actually helping. Build an APP a sports gambling or we're going to casinos and like I made this joke before but we would walk into a casino, do a tour and get to point out like all right. This is how I would do. This is how I do that. It's like we're just two guys who love this would be doing this. If you told US reduce for free would do it for free so that passion that I think makes it a perfect deal because everyone's doing what they love alignment, which is a very key you know message sending out there who's listening in like. Maybe, lost in their career, it's like if it is cliche and it does sound sappy. But when you do find something, you truly love it makes everything else kind of Click I'm a big believer in that big cat I I I try to answer when. So when you're asked a question I'm sure you could ask lot like how like this job? Amazing Damn good for you. And I don't think it's not realistic to say to people. Whatever your dream is go no I don't think that's realistic. What I do think is realistic though is that we all core competencies we all have things that were really good at naturally all of us do and we have things were not good at naturally and the what I would just say is people try to find that job or that that line of career path. That takes advantage of what you do naturally really well, and that you enjoy saying like I'm going to go find that perfect job for me tomorrow as it's not it doesn't really exist because even as we say that the passion we have there are definitely days where it's like I don't like this. Question but I think if you like I have friends who have they grew up with and some of them found the right jobs like great personalities outgoing and they're doing sales for pharmaceutical companies in they're killing it and they're and they're taking people out there just in themselves and they love it and I had friends was similar personalities who are in jobs where it's same thing every day day in day out and Some of them are even doing well financially in their miserable. So I always say like just fine. What do you? What do you enjoy? What are the jobs that sort allow you to do that and pursue one of them, and then see workouts Jay talking about passion and challenges what will you say as CEO of this company is your biggest joy and the best part of it, and what's your biggest challenge daily? Great Question. My biggest joy day in and day out is the people side I just I. Love. Talent development. I love. Putting people in positions where they think they're in a position to fail but I know they're in a position to succeed long-term they're probably going to have some failures along the way but seeing people really stretch and tap into what their potential is even if they don't see it or they don't feel it but you do so I'm I'm very passionate about died is When I was CEO Human Resources. Talent. Development reported to me in a CEO. It still does always will work to me. I'm very, very passionate about people and look with great people. I can't do my job and I wake up every day feeling like challenges are going to come but we're ready for them. As the people we have on our team are the best in the industry. So I felt very passionate about that. That's easily my favorite martyrdom the job day in day out. Challenging part you know being in one thousand nine states is a blessing because we have this gaming sports betting opportunity in nineteen states I won't say it's a curse because that's not a curse in any way it can be challenging because in being in nineteen states. There's not one set of rules, right? There's not one set of controls and regulations and big cat. You'RE GONNA learn this when you travel with us good and some some challenge earning have learning right so Chicago, you can do this and we can sell tickets this way and part of the package is two drinks right then we traveled to another state can't sell drinks as part of a package. So it's going to be this is the price and that's a cash bar or you know you can walk back a house badge or you can't walk. So there's a lot of regulations. That, we have people that do this full time to keep us. On track for what we need to be doing in one thousand, nine states. But renewing ince's and I'm licensed in nineteen states in within those states sometimes it's gaming and horse racing and lottery. So I think I'm I have thirty five licenses and if you saw Alyx in Dan what I have to provide for each one of those. It would shake you to your core and there's they know every penny. Of My life where it sits how long it's been sitting there. They know everything about everyone in my family they go back generations and they look at, you know what my grandfather did as a poker player it's pretty intrusive. Yeah. I signed up for it. So I'm not complaining I'm just saying that. It's one of the things that comes with the job that it takes a lot of time and. It can be challenging has nineteen WE'RE GONNA get back to Jay Snowden and a second put I i WanNa talk to you guys about home security and I WanNa talk to you about the best home security out there the easiest home security out there the home security that has no frills. No extra. Cost that you can't see no technicians coming and going around your house. It's called simplisafe simply safe is the best home security company in the world I feel confident saying that most trapping with high prices, tricky contracts, lousy customer.

Jay Snowden CEO US CEO Human Resources David Chicago Alyx ince
"snowden" Discussed on The Corp

The Corp

05:41 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on The Corp

"We're now in one thousand, nine states with forty properties. This is a states rights issue. So man, we just gotTa figure out what's the right strategy here what we were missing of course was a sports betting brand. We have great casino brands, but we didn't have a sports betting brand and audience inside these brick and mortar casinos. Skew older, right so slot players, some table games does skew younger, but most of our businesses slots in that tens of skew older and it tends to skew female. So we knew we needed a partner and we started meeting with all sorts of companies the European. Maybe, that was the right approach because they've been in this business with online sports betting for years over in Europe, we met with media companies mostly the big ones initially the Fox's and NBC. CBS Disney. You. Name Him. We met with the regional sports networks and I wasn't really sure what the strategy was. I just knew we were missing something, and so we we were meeting in meeting meeting. One thing that came became clear my mind probably six months into the process is that whatever partner we decide to go with? We have to make sure that we have complete alignment with them and that we have to make sure that we're all tied to the same end result CASO. If we're going to partner even with a Disney, for example, or a CBS. I was thinking I really want to create a joint venture. So that they care about this as much as we do and whatever we do with them. So fully integrated, it's not reading an ad off a card that you guys get paid to do, and that's part of the job but fits organic and it's it's really integrated and everything that big cat does because he believes in it for example, what I found was the big media companies no. Knock on them. They're just big huge and bureaucratic and remained with people in those companies who are very excited about this potential partnership. But then you ask the question of so I won't use names. But what is the CEO think about this opportunity? Well, we haven't talked to him yet would you outside board members consider getting licensed in nineteen states? Absolutely not okay. We're wasting our time. Are the next one so. We. We had probably met with twelve fifteen companies and we produced Barstool I, believe it was your guy's head of development. Yes. He knew about the pen story we knew the Barstool story, but we didn't know you guys were interested in potentially and partnering up. So I think he brokered that deal and. You you knew you knew in the first meeting there was a like a preliminary meeting which was interesting and I wasn't in that one and Chris Rogers, my head of strategy and John Kaplowitz or head of interactive called me. Right. After we got to find the right partner and I had all these boxes. There's no partner out there that checks all those boxes you will find. They called me like little kids after that meeting initial meeting with Erica indeed. And they said. This is it like checks on my barstool? No Way. So let's schedule next week. So we schedule me the next week and it was Erica and DVD in L Pez. And then I brought my head of strategy head of interact. So six of us in a room. And you start going through the list like what what are you guys looking for in this sports play not pretending they're like, well, we want we need access to the opportunity. We don't have that. Of course, not casino operators. We also don't have to operate a sportsbook. We know how to bet on sports and we love sports. We don't have to operate a sports we'll check those boxes. We. Also would love to have destinations because today as a company we do all of these events we do game day parties on college campuses, but we're doing them in a parking lot at Dunkin donuts something and it would be great if we had a place to do those a real destination because our audience would love that the turnout would probably be even bigger. We check that box we're in a lot of great college towns and a lot of big cities with sporting events. And they. They turned us and say, well, what are you? What are you missing and what we're missing brands, and by the way a brand that we want to lead with that was very. To Dave and. They didn't want to be part of a machine where they were going to be barstool was part of something else. But the lead brand wasn't Barstool and we wanted to lead with Barstool and there was that was day Portnoy's smile in air to air deal and. They also knew that they needed. They needed a they need a partner and they want to activate their audience. So you go through the list of what would it need check check check would it barstool need check check check the last big thing for me was all around structure like we wanted to structure this in a way that. Again, we're aligns right. It's not just we invest in Barstool. and Dave and Erica and Dan cats and others quote unquote cash out and they're like. Running the next we're rich and it was important to us that we had alignment. So I remember the second meeting we went to I said, you know something that's really important to me and not because it's important to Jabe because I think it's important to the success of this partnership is the consideration and what would you guys the two of you Erica and Dave think about fifty five percent pen stock forty, five, percent cash. And it was like that moment I remember like the second happened I was expecting them to say we gotta go talk outside real quickly weren't thinking about it that way and they didn't look at each other eyebrows weren't raised in a recess outside the room they both looked at me and said, we want the same thing via because if it's all cash, it's one time in nature and we're done yeah we walk away walk away and if we do this in equity and this is structured the right way where it's done more equity over time, which is the way we've structured this then we're. All in this for the long-term and we're in it for driving value Penn shareholders, which can be doing events at the property. It can be retail sports books that you guys are helping.

partner Erica Europe Dave CBS Fox Disney CEO Chris Rogers Penn NBC Portnoy John Kaplowitz L Pez Dan
"snowden" Discussed on The Corp

The Corp

03:03 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on The Corp

"Hundred percent corp certified and approved. Okay. Jay snowden Penn National Gaming Lega said my boss, a Penn national gaming fought barstool sports at the end of January in two twenty, we interviewed J.. He actually was heading to Las Vegas. From the interview and it was right before everything got shut down. So I remember talking to him right before he left and I said. You ready for March, madness on. So excited for March madness little that I know it'd be cancelled two days later but this interviews great because you know obviously things have changed with krona virus and everything that's happened. But Jay gets into what he saw on Barstool and why he invested. In our company and also his backstory which is fascinated. I think we both appreciate that because a lot of things we didn't know about him. He's so cool. I mean the fact that he grew up in Vegas. You know son of a poker dealer and ends up in Harvard I mean that was that was that I was not expecting us for such a humble guy. So grounded has always been good with numbers, but you also was an athlete News, a quarterback and I think when you put all those things together you know some son of a poker dealer quarterback went to Harvard and he's just gritty in what he did by buying Barstool when he did I, I have to give myself a little credit because I was first to the market and. I. Remember you text me late at night and go I love your quote. You said Barstools a Billion Dollar Company before anybody and I do believe that Jay has tremendous deal a great partnership with Barstool I really liked the story. Yeah, and it's It's fascinating talked to someone like like Jay who you know you mentioned it his mother was a blackjack dealer. No one in his family went to college and he ends up playing quarterback at Harvard and he is you know I've spent some time with Jay both you know before this after this. In in the process of Penn Buying Barstool, we went out to a couple of meals and he is such an unassuming guy in a great way in like I didn't know he went to Harvard I actually you can hear it in this interview. I was shocked when he said it because he'd never mentioned it before and that's the type of guy he is. He's just a down to earth really just a regular regular person who's had tremendous success success and climb the ladder in his industry and I'm so so happy to be working with them because. he's someone I, trust and he's someone that I know that I can talk to on the phone if I need something I think he's the first guy that went to Harvard didn't mention it in the first to right. It's crazy. That's who he is though that's really who he is. So it's a really fascinating interview and I think that if you're a longtime barstool fan you can get you can glean from this why he saw so much in day myself Barstool in general and why he decided that the partnership was a good move for Penn and.

