28 Burst results for "Smithsonian Museum"

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

08:56 min | Last month

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Here & Now

"From npr and wb. You are peter. O'dowd and i'm jane clayson it's here and now president biden heads to pittsburgh today to unveil a sprawling two trillion dollar infrastructure plan. It wouldn't just fix bridges and roads. It would also expand access to broadband internet upgrade schools and fund clean power. But the ambitious plan doesn't yet traction in washington where biden may need republicans to pass the bill. We're joined now by. Npr white house correspondent hammer. Keith heitkamp high. So this bill goes far beyond what we normally think of as infrastructure just how big of an economic transformation with this really be. Well that is. The goal is to transform the us economy and repair some of what has been broken by the pandemic and some of the broken this that was revealed by it and it includes things as you say that our traditional roads bridges transit rural broadband. Which is widely popular up but also things like fixing sewer and water systems to to resolve issues like what happened in flint michigan or bolstering the electricity grid to prevent what happened in texas earlier this year schools hospitals housing and then also really focusing in the they're calling this jobs plan but really focusing in on areas that have been previously under served or not quite helped by previous infrastructure efforts so putting an emphasis on trying to get manufacturers to move into areas where there have been a loss of cold jobs or trying to reconnect neighborhoods. That were cut off by highway building. In the past so infrastructure spending has been popular with republicans and democrats before How about now. We'll biden be able to get this done can get the votes he needs. Yeah i mean this is one of those things that used to be. A rare island of bipartisan cooperation. And it's not clear yet whether this will be that island anymore. The challenges that this is sweeping and wide ranging but that is also an asset in that there is something for everybody in this legislation. Something for every senator and house member to bring home and heck get their name on a bridge so it will be we we. We have to watch how the politics play out and whether democrats ended up having to go it alone again like they did with the covert relief bill. Then there's the eye-popping two trillion dollar price tag on this one. How does the president say he'll pay for it tamra yet so the the way that they are proposing to pay for it is bhai rolling back some of the tax cuts on businesses that were in the tax proposal in the tax bill that was passed by republicans and signed by president trump in two thousand seventeen so the top corporate tax rate would go up to twenty eight percent now that is still historically low compared to the past. It's about halfway back to where it was before. The trump tax cuts one thing. That's not in. This is raising taxes on wealthy individuals. Which is something that had been discussed and also democrats and their allies are making an argument. That hey maybe don't get hung up on paying for this dollar for dollar. Because infrastructure investment can pay for itself by creating efficiencies and also creating jobs but that is unlikely to be an argument that is accepted by republicans in congress who who are going to express concerns about the debt and deficit as they did. When president obama was in office about a minute left here tam as some progressive democrats say. This proposal does not go far enough. What more do they want. Well part of what is going on here is that the white house says this is only part one there will be part two as well and that will include more of a focus on the human side of if you will things like a free community college or universal pre-k or Paid family leave some of these other things that have been holding back the economy but do not certainly fit into the traditional definition of infrastructure and progressives want that and also more more on the environment well the infrastructure plan is here we will keep watching. Tamra keith is. Npr's white house correspondent. Thanks him. you're welcome. We are getting our first look at a detention facility overcrowded with children on the us mexico border yesterday. Journalists were allowed inside a temporary tent structure in donna texas. It's supposed to hold two hundred and fifty people but right now more than four thousand people are crammed inside. Many are children travelling alone. They're supposed to be processed there before going to a government run shelter and then eventually united with a family member joining us now is democratic congressman essentially gonzalez of texas. He represents a district near the border congressman. Thank you for speaking with us. Thank you for having me. You recently called president biden's immigration policies catastrophic. So when you see these latest images from texas what are you thinking. Yeah well let me clear that up. I didn't call his as immigration plan. Catastrophic i called the fact that people were coming across the border processed and released in the middle of a pandemic within my community potentially catastrophic overall think is planned as a good immigration plan and certainly much better than what we had in the past administration. Obviously the by the administration is dealing with this in a very humane compassionate way but clearly this administration has her hands full and at the same time we're in the middle of a pandemic and i think the pressure there on under the circumstances they've done a quite a job but they're still much more that can be done and what i'm trying to do is have ideas that are solutions to what's happening. What's happening on. Our southern border is nothing more than a result of our broken immigration system. The administration is trying to fix this. They've started housing some migrants in hotels. As you know some children have been moved to convention centers in dallas and in san diego. Is that working. Is that a solution to this problem. I i think it's a temporary solution. And it's a way to process them as fast as possible and with the intention of getting them into the homes of their family members as fast as possible. so let's get to some of the other potential solutions here. What should the president be doing to solve this problem. First of all we have to have a very clear message to central america that it's not safe to make this two thousand mile trek and we should have a system in place where people can ask for asylum in a safe way in a safe zone in their home country or their neighboring country and create much like the camps that we see on our southern border here within my district these ten facilities we should have facilities like that in southern mexico and guatemala honduras and along the way for people to check in register and try to have an expedited asylum hearing and if they qualify they should be able to get on a plane and fly into the united states and we need to have a holistic approach to our immigration system. We need to have a robust guestworker program alongside with people asking for asylum and we need to find ways for people who are here already to be able to have some kind of legal status. So you're calling for migrants asylum applications to be processed in their home country. That is something. The biden administration has said. It's working on and trying to revive but we also know that the president has tapped vice president kamala harris with addressing the root cause of migration from central america trees. The us has been sending money to those countries for ears with questionable results. What will be different this time. How would that work what. i hope. we'll be different this time that those investments just don't go to or governmental entities in those countries and the money ends up being squandered and not invested properly. My idea is to invest in areas where people are likely to migrate from if you take guatemala. For example people don't migrate from all over the country. They migrate from certain pockets within the country. And we need to have a surgical approach and go into those areas and figure out what we can do to create stability on the ground and have permanent investments that create employment and create conditions for people to want to stay in their home country. Do you think the white house was caught off guard well. I don't think that this plan for them that they were gonna have this massive surge come from central america..

