8 Burst results for "Smu Economic Growth Initiative"

"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

05:45 min | 3 months ago

"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Welcomed or guest today, Hector Baretto Hector form headed up the United States. Small Business Administration today. He's the chairman of the Latino Coalition. Thanks for waking up early with us. Do this actor thank you in our Co host Laura Collins, once again. Welcome back, Laura. She's the director in the Bush. Institute smu Economic Growth Initiative thank you. Thank Santa I. Only wake up early for this I know we. To Peel back the curtain we're here at about seven thirty in the morning in Dallas and Lauren I were comparing notes and turns out that one of us are morning. People so hector. We're looking. We're looking at you. Demand on. West Coast time. It's like five thirty in your body clock Oh. That's rough. Hector's here for our SME Economic Growth Advisory Council where he is one of them. Is that help guide the policy work that we do at the Bush Institute, because both of his expertise is the forty first administrator, the small business, and because his work with the Latino Coalition. Let's start with the former when you were with the small business administration. What was the goal of that department? What were you? You, all working on the small business. Administration was actually started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, three by President Eisenhower and there were some small business programs before that, but they unified those all into one agency, and it's really the agency that supports and advocates for America's small businesses, and that role has become even more important over the years when they formed the SBA. There probably weren't thinking that was going to be over thirty million small businesses in the united. United States and I like to say nothing small about small business. They really are the engine of America, the engine that fuels the economy of America not only are there a lot of them, but they represent over fifty two percent of the gross output of the economy. It's the place that two-thirds the net new jobs of our economy comes from, and it's also the place that a lot of our innovation comes from. That makes us the envy of the world. World in terms of our economy so very very important agency. A lot of people have heard of it, but they oftentimes don't know everything it does. Where does your passion for Small Business? Come from a well? That's easy. I was fortunate to be born into an entrepreneurial family, so the first business owners I ever met where my mother and father and my father was especially a serial entrepreneur. He loved business. He loves starting businesses. I'm not saying he loved running. My mother ran the business ideas, man yeah, but I learned a lot about a small business I used to joke that everything I learned about business. I learned in a Mexican restaurant because that's why I worked when I was a little kid. What jobs is you? Hold with your parents Oh, a lot of them, you know we were an immigrant family and. There was five children. My mother had five children six years. I have four younger sisters, and so we were all recruited to my father's executive training program very early on, so we all had to work <hes>. I remember waiting tables when I was nine years old. So And then I. as I got older, I got more responsibility and help run some of those businesses and start some of those businesses, and my father had a number of different businesses. We started off with the restaurant business, because that's an easy business to access, but then later on <hes> at a little import export business, a little construction business, none of those businesses wherever really large, but they were very important to our family helps support us. They helped educate, and we learned a lot about being in business and working with the community and customers, and so your father came to America start these businesses. He actually didn't. My father was an immigrant to the United States in the late nineteen fifties. I don't think he was planning on staying that long. But he met my mother. My mother is also from immigrant parents from Mexico <hes> they've shown love, and and of all places they started their journey in Kansas City Missouri that's where I was born. I grew up in Kansas City Missouri and my father. He had a lot of different jobs as a lot of immigrants do when they first get here. His first jobs were picking. Picking potatoes for fifty cents an hour in rural Missouri and later on, he worked at a railroad, a literally pounding the spikes into the ground, but in the winter it got too cold, so he moved into <hes>. He started working in the livestock business, and it was very difficult. <hes> dirty work. He was cleaning out stalls, but at least it was warmer than being outside. When he was working at the railroad later on he, he was a janitor at the school that I would eventually go to, but my father used to always say that he was a business owner, and I would say dad. You have these jobs. You're not a business owners. They know what I have to do right now, but eventually alone my own business, so he was very passionate about that. He always wanted to work for himself, so he starts so then he starts these businesses and his career trajectory starts trending too so far up that start happening. Yeah, my father was a very visionary leader <hes> very. Very charismatic <hes> you know he when he's grown up used to say know. I came here with nothing I didn't know anybody. I didn't speak the language. I had no money I had no power, but I believed in myself I was willing to work hard, and this is such a great country that affords us the opportunity to go as far as we WANNA go. We're only limited by our own imagination our own commitment, so he he's. We started these businesses, but later on my father was kind of an organizer as well, and he wanted to belong to the Chamber of Commerce. This is in Kansas City. Number of others spanning businesses. There were there at the time, and my father started asking. Where's the Hispanic Chamber? And they said well. There isn't an Hispanic Chamber. My Dad said well there should be, and if nobody else is going to start it, I will so my father was one of the founders of the Kansas City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, that was in the mid seventies,

Hector George Bush Presidential Cente Hecker Baretto Latino coalition Andrew Kaufman executive chairman America
Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