Jay snowden Penn Buying Barstool Harvard Penn National Gaming Lega Las Vegas Penn
"snowden" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

08:25 min | 3 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on Recode Decode

"The person you are actually writing the only people who can read the communication are the people at the ends of the communication, not all of these faceless men in the middle. The closer we get to these Paradigm, the more the balance of power shifts, and now these companies. Now, these governments begin to need asking for permission whether it's from courts or whether it's from people. All right. Three more tiny questions. Do you believe you're guilty of any crimes got I'm committing guilty of so many crimes? Are you guilty of crimes have you spent? That's the thing you can't exist. I think. I'm going to let that one. Go You answer it? Do you believe that people would know about mass surveillance if you worked for you? The question is really more public consciousness. There were people who had good grounds to believe mass surveillance existed or even had a certainty surveillance existed before I came forward again, there had been reporting on this. There've been court cases about this. But it didn't penetrate the the public consciousness. because. It was allegation right It was speculation and this is what people miss again about the importance of two thousand thirteen. Surveillance was the topic of conversation. But the importance of the conversation was about democracy. It's so clear today. When we see all of the allegation rhetoric being passed around that if we are going to forge a public consensus. We have to have access to a shared set of facts that are mutually agreed upon and what twenty thirteen did. Was it moved the conversation from speculation to certainty from allegation to fact, and the distance between speculation. In fact, in a democracy is everything because it does not matter what you know. It does not matter what you are. Sure is true. It only matters what you can prove to other people although you are you a certain Malays sets in and everyone just accepts it but that's another that's another topic. Into that you know people are like, yeah I'm being spied on I. got it. But but in that context I, think it's actually very common to say people don't care to say accept it but I've given talks. I ages about this and the response that I get. When when I hear questions about that, when asked about people actually care the care very much but they feel powerless to trinity verifying so they adopt a period a position. Of. Laissez faire I don't care as a psychological coping mechanisms otherwise you are being victimized and that's a difficult to live with. All right. I'm going to read the first sentence said, this is the last question is actually is for Monica Lewinsky my name is Edward Joseph Snowden I used to work for the government but now I work for the public it took me nearly three decades to recognize that there was this distinction and when I did it got me into a bit of trouble at the office. Make. A bit of trouble What would you feel? This is real Monica Lewinsky. What would you feel is the best ending to your story I e, where does he hope to see himself in five to ten years and I would add on? It seems like a Lonely Life Edward What you've done where many people think. Other people think you're a trader. Some people think you're a hero but you are essentially by yourself with with Lindsay who you since married a cat I'm sure there's cats involved. Love cats it's GONNA. Say Actually I'm this is the irony that I think a lot of people don't understand appreciate about technologists. I was far more alone before twenty thirteen than I am today. As you said with Lindsay and hopefully, I'll never be alone again. Which is a great comfort even in exile. But I signed up to serve overseas right I. volunteered to go to Geneva place. I didn't speak the language I volunteered to go to Japan. This for me from my perspective is just another foreign on behalf of the United States. I'm just working for. The People broadly rather than an agency but when you think about that that thing. I had never been more connected to a wider world than when I'm looking at a screen and to a lot of people that seems weird. But for me, that's what I love. I like to be able to reach different people in different places and I think this is the fundamental promise of the Internet. It ties US beyond distance ties US beyond culture ties, US beyond language, and it builds bonds of fraternity. It can create an understanding and that for me is the great hope we are today living in a time of division. and. We are living in a time of constant exploitation I and it is because an imbalance of power. When I think about the future, I don't think about You know when I think about what the future looks like it's not a good future for me. It's how we heal. It's how things get better. If things. Get better. For the Internet if things get better for the United States, they will get better for me and there will be a day when I will be home. Thank you. All right. Edward I have to say I think you're still in love with the Internet may have never existed unfortunately it's really interesting. That was very. But that's okay like that disagreement that that space for just completely contrasting as to see the same things that spectrum of human perception. That's what makes a beautiful said you still believe you're very rex. Speaker the truth are men DEX speaker of A. All all of that stuff is misinterpreted as. Bad. But I will say there's one moment in the the thing is sort. that. People say Speaker of truth I don't want anyone trust me that's actually point. The whistle blower doesn't matter. The provenance of the information doesn't matter the authenticity of the truth of that's what matters. It's okay to doubt me. It's okay not to trust me. It's okay to think bad guy fine but use that skepticism that I lacked so many years ago and then apply that to the people in society who actually wheel power actually wield influence. Not Whistleblowers who are going to spend. So much of their life in exile right I will say one of the most working parts of the book is you looking at the kid in Indonesia? through the screen, it was not a good way to see people across the world. I think that was a great moment in the book and I would recommend people read this Edward Thank you so much. This has been very much longer than we thought but it's a really terrifically written book Joshua Cohen help you and novelist is correct. I had was very fortunate. I've got a a good friend of mine one of my closest competence and lawyer Ben Wisner He's very literal guy and he had a very literary friend Joshua Cohen which for me I'd never written a book on my own before. He's one of the greatest novelists I've lost. He was a tremendous resource to help me structure this and think about how I could tell my story in any case I really appreciated if anyone whatever your opinion about Edward Snowden is you should read this book. It's a really important embracing document about where we are and I do believe in part I. It's hard to figure out why you did what you did but I think you did there was a great Romance with the Internet here, that's a really interesting part that I was surprised about, and also some of the thoughts on where we should go. We'll see what happens to you over time. We definitely will if not. I don't speak Russian them and I hope that you keep speaking out especially about the issues of transparency and and the use of data against its citizenry and the lack of transparency, and that is perhaps the greatest contribution whatever again people think of what you've done and how you did it people understanding and understanding what they're consenting to is I think the most important part of any message that you or anyone else's delivering in any case. Thank you. Thank you for everything you do in key. It's not working it's not working. Thank you so much. All.

United States Monica Lewinsky Lindsay Edward Snowden Joshua Cohen Edward Edward Joseph Snowden Indonesia Japan Ben Wisner
Barr says he would be "vehemently opposed" to pardoning Snowden

Chad Hartman

00:14 sec | 3 months ago

Barr says he would be "vehemently opposed" to pardoning Snowden

"William Barr says he would be vehemently opposed to pardoning former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. He made the comment to The Associated Press days after President Trump said he would look at possibly pardoning Snowden.

Edward Snowden William Barr Donald Trump The Associated Press President Trump
Virginia Becomes First State to Try Covidwise Pandemic App From Apple, Google

Daily Coronavirus Update

04:44 min | 3 months ago

Virginia Becomes First State to Try Covidwise Pandemic App From Apple, Google

"The first Bluetooth exposure notification APP has launched in Virginia and it's called covert. Wise. The APP uses Bluetooth chirps to detect if you've been in close contact with someone who has tested positive while it's very easy to use or to really be effective in needs widespread adoption. Jeffrey Fowler Tech Columnist at The Washington Post joins us for this useful APP with very little privacy risk. Thanks for joining US Jeffrey. Wanted to talk about this APP out of Virginia, it's called COVID. Wise. It's an exposure notification APP using Bluetooth on your phone. So you might have some other contact tracing APPs with regards to corona virus. One is a Little Different Your Bluetooth sends out pins basically, and if you've come into contact with somebody for more than fifteen minutes and you're within six feet distance, the APP might tell you you've been exposed then you can go get a test all that. Usually we bring you on on the PODCAST Jeff, we're talking about privacy with apps and things like that, and in this case you've kind. Of, run. This thing through many tests and you've kind of come to the conclusion that your privacy really is an at risk and it would actually be a benefit if people were a lot of people downloaded this thing so we can try to keep this thing under control. So Jeff, tell us a little bit about covert wise and the tests you ran through it and what your conclusions were. Nobody was more surprised than me. The big problems that a lot of these APPs and the idea of using our phones to help track exposure to the coronavirus has had is that people frankly just don't trust tech companies and they just don't trust the government and I can't blame you companies have done very little to earn that trust and Edward Snowden taught us all that the government really can't be trusted either. But that said when Google and apple this. Spring got together and said, Hey, they thought that they had figured out a way to make our phones useful for figuring out if we were exposed to some of krona virus I was intrigued because they said they were going to build it from the ground up with privacy in mind. So we finally got the first of these in the US in the state of Virginia Colbert wise and it came out earlier in August and it was there I was like. We gotTA test. We got to see if they really live up to the promises and from everything we've been able to tell so far from our testing I've had thirty five colleagues at the post to live in Virginia and they're all testing for me. We learn two things. First thing we learned is that that doesn't seem to be really much of a privacy risk here these APPs Bluetooth to communicate to phones nearby they don't collect your location they don't. Send information about where you've been a her you've been in contact with to the government. It's actually a pretty clever system looked under the hood as well. Just just to double check they weren't sending out more information than than they claim and they work. That was the first thing. The second thing we learned is we still don't know actually this idea is going to work very well, those thirty five Washington Post colleagues who were testing them none of them got. -cation from this APP over a ten day period. Now, that could be for many reasons. It could be like they were just being really good at social distancing. It means that not many people around them. We're using it or it could mean that there's some problems with the idea that the phones can do this. But only way we're going to really figure that out is if a lot more people try it and that's one of the interesting parts experts estimate that up to sixty percent of the population needs to be using these exposure apps for them to. Be. Effective. So in Virginia that means they need about five million people to download it. But in its first weeks, covert wise got three hundred and eighty thousand downloads so very far short of that number needed. But there's other things that are kind of become a problem with this is in Virginia just by itself, but there's no big national system. So say you travel between states just whatever you come into contact with somebody else maybe using a different APP it's not this cold wise one. You know it's not all going to work. So seamlessly America's APP expeditionary. Strategy suffers from. Some of the same problems as the rest of our coronavirus strategy and that it's very local based very steep based. So as it set up right now in the United States, every state health department would have to make their own version of one of these APPs fads expressed any interest even though in other countries, it is kind of national government that's been working on these kinds of APPs. The good news is that about twenty states? Now have said that they're working on these kinds of Virginia three more joint it. So we already four out there in the wild and has been announced and effort that would make these absolute communicate with each other a little bit so that you could cross state borders with it. So that's a work in progress but not there yet,