san diego texas jane clayson Keith heitkamp congress pittsburgh dallas Tamra keith washington white house two thousand mile democrats united states southern mexico yesterday biden two trillion dollar central america donna texas today
Trump threatens to torpedo COVID relief with new demands

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Trump threatens to torpedo COVID relief with new demands

"President trump threatens to scuttle the coronavirus relief package passed by the house and Senate in a video posted on Twitter president trump demanded changes to the bipartisan nine hundred billion dollar relief bill after slamming the Egyptian military the Kennedy center and the Smithsonian museums trump demanded Congress increases six hundred dollar per person stipend them out back by the Republican leadership increased the ridiculously low six hundred dollars to two thousand dollars or four thousand dollars for a couple house speaker Nancy Pelosi fired off her own tweet at last the president has agreed to two thousand dollars adding Democrats are ready to bring this to the floor this week by unanimous consent let's do it the huge package cleared both the Senate and house by lopsided numbers enough to override a veto should trump decide to take that step to acquire Washington

Smithsonian Museums Trump Kennedy Center Donald Trump Senate Twitter House Congress Nancy Pelosi Washington
Congress approves Smithsonian museums in Washington DC for Latinos and women's history

NPR News Now

01:02 min | 4 months ago

Congress approves Smithsonian museums in Washington DC for Latinos and women's history

"Buried in the massive spending bill that includes the next round of coronavirus relief funding to new national museums for washington. Dc npr's neda ulaby reports of both latino and women's history have long pushed for legislation authorizing both to be included in the year. End deal the national museum of the american latino and the smithsonian women's history museum. We're blocked earlier this month. By senator mike lee of utah. He dismissed their creation as identity politics that would in his words. Further divide an already divided nation. The museums advocates pointed to the widely documented lack of latino in pino representation in museums. Already on the national mall support of the museums was broadly. Bipartisan both have been decades in the making the president of friends of the american latino museum as tornado. Rodriguez told in. Pr that after a year that's highlighted booth economic disparities and the hard work of latinos across the country. It's a great moment with which to end the year neta libby. Npr

Neda Ulaby National Museum Of The America Senator Mike Lee NPR Washington Utah American Latino Museum Rodriguez Neta Libby
Smithsonian Museums Are Latest to Shutter as Virus Surges In Washington DC

Coronavirus Daily

01:02 min | 5 months ago

Smithsonian Museums Are Latest to Shutter as Virus Surges In Washington DC

"The smithsonian is temporarily closing all of its museums starting november twenty third because of growing concerns over the spread of covid nineteen in the region and across the us that means locally eight smithsonian facilities including the national zoo will close dc's covid nineteen seven day average is steadily inching back up to the rate of positive cases. We saw back in may when cases per one hundred thousand people were at their highest in the washington region. To be honest. This news is giving me deja-vu in the worst way the trend is signaling more tough days ahead as thousands more people are infected with the virus and as many people consider their thanksgiving plans officials across the region have asked residents to limit and gathering in large groups for the holidays or to avoid it altogether if they can maryland and virginia have already increased restrictions to try and stop the spread of covid in dc mayor. Muriel bowser says new restrictions are coming soon

Smithsonian National Zoo DC Washington United States Maryland Virginia Muriel Bowser
Smithsonian closing Washington DC's museums and zoo again amid virus spike

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 5 months ago

Smithsonian closing Washington DC's museums and zoo again amid virus spike

"We have determined that will be closing all Smithsonian museums temporarily beginning on Monday, when we've made that call as as a public health precaution. That's the Smithsonian's police. Fischer. Eight destinations are affected, including the National Zoo, the National Museum of American History and the National Museum of the American Indian Visitors who had gone online ahead of time and reserved a pass to come visit us. We're contacting all of them directly, also planning to temporarily close the National Gallery of Art starting so Saturday. How long the closings last depends on what happens with the pandemic. Michelle Bash w T. O P New. Also

Smithsonian National Museum Of The America National Zoo National Museum Of American Hi Fischer National Gallery Of Art Michelle Bash
Smithsonian museums, National Zoo to close temporarily again amid rising COVID-19 cases

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 5 months ago

Smithsonian museums, National Zoo to close temporarily again amid rising COVID-19 cases