The Strategerist

05:45 min | 3 months ago

Hector Barreto - Entrepreneurship and Immigrants

"Welcomed or guest today, Hector Baretto Hector form headed up the United States. Small Business Administration today. He's the chairman of the Latino Coalition. Thanks for waking up early with us. Do this actor thank you in our Co host Laura Collins, once again. Welcome back, Laura. She's the director in the Bush. Institute smu Economic Growth Initiative thank you. Thank Santa I. Only wake up early for this I know we. To Peel back the curtain we're here at about seven thirty in the morning in Dallas and Lauren I were comparing notes and turns out that one of us are morning. People so hector. We're looking. We're looking at you. Demand on. West Coast time. It's like five thirty in your body clock Oh. That's rough. Hector's here for our SME Economic Growth Advisory Council where he is one of them. Is that help guide the policy work that we do at the Bush Institute, because both of his expertise is the forty first administrator, the small business, and because his work with the Latino Coalition. Let's start with the former when you were with the small business administration. What was the goal of that department? What were you? You, all working on the small business. Administration was actually started in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, three by President Eisenhower and there were some small business programs before that, but they unified those all into one agency, and it's really the agency that supports and advocates for America's small businesses, and that role has become even more important over the years when they formed the SBA. There probably weren't thinking that was going to be over thirty million small businesses in the united. United States and I like to say nothing small about small business. They really are the engine of America, the engine that fuels the economy of America not only are there a lot of them, but they represent over fifty two percent of the gross output of the economy. It's the place that two-thirds the net new jobs of our economy comes from, and it's also the place that a lot of our innovation comes from. That makes us the envy of the world. World in terms of our economy so very very important agency. A lot of people have heard of it, but they oftentimes don't know everything it does. Where does your passion for Small Business? Come from a well? That's easy. I was fortunate to be born into an entrepreneurial family, so the first business owners I ever met where my mother and father and my father was especially a serial entrepreneur. He loved business. He loves starting businesses. I'm not saying he loved running. My mother ran the business ideas, man yeah, but I learned a lot about a small business I used to joke that everything I learned about business. I learned in a Mexican restaurant because that's why I worked when I was a little kid. What jobs is you? Hold with your parents Oh, a lot of them, you know we were an immigrant family and. There was five children. My mother had five children six years. I have four younger sisters, and so we were all recruited to my father's executive training program very early on, so we all had to work I remember waiting tables when I was nine years old. So And then I. as I got older, I got more responsibility and help run some of those businesses and start some of those businesses, and my father had a number of different businesses. We started off with the restaurant business, because that's an easy business to access, but then later on at a little import export business, a little construction business, none of those businesses wherever really large, but they were very important to our family helps support us. They helped educate, and we learned a lot about being in business and working with the community and customers, and so your father came to America start these businesses. He actually didn't. My father was an immigrant to the United States in the late nineteen fifties. I don't think he was planning on staying that long. But he met my mother. My mother is also from immigrant parents from Mexico they've shown love, and and of all places they started their journey in Kansas City Missouri that's where I was born. I grew up in Kansas City Missouri and my father. He had a lot of different jobs as a lot of immigrants do when they first get here. His first jobs were picking. Picking potatoes for fifty cents an hour in rural Missouri and later on, he worked at a railroad, a literally pounding the spikes into the ground, but in the winter it got too cold, so he moved into He started working in the livestock business, and it was very difficult. dirty work. He was cleaning out stalls, but at least it was warmer than being outside. When he was working at the railroad later on he, he was a janitor at the school that I would eventually go to, but my father used to always say that he was a business owner, and I would say dad. You have these jobs. You're not a business owners. They know what I have to do right now, but eventually alone my own business, so he was very passionate about that. He always wanted to work for himself, so he starts so then he starts these businesses and his career trajectory starts trending too so far up that start happening. Yeah, my father was a very visionary leader very. Very charismatic you know he when he's grown up used to say know. I came here with nothing I didn't know anybody. I didn't speak the language. I had no money I had no power, but I believed in myself I was willing to work hard, and this is such a great country that affords us the opportunity to go as far as we WANNA go. We're only limited by our own imagination our own commitment, so he he's. We started these businesses, but later on my father was kind of an organizer as well, and he wanted to belong to the Chamber of Commerce. This is in Kansas City. Number of others spanning businesses. There were there at the time, and my father started asking. Where's the Hispanic Chamber? And they said well. There isn't an Hispanic Chamber. My Dad said well there should be, and if nobody else is going to start it, I will so my father was one of the founders of the Kansas City Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, that was in the mid seventies,

Small Business Small Business Administration Hector Baretto Hector United States America Business Owner Latino Coalition Kansas City Kansas City Hispanic Chamber O Missouri Hispanic Chamber Laura Collins Smu Economic Growth Initiative Kansas City Missouri Chamber Of Commerce Chairman Director Bush Institute President Eisenhower Dallas
"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