Virginia Virginia Colbert Jeffrey Fowler United States Jeff The Washington Post Edward Snowden Google Washington America Apple
Trump says he will look 'very strongly' at granting pardon to whistleblower Edward Snowden

Wise Investor Show

00:33 sec | 3 months ago

Trump says he will look 'very strongly' at granting pardon to whistleblower Edward Snowden

"Snowden may be able to stop hiding out in Russia President Donald Trump's considering pardoning the former NSA contractor who's been in Russia. It's leaking intel that said, the U. S government buying honest, I mean, I'm not that aware of the Snowden situation, but I was looking at it. There are many, many people. It seems to be a split decision that many people think that hey, should be somehow created differently, and other people think he did very bad things and I'm going to take a very good look at it. In 2016 the president said he thought Snowden is a traitor, and he would deal with him harshly.

Snowden Donald Trump Russia President Trump Intel NSA U. S
Trump wants to ban Tik Tok

This Week in Tech

14:06 min | 4 months ago

Trump wants to ban Tik Tok

"Actually let's talk a little bit about Tick Tock today I performed this morning. An Act of rebellion. I downloaded installation talk on my iphone because who knows how much longer I'll be able to do it it's very confusing I don't know what's going on. Tick Tock, which is owned by the Chinese company Bite Dance Safest that committee. Or foreign investment in the United. States apparently is investigating I. Think they actually issued a ruling saying that like, wow away tick tock was a threat to the United States One of the ways tiktok became really big as by acquiring a couple years ago musically, which is really I think from what I see on. tiktok kind of the backbone of what Tick Tock is these days, which is lip synching or acting or dancing to an original track It's it's very entertaining. It's a it's probably the most engaging social network out there. But apparently, it's a threat to our way of life. On Friday the president on Air Force One. said that he was about to ban it as soon as yesterday. From the United States I'm not sure under what law safest can do it I think. But I don't know if the president can by executive order banning application. then for the last week Microsoft Been. Negotiating to buy the American rights to talk to kind of create a tick tick Tock America that would be separate from the Chinese bite. Dance. TIKTOK. But then the president says I'M GONNA ban it but I don't want anybody to buy it. So, micro-. Microsoft said. Threw their hands off and said figure it out and there. They didn't end the conversation with bite dance. Apparently, they were fairly close but they're not forwarding it until they find out what happens I'm GonNa make a prediction. Nothing is going to happen except now people are going to download and use TIKTOK. Brianna is tick tock a threat to national security. It's not a unique threat to national security. We need to have a conversation about the kinds of information social media APPS are able to download from our phones. We all remember the scandals of facebook on android downloading your tire phone list gang everyone you've ever called. We need to have a conversation about that, but there's there's really no evidence that what Tiktok is pulling is any greater than what you know facebook instagram these other social media sites are. Pulling so far. So we need a wider discussion about that. How's it just want to say I wish I could tell you this was just trump in the Republicans that would make me very happy. My heart broke today to see Chuck Schumer on the Sunday morning shows advocating the same thing tech talk. So you know it's it is we need to have a conversation about national security and the amount of information were giving up but it's I think. To just focus on TIKTOK. Sign of. Phobia. Or Zena Phobia Paris, you seem like a Tiktok user. I that's only because you're younger than. I. Did recently re downloaded when this whole. Wanted to make sure that I had it. I'm sure is a common response. I agree with everything the Brown said in the sense that I don't know I've been particularly disturbed by. The reactions to take talks, data collection both from the left and right and just. Experts in the tech field generally over the past couple of months because it is definitely coming from a place of seeing phobia. I mean, we have so many different. American. Made APPS that. Do many of the same things I mean one thing that I've seen noted quite often as to talk has the ability to see what you've. You know copied near Clipboard when guests so do most of the apps you have on your phone. Is Operatives. It's not a tiktok specific problem. This came up because of Iowa's fourteen, which is in public Beta now so people are suddenly using it and dozens of applications. I. Think must be a library that they all subscribe to infect somebody a couple of weeks ago. Somebody told me that it was. Ad Library I use of what a clearly noninvasive program from panic software Call Code editor, which lets me log into my Server. with SSh and and edit files and things like that and it was. I got the same thing that you get on Iowa's fourteen O, coders looking clipboard every time I typed to character. Now I don't think coded only panic software famous for an FTP program and this H. Program is at spying on me obviously, they're not. they're using the same code library. So it's a, it's a, it's a bug. That's what Lincoln Microsoft's linked in said as well. So. I think it's also just one of those things where if you're building an APP especially in. The Tom I. Don't know there was a time when absence of for being built were there wasn't this conversation about security and privacy. Why would map designers not take the position of? Yeah. All the things maybe we'll need that information talk said quite credibly. We're just looking to see if you put a url on your clipboard so we can pasted in. That seems credible I. Don't know if you need to do it every single time I type of character that seems like more that book I can tell you firsthand from developing an Iowa it's often easiest just to get it submitted to the APP store to take a bunch of permissions and It's just it's like you're trying to debugging in. Store, to accept it is just quirky. I can't tell you how many times I in other APP developers have. Just it's a very, very quirky system. So I, think this is just in Beta. I think it's really important to point out as far as the impetus for this I personally do not think it's a coincidence that tiktok was widely credited for disrupting trump's Tulsa rally a couple of weeks ago and Sarah Cooper is so famous for she's making five star she's she's amazing and those videos are brutal to trump and I I don't. That's a coincidence. She does trump limps licks lip sync. And I was talking to a friend said you know is the trump on TV I can't understand what he's saying but then I watched Cooper and that makes sense Sarah ads expressions and Gestures and all kinds of makes sense all of us and so I don't think the president should be so quick to to not like Sarah purchase he's adding context Might have something to do with it certainly in his mind because we know. You know. I don't know what he's going to do to Cape Pop stands because they were the other the other group that apparently figured out that you could register took on trump's team has got to be wise enough to know you can't take on the capons stands. Being. The capon stands the United States would crumble. Yes. That would be it would be over right. You just can't win against the K pop stands So. They were both advocating people sign up for the Tulsa Rally and not not show and Honestly the fault lies with Brad Par Scout trump's former campaign manager and his campaign team for believing all those registrations and building a giant outdoor stage. Giant parking lot so that the millions of people who are going to be coming because they all registered would have somewhere to be, and then I loved. Well, I shouldn't say that that sounds partisan was interesting to see the one person with the baby stroller in that giant area and the rest of the arena half full or third full So I could see why he might be a little angry about that. Is there. No, Matt. And I'm not putting you in the position of speaking for the government I want to say that in fact, we should have said that. That Nazi for the. Federal government but you also having worked Akiko Google you understand how you know a little bit about how this stuff works the the there's not any proof that while way for instance, has ever done anything. Particularly Evil they've done some commercial espionage apparently, but nothing could particularly evil but there's the potential if they run the entire five G. Network that at some point, they could inject malicious software to the network or shut it down. Is What could Even even sounds stupid asking it. What could take time do? It's the forbidden APP. If you think about it if you don't have it on your phone, it could disappear at any time. No I think it's it's less about that although you do see companies like Amazon saying, Hey, on your work phone or work device please don't install. And they did it. Because they realize Oh we do business with these guys. Let's not this them off but wells Fargo did that I think the Department of Defense I don't know about you sds, but it's reasonable if you've got a company phone. Probably shouldn't have facebook or instagram on it either you right? Yeah. I keep my twitter and all that stuff very far away from work phone. It's my it's my personal account, but you know it's I can understand why people want to have just a a sense of okay. Let's be careful. Let's see what's going on and then You know just making sure that you can depend on the. Tools all the way down reflections on trusting trust. You can put things into a compiler, which then you can remove it from the source code and turns out that thing can stay in the compiler for years and years and years. So you know you don't WanNa be load bearing on any particular technology that you can't quite vouch for his guesses what people are thinking, what would be the legal? How could a president ban an APP in the United States I was thinking about this in the one thing the United States government is very effective at is We we we went after Isis in I sell at a very effective way instead of this Ip address to a recruitment site you can't access it. So my my guess would be the executive order would basically grafter the ISP's and say you can't go to this particular ISP but think about that I know of VPN products is sponsor show sponsored mind and to know how few seconds would take the average teenager together VPN account to just keep their tiktok going. Yesterday I downloaded the tiktok cap the first video that came up credit account 'cause I forgot my previous password was a if Tiktok it's banned. Here's how to get around it. You don't Vpn you can go into the settings, your phone, change your country of origin to Canada and then You're great. Exactly I mean it's not enforceable basically So I mean one thing Leo I think. Matt and I would probably agree that we do need to. I don't know if it's more oversight from the point of sale like on the APP store or Google play I I don't know if it's kind of an External Code audit policy for these kinds of APPs on their own by countries I. Think we agree we we need more oversight and we need to make sure all of these are not stealing data from people and just to get people very brief history lesson you know Edward Snowden had some very serious allegations about our own spying agencies using. Facebook to gather intelligence on people all around the world there's evidence for that. There's no hard evidence at this point the Tiktok is doing any of this. So if we're serious about doing this, the answer isn't to further balkanize the United States from the rest of the world the answers to form coalitions with other countries say look if you're going to operate here in, you know if you're gonNA have the software operating in our country here, the rule you have to follow you can't just arbitrarily download people's Phone books, there's going to be You know civil fights. That's clearly the way to go is got to be bigger than just tiktok. I'm just looking at Tick Tock on my iphone. It has access to my photos because I gave it access to my photo so I could put a profile picture on there. it gives me notifications I could turn that off. That's that's a push though that's not a poll. Background APP refresh means it can run in the background and cellular data doesn't ask for. location data doesn't ask for I mean facebook asks for ten times more. That's why I don't have it on my phone. I. mean the worst thing Tiktok does is waste millions of hours a productivity, and maybe that's a recent ban I don't know. But I, just I don't understand how it could be used. If it's not getting location permissions, how could it be used maliciously and I think it is getting location position. I know that I've know anecdotally at least from a couple of friends whenever they let's say go to Connecticut to visit family or something they will suddenly get Connecticut. Themed Tiktok content or something similar. Okay. that could just be from. Connection you can get that from the IP address so they could get a Geo location through IP address without asking APP without telling apple that they're doing that that would make sense. Okay. So they're getting them. Every cannon probably, I hate to say it probably does do that.