"Zoo and seven Smithsonian museums in our region will close to the public on Monday. They include the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the National Portrait Gallery and the National Air and Space Museum's Udvar Haci Center. The Smithsonian's Alise, Fisher says. We don't have a re opening day at this point. That that really gives us the flexibility to continue to watch the data monitor the situation very closely because things continue to change so rapidly. Also closing the National Gallery of Art starting Saturday that will affect both the West Building and the sculpture garden. No reopening date has been announced. They're either Michelle Bash w T o P News

National Museum Of African Ame Smithsonian Udvar Haci Center Alise National Portrait Gallery National Air And Space Museum Fisher West Building National Gallery Of Art Michelle Bash
Washington, D.C. - House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:21 min | 9 months ago

Washington, D.C. - House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

"A Smithsonian National Museum of the American Latino is one step closer to becoming a reality. The House approved a bill last week with bipartisan support in favor of it. And while the road to the museum opening is still long, the bill is sparking celebration and conversation within Latino communities. Here's NPR's Isabella Gomez. Salsa singer Celia Cruz. The traditions of the Dialogues, Martos Holiday alone is worth and the farm workers movement. The Smithsonian Museum of the American Latino can potentially explore Ah lot of the contributions of latte next people in the United States, but there are still logistics to work out. The bill now goes to the Senate. Then it gets signed by the White House, then the government to determine how much the museum will cost and where it will be. The location is going to be the biggest concern for me. That's a story the Rodriguez who's been lobbying for the creation of this museum for the past 15 years. And he knows where in Washington he wants it to be. You cannot Not be on the national Mall. There's also the cost, half of which will likely come from the federal government. The rest will be from donors. We all remember stories of how really stepped up for the American resume. We need to make sure that we have our donors like an overwintering. Bodegas estimates that building the museum from Scratch could take another 10 years, which gives lots of time to air some skepticism. Can one museum really encapsulate so many different cultures and experiences? Will it expand on what? Letting me that or let next identity looks like for Afro Latinos and indigenous people? My immediate reaction is I'm nervous simply because The branding of Latino lad, especially by stands. Broadcasting doesn't reflect the fact that Afro Latinos exists. That's got the knack Liston from Boston who studies the history of music in Latin ex culture. She says she thinks the museum is a good opportunity to finally have some tough conversations on race. Gender immigration. I think this is Ah, very exciting Start. If I'm gonna be honest, I do think that there's definitely a way for us to get it right. It just requires a level of honestly, I think some people are now becoming aware of that we didn't have before. And she's not the only one with some pause. Bala Santos is a museum educator in Chicago. She says she doesn't want the Smithsonian to brush over the struggles. Immigrants face when they come here. With an overly optimistic message. I would love to have Ah latte next museum where you could say they're actually structural inequities here. And it isn't about cease up. Whether it's about how are we setting up our society's? That's why museum champion is toward the Rodriguez says. Now is the time for people to raise their voices and explore those tensions. These are all historical moments they need to be laid out. It's not a story that's going to be very clean and print. That's not what we're trying to do, and it's not on the shoulders of one single Smithsonian Institution to tell that story. Well, a Santos says Now is the time for all museums across the US to reevaluate how they convey Latin ex

Smithsonian National Museum Bala Santos Rodriguez Smithsonian Institution Celia Cruz United States Liston NPR Isabella Gomez Martos Holiday Senate National Mall White House Washington Boston Chicago
Washington DC Will Have Its First Museum Reopening on Monday

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

Washington DC Will Have Its First Museum Reopening on Monday

"News at least two local museums will re open their doors Monday morning the international spy museum and the museum of the Bible the private museums will open their doors to visitors for the first time in more than three months as DC enters phase two under the city's guidelines museums and galleries can re open with limited capacity and physical distancing measures in place what about the Smithsonian museums spoke person says first to open will be the national zoo and the wood bar housing center probably sometime in July but not before the fourth we're told and the other movies museums will follow in the Smithsonian

DC
Do Humans and Bananas Really Share Half Their DNA?

BrainStuff

06:04 min | 1 year ago

Do Humans and Bananas Really Share Half Their DNA?