05:07 min | 4 months ago

"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"So much for being here it's been a busy day governor Greg Abbott announces a pause in the re opening of taxes now hopefully it helps with the upward trend in cases and hospitalizations but what does it do to the recovering Texas economy we're joined by Colin Clark director of the bush institute's SMU economic growth initiative first of all people are going to be afraid what we saw there's a lot of real time data about the recovering economy things like OpenTable reservations things like foot traffic in retail areas measured by Google and we were seeing a pretty good recovery now a question is how much of a difference did these opening orders and the pies in the opening order from the governor really make out what we have seen is that while there was a pretty good recovery under way the actual foot traffic in restaurants and retails was nowhere close to what was allowed I mean if a restaurant with operating it maybe twenty five or thirty percent of capacity and the rules allowed seventy five well it doesn't really make a difference whether the seventy five goes to a hundred or not so I would say the most important thing about what the governor's done today it's not so much the speed of the of help after he left the restrictions that he put on several months ago the most important thing is the signaling a FAQ because he is telling the state of the state the people of the state what we've got a big public health problem you've really got to be more careful so what does the signaling of the governor due to consumer confidence there's also a pretty big range of opinion you can say among people about how afraid they should be for their own safety when they go out and engage in various activities and I think there's also a pretty wide range of thought as to how to think about the fact that we put other people at rest when we go out without a master orders and so forth so the question is to what degree can the governor influence that thinking I want to be hopeful John I I can't help but be somewhat concerned because it's been clear it's been kind of strange but it has been clear that that opinion is it reflects the polarization in our society it's been more politically driven than I ever would have imagined when the governor comes out and basically says Hey people of the state of Texas we really need to think again about the extent to which we for example go out into the go to the restaurant without a mask and so on my hope is that he actually encourages some people to think a little bit differently than they were thinking particularly about the danger they're putting other people in jail at the margin probably it makes some difference but I think what will make an even bigger difference quite frankly are the charts that you see on television every day about the explosive increase in the number of hospitalizations that data is real scary that is Colin Clark director of the bush institute S. annual economic growth initiative she had his time and his thoughts now president trump says he intends to sign an executive order protecting statues and other national monuments CBS's we should check president trump has not offered any details about that executive order and it's unclear what it will do since a federal act already makes it a crime to destroy or vandalize veterans monuments on public property that carries up to ten years in prison according to The Washington Post U. S. marshals had been told to get ready to protect those monuments across the country that's we sharing reporting your news for Mr electric Dallas dot com one fifty four we check your money a listless trading day investors not sure whether to buy or sell all three major indexes have small losses at the moment of around a tenth of a percent with the Dow down forty six points only bank stocks seem to have direction they're surging more than two percent after regulators eased up on rules that will free up capital oil prices have turned higher after dropping for two days straight futures up nearly two percent some members of Congress are asking the small business administration to explain why more than thirty eight billion dollars in virus relief loans for small businesses were canceled at the end of may Google shares are down slightly after it agreed to begin paying some media outlets to carry their content Google is planning to offer its own new service later this year and shares of Macy's have dropped more than five percent after news that it's laying off nearly four thousand management and corporate employees morale there a Bloomberg radio as many as twenty million Americans have the coronavirus sort of had it that's a big number we'll talk about it coming out traffic and weather together on the gates as well next week it's Jamie progresses employee of the month to month in a row leave a message at the hi Jamie hit me Jamie I just had a new idea for our song what the name your price tool so when it's like tell us what you want to pay the trombone was Bob wine you say well be fine coverage options to fit your budget then we just all the fingers now small choir goes even coming after they've come at jet yes no maybe anyway so your practice tonight I got a new there so the referee the insurance company and affiliates pricing coverage much limited by state law I didn't write a motorcycle.

Greg Abbott
"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

05:11 min | 7 months ago

"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Stay connected with us on your computer or your phone just download the radio dot com app and favorite K. R. LD eight ten now businesses are awaiting word from the governor this afternoon about plans to re open business joining us live right now Cullum Clark director of the bush institute at SMU economic growth initiative thank you so much for taking a couple of minutes to speak with us this morning good morning thanks for having me and so with the the Texas economy the governor announces his planned later today how well positioned is taxes at in terms of re opening the economy as compared to some other states well I think the first thing to say is it's it's really good news is that we are in a moment when we when government states everywhere actually can start can make these plans and I think that we will see that in the course of may a number of these plans will start going into motion at the George W. bush and they were following all this very very closely now that that I think we do have to recognize that in Texas and elsewhere it's gonna take time we have to recognize that for example that serves to really open everything up it's gonna take a degree of testing that we haven't fully pulled together yet and we also have to recognize that what we've seen in the in the in the in the labor market with unemployment won't reverse that I mean I I like to say that the that the labor market is like Humpty Dumpty went to pop off the wall it's not that easy to come back together again that when we start to reopen in Texas I think we will we will actually see the the worst in unemployment but it will take time to heal how will how long might it take then they're talking about this being a a lengthy and gradual process before we get back to some sense of normalcy we're talking about the end of the year maybe I don't think anybody knows to be honest I think what we'll see is that there are a lot of work places that will figure out how to reopen in a way that that that basically instituted a lot of news thank you for your work it's possible for factories and a lot of cases reopened it's possible for many kinds of stores reopened but I think that that one of the biggest challenges will will see is that there are a lot of categories of business particularly one that involves people coming together into dance places for fine like restaurants and bars and theaters and sports arenas and so forth where the big question is how worried are people going to be about going to those places and we just don't know yet so I would I would think it's reasonable to suppose that take the number of months and possibly into next year and and and that's a very good point just because the you know the airlines say Hey all the planes are flying again that doesn't mean people are going to flock to the airport and get on those planes awful lot of planes flying I think American and southwest out of Dallas for flying do you work like them before but a great many but I'm sure you've probably seen pictures on Instagram about that when you when your friend actually gotten on a plane it's basically like they're on a private jet by themselves there's no one out there you mentioned the testing this isn't this is a critical part of this for any business you have to know that the people you're bringing back our okay right absolutely and and that's the basic we we face the basic technical challenge which is to actually create and process and not test opened all the work like that that we want to open so I think that that is that I just saw there that number that will be for the country as a whole we're gonna need something on the order of six hundred thousand tests a day which is about four times the level that we're doing currently so clearly it I think something that America can achieve inspect it and see if set to ramp up to that level but we're not there yet despite a huge effort for that work to be done do you optimistic well I would say certainly over the long term I am very optimistic about about the that the spirit of in business the ingenuity the ability of the American people to overcome that and I would say also effects and I'm very optimistic that that that the the economic model that created the Texas miracle well ultimately and restart itself and and ineffective economy will continue to outperform as it has in the past I think as to specific timeline I think I'm I'm cautiously optimistic that some good things will happen in the very near future and we will be we will be done be glad about that but that doesn't mean that hi I'm not Pollyanna I I certainly want to take into consideration the challenges are still ahead thank you so much for your time we really appreciated that is Calum Clark is director of the bush institute's at SMU it's eight fifteen a KRLD the mayor of Plano Hary Rosselli air he's gonna join us next to talk about how he and his team are looking forward to the future of that city that's coming up after traffic and weather together on the Acer corona virus news changes quickly Dallas County issues new guidelines requiring residents to wear face coverings get the facts first this applies to anyone visiting a.