Facebook United States President Trump Tiktok Microsoft Iowa Tulsa Sarah Cooper Matt Executive Donald Trump Zena Phobia Paris Chuck Schumer Connecticut
Europe's Top Court Strikes Down Key Rules Of U.S.-EU Data Transfer

Wall Street Breakfast

00:45 sec | 5 months ago

Europe's Top Court Strikes Down Key Rules Of U.S.-EU Data Transfer

"In a major case, surrounding data privacy Europe's top court has invalidated the privacy shield. An EU US framework used to transfer personal data across the Atlantic. The ruling came in a clash between facebook. An Australian privacy activists Max Trams who has challenged the tech giants handling of EU citizens data ever since Edward Snowden spine revelations in two thousand thirteen, while the ruling does not mean an immediate halt to all data transfers outside the U. The court upheld the validity of standard contractual clauses. Two processors established in third countries scrutiny over data transfers will be ramped up a new system also have to be implemented, which guarantees that European data is afforded the same standard of privacy protection in the US.

EU United States Max Trams Edward Snowden Facebook Europe Atlantic
EU court invalidates data-sharing pact with US

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

EU court invalidates data-sharing pact with US

"The European union's top court has ruled that an agreement that allows a big tech companies to transfer data to the U. S. is invalid and that national regulators it needs take tougher action to protect users data the ruling doesn't mean an immediate halt to old data transfers outside the EU there is another legal mechanism that some companies can use but it means that the scrutiny over data transfers will be ramped up and that the EU and the US may have to find a new system that guarantees that Europeans data is afforded the same protection in the US as it is in the E. U. the case began after former US National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden revealed in two thousand and thirteen that the American government was snooping on people's online data and communications center shockingly London

European Union United States E. U. Edward Snowden American Government London Us National Security Agency
Unrest erupts all over US, including Washington DC, following the death of George Floyd

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:23 min | 6 months ago

Unrest erupts all over US, including Washington DC, following the death of George Floyd

"Has spread across America riots and protests breaking out in at least twenty major cities sparked by the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis things were tense here in DC even close to the White House White House went into lockdown mode things evolved very quickly we were actually at our life position outside when we started hearing chanting and yelling we heard people saying things like George Floyd's name I can't breathe I even some anti trump slogans like Hey Hey ho ho Donald Trump has got to go those were the types of things that we were hearing that CVS is Nicole Killian in Maryland leaders and Anna Rundle county are denouncing the actions of the Minneapolis police officers who were involved in George Floyd's arrest the people all over this community who have just reached the point of being fed up Carl Snowden with the caucus of African American leaders joined Anna Rundle county executive Stuart pigment and civic activist in denouncing the death of George Floyd a black man who died after a Minneapolis police officer knelt on Floyd's neck for nearly nine minutes Snowden urged the county executive to keep money in the county budget for police body cameras with body cameras have proven to be is that I'm blanking out there will tell a story that is not based on people's perspective of what happened Kate Ryan WTOP

George Floyd White House White House Donald Trump Nicole Killian Carl Snowden Executive Kate Ryan Wtop America Minneapolis Maryland Anna Rundle County Anna Rundle Officer
"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:41 min | 6 months ago

"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

"What did he mean snowden wanted advocates on his side he wanted a pure and clear message of dissent against the way the NSA was behaving And he wanted nothing that would raise any doubts or questions about him or or get into his personal life..