"During Party conversation or a Trivia night you may have heard the fun little fact that humans and Bananas Sheriff Fifty or even sixty percent of the same DNA there it seems to be a lot of differences though between a person and a piece of yellow fruit starting with the fact that one is an animal and the other is a plant but actually there is some truth to that startling statistic but it's not the whole truth. This urban legend of sorts likely originated from a program run by the National Human Genome Research Institute back in two thousand thirteen. Although similar similar data may have been run elsewhere genetics expert. Dr Laurence Brodie at his colleagues generated some banana human information to be included as part of an Educational National Smithsonian Museum of Natural History video called the animated genome that video noted that DNA between a human and a banana is forty one percent similar so in order to find out how this similarity was determined. We talked with Dr Brody himself. He explained that. I it's important to understand the difference. Prince between DNA and protein products. You can think of DNA as the blueprint of a house and protein products the actual house because all of the information is in there Then think of human DNA is the blueprint for a ranch home and banana. DNA is that of a condo in each house. A bunch of things are similar. The plumbing bathrooms kitchen and products are both quite different. That's how it works with humans versus just about everything else from bananas to chimpanzees. The second thing to keep in mind is that genes which are the regions of DNA that code for these proteins. Only make up about two percent of your DNA in order to compare humans and bananas scientists. I looked at the sequences of jeans and a typical banana. Genome Brody said we then used these DNA sequences to predict the amino acid said sequence of all the proteins that would be made from those genes. We then did the same process for all human genes. All of the protein sequences were placed in a file file next. The scientists compared the protein sequence from each banana gene to every human. Jean Brodie said the program compares. How similar the sequence of the banana genes are to each human? Gene Program. Kept any matches that were more similar than one would expect by chance. The program continued doing this gene by gene seen all told more than four million comparisons were done resulting in about seven thousand best hits between the two genomes then the percent similarity score score for each of those hits was averaged Brady said this gave us the result of about forty percent this is the average similarity between proteins gene products. Not What genes gene products or proteins are the biochemical material resulting from Jean becoming functional. Brody continued of course there are many many genes in our genome that do not have a recognizable counterpart in the banana genome. Ns Versa in case. That's a bit difficult to chew and swallow. Let's let's break it down. Essentially they took all of the banana jeans and compared them one at a time to human genes from that they called a degree of similarity. If the banana had the gene. But the human didn't that didn't get counted and about sixty percents jeans have a recognizable counterpart in the Banana Genome Brady explained and of those sixty percent. The proteins encoded by them are roughly forty percent identical when we compare the amino acid sequence of the human protein twins equivalent in the banana. Uh it may seem shocking that so many genes and so many of the proteins that they create are similar in to such vastly different beings as a person in a banana. But when you think about it. It's not that shocking. Brody explained if you think about what we do for living and what a banana does. There's a lot of things we do. The same way. Like consuming oxygen a lot of those genes are just fundamental to life so when people repeat the percentages being a similarity of DNA. Actually actually what the research looked at was the similarity of gene products. Brody reassured US. It's a pretty minor mistake. The kernel that you would take home is that we have something in common with a banana and a potato and the pine tree that part is true. The fine points about the gene products or the DNA is easy to see how that would get translated incorrectly so the scientists looked at the DNA sequence of a banana and compared it with the DNA of human it would not align. We also spoke by email with Mike Francis a PhD student in Bioinformatics at the University of Georgia. He explained you share fifty percent of your DNA with each of your parents but with bananas as we share about fifty percent of our genes as we said earlier genes make up just two percent of your DNA. So what's the other ninety eight percent made up of well. Eight percent of the rest of your DNA regulates genes as to whether a gene should be turned on or off other ninety percent appears to have unknown functions or functions that have been lost through evolution. Francis said these unknown sections of DNA used to commonly called junk DNA because it was thought to do nothing I hesitate to use the phrase junkie because each year. It seems we realize more of this junk is actually functional. Humans don't just share a high percentage of protein protein encoding genes with bananas. We also share eighty five percent of those genes with a mouse and we share sixty one percent of disease causing genes with a fruit fly. Brody Brody said the remarkable thing is that despite being very far apart in evolutionary time we can still find a common signature in the genome of a common ancestor. These are preserved served because the genome of an organism that lived billions of years ago contained genes. That helped cells live and reproduce. Those same jeans are preserved in US and plants Francis added that humans likely share about one percent of their DNA with other as well. He said this is because all life that exists on earth has evolved from a single cell fell originated about one point. Six billion years ago in a sense. We're all relatives

Genome Brody National Human Genome Research Mike Francis Jean Brodie Gene Program Dr Laurence Brodie Educational National Smithsoni United States Brady University Of Georgia Fifty Percent Forty Percent Sixty Percent Two Percent Ninety Eight Percent Eighty Five Percent Six Billion Years Forty One Percent Sixty One Percent
Massive heat wave blamed for 6 deaths

WBZ Afternoon News

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Massive heat wave blamed for 6 deaths

"And as you know there is a heat wave gripping much of the country Meg all over as more from New York City much of the nation is roasting triple digits in some places the humidity makes it feel even hotter in queens New York Saturday kids took refuge in a massive public schools in Washington DC sounds on the mall provided relief so did paddling on the Potomac others escape to the air conditioned comfort of the Smithsonian museums the mail went out in Ohio and beyond on Saturday but the heat was oppressive rob but he does turn from uncomfortable to fatal so far it is blamed for at least six

New York City New York Ohio Washington
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on The Science Show