K. R. LD
"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

11:47 min | 1 year ago

"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Of the strategic after hours. Where are we take topics that have come up on the show and bounce them around these fine minds at the Bush Center our panel today first off? We have Hannah Abney the VP of external affairs. whose voice you're gonNA recognize recognize from our interview with President Bush? Hannah thanks for coming back. Thanks for having me again. And we also have Matt Ryan eat the Director of the Bush Institute. SMU Economic Growth Initiative Mad. It's been a while L. But we're glad you came back to honor. Thank you and we have making her debut on the strategic just Rhonda Houston. WHO's chief of staff to percenters CEO? Ken Hirsch Ronda. Thank you so much for being here. It's an honor. Thanks for the invitation it. Finally we have podcast veteran. Lindsey Lloyd the Bradford M Freeman Director of the Human Freedom Initiative at at the Bush Center making his debut on the strategic as. Well Lindsey. Thanks for doing this. Glad to be here. Thank you so. On the first episode of the strategic our guest was Carly Fiorina at the end of the interview. We asked her one of our usual questions. What are we as a nation not talking about that we should be talking about and her answer? We thought was kind of interesting. And she said said that the role empower that each of US citizens have. We're not talking enough about and so we wanted to follow up on that today and take a deep dive into that question so I wanted wanted to start by going around the horn and just hearing from each of you. What does it mean to be a good citizen of the United States? Hannah what do you think well so i. I was doing a little research before this giving. You're always prepared. Well you know these are some smart people. I'm at the table and I wanted. I just looked up pew. We did a poll recently. The talked about actually this very topic. which was the question they asked was what makes a good citizen and the response they got? I'll give you the top three voting in elections paying hang on taxes. Yo and always following the law. It went down serving on jury duty respecting the opinions of those who disagree participate participating in the census volunteering. But I thought it was interesting and maybe this is the softer side of me. Coming out with three little boys who I see growing up in an increasingly divisive community Well not community. I think the community there is pretty great but a defensive world how far down on that list was has listening to people dislike just respecting them even if the avid disagreement helping others following. What's going on in our world? I mean obviously voting in elections is really important. I think more people should do it paying the taxes you. Oh you should probably do that and yes you should absolutely follow the law but I think one of the things that is increasingly obvious to me is unless we start respecting each other more and being willing to have sometimes is uncomfortable but really important conversations. I just don't think we're going to be able to Get past some of the divisiveness and some of the just just meanness. It's occurring in our society and I think I think that's what's important in being a good citizen. No no nothing against paying paying your taxes or serving on jury duty which I think is very important. It's almost like a hierarchy of needs like you have a you have to pay taxes and don't murder people at the base ace but then you keep going up and these other things are just as important guy. I think sometimes people think it's cool to be snarky and tough and divisive even louder being right and being loud instead of being a little bit softer and now your perspective. You came from a State Department background. He spent a lot out of years overseas as an American living in another country. What's what are your thoughts on on? This tend to start by saying that contrary to carry Carly Fiorina arena with respect to her. I would actually argue that. We're talking a lot about citizenship to quote Mark Twain. Everybody's talking about it but nobody's doing anything about it Martinez said that about the weather and so Hanna says I see US talking a lot of people talking about what they are entitled. Oh to as a citizen or what their what their rights are as a citizen. But I don't see enough people talking about what their obligations are as a citizen. And you know this talk of you've absolute right to do. Something is actually kind of not a democratic sentiment because there are no absolute rights and democracy all rights come with obligations nations. And and we're not really talking enough about that in my view and that kind of goes back to Hannah's point about about the need to be respectful of others which which flows from the thought that. I don't have any unrestricted rights. I have only rights that are embedded obligations to others. And I don't get to exercise the rights until I discharged the obligations nations But we're kind of skipping that step in my view in our society these days are there specific obligations they feel like a really particularly being ignored well the obligation to be respectful of others is certainly being ignored it. You know I'm tempted to say that it has to do with our car culture because you know if you're up if you're in a European city and you're walking down the street you're not gonNA shoot the bird at somebody's only two feet away from you right but if you're in your car safely distance safe distance from another driver evernote drivers something does something the offensive you shoot them the bird and then and then that translates itself into social media where you can say anything because you know you're never going to have to face to face confront the person that you're insulting or or trashing or calling out. And so that that sense of an unrestricted restricted. Right to say whatever I want without having to face the