snowden
The surprising danger that deepfakes pose to the presidential elections

The 3:59

14:47 min | 7 months ago

The surprising danger that deepfakes pose to the presidential elections

"Deep fakes. Those digital manipulated videos. That look scary. Real pose a threat to the upcoming presidential election. Real danger will surprise you. I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge me reporter John Salesman. Thanks for joining me Joan. Yeah it's great to be back on the daily charge so we've all heard of deep fix but you don't think there's actually a real risk in say candid footage of Joe Biden. Donald trump actually saying something crazy and swing voters. What's real danger deep fix with this election? The Deepak experts that I talk to yes. They said that they're not most worried about a candidate depict like that like something where Donald Trump or Joe Biden is admitting to a hot button. Crime or saying something really inflammatory with. They're more concerned about are two things. One is known as the Liars Dividend. And that's this concept that as more people know that the fakes exists that there can be these completely false highly realistic out there. It gives people who are caught in the act and are guilty more credibility when they deny something when they denial legit video by saying. Oh you heard deep fix. You can't trust what you see anymore. And that just muddies the waters and makes it harder for people to understand and trust what is truth. And what is fiction? Yeah that's that sounds very dangerous because that's like it damages the credibility of basically everything right. Because if you could point to this one thing is oh see this fake. It applies to everything essentially right. Yeah it makes it harder. You know we. Our brains have been wired for so long to believe what we see. And we've learned to you. Know as Photoshop came along and as other sorts of media manipulation have come a long. We've been able to catch up and at least be more skeptical of those but because video is tricking your eyes and your ears because the AI that powers depicts is so sophisticated and so good and making things look real. That's really really deep wiring in your brain telling you all these signals like trust this. Trust this trust this and so when people start saying. Hey you can't trust that anymore. It just means that it's harder for anyone to understand what's even real and speaking of the AI aspect of things you have a nice breakdown of how deep fix work like how how are these videos created defects are created by a kind of artificial intelligence called Ganz that's short for generative adversarial networks and the the the basic way that they work is they have to neural networks. Networks are a kind of learning. That's based on how the kind of inspired by how the brain works so imagine that these two neural networks are actually an artist and an art critic and they're locked in rooms right next to each other. The artist creates a painting trying to make something that looks like a masterpiece. And he shuffles that painting into a stack of other paintings that actually are works by the go or we're in war or whatever they take that stack moving into art critics room and art critic picks out which ones he thinks are a forgeries. The ones that aren't the real masterpieces. That feedback goes back to the artists and the artists gets better and better and better at figuring out how to make a really convincing fake masterpiece up to the point where he's able to he or she is able to. This artificial neural network is able to make something that can trick the critic into thinking that what is fake is actually real. That's how these sort of artificial intelligence systems work. So I mean that sounds complicated by no love this kind of working superfast background but how easy is it for someone to actually make a deep? Do It depends what kind of deep lake we're talking about. You know there are open source tools to make the kind of celebrity face swaps the Elon. Musk sauna babies had sort of thing. They're open source tool sick at that. They're not as easy. Those aren't as easy to make us like a meam or an animated Gif. You need to have technological savvy Know How to get. You need to have a pretty powerful computer you need. Large data sets unique things. That are more difficult than like making taking a photo putting some white text on it of course so those are berry accessible with are kind of acceptable. But what we're talking about here talking about election defects now. These are the kind of things all the experts that I talked to say. You know we have a lower hurdle to suspend disbelief when we're looking at Elon. Musk space on a baby. But when you're presented with a video of a candidate for president or the president of the United States we have a luckily human beings. Have they kind of set a higher bar that you have to clear to actually believe that it's true so what that means is kind of very sophisticated high end e fix that would threaten on election? Those are really reserved for people that work at universities or research centres powerful computers or state actors that have that kind of computing power like China at their disposal. So the idea here. That Kennedy fakes are less of a risk. Like what are some of the defects? We should be worried about what people are more worried about aren't necessarily these candidates it's more an a deep lake that attacks your faith in the election rather than your trust in a candidate so instead of having what are the reasons is at the state in our political discourse where we're very divided. I think everyone agrees that we're divided and our our opinions seem more entrenched than they had before and so in that environment it's harder to convince or sway voters either way with a fake video. You know like if you were to make a video of Donald Trump's hair flying off or something like it will only solidify your beliefs if you liked on trump you'll be like that's a fake. I like Donald Trump. Even more. If you don't like him you'll be like he looks Tom. I dislike them even more. And so a more cunning way to use a deep fake to disrupt the US election would be to create a deep fake of say like an authoritative news anchor or a governor or authority. Figure who not as many people know saying things like. We're in the age of Kobe. Nineteen we have marsh. It's two days before election martial law. You cannot go to your polling place or to create like news. Anchors saying there There are you know there are some sort of you. Know armed militants some sort of supremacists or militants. That are arming themselves. Going to polling places in a specific neighborhood these kind of people need to be scared about showing up to vote and in that way you can suppress votes and you can also after the vote undermine people's faith in the result if you have an authoritative figure saying something about how we have footage of vote-switching from trump to Biden That could so this sort of distrust not only in going to the election but after the election in the results themselves. That's an interesting point because it's it's not necessarily like a defect that would make Joe Biden. Say something like I killed the spurs like this is these are actually kind of believable is right. I think that's your point like this is a lot more coming. It's lot a lot more nuance but I think. That's what makes the lila easier to swallow the fact that it is all what you're saying. It's pretty plausible sounded. Yeah and the other thing to keep in mind. Is that a candidate. Deep fake would. It's kind of like this Yin and Yang. Were like the the head of the snake is eating the tail like a candidate. D. Fake would only be successful if it basically goes viral and lots of people see it right but when it goes viral. One thing that the. Us has say what you will about the US press core. We have a robust free Press we have a robust free press entrenched in our country other countries where there are dictatorships or more emerging democracies. They don't have that quite at their disposal as much as we do. So if a candidate of the president or Joe Biden were to come out. We do have the capacity here built into our democracy to have a force of people trying quickly as possible. To debunk it. Whereas if you were somebody that wanted to make a deep fake that could actually just robbed or suppress boats. It would be more successful if it doesn't go viral if it's not something that draws the attention of an entire press corps. That's entirely focused on this on this election. And so and that way could also kind of be the most successful not going viral kind of existing on the radar enough to disrupt people in say one or two counties that are really important in a swing states. And that wouldn't draw the attention of a national press corps debunk it well defects captial of tension and headlines is really just sort of one way to manipulate the Info right like this. We're looking at it a little bit too narrow. If we're just focusing on defects is that is that the case. Yeah you know. It's it makes sense that people would be scared of depicts because you know as we talked about earlier it. It undermines the species assumption. That if I see it I can believe it. And so that's why. There's a lot of fear around deep fakes and what they could pinch the harm that could potentially cause but the reality is you know because of some of these things we talked before about. How really sophisticated deep picks are still inaccessible to a wide right of people? That's not true for like you said memes for slowing down video like the Pelosi sounding drunk video that went viral. Those are kinds of media manipulations. Sometimes people refer to them as shallow fakes or cheap. Fix that have the power of being cheap easy and still incredibly effective. And so. That's why you know. One of the Edward Snowden slayer. Aclu lawyer this comparison. He said that you know looking at election information manipulation by only looking at depict looking at it through a straw. You're just not seeing. You're seeing something really scary. But you're not seeing the much. Bigger picture of how things could be disrupted in twenty twenty oxygen. Russia played a big role in. You know clouding the two thousand sixteen elections with misinformation disinformation. And you know you talked about how it takes a lot of resources for these fakes to be effective. Obviously Russia's a country with a lot of resources like should we should we be worried about Russia antiques. Well so I talked to one expert on the national security locations of depicts his. Name's Clint Watts. He testified to Congress. He testified to senators about just the sort of thing and he says you know anything's possible but Russia and their disinformation tactics. They are more skilled at the art of this information than they are at the science of deep fakery so they although anything's possible. Russia has lots of oil money could always who knows what Russia could do. But he's more interested in the potential in China or other places China in particular as a place. Where China has you know. They have supercomputers I think Stephen Shanklin expert on nonstop. He always has that but I think they have. More supercomputers than we have in the US or whatever compute they've got lots of supercomputers which is important for making the takes no for sure beyond supercomputers they've invested heavily artificial intelligence. The one leads in the world in a appear that neural network. That's that stuff is a recipe for a lot of potential problems. Down the line. Yeah in China they have completely synthetic television personalities like deep fake news anchors so that a very authoritative anchor can report on something without actually take time out of his day to report on it The fact that a country like that if if they wanted to do that then they could They are the ones that are in the best position to create a deep fake That would disrupt global geopolitics. But you know. State actors could create other kinds of deep fakes. That could cause other kinds of problems. Those are in the world so you know it's just doomsday scenario. No matter how you look at it well that's that's glorious and very positive Just lastly I mean I think we can all figure out that Elon. Musk is not really a baby. But are there giving advice for for like how despotic fake. Or or just a you know how to be a little bit more vigilant when looking at some of the content that surfaces around the web. Yeah so I asked everyone. I talk to you all the extra Saturday. I asked this question. And there's no silver bullet like little loophole that you can find for understanding it's fake For debunking it on your own. If it's a real deep fake than your eyes won't save you like watching it. You won't be able to tell that it's like that's the whole point of a defense that it's an AI. Created where the power of this artificial intelligence outstrips like. Our brains are very attuned human faces. But they're not so fast that they can keep up with how well deep fake technology can progress. And so you know. We don't have computers in our brains that are as powerful as supercomputers at research universities So the advice for normal people that are like hey how do I even know of this fake? It really comes down to like basic hygiene about what you're exposed to if you see a video and it seems like it's so outlandish that it couldn't be true than might not be and if you see a video that is clearly something trying to appeal to some person some segments inflammatory instincts. That's also reason to be skeptical defects just mean. Everyone needs to do what we should be doing with other kinds of manipulated media slowdown. And think before you share. It's hard to do and it's even harder when we're talking about deep ix but it's just as important to act that way what you're presented with a really realistic video as you would be if you presented with a mean or like a cheap slowed down video of a drunk. Nancy Pelosi Right. Yeah well. That's good advice in general whether it's an article or D do a little bit of Homework. Thinks through what you're actually looking at

Joe Biden Donald Trump United States China Russia Elon Nancy Pelosi President Trump D. Fake Roger Chang Liars Dividend Joan Tricking Photoshop John Salesman Reporter
Lamar reviews 'The Stranger'

Bob and Sheri

04:38 min | 8 months ago

Lamar reviews 'The Stranger'

"Good friend of ours recommended the stranger and she was not wrong. The Stranger is based on a novel by Hauling Cohen. And it was originally set in New Jersey but Netflix chose to move to England because evidently British mysteries or a lot cooler than American mysteries. And I don't disagree but along with that. Coolness comes that British accent that makes everybody sound smarter and what they're saying seem more important. It has its own set of problems. I can't always understand what they're saying to characters home sentences that will make everything clear with a hugely dramatic consequence and cargoes wait. What did you say go? We wish? Stop and rewind which means instead of going back to riot before the two sentences we wind up twelve minutes earlier so they're not trying to fast forward back to where we were and zoo passed it and then we see some that we should have seen until we understood those two sentences and callers like what are you doing and I said I'm over here if you could do any better take the remote now. We're having a fight over this because it's it's nuts nuts and it happened at least three or four times in each episode. So now it's like I don't know the words they're using this need. I need less mumbling. Okay and so what? I should have done what I'm telling everybody else to do. If you have this problem it's turn on the closed caption it so you can see what these fools are talking about. It's at don't ever have this problem. One Lamar the TV show peaky blinders learned how to turn the clothes caption on A. I agree with what you're saying but right now there's some guy from England who's living in the United States saying are you telling me some guy from Georgia is criticizing how the English speak what they invented the language. At least it looks like they could speak it clearly. Mean no it's true. It's very and the toughest understand out of the all of the United Kingdom Areas is Scotland Scottish. Accent to me. I can't even understand what they're selling. Well I keep them I turn on the closed caption for peaky blinders and for outlander because when some of the side outlander characters dodger that. I'm pretty sure that Berta just said something critical to the plot. I have no idea what it was so I feel you Lamar. When Kelly was learning Japanese. She told me that she would. She would go to this place where the old Japanese men were talked to them. She said the hardest thing to understand is old because everybody they've been talking to each other for so long they just sort of say half the word and everybody's sort of picks up and I think this is what's happening here. I'm not getting the whole things I don't know anyway. Back to the story the series Stewart Richard Armitage and hit as Adam price season attorney has a wife and two boys. He's approached by this attractive young woman. The Stranger played by Hannah. Joe John Cameron and she tells him that his wife has a secret and she has been lying to him for the last two years she tells him or he can find the proof and now that he knows that she's a liar. He no longer has to stay with her so this she just leaves now. When he confronts his wife his wife says well. There's more to it and I'll tell you everything but not right this minute it while this is going on. A decapitated animal is discovered in the middle of the town. Along with that comes. Multiple visits from the stranger to other people naked bodies found in the woods. Really Bad Cup. I really good cup murder embezzlement blackmail infidelity and so many other things that have nothing to do with each other or do they have power. They connected snowden brings more questions but no answers. It's just definitely been show. You can't stop once you start there eight episodes. They're forty two minutes just rated TV may for language include the F word a lot edgier seat twist and turns with a lot of surprises and a lot of British monklands. It's you have no idea what's going on but overall it's a good series. My schoolwork is four solid budweiser. I enjoyed