"And what sort of scale that how many elephants have you dealt with in that sense. You know, we're really the well the effort is just beginning with something in the neighborhood of four thousand of these elephants now compared to only fifty thousand left that's a very large number. So we're really at the very beginning of understanding what that population represents genetically. And then trying to figure out what are the factors that we need to take into account that will lead to success? You know, when we're putting together, these are, very smart animals are social animals, you can't just throw them back into the wild. And hope for the best we need to be able to understand the social factors. How are we going to track them and make sure that they're successful? Once they're released some sort of work with other animals on the other round the world. Absolutely. We work in about thirty different countries. We have a staff around two hundred and fifty scientists that are working on everything from EMF IBI ns and avian species all the way up to elephants. So it's a very diverse portfolio. We work in thirty countries. A lot of work in Africa southeast Asia Latin America, how many people know that. I mean in the United States the extent of what you do not very many, people know that the Smithsonian does research at all much less that we have national zoo that's leading the world, and what we do people think of this Massoni, and as a cultural institution that houses Lincoln's hat and Dorothy, ruby slippers, and that sort of thing but in. Reality. We have the largest assemblage of biodiversity and conservation scientists of any institution in the world. If you look at our natural history museum, our environmental research center tropical research institute, and our zoo. It's quite an awesome, assemblage of intellectual strength. Congratulations. Thank you. Okay. Thank you very much steeped Montfort is the director of the Smithsonian's national zoo. And he spoke of the trip last meeting in Washington DC just ended..

Lincoln center tropical research insti Africa Montfort Asia Latin America United States Washington director Dorothy
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Cates. AL news at six o two. I'm steve. Even though federal employees will be getting back pay soon. Virginia congressman Gerry Connolly says we have people already missed two paychecks. And that has really put a huge damper on the broader economy still he thinks our local economy will recover the end of the shutdown means the end of closures for DC's iconic Smithsonian museums the Smithsonian museums and national zoo will reopen on Tuesday, both entities were able to stay open for the first eleven days of the shutdown using money left over from other years but had to close for that money. Ran out Marylanders could be getting a quarter of percent income tax cut. If Maryland House Republicans get their way, the tax cut is one of a number of priorities outlining for this legislative session. House. Republicans are also proposing changes in existing law for special police officers to create flexibility for counties to have an officer in schools. If you're taking is sixty six this weekend. Leave yourself a little extra time there will be lane closures tonight on sixty six between Blake lane and the beltway. So construction can be done outside the beltway express lanes and the eastbound and westbound direction will be shutting down three lanes in each direction tonight during overnight hours, that's V dots. Michelle, Holland who says lows closures will go into effect tonight at nine and tomorrow morning at nine investigators say Wednesday's fire at comet ping pong pizza in DC was no accident the district arson explosives task force as the fire at the restaurant. Associated with pizza gate. Was set intentionally. A police report says investigators found a few burn matches and a bottle of lighter fluid by curtains that went up in flames. Now, the search is on for a man who may have set fire to the curtains police do not believe the fire had any connection to pizza gate. That's an incident where a man opened fire at the restaurant in two thousand sixteen believing a false theory that Hillary Clinton and other Democrats were running. Child-sex ring out of the restaurant. Wwl news time six oh four now. Wwl traffic.

DC Hillary Clinton Gerry Connolly Maryland congressman Virginia Cates. officer arson Michelle Holland eleven days
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