consequences sequential the reaction of the person across the table from me and the feelings that mice speech whatever. It is in insights in that person that there I think is creating the kind of coarseness in the culture that Hannah commented on Interesting Rhonda. How does that strike you? So you know I think we focus Salat on big picture and globally and I think a lot of times we don't think about it as far as our own intimate. Ah Free and our own intimate community is concerned and I think if we thought about being a citizen in our families in Ah what that means in your family what that means in your your close friend network. I think we think a lot differently about it because I agree with Hannah and Matt that sometimes when you have that distance between you when you're on social media or you're in your car you're not. You don't think that that you're going to have that contact close contact with people and so if you know that you're GonNa have an intimate conversation with your friend or your family you are less likely to be as divisive As you are when you when you don't think you'll ever have contact you'll ever see those individuals and and so We just have to get to the point where we think about our world in our extended community more as a family family of citizens that we are related to because we are all citizens of this great country in his great world so it sounds like we're ready. We're all ready to blame social media for the fall of modern civilization. But I'm here. We never have any more podcasts. Never Never Lindsey. What data? Where do you land on this? Well you know it struck me opened by talking about pulling data and we at the Bush Center did some polling of our own last year with the partners From from the Penn Biden Center and Freedom House kind of looking at the health of American democracy and there was a lot of a lot of reasons for concern there but there was also a surprising amount. I think Of of of reason for optimism. we you know we know that People are dissatisfied with our system is working. They feel that our democracies and delivering on even the most basic things fixing potholes and the streets. Were you know kind of very local issues that touch people but the flip side of that is we have seen scene upticks in voting participation As toxic as social media can be. We have an explosion of people who are making their opinions known for better for worse in ways that they couldn't do ten years ago so the You know young people participation which we hear about all the time in the twenty fourteen Midterm elections it was about twenty one percent very low in the two thousand sixteen Twenty eighteen that went up to thirty one percent so on one hand. That's it's basically a fifty percent increase in people who are going to the polls on the other hand. It still means that two out of three young people didn't feel it was worth their time to go out and cast ballots. So there's a lot of work to be done but I think that in part because this is so divisive that more people are engaging maybe not always the the best ways maybe not always the most positive ways but they're we have seen an uptick in all kinds of different involvement in people volunteering and people speaking out in and hand in voting. So this is interesting you were saying Matt was saying that people aren't necessarily meeting their obligations toward democracy. And you're saying that some of the polling data was saying that people feel like democracy isn't meeting their basic needs like wh who who come which comes first. Yeah I mean I think they're both right at the same time. I made the but this notion that that our democracy somehow is is no longer able to deliver on the way On the things that Americans need compared to you know ten years ago go twenty years ago whatever the figure it. Is You know if you look at a lot of the big issues out there. That have just been Stalemated in in Washington for years like immigration reform which everybody agrees needs to happen but it can't happen because we were in our respective camps and we can't seem to compromise anymore so democracy is not delivering on things that people genuinely care about gun control would be another one. Nobody has a perfect solution of this but but everybody wants to see things change so we don't have these weekly mass shootings around the country. I think it's so interesting to When I was looking at this other poll I also saw something on Pugh for a year ago? I think that talked about the difference between the Post Small Neil inject an millennial generation and I to be totally honest. Get a little bit tired of the whole conversation around. Like what are the young people think versus. What are the older people? Think I. I think it's a little bit overblown scratch that question for me but it reminded me there was also an interesting article in politico yesterday. I think it was politico. That talked about how much older our society is in terms of the age of our government and the age of those who represent us and I wonder a little bit about what the future's going to look like because when you look at things like Questions on whether or not increasing creasing ethnic and racial diversity is good for society the gap between what Gen Z.. And millennials think sixty two percent. Think it's good for for society. I wonder a that seems low to me. Actually but only forty two percent of the silent generation forty eight percent of boomers said that increasing greasing ethnic or racial diversity was good for society. Think about it that way you can think about the difference between how men and women answer questions about whether there are enough women in top political positions executive business positions and we're just on totally different sides of the field on this. Yes I feel like I wonder how that comes together. You know sort of as this younger group of people grows up and starts to Take on more responsibility and places of work and hopefully in places of our government I wonder how.