Kelly Joe John Cameron Lamar England Hauling Cohen Netflix New Jersey United Kingdom Scotland Scottish Berta United States Stewart Richard Armitage Hannah Snowden Attorney Georgia Murder Embezzlement Adam
To Track Coronavirus, Israel Moves to Tap Secret Trove of Cellphone Data

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

08:02 min | 9 months ago

To Track Coronavirus, Israel Moves to Tap Secret Trove of Cellphone Data

"Brand so far Israel hasn't been hit as hard by the code nineteen outbreak as countries like China Italy or even neighboring Iran Israel's health ministry said today more than three hundred Israelis have tested positive but there have been no deaths so far Palestinians say they've diagnosed forty one people in the west bank and non in Gaza but Israel is still taking drastic steps to get a handle on this coronavirus they're tracking the movement of people who have tested positive including tapping into a secret cache of cell phone data and it might have been here to the US government is reportedly in talks with Facebook Google and other tech companies about using location data to track people with the disease and that's all raising big questions about privacy and government intrusion David how finger is the Jerusalem bureau chief for The New York Times and he joins us now hi how are you I'm good thank you so prime minister Netanyahu made this announcement last night what do you say yes so he he he what didn't get a whole lot of detail about what they're up to but basically you know it's an emergency Israel's broad emergency powers to do pretty much anything the government once more for as long as it wants and as we reported it turns out that since two thousand and two the secret the shin bet the the internal security agency has been routinely amassing pretty much every all the all the meta data on cellphones are belonging to all the the the major cell phone providers here it's it's been used it was intended to combat terrorism which is obviously an ongoing problem and you know it it it it's generally understood to have been used against the Palestinians but they've got all this data sitting in a big pile somewhere and the idea now is that they can take people who are known to be carriers or of the of the corona virus and go back to that truth of data figure out where they went I'm pretty hopefully pretty precisely and then cross matches against the the cellphone locations of the geo locations of other people to find you know people who cross paths in space and time with these people are known to be carrying the virus and then the ideas that they might send a text message to people who may have you know cross paths saying that you were in close proximity to sun sun so if some person carrying virus you should get yourself into quarantine there's a lot of problems with this as you can imagine just the invasion of privacy which is some technical issues I mean you know for one thing as I understand it's a lot easier to type to to to be clear on the precise location of a form when you're actually you know hacked into our monitoring that phone live then when you're going through archives to data that might not be quite as some precise but again what they're saying is that you know given the choice between narrowing down and and and having like a least a comprehensive path of some person to some you know if it's through some time knowing exactly where they went even if it's not even if it's not in point accurate is better than relying on people in interviews to say with total honesty and recall exactly where they were you know relying on honesty and candor but this is taking this can take a look I mean that this could involve a huge amount of people right so you can apparently have this virus and not even show symptoms and be walking around going to all sorts of places in Tel Aviv for example interacting with all sorts of people shopkeepers yes arriver that's true I mean one thing we don't know for example in New York Tel Aviv is a verb is a vertical city right you know I mean is this gonna be a point on a map well what if it's in a very tall building you know what if it comes close to a very tall building we we don't know how right the accuracy is and when you when you start multiplying that's about you know across a lot of people and whatever the error rate is you can have an enormous number of false positives to the point where you wonder whether it's really worth the effort I mean that's what one of things that people are saying here is you know why are they grasping at this quick you know techie fix when we could just put it be putting our energy and our money and our effort into a great you know more testing which is really going to get the bang for the Buck so there's a lot of issues at play what is the testing scenario right now in Israel it's better the United States it's not as as good as S. like South Korea I think it's something around four hundred people per million but you know which is way better than that states but they're still trying to get more and more people tested they're now talking about bringing around some kind of dries up queue for for testing in the coming days but it's you know it's not anywhere near anybody where where people want to be right well so get getting back to this idea of the geo locating is this something that they're actively doing or they're talking about doing have they already reach out to people who have who have had contact with you know they just authorize this overnight one of things people took issue with that was that was done at like one in the morning without legislative approval you know of course permission at Yahoo says you know every hour that we delay you know people can be dying so they're rushing to do it it is not clear how quickly they will be able to go about it and do you know people are trying to get them to get other you know the legislator approvals and is a democracy here this argument going on but the you know and the people are trying to do it the secret service and and the judge the Attorney General promised to do it within you know reasonable bounds and and you know not abusing their access to this information promising just destroyed in a timely way and so on but we don't know how quickly they can do it and we can you know a lot of this is very secret so we don't really know exactly what they're gonna do either yeah what will start to find out when they actually start sending some of those text messages right so meanwhile the country is in the midst of some political turmoil there's a power struggle between Netanyahu and Benny Gantz opposition leader is Benny Gantz coming out against us or is he in favor of it too and saying I want to put again that's that's that's an interesting thing I mean what what I was struck by to be honest after our story was published was how people work you know it's very unlike the United States people comes barely raised an eyebrow at the fact that the government had been collecting all this information about their cellphones for so many years it's like eighteen years you recall the uproar in the United States with the snow and but the Snowden affair so you know here really people you know are saying well we have to do it you know according to the right what was the right authorization in the right oversight if to make sure it's done you know appropriately and carefully and we're not gonna sweeping too many people up you know with one big net but really what I learned is that it is really have a the system has a really high degree of confidence in the in the shin bet their third total security agency they rely on them to to protect their safety to go after the bad guys in general that has been you know hunting down terror here it's a different scenario but they haven't really squandered the the the public's trust yet what people were saying to me is you know if I should ever really wanted to like abuse its power it could have done that years ago so they have they have a pretty high threshold of conscious before before this goes

Israel China Italy
"snowden" Discussed on At Liberty

At Liberty

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"snowden" Discussed on At Liberty

"From the ACLU this is at liberty. I'M EMERSON SYKES A staff Aphids Ernie here at the ACLU and your host today. I'm handing hosting responsibilities responsibilities to my boss ACU Executive Director Anthony Romero a few days ago he interviewed. NSA WHISTLE BLOWER ACLU client Edward Snowden in front of a live audience at the Brooklyn Public Library. Anthony spoke to snowden about his memoir permanent record. I'll be back with you as usual for the next episode. I hope you enjoy the interview. The hello everyone it is a pleasure to be with you here tonight. In Brooklyn where I live Hello Ed we'll get to you in a second. I'm really thrilled to be talking to you about this incredible new book permanent record. If you haven't read it you must it is beautifully written. It tells a very personal story. That's relevant not just to the one man who's the author tells a personal story about each and every single one of us. It is so good that it's number two on the New York. You're at times bestseller lists congratulations and the US government is suing the author as an effort to try to shut the book down in perhaps is helping promote it in fact ed sparked a historic worldwide debate about privacy and technology when you expose evidence of the mass surveillance that was was happening unbeknownst to the American people or even to members of Congress so this is not our first conversation at an I had a chance to sit face to face a couple all times Moscow couple times with robot couple times on video chat but I've been really looking forward to this the.

ACLU Anthony Romero Edward Snowden times bestseller Brooklyn Public Library EMERSON SYKES Brooklyn US New York ACU Executive Director Congress Moscow
"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for NPR comes from Newman's own foundation working to nourish the common good by donating all profits from Newman's own food products products to charitable organizations that seek to make the world a better place more information is available at Newman's own foundation dot org support for NPR are coming from whyy presenting the podcast eleanor amplified and adventure series kids love and will make those summer road trips a little easier on everyone everyone here reporter Eleanor outwit crafty villains and solve mysteries as she travels the globe to get the big story available where you get podcasts or at whyy dot org this is fresh air and we're speaking with Edward Snowden who worked for several years in the US intelligence community in two thousand thirteen he provided top secret documents about US surveillance of American citizens to three journalists which resulted in his indictment on alleged violations of the espionage act. He's written a new memoir called permanent record. He spoke to us from his apartment. In Moscow. You fully expected to be identified. You eventually identified yourself off to explain your motives as you were planning this. What kind of future did you envision for yourself. The likeliest outcome from hands down was that I'd spend the rest of my life in an orange jumpsuit but in present yes but that was that was a risk that I had to take so now. You're you've been in Moscow for six years. Lindsay Milk has join your now married. you live in a two bedroom agenda -partment. What kind of security precautions do you take..