17:11 min | 2 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Occurred, and I was covering the Palestinian and Israeli response to that. So I went back to some of the people that I reported on at that time and was able to see how things had had not changed in fifty s and ended up focusing in on an Israeli attorney who defense Palestinians in the Israeli criminal Justice system and focused on it really tragic case that she had at the time which was about a young Palestinian accused of attempted murder of a young Israeli and both on the that India's old at it showed how entrenched and desperate the situation. Est. Did that is that building on your next book at all nine? My next book is quite different. My next book is it's another historical novel set in three time periods, but the historical spine of the story is in the eight. Fifties and sixties, and it's about a famous gray sauce. And about the enslaved people who trained that horse and rode that horse, and what happens to the people on the house during the civil war. And then it has all contemporary thread about a missing painting of the house, and that brings us to the abstract expressionist movement and the dawn of that movement in New York in nineteen forties and then to the Smithsonian museum today an encore presentation of untapped doubled. UCSB from rushed when will we see that I hope to finish it next year? Do you rewrite and rewrite I do and this one this one's required? A lot of picking a pot and reconnecting because it's quite it's quite a puzzle to connect this three different threads and in a convincing way. That will keep the radio with me. Although Hanna heath from people of the book is a stray alien, what about a book about Australia. I feel in some ways all my novels uh sort of Australian novels because they share some sort of car Australian values and concerns which is the plight of the underdog. I think when you you know, it's it's interesting to me that Austrailia in America. So much, but I'll founding mythology is and experience of airing is so different in so many ways because Americans came here as I idealisation and Optimus Australians were dragged in chains and dumped on this unforgiving show. And that that that. These people who are the wretched outcasts and despised society managed to create this incredible open tolerance forward-looking wonderful place. It has shaped my political views of the world. And I think shapes many Australians view of you know. America's said, send me a Australia strategist took him. And then when they got there they had to learn how to be in a they didn't go out to the midwest and find three Mehta's of rich Topsail, they founded tiny layer of arable soil and a massive unforgiving does it. So there's a different relationship to nature as well. Diana, wimberly, Texas. Good afternoon. Diana you with us. My fault, Diana. I apologize. I need to hit the button. You're on. Still having trouble. Diana. If you could start again that was all that was all on me. I apologize to you. Please go. It's so hard because mistress Lynn, you are my favorite favorite interviewer. You always do such a fabulous job. You never make a mistake and this program with MS Brooks is just fabulous. I do not know where work, but I am going to recommend Caleb to my book club here Wimbley. I'm sure we will enjoy it. And love it. I missed the first part would she be able to expand a little bit more about how she got here from Australia. And my other question is that she ever come to Texas on a book tour in now. Whereas wimberly Diana is between San Antonio. And Austin deep in the heart of Texas. There you go. All right. Thank you. Well, I have been to Texas that only to Houston and Dallas, and I haven't ever managed to even get to us then, but I would like to do that. I'd like to see the hill country of Texas much to explore this from your mouth to God's ear. I had found my next folks are more of Texas. You ask about coming to the United States. It's in some ways, a very common Australian story, we love to get out and take chip and stay the world's and for me. I wanted to do it with a mission, and I was lucky enough after working as a journalist on a Sydney newspaper for three years to get a scholarship to the graduate program in journalism at Columbia University. So I came to New York City that was my first stop in the United States and had a wonderful. Yeah. Learning from some terrific professes at Columbia University. And. My intent was to just get that degree and go home and get on with my real life back in Sydney, but I met two guys attend out to be quite influential in changing the direction of my life. One was the gentleman who hired young reporters for the Wall Street Journal and the other was tiny Hallet's fellow classmate and I've been married to him for thirty three is coming on. So so it was a very interesting. Yeah. But the Wall Street Journal hired me and my first job with them was in that bureau in Cleveland, Ohio. And I spent a year they're covering all kinds of things that a lot of basic industry and a lot of the themes that we see currently bubbling up in our political discourse. We're already there in the eighties with the jobs being sent south are offshore. And you know, working people struggling to keep their heads above water. So I was very grateful for that time in Ohio. And then I went back and open, a bureau food, Wall Street Journal in Australia, and that was fantastic to and after that they had made the Middle East correspondence job. And that was the kind of adventure that ago from Sydney contend down. Do you feel isolated in Australia when you're there? I think in the days of my childhood. There was some feeling of thing at the ends of the us because. Look dinosaurs were walking the us back. I we didn't have the internet. We didn't have the instant communication. I can go to Westralia now. And I can watch the news hour, I can listen to NPR done have to be disconnected from this country in in when I came to Columbia. It was impossible to get any Australian news. It was. You. Even a phone. Call was very expensive. You know? So it was a much more isolated time. When I was growing up. I don't think that's true at all today and people manage their careers, quite well from Sydney. Whether they're working so companies in China or the US or Europe. So I think things have changed enormously in that census being in in an interconnected wealth. Another one of those themes that I found in all your books was the importance of place, a real sense of place. Yeah. Well, you had asked me about writing and Australian book and two I will I will have to go on and get immersed in. There is a story that appeals to me a great deal. And so if I can dissuade stubborn husband to get his head out of his American history times for long enough, and we can get back there to look into it. I was up to do that. But even in your in your books here, you talk about Martha's Vineyard in that seven miles and Sarajevo how it sits in the valleys and Jerusalem the world of David. With a hard scrabble life. Well, the land is a character in the code to be sure. And that's why I capitalize land every time anybody mentions it because the land is what is being fought over the land was what was promised land is what defines these people and the land is still being Florida today and the battles that king David was engaged in our ongoing. And so I think you know, that history and that sense of the land, and the people of the land is very entrenched there. Was David bisexual. I think that the relationship with Jonathan is one of the most ten delay drawn relationships. So what we do with scripture at Al. Synagogue is we take the Torah portion of the week, and we hold it up to the light. And we turn it around. And we look at those words, and we try and squeeze every bit of juice outta them. According to Iran lived experience. So when I did that exercise with the plan woods is a text about David and neon. I can only come to the conclusion that this was a full relationship. David talks about his love Yana tan being greater than his love of any woman. And at that point in his life is loved a lot of women when they first meet each other Yana town is an established officer army soldier very experienced much older than David David is young fresh hero. Yana tan gives David everything he gives in his clothes his weapons. He gives him the right to succeed him as king. He hands his birthright as souls. To david. And I think in the the song of the bow the beautiful psalm that is a lament after the death of Anna, Tannen soul. You feel the emotion of people, and it says in the text their souls when knit together to me. I would have to twist my own beliefs into a pretzel to see anything there other than a full relationship reading that it felt like a contemporary political novel. I think as many contemporary resonances in this story when I was writing it. The David portray us scandal was breaking and I remembered from my reporting in Iraq that. Us who is so admired by his men. His troops men and women. They called him king. David. And then of course, he does his career to a certain extent because of an adulterous relationship. The palooza, Sean. About Tom you write that the ton felty was quote, no more than a tool in the hand of an unseen craftsman. I was trying to learn about the Hebrew prophets. And Joshua Hessel. Russia has shell wrote a beautiful work of scholarship on the prophets. And he talks about them as the. I love he says the son of the most irritating men who have lived because they're always telling people what they don't want to hear that for many of the Hebrew prophets. It was a role that they assumed unwillingly. I like Jonah particularly because every time God calls Jonah to go and tell an unwelcome truth to you know, a corrupt nation. Genesis wants to go and take a nap. And I think we all feel like that. Sometimes when we're confronted with Judy that, we know we have to attack we have to perform. I'm sure Christine blazey food would have rather taken a nap then give testimony that she was doing what she felt it was so Judy to do and that's very much in that prophetic tradition. So Netanyahu and the town again, he might be a reliable narrator. He might not be we only have his account of his powers and his visions. Other people in the book expressed to him some grave doubts about what he's up to. And what his motives really are. So again, it will be for the reader to decide. Another theme in all of your books is life is rough. It's not fair. Is that purposeful or is that just something I'm reading? I don't know that it's toughest full. It's certainly true. At certainly, you know, people sometimes say. If you could go back in time, where would you go? And I say. Now where I could have gender reassignment surgery. I I would not choose to willingly go back in into any time as a woman because women have always been. Endangered subjugated victimized through throughout history. Yes for women. Life is tough. And it's not fair, historically. So that's true. I hadn't really I'm quite a sunny optimistic person by nature. I think when you write about the past. Much to be concerned about as we were talking earlier. The lemon tation is very loud. And we hope that we're bending the arc of the universe towards Justice that sometimes the band is so slow as to be indiscernible human failings. Another thing. Well, we all got him. And it's what makes us in the end and in in the wonderful Leonard Cohen song. He hallelujah. He talks about the holy. And the broken. And he says there's a blaze of light in every word. It doesn't matter which you heard the holy or the broken Hallelujah. And that idea the holiness and broken nece can coexist. And in fact, it's a very mystical Jewish idea that it is out of the broken crack that the divine light can penetrate. Monica Miller tweet how does Geraldine Brooks approach archival research? How much time does she spend in the archives? I do love Akai's. You can accomplish a great deal on line. Now, more and more of the great collections of human knowledge are being digitized, and I think that's a wonderful things that people who can't access the guys that I tell you what things still happen in the guys that will not happen online..