Hannah Abney Bush Center Matt Ryan Carly Fiorina politico US SMU Bush Institute Lindsey Lloyd Ken Hirsch Ronda Rhonda Houston President Bush Mark Twain State Department murder Washington
"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Congressman Dan Crenshaw life has taken in from Houston to Venice Waylon as a kid to the Middle East and Afghanistan is a navy seal and Saturday and I live in Washington. DC as a congressman representing the Texas Second Congressional district. There's a lot more friendly relationship in Congress and I thank people realize Probably should do a better job of letting the American people know that we talk about the importance of Central America in US policy and his transition from military to civilian life. I Imagine Kaufman and this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush Institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night? Sketch comedy and compelling conversation the strategic podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by ASK SNL and embraced. By the George W Bush administration we highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most affective leaders are the ones who laugh. Well thanks so much to congressman Dan Crenshaw for joining us today on the strategic just congressman. And we appreciate you taking a few minutes here. Absolutely great to be with you. In our CO host. Today is the Great Lower Collins. WHO's the director at the Bush Institute? SMU Economic Growth Initiative Initiative. Laura thanks for hanging out again thanks for calling in great must be all the cookies I brought it. I'm easily bribed. Yes so congressman you represent the Great State of Texas. Were you grew up but your your background isn't strictly restricted Texas year. Pretty uniquely global. Can you tell us a bit about the path that you took to where you are today. Wow well quite a quite a few years so I'm from Houston My Dad was Petroleum engineer he He jumped around a lot of a lot or some companies over's career and You know as a result we moved around a lot so my life was going between Houston and overseas and back the east and back overseas and You know somewhere on the lines of I wanted to join the military Specifically the seal team's James Next you didn't WanNa do in the military wanted to be a seal specifically right. Yeah that's what I did. And did a few deployments a little mixed up on third deployment and that kind of sent me on the path in Amman now because eventually resulted in me. Happy military fought that pretty hard for years. And and Did a couple more deployments and operations role but eventually had to leave. Some of that time in the military too was was some overseas living with. You said Your father father worked in the oil industry in west end lived overseas at time. He spent some time in Central America. Correct Yeah South America. Yeah so Lived in Ecuador a little bit Middle School and then actually all my entire high school spent in both hot Columbia de. Do you think that your childhood influences your public policy in any way because you were exposed to so so many different cultures as you as a as a young kid and and a lot of a lot of different experiences than your typical politician. I think it does. I mean it's So as a as a younger kid what I'm exposed to is kind of a need to defend the United States Like a new. Defend your patriots them you know. America is sort of punching bag around the world. Because it's it's the big the big guy in the room right there you know it's it's it's always been that way and it was just commonplace for everybody to to to take swipes out there you know. Sometimes you know well and say well intentioned but not not in a malevolent ways. It's just is what it is and that's just not something you're used to at a young age usually unless you grew up overseas like I did so that's the first thing I did start thinking about patriotism early on in Mike It wasn't default. You know and so and And other than that though it just gives you perspective Perspective on how good we have it in a lot of ways and What we should be grateful for and In Perspective on other countries you know deeper understanding and and and You know appreciation for for other cultures as well You know my my My parents actually. After I live in Columbia my parents moved to Venezuela. I was earning college by this point. So I know some pretty well I knew it was prospering. And then as it devolved into terrible socialist policies. I don't pretty well like what we be grateful for. Yeah totally do you think you know. We're in kind of a time where there is a bit of an isolationist streak but so far in your short political career. You haven't had a that perspective you've been a little bit more More of a proponent of being involved abroad particularly in Central America. You have co sponsored some legislation About the northern triangle. You've visited with our Central America Prosperity Project participants which We really appreciate. And you've talked to us a little bit about the digital strategy that we proposed for Central America. How do you Game just a a little bit about what that means you why you think it's important. Yeah well we have to empower our neighbors and we have to give them the same lessons that America has learned over the last few hundred years. Unfortunately we're I think we're forgetting many ways but but we'll here's what we learned. We learned that when you empower the individual to to live free and protect their personal property rights and their freedoms. Then you have the best chance for human prosperity and it's a really simple lesson that America has learned that America has been the leader of for very long time. We're questioning that ourselves lately You know as we're flirting with socialism and things like that But as we question it we we should also Empower our others and I thought it was cool to meet with you guys with your team on this and and hear about the digital infrastructure ideas. Because what I got from that was exactly the right American lesson which is you empower people to to live and thriving economy and In the best way to help people come out of poverty is to empower empower them and I just really cool conversation that we have you know talking about. What would they presented which was like listen? The these people want to work right but they can't. I can't set up an Uber Account. They can't set up online banking. They can't sit up you know. They can't rent their house out there. BNB just some basic stuff You know want we help with that digital infrastructure and allow them to thrive you know again. These are neighbors where we do have to do it. To look at ways to and smart ways to help development oatman these countries. And it's it's not just throwing money away. Corrupt governments no. It's actually look some more creative ways to do that. Deeper than that. You mentioned the corrupt governments and there are some some things that we completely take for granted here because we do have transparent government not perfect but transparent. We do have A situation where we have the rule of law and we have protection of property rights. These are things that I don't think a lot of Americans understand. Fundamentally don't exist particularly in the northern triangle countries in way that makes every bit of existence difficult. There's lack of economic opportunity If you want to set up a business pay your taxes you might get shook down by a a government official in addition to street gangs You your tax rates on it being higher than they need to be because there are so few people actually paying them and there's just a lot of things are the adept to make it an untenable situation. It's very hard as an ordinary person to to make it in any sort of way and have they lacked fundamental freedom that we have. Yeah exactly. Yeah 'cause back to we should really be more grateful for the United States of America And I think we used to be as a country and we're slowly forgetting that and It's a it's a parent as we all commemorating nine eleven. And you know there's been a lot of talk. We remember how we all came together as Americans back then it would just loved our country and everybody through American food who American flags everywhere and You know we definitely don't want another nine eleven back there but I want why we shouldn't need one right. It should just be the default you know we have our differences is but there are certain things that we appreciate about about our country and Those things are embodied are symbols. The flag the.