Edward Snowden Newman eleanor Moscow NPR US whyy Lindsay Milk reporter six years Milk
"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:38 min | 1 year ago

"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Percent off select items with Promo code real what happens when Ronald McDonald Donald Walks into a poor immigrant neighborhood in the south of France and sets off a super sized revolution. The story of how company Slogan Salvo Shakes and Burgers became a rallying cry for workers in France. NPR's rough translation this is fresh air and we're speaking with Edward Snowden who worked for several years in the US intelligence community in two thousand thirteen he provided top secret documents about US surveillance of American citizens to three journalists which resulted in his indictment for allegedly violating the espionage act. He's written a new memoir called permanent record. He spoke to us from his apartment in Moscow. So I WANNA talk about your decision to release these access to many documents to three three journalists and just talk about why you took the course you did and why some critics say you had other options. One thing people say is look. There's a system. There are the inspector general's offices of each of these agencies. Why couldn't you go to them. we'll this is. This is a great question. for one we've never seen the inspector general's office actually being effective safeguard for the constitution itself we have had since. I came forward one of the inspector her general employees. I believe the deputy inspector general for the NSA comparison. If snowden had come to me I would have explained to him. His misconceptions exceptions about how these programs work how these things are in fact legal how these things are in fact constitutional and maybe he wouldn't have had to do this at all. The inspector general is a great resource to have if someone is a middle manager and they're engaged in sexual harassment door they are embezzling or or something of that nature but if you have a criminal conspiracy inside not just the leadership of the NSA but in fact in the White House that is run by the vice president's own lawyer in the Bush Administration Dick Cheney had a lawyer named David Addington who said building this mass surveillance system and the very first instance was legal when in fact he knew that was not the case but what do you do. This is asking you the hens to report the Fox's misbehavior to the Fox himself and I want to point out just just real quickly that is not in contention that these programs were illegal. These programs were likely unconstitutional. That's not my assertion. That is the Certian of very first Federal Court ruling of Uh Judge Leon in the wake of these disclosures prior to the revelations of mass surveillance in two thousand thirteen the government as I said these things weren't happening now be if they were happening. They were legal and see. Why are you even asking about this. In the first place the description in the book of how you worked through how you were going to release this material and how you contacted the journalist and provided at Israeli fascinating we won't have time to go into it here but I wanNA talk to you about some of the specific specific arrangements you made you three journalists were provided with access to thousands of documents that you had what conditions did did you impose on their use. What did you tell the journalists about what they could do and not do when we look at what happened what produced this the system of checks and balances failed and so if I come forward myself and said look this is wrong this violation of the constitution. I'm the president of secrets and I'm going to decide what the public needs. No one I just throw out on the internet which wouldn't be hard from technologist. Coulda done this in an afternoon. There's a risk implied in that. What if I was wrong. What if I didn't understand and these things what if it wasn't fact legal or constitutional or these programs effective rather than as I believed ineffective which later was confirmed by the Obama Administration. These programs weren't saving lives. They had some intelligence value but they didn't have a public safety value. At least that was meaningful so what I did did was I try to reconstruct the system of checks and balances by using myself to provide documents to the journalists but never to publish them myself. People don't realize this but I never made public a single document. I trust that role to the journalists public did and did not need to know before the journalists published these stories they had to go to the government and this was a condition that required them to do and tell the government warned them. They're about to run the story about this program and the government could argue against publication say you've got it wrong or you've got it right but if you publish this is going to hurt somebody. I never case. I'm aware of that. Process was followed and that's why in two thousand nineteen we've never seen any evidence at all presented by the government that someone's been harmed as a result of the stories. That's why believe these stories won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. It's because there is a way that you you can maximize the public benefit of a free press and them aggressively contesting the government's monopoly on information at the same time. I mitigate the risks of even a very large disclosure of documents by simply making sure that you trust the right people the right sector of society with the right system to keep everyone honest because all of us work better together than we do alone it. I will say that on that question of whether this has put hard American interests or put people people endanger there was an AP story last year at which quarter spokesman for the National Counterintelligence Insecurity Center as saying Snowden disclosed documents have put US personnel or facilities at risk around the world and damaged intelligence collection efforts exposed to tools used to amass intelligence et CETERA. Are they wrong now. They are wrong long. Look I can't correct six years of lives in sixty seconds but when you look at all of those claims they're always merely allegations. The government has never put forward any evidence and they have investigated me for six years so has basically every other government on the planet and you journalists know better better than anyone else that the government aggressively leaks when it's in its favor you can look at this. White House right now relief if disclosures of classified information just hard stop caused damage if they created risks for US personnel programs three quarters of the White House would be imprisoned right now. They're not because the vast majority of leaks while they are uncomfortable while they are embarrassing or sometimes beneficial to government far more is classified than actually needs to be so yes. The government has made those allegations and they will continue to make these allegations but look the thing that we always have to ask is what is the evidence to back that assertion and they've never ever provided that and I'm quite confident. They never will because it didn't happen. We're speaking with Edward Snowden. His new memoir is called permanent record will continue our conversation after short break this is fresh air.

government Edward Snowden US NSA White House deputy inspector general Ronald McDonald Donald Walks NPR Moscow France Burgers Pulitzer Prize contesting Federal Court Fox Dick Cheney Public Service David Addington Obama Administration harassment
"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The NSA through the FBI and this being replicated again and again and again throughout the country and across the world. It's not everywhere but it's closed just everywhere as we can get and this means. It's basically every communication that can be intercepted. that can be stored award can be processed at can be decrypted. We can search and we can read. You Sat at one of these terminals and had access to this. Can you describe looking at the material of a professor in Indonesia right yes so this is an academic He is just some kind of engineer. I believe he's applying for either a position or a period of study at a university in Iran and the US government for whatever reason has an interest in this particular university. We don't spy on every university but we spy on interestingly a lot of them which would surprise people but is. Iran so people go okay. You know maybe there's some intelligence value. Maybe this guy's a terrorist and what struck me here. Was that normally when we do a deep dive and we look into someone it's because they're up to no good it's because they're associated with terrorism. this gentleman affect was not he's applying to university but he's caught up in the dragnet and so they have his university admissions application they have pictures of his passport and then. I see something unusual something that I normally see. I see a video file now. Now we can intercept video files just like we do with everything else but this one to me indicated that it was produced because we had hacked his machine we had turned his Webcam on while he was at the machine and we do this. Sometimes to to confirm particularly infrastructure analysts who at this anonymous honest machine is actually using it to fund. He's on his laptop right. Yes he's he's on his laptop and we're we're looking at the man behind the device in his lap his little boy a toddler who's just playing on the keyboard and the father smiling and Lou boy looks at the Webcam. It's it's just a glimpse but to me it seems as though he's looking at me in it reminds me of my childhood of learning about technology with with my own father and I realized this man has done nothing wrong. He's just trying to get a job. He's just trying to study. He's just trying to get through life like all of us are and yet. He's caught up. His children are caught up. We we are all caught up by a system that we were not allowed to know existed but we were not allowed to vote whether this was proper or improper and courts were not allowed to assess open courts real courts whether it was proper and constitution Where do we go from there. Edward Snowden is new memoir is called permanent record will continue our conversation after a short break this is fresh.

Lou boy Iran Edward Snowden NSA FBI Indonesia professor engineer US
"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Air's Dave Davies recorded with Edward Snowden a former. It systems manager who worked under contract for the national security the agency in two thousand thirteen he gave three journalists access to thousands of classified documents describing US intelligence agencies surveillance of American can citizens snowden spoke today through an Internet connection from his apartment in Moscow a year a guy who believed end the US intelligence services. You are the son of two career government servants. When you discover this broad surveillance what what impact does it have on emotionally. It was a severe relation because think about it and you know people look let me now and they think I'm this crazy. I am this extremist whatever some people have a misconception that guy he set out to burn down the NSA but that's not what this this was about in many ways twenty thirteen wasn't about surveillance at all what it was that was a violation of the constitution what was about democracy and government. I had signed lined up to help my country and my very first day entering into duty for the CIA. I was required to pledge an oath of service now. A lot of people confused. I think there's an oath of secrecy but this is important understand. There's a secrecy agreement. This is a civil agreement with the government. A nondisclosure agreement uncalled standard form three twelve very exciting that says you won't talk to journalists. You won't write books. I have done but a the when you give this of service. It's something very different. It's a pledge of allegiance not to the agency not to a government not the president but to support support and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic and so when I realized we have been violating in secret the fourth amendment of the Constitution for the better part of a decade and the rate of violations increasing the scope of the violations increasing with every day we are committing Finland. He's in the United States at under a direct mandate from the White House billions of times a day honestly I fell into depression and this leads to a period where I resigned from what would be considered direct mission related related work out in Japan and the foreign field as we call it and I returned to a purely corporate position for Dell as a as a sales official don't let CIA headquarters before you actually go through the revelations of this material you described going to Fort Meade the NSA's essays headquarters and you see analysts using a tool that allows them to exploit the fruits of all this mass surveillance. It's a tool called X. Key Key score. Would it allow these guys to do okay so you to do so when you think about all of these intelligence programs you've heard of right. They've got your email. I got your Internet communications. They've got your phone calls but for everybody everywhere. Obviously this isn't just a straight stream. People are reading. Is it comes in because it would take more hours in the day. Hey thank you know any government has people go through so what they actually do is they just dump this into gigantic data centers like they've built in. BLUFF DALE UTAH and other smaller couvert ones around the world so they don't have to move data around so they construct what's called a distributed query system you can think of this like Google for spies and what it does anywhere in the world that we've collected information every were in. Sep Intercepting Communications. Now we have have our own little search engine. It's Google box that little prompt that you can access from your desk wherever you are just an NSA NSA internal website and you can type in anybody's phone number anybody's email address any computers Internet address and the anywhere on the Internet one of our sensors collected a communication it will look through instantly everything that it has and it will send just the results back to that employee so you can spy on anyone in the world from anywhere in the world as long as you have access to this network work in this tool so if you had the clearance you pick a name you get. Their phone calls their web searches. What so I'm working with the Internet side of it we have people who work with telephony data which is largely phone calls and S.'s but your Internet data eight is everything everything largely that transit the global communication network if you send it over satellite hop we have what are called foreign set foreign satellite sites sites all over the world that are just listening to the sky. If you're sending it to a cell phone tower well we hack those all over the world to the best of our ability. If you send.