David David Austrailia Texas king David wimberly Diana Sydney United States Wall Street Journal America UCSB Smithsonian museum Columbia University Ohio India Hanna heath Jonah attorney Leonard Cohen
Belarus president: Belting a 'useful' way to punish children

Best of the Michael Medved Show

01:56 min | 2 years ago

Belarus president: Belting a 'useful' way to punish children

"Thousand bucks. In fact, the nearly twenty three pound hunk of iron and nickel is the sixth largest meteorite ever found in Michigan. According to the Smithsonian museum in central Michigan university. More on these stories at townhall dot com. The ruling on. Jerseys funny foam fingers in everything you need for the game. But what really get much more FedEx delivery

Smithsonian Museum Michigan University Michigan Fedex Twenty Three Pound
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Of the White House on Friday unrelated to the capital confirmation. The Labor Department reported Friday that the unemployment rate fell to three point seven percent in September its lowest level since nineteen sixty-nine President Trump quickly celebrated the news on Twitter and many forecasters predict the jobless rate will decline even more in the months to come unemployment has declined steadily since the great recession when it skyrocketed to ten percent in October two thousand nine many economists see today's low rate as a continuation of the trend that began under President Obama, but they also think the Republican tax cuts played a key role in keeping job gains strongness late in an economic expansion at the White House Jon decker Fox News special FBI team that investigated the slayings of five police officers in Dallas in two thousand sixteen and the deadly mass shooting in Las Vegas last year. Now, hopefully, local authorities gather evidence in the attack this week. South Carolina law enforcement officers. Frederick Hopkins was charged with six counts of attempted murder and one count of murder on Friday for that outbreak. A man and Michigan has discovered there can be money in old rocks. We Michigan resident David Missouri. Bought a barn thirty years ago. It came with a meteorite and his story from the farmer who sold the barn about it. Landing in the backyard and the nineteen thirties, but Missouri ended up using it as a doorstop until earlier this year when he saw reports that pieces of meteorites could sell for thousands of dollars. He took his Twenty-three pound iron and nickel specimen to central Michigan university and learned it's the sixth largest meteorite found in the state university sent two pieces to the Smithsonian museum more testing that's already estimated to be worth about one hundred thousand dollars with easy homes. Interested in buying it. Missouri pledging to donate a portion of any potential proceeds.

David Missouri Michigan White House President Obama Twitter Michigan university President Frederick Hopkins Jon decker FBI Labor Department Smithsonian museum Trump Las Vegas South Carolina Dallas
Ex-Michigan State president apologizes in gymnastics sex abuse scandal