The Leadership of Congressman Dan Crenshaw

The Strategerist

08:11 min | 1 year ago

The Leadership of Congressman Dan Crenshaw

"Congressman Dan Crenshaw life has taken in from Houston to Venice Waylon as a kid to the Middle East and Afghanistan is a navy seal and Saturday and I live in Washington. DC as a congressman representing the Texas Second Congressional district. There's a lot more friendly relationship in Congress and I thank people realize Probably should do a better job of letting the American people know that we talk about the importance of Central America in US policy and his transition from military to civilian life. I Imagine Kaufman and this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush Institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night? Sketch comedy and compelling conversation the strategic podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by ASK SNL and embraced. By the George W Bush administration we highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most affective leaders are the ones who laugh. Well thanks so much to congressman Dan Crenshaw for joining us today on the strategic just congressman. And we appreciate you taking a few minutes here. Absolutely great to be with you. In our CO host. Today is the Great Lower Collins. WHO's the director at the Bush Institute? SMU Economic Growth Initiative Initiative. Laura thanks for hanging out again thanks for calling in great must be all the cookies I brought it. I'm easily bribed. Yes so congressman you represent the Great State of Texas. Were you grew up but your your background isn't strictly restricted Texas year. Pretty uniquely global. Can you tell us a bit about the path that you took to where you are today. Wow well quite a quite a few years so I'm from Houston My Dad was Petroleum engineer he He jumped around a lot of a lot or some companies over's career and You know as a result we moved around a lot so my life was going between Houston and overseas and back the east and back overseas and You know somewhere on the lines of I wanted to join the military Specifically the seal team's James Next you didn't WanNa do in the military wanted to be a seal specifically right. Yeah that's what I did. And did a few deployments a little mixed up on third deployment and that kind of sent me on the path in Amman now because eventually resulted in me. Happy military fought that pretty hard for years. And and Did a couple more deployments and operations role but eventually had to leave. Some of that time in the military too was was some overseas living with. You said Your father father worked in the oil industry in west end lived overseas at time. He spent some time in Central America. Correct Yeah South America. Yeah so Lived in Ecuador a little bit Middle School and then actually all my entire high school spent in both hot Columbia de. Do you think that your childhood influences your public policy in any way because you were exposed to so so many different cultures as you as a as a young kid and and a lot of a lot of different experiences than your typical politician. I think it does. I mean it's So as a as a younger kid what I'm exposed to is kind of a need to defend the United States Like a new. Defend your patriots them you know. America is sort of punching bag around the world. Because it's it's the big the big guy in the room right there you know it's it's it's always been that way and it was just commonplace for everybody to to to take swipes out there you know. Sometimes you know well and say well intentioned but not not in a malevolent ways. It's just is what it is and that's just not something you're used to at a young age usually unless you grew up overseas like I did so that's the first thing I did start thinking about patriotism early on in Mike It wasn't default. You know and so and And other than that though it just gives you perspective Perspective on how good we have it in a lot of ways and What we should be grateful for and In Perspective on other countries you know deeper understanding and and and You know appreciation for for other cultures as well You know my my My parents actually. After I live in Columbia my parents moved to Venezuela. I was earning college by this point. So I know some pretty well I knew it was prospering. And then as it devolved into terrible socialist policies. I don't pretty well like what we be grateful for. Yeah totally do you think you know. We're in kind of a time where there is a bit of an isolationist streak but so far in your short political career. You haven't had a that perspective you've been a little bit more More of a proponent of being involved abroad particularly in Central America. You have co sponsored some legislation About the northern triangle. You've visited with our Central America Prosperity Project participants which We really appreciate. And you've talked to us a little bit about the digital strategy that we proposed for Central America. How do you Game just a a little bit about what that means you why you think it's important. Yeah well we have to empower our neighbors and we have to give them the same lessons that America has learned over the last few hundred years. Unfortunately we're I think we're forgetting many ways but but we'll here's what we learned. We learned that when you empower the individual to to live free and protect their personal property rights and their freedoms. Then you have the best chance for human prosperity and it's a really simple lesson that America has learned that America has been the leader of for very long time. We're questioning that ourselves lately You know as we're flirting with socialism and things like that But as we question it we we should also Empower our others and I thought it was cool to meet with you guys with your team on this and and hear about the digital infrastructure ideas. Because what I got from that was exactly the right American lesson which is you empower people to to live and thriving economy and In the best way to help people come out of poverty is to empower empower them and I just really cool conversation that we have you know talking about. What would they presented which was like listen? The these people want to work right but they can't. I can't set up an Uber Account. They can't set up online banking. They can't sit up you know. They can't rent their house out there. BNB just some basic stuff You know want we help with that digital infrastructure and allow them to thrive you know again. These are neighbors where we do have to do it. To look at ways to and smart ways to help development oatman these countries. And it's it's not just throwing money away. Corrupt governments no. It's actually look some more creative ways to do that. Deeper than that. You mentioned the corrupt governments and there are some some things that we completely take for granted here because we do have transparent government not perfect but transparent. We do have A situation where we have the rule of law and we have protection of property rights. These are things that I don't think a lot of Americans understand. Fundamentally don't exist particularly in the northern triangle countries in way that makes every bit of existence difficult. There's lack of economic opportunity If you want to set up a business pay your taxes you might get shook down by a a government official in addition to street gangs You your tax rates on it being higher than they need to be because there are so few people actually paying them and there's just a lot of things are the adept to make it an untenable situation. It's very hard as an ordinary person to to make it in any sort of way and have they lacked fundamental freedom that we have. Yeah exactly. Yeah 'cause back to we should really be more grateful for the United States of America And I think we used to be as a country and we're slowly forgetting that and It's a it's a parent as we all commemorating nine eleven. And you know there's been a lot of talk. We remember how we all came together as Americans back then it would just loved our country and everybody through American food who American flags everywhere and You know we definitely don't want another nine eleven back there but I want why we shouldn't need one right. It should just be the default you know we have our differences is but there are certain things that we appreciate about about our country

Congressman America Central America United States Texas Houston Congressman Dan Crenshaw Central America Prosperity Pro George W Bush Administration DC George W Bush Institute Middle East Bit Middle School SNL Dan Crenshaw Afghanistan President Trump Kaufman
"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