US NSA CIA Edward Snowden Google Air Dave Davies Moscow Finland Dell president UTAH S. White House Fort Meade Japan official
"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

12:16 min | 1 year ago

"snowden" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Ideas and and encouraging meaningful conversation to privacy advocates our guest Edward Snowden is a hero a whistle blower who exposed abuses by government intelligence intelligence agencies to others. He's a traitor who exposed national security secrets. SNOWDEN WASN'T IT systems expert working under contract for the the National Security Agency in twenty thirteen when he provided three journalists with thousands of top secret documents about US intelligence agencies surveillance of American citizens the revelations made snowden a wanted man accused of violating the espionage act they also led to changes in the laws and standards entered governing US intelligence agencies and the practices of US technology companies which now encrypt much of their web traffic for security snowden has lived live for the past six years in Russia out of reach of American law. He's written a new memoir about his life and experiences in the intelligence community. It's called Permanent Senate record. SNOWDEN spoke to fresh air's. Dave Davies via an Internet connection from snowden apartment in Moscow will Edward Snowden. Welcome to fresh air. I want to begin with the suspicion that some have that you are. A tool of the Russian government. Were collaborating with Russia. I I know that you ended up in Russia stranded at the airport because you had released these documents to journalists in Hong Kong and had booked a flight flight to Kito but after the first leg in Moscow your passport was invalidated by the US State Department so he got stuck in Moscow. You met a Russian intelligence is operatives. You believe at the airport that day in two thousand thirteen. What was the conversation like you have to remember that I worked for the Central Intelligence Agency? I'm very skeptical because of every intelligence service at this point in my life. I've just worked with journalists to reveal mass surveillance up. Now I know again having been trained ended the CIA through customs are what an interdiction at passport control looks like very much what to expect if anybody is up to no good and so the main thing is to survive getting through Russia on route then to Cuba Venezuela and onto Ecuador you have to travel through non on extradition countries build the kind of Airbridge to get one destination to the other from Hong Kong because every direct flight from Hong Kong I'm to Ecuador goes over. US airspace right so they can bring you down over California which is a very problematic thing to be vulnerable to for a person in my position so what I wasn't expecting was that the United States government itself as you said would cancel my passport so I'm stopped at at passport control and there's this you know the standard passport officer and when I go through the line. He takes a little bit too long. He picks phony makes call and I realize it's longer than everybody else and suddenly he looks at me. Just says did his problem with passport. Come with and I'm lead very quickly into this business lounge. which this very much not standard normally you'd be taken off to the security area and go in and it's a room full of Russian? Guys in business suits an unmistakably. There's the old guy he's in charge and he begins to Mak- what the CIA would call cold pitch now. This is where you have no history but they try to just say do you. You want to cooperate with us now. This is a very unusual situation being foreign intelligence officer because these kind of pitches requests requests for cooperation or almost always made clandestinely. They're made in private where they can be denied in. The first thing I'm thinking about because every alarm bell in my head is ringing is are they recording this are they using this to try to blackmail meet coerce me so immediately. I go look I worked for the CIA okay. I know what this is. I know what this how this is supposed to go. This is not going to be that kind of conversation. I'm not going to cooperate. I don't have any documentation with me and this is something that publicly is not very well understood but I destroyed my access to the archive. I had no material with me before before I left Hong Kong because I knew I was going to go have to go through this complex multi jurisdictional route and so this was the moment where they tried and he was he. He was basically saying look. Is there anything you can do. Is there any small piece of information anything you share because life is going to be very difficult record for person in your situation. If you don't have friends no thanks great but I'm not interested. I'll be fine on my own and then they get up and they say I hope you won't regret your decision. A little bit of a sinister moment and then they walk out so you declined there the the Russian intelligence request to cooperate then you got stuck in the airport for forty days because you didn't have a passport sport. They eventually grant temporary asylum right. That's correct and I actually just to to drill in there a little bit. you've said something very important which was that. I was trapped apt airport for forty days again for those people who might be a little bit skeptical of me if I had cooperated with the Russian government right. If you think I'm a Russian spy. I would have been in that airport for five minutes before they drove me out in a limo you know to the palace we're reliving the rest of my days before they throw the parade aid where they call me a hero of Russia instead. I was trapped in this airport for forty days. Where instead of saying you know Russia. Please let me in I applied for some in twenty seven different countries around the world places like Germany France Norway that I thought the US government and the American public would be much more comfortable with me being there and yet we saw something extraordinary happened. Just just one thing which is that the. US Government worked quite hard to make sure I didn't leave Russia to the point that they actually grounded the presidential aircraft of the President of Bolivia which is like grounding Air Force One. It's something that's really unprecedented. Diplomatic Mattock history and it's very much an open question today. Why did the US government worked so hard to keep me in Russia. We don't have a clear answer. We never have have that until more people in the Obama administration start writing memoirs but it's either they panicked when they realized this would be an evergreen political attack where they could just use guilt oh by association people's suspicion of the Russian government to try to taint me by proxy you say in the book that you applied for asylum to believe twenty seven countries was Russia one of them at the very end yes. There's a sort of a circumstantial case of suspicion right. I mean sense. This happened in two thousand thirteen. We've seen you know the Russian interference in the US election. It's collaboration according to the Muller report with wikileaks and getting stolen emails to affect the election and I think there's just a general belief that in this authoritarian state Edward snowden wouldn't be able to live for six years unless he were useful all to the Russian government. What's the general answer to that. I think this is for a lot of people who have sort of a a Hollywood understanding of how international affairs and intelligence it's works but the reality is even the case of as you said electoral interference in the case of wikileaks the Muller report the United States government itself never alleges that for example wikileaks even knew that they were talking to Russian intelligence wikileaks entire system is designed so they don't know who submitting documents and even even granting that they came from Russian intelligence that that was in fact the case every newspaper in the world thought were newsworthy stories of the New York Times The Washington Post. Everybody was reporting on this and when you look beyond the sort of the standard examples that we look at in case of electoral interference and we look look toward my case there is that question if he's not cooperating with the Russian government. Why would he be allowed to stay and I think the answer answer. Here's actually quite obvious. Russia doesn't need to do anything or rather the Russian government doesn't need to do anything to look good in this circumstance dance it shows that they have an independent foreign policy to their public because I applied to all these other countries in Europe or silent and all of their governments unfortunately could be threatened to revoke their expressions of support and this happened. This is a long well reported campaign where every time a country started into lean towards letting me in it would be either the secretary of state or the vice president of the United States that would call their foreign ministry and say look if you let this guy and we're going to retaliate and Russians very much consider themselves to be a European country so if the rest of Europe is afraid to do something and Russia is not afraid to do something that that makes Russians feel good and remember we did this in verse so Russia and the Soviet Union for the last fifty years so of course if we have an example or an instance where the whole world sees basically the United States government is not living up to its values. The Russian government is going to be very eager just underline that that's all they need do receive any financial support from the Russian government. No no this is. I'm one of the things that again is a common misconception. People sort of think about my life. They think I'm living in a bunker. There's Russian guards you. You know the the Russian government and I have any contact whatsoever. They're paying me now. I have my own apartment. I have my own income. I live a fully independent life. I have never and will never accept money your housing or any other assistance from the Russian government you didn't exactly have a typical adolescence you ended up spending nights on the computer school not of great interest to you you tell the story of looking being at the website of the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the did all this nuclear research and discovering that anybody with little understanding of Computers Directory Systems uh-huh could get internal memos. You looked at confidential memos that were just available. You call the general number the lab and left a message and said this is a problem you. You've actually got a call back. Tell us about that so my mother gets a little bit of a rude awakening because she's making dinner and I'm sitting in the living room on this computer and she picks up the phone says Yes yes he's here and she turns and looks at me and as I see her hearing the other side of the call all that I can't hear her face just gets Pale and she looks at me her eyes grow wide and she covers the receiver and she says like shoot tell and when I get up out of my chair and pick up the phone and this this man says I'm from Los Alamos Nuclear Laboratory these are the sweetest words anyone have told me in the moment because I'm like. Oh thank God because I had left that message because I had called because I hadn't really done anything wrong. I had simply been curious as a boy scout. I called this facility and said Hey. There's something broken on your website. You should do something about that and my mother did not punish me for this in fact she was very proud of the fact that I told them they had a weakness in their website and Los Alamos for all things once once they realized I was a child. I think they'd been expecting someone older. They said when I turned eighteen I should give them a call. You wanted to use your skills. Your skills sales were in the area of computers and you'll get your way into the intelligence..

Russian government Russia US Edward Snowden Central Intelligence Agency Hong Kong US government Moscow Senate officer National Security Agency US State Department Dave Davies Los Alamos Nuclear Laboratory wikileaks Muller Los Alamos Ecuador California
"snowden" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"snowden" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"So i want to talk about it with snowden you take a from my point of view remarkably generous view of edward snowden and i want you to first of all lay out how you think about him and let's let's start there are edward snowden friend or fiend so i think he was misguided and reckless in the decisions that he took to steal large amounts of classified information and share it with reporters but i have not seen at least any any information on the public record uh that he did it for any thing other than the reasons that he said he did it for that doesn't mean that it wasn't reckless of course it was i think that my views on snowden change somewhat over time and i think a lot of that was because of the results that his act achieved it was an active rebellion an act essentially to burn down everything and had had serious consequences for our national security but when you looked at it after three or four years you saw that this was a conversation we desperately needed to have in that we weren't having even with people like me inside the government trying to force it and i stand by the idea that the surveillance reform era of 2013 too hopefully the end of 2017 is that the most significant progress we've had on that area since the 1970s and so i kind of felt like look if that's the result and the reforms that we've had have been this significant how can we as a country say and you know the guy who did this was a nasty evil criminal who is just doing it because he was friends with putin and so i i kinda took.

edward snowden putin four years