12:04 min | 1 year ago

"smu economic growth initiative" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Here's a unique career path from computer science in college to CIA agent collecting Intel and some of the most dangerous places on earth to Republican congressman representing the twenty third district of Texas. We chatted with congressman will heard whose district includes much of the Texas Mexico border about what immigration reform should look like we also talk about the skills. He learned to the CIA and how they're helpful in Washington DC. And we of course, cover how he ended up on a thirty six hour road trip with democratic congressman NATO Iraq. Here's what was crazy during that whole experience. We have like twenty six million people watch we were on every news program, which tells me that people actually want us to get along and solve big problems that the American people went that congressman heard also takes us into his world. Giving us behind the scenes details about life as a lawmaker in the United States. I major Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic is a podcast born from the word strategically which was point by us in braced by the George W Bush administration. We highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. We're here today with will heard congressman from the twenty third district of Texas Republican. Well, thank you so much for joining us this morning. It's awesome. To be be with y'all to their also with Matt Rooney are co host today who is managing director of the Bush institute SMU economic growth initiative math. Thanks for joining us as always as always a pleasure to be say that three say that title three times fast. Congressman your your legislator, and you're making the laws of the land. At this interesting point history. What's what's your approach right now? We my approach now is the same way. It's always been. You know agree with people when I agree with them, disagree when I disagree. The only way you get big things done is if you do it together. And so I've gotten fourteen pieces of legislation signed into law that's under a democratic president and Republican president. I'm a Republican legislator. And the only way I've gotten that many piece legislation son in law is by working together. And I actually believe we way more United States in the Visayas. And so that's the strategy. I've had since I've been in congress now for four and a half years. And that's the strategy. I'm going to continue. You know, congressman if you don't mind my asking. I think it's safe to say that Texas A and M to the intelligence community to congress is kind of unique career path. What what sent you down that path? Well, I thought I was going to be a programmer at IBM, and I grew up in San Antonio, and I had an internship at southwest research institute, and I was working for a female engineer who was like a leader in robotics and loved it and decided to pursue computer science in high school, and I went to am I was supposed to go to Stanford. But I decided to go to an after being on campus, I fell in love with it. And I had never been outside of Texas and I'm walking across the campus for one afternoon, and I see a sign that says take to journalism classes in Mexico City for four hundred twenty five dollars, and I had four hundred and fifty bucks in my Bank account. So I go to Mexico. It was a sign. It was a sign I fell in love being in another culture. I fell in love seeing things. I'd only read about in books, and I added internet. National studies as a minor. In my first class. I had a guest lecturer who was his former CIA tough guy, and he told the most amazing stories, and I Don I did something the next day after hearing him that I hadn't done at that point in my college career, I went to a professor's office and knocked on the door, and that began a friendship and that began my interest and the CIA and so I went in right after my after I graduated and then so I was the dude in the back alleys at four o'clock in the morning collecting intelligence on threats to the homeland. It was you know, being in in dangerous places trying to stop bad guys from doing bad things in our homeland. And in addition to collecting intelligence, I had to brief members of congress and be Frank. I was pretty shocked by the caliber of our elected officials, and I thought I could help intelligence community in a different way. And I had some friends that ran races and put the idea of the twenty third district in my head, which is basically where I grew up and I decided to. Run for congress. I left a job I loved I did two years in training at what I used to call the super secret CI training facility called the farm now. It's on Google maps. How he's wish that was a joke. Right as Julius and then two years in India, two years, Pakistan, two years, New York City do an inner agency work year and a half enough ghanistan. And so I left Afghanistan move back in my hometown ran for office and lost an election by like seven hundred votes. Glad on tell that story anymore. But, but but it gave me an opportunity to go in the private sector. And then I ran again and was successful. So if I could ask you a follow up at least in the popular imagination seats is the opposite of bureaucratic. It's the opposite of brass. Yes. It's cut to the chase. And take not even take the hill. It's it's still the stuff. Congress is the process. So how did they want to prepare you for the other? What are you bring from the former experience to the letter you are one hundred. Percents accurate in your understanding of of the agency and the rise. If you knew this space, I worked for the department of absolutely. And I and as you know, the reason the CIA is able to be nimble is because everybody's geared towards the mission. The the clandestine service, which are was in our the collectors of last resort. If you can't get a piece of information any other way, that's when you go to the national clandestine service. So it's the hardest. It's the most expensive is the most dangerous way of getting information. And so everybody in the organization is geared towards that. In the frustrating thing about congress. It was actually designed not to be officiant. The reason you have checks and balances is so that somebody one individual can't come in in change things on a whim. So that's that's. Actually, a good thing. It's frustrating. But for me, I always remember martime agency. I remember by the time in the private sector and try to bring the things I learned there into the legislative process. So the thing that prepared me for the job is I work on issues that I haven't in right? Yeah. There's not too many people that have my national security background experience. You know, when we talk about border security, I've been in some pretty nasty borders. I have chased bad people all around the world. And so so I have that experience. And so when it comes to congress having more of a role in national security and foreign policy a more able to were you know, I I haven't I have a role there. I also the training as a professional officer, and I would expect I would also say our diplomatic corps. What we learn is. How to ask really good questions? What we? Learn is how to get the right information from the right people to inform a particular decision. And that is that's the role of an individual member congress. There are so many issues that you have to deal with in. The course of a day course of a week and knowing how to gather that information talk to the right stakeholders in order to formulate some kind of final position. And that's another thing that I've tried to do in that something that I've I've had my my team work on. And that's why I think we've been able to be successful in so many areas is because you know, seek to understand before being understood. And that's one of the reasons why all the issues that impact my district. I take that approach. Well, I'm one of the big issues. That's impacting your district is of course, the immigration issue. Which is what we're here this morning and talk about your here for our naturalization ceremonies being hosted by the Bush institute, if you if you were in a vacuum, and you could just ride immigration Bill and your. With your pen this morning. What would that Bill look like it would be a market based system that was based on need? And you were it was so streamline that it didn't take. Nine months to process visa, that's it's that simple. The United States has benefited from the brain drain of every other country for the last couple of decades. I want to see that continue and I want to benefit from the hardworking drain as well. In my district. Unemployment across the country is is three point nine four percent. What does that mean? No matter what industry agriculture artificial intelligence, you need people. The thing that will stall our economy is the lack of a workforce take advantage of opportunities. That's why we should be able to streamline our our immigration. And when I say streamline it starts with Dhaka. These are one point two million kids. I shouldn't say kids young men and women that have only known the United States of America as their home. They were brought here. Through no fault of their own. They were brought here by their parents. They have all they all have if someone is a potential Docker sympa. It means they have a clean record. It means they've gone through high school. It means they're either pursuing college or been working for eighty percent of the time that they've been out of school or they want to go in the military. These these these kids have a already contributing to our culture our economy our society there Americans we should make it permanent. Right. And we should have a legislative a proper legislative fix. So that's DACA. You can also add TPS into this TPS is temporary protected status. These are people where there was a natural disaster in country, and they got a legal visa to come to the United States. Now the first letter in this visa category is temporary. It was only supposed to be temporary. Many people. Have been here for couple of decades. But they're paying they've been paying taxes. They've been paying into social security if you look at I think Texas has about fifty thousand TPS many of them are in Houston and many of those folks are in construction, so they're rebuilding Houston still from from hurricane Harvey. And we're talking about kicking him out of the country that makes no sense. And so at Owen, by the way, there's not thousands of people that are waiting to get construction jobs that can be tapped in to to come in and work. So so those those are the two areas that we should be able to to sort out quickly. If you also streamline immigration so that people that need workers can get them. You relieve the pressure on the border for men and women in border patrol to actually go after the

congressman United States CIA congress Texas president Bush institute George W Bush institute George W Bush administration Texas Mexico Washington DC NATO Iraq Kaufman Intel Afghanistan Mexico City Mexico