All News, Traffic and Weather

02:30 min | 3 years ago

Ex-Michigan State president apologizes in gymnastics sex abuse scandal

"To hear the very latest news traffic and weather just say hey alexa play wbz newsradio on iheartradio and we are following developments in washington where senators have just seen their summer recess cancelled senate president mitch mcconnell told members today they should expect to remain in session through the month of august much more on the story as more information becomes available a not guilty plea from harvey weinstein the former hollywood heavyweight was formally arraigned today in a new york city courtroom weinstein is facing rape and criminal sex act charges that could result in decades in prison if convicted weinstein's attorney ben brockman spoke to reporters after this morning's hearing and suggests he expects a very lengthy court battle is the first day of this process we begin our fight now harvey weinstein is free on a million dollars bail but is confined to just new york and connecticut on capitol hill as senate subcommittee is set to hear testimony today from former usa gymnastics president steve penny and former michigan state university president luana simon about the sexual abuse of female athletes during their respective tenures by disgrace sports dr larry nassar ahead of today's hearing a number of athletes who were asked spoke they were abused they spoke today here's victim hannah i envision a future where girls can walk into a gymnastics facility and feel like they can have fun where they can feel safe where they can enjoy what they do and where they can get proper treatment nassar is now serving life in prison in other news she's famous enough to go by only one name and now the smithsonian is paying trivia she's been a household name for decades even raising speculation of a run for president in twenty two twenty for too long women have not been heard or believe oprah is being honored with an exhibit at the smithsonian museum of african american history and culture beginning friday it'll include video clips interviews movie costumes personal photographs and journals exploring oprah's influence how her work has shaped america the museum's director says her twenty one million dollars in contributions to the museum did not influence the decision to honor her deborah rodriguez cbs news wbz news time one forty two in sports the red sox will start a threegame set with a tigers tonight at fenway at seven ten boston front office was very busy last night wbz's adam kaufman is.

Director Boston Deborah Rodriguez Smithsonian Museum Of African Dr Larry Nassar Luana Simon Michigan State University Steve Penny USA Attorney Hollywood Adam Kaufman Iheartradio Oprah President Trump Connecticut New York Ben Brockman Rape
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"All right would you oh we kind of going on to do the talking about the business either new hockey thing coming out here at barstool would you rather have to do battle you have like teams five on five hand to hand combat in super thick sand or on ice i huff nice yeah i guess ice because you can still get still standing in have your wits about you on ice although obviously it's very slippery but i think if you're super thick sander or mud or something you're losing use of full use of your legs and feet so you're kinda planted there you're at disadvantage i also think it depends on the size of the person like if you if there are a lot bigger than me i would probably rather go for sand because then i can use the sand as a weapon but if there are about the same size same reason but i feel confident in my ability to take somebody down then i would use the ice as a weapon where i would slam their head into the ice oh yeah isis a weapon you're right that would do it because i would go low and just try to trip somebody and then immediately cover their eyes with sand and try to use it that way up this is kind of gross but i went on that hike last week and yeah i do it was like two hundred nine mile hike for the marine raiders foundation but at the end we all went in the ocean i had these blisters on my feet and then i guess this this gross the fake one on my heel like resealed itself but it was like getting puffy and it hurts the last night i was like man so i kind of feel that it and like a pile of fucking sand came out of it.

marine raiders foundation hockey five hand
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"Really cool it'll be smithsonian time so you gotta give us a year i i just learned why we clap by the way oh really believes the mark and you know it was fun i just i was like i don't know how the fuck you doing this i'm here for yeah now we now we again and still talking after not yet he's still talking shit okay all right here we go that interview is brought to you by simple contacts goto simple contacts dot com slash cbt or enter the code bt to get these contacts simple contacts as the most convenient way to renew your contact lens prescription and reorder your brand of contacts from anywhere in just minutes it's vision care for the twenty first century instead of heading to the doctor every year to renew your prescription for something you wear every single day take a few minutes out of your day to do it on your own time in your own terms need to renew your prescription take five minute vision tests from your phone or computer it's reviewed by a licensed doctor you receive a renewed prescription and reorder your contacts and all you need is your current contacts and internet connection in just ten feet of space if you have an unexpired prescription just upload a photo of your doctor's information in order your lenses right then and there there are a million things demanding your time and contacts on just shouldn't be one of them with simple contacts you knew your prescription and reorder your context from anywhere in minutes no more doctors offices weight rooms it takes less than.

smithsonian five minute ten feet
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"That's really cool absolutely and then maranda is a former member of the the military yourself how do you view this and beyond that how did you even get involved in working at the smithsonian had kind of a passion or history on nf anything i think working in history has really expanded my world view it's a lot like fram late as far as like seeing other ways of doing things and i found a lot in my military career of sometimes i didn't have the perspective to understand how like my job you know as a plo which is what i do really did the grand scheme of things so especially looking into military invention day i'm helping to set up a dislike we're won't fulsome the historic objects they have in the armed forces suspi collection out so you can kind of hold it side by side and look at it and i think that's something that a lot of us can really appreciate you're still serving in that you may have danny where you are using the most cutting edge navigation technology we have some demonstrators coming in that are kind of looking at like host gps navigation but you also might be back to like the compass in this accident we'll have those someplace the military's really the future and in some ways we just live in the past every day because it works right you know we stick with what works so many so many times what is post gps though what's beyond gps are based oh okay so draper charles stark draper labs the bringing in a system called skylark and the idea is okay so you wanna you wanna land vehicle on mars you're not gonna have gps guidance suppose you want to land it with precision on mars instead of just having plopped down so you really going to be able to do that says this this technology integrates in a what we know about star maps with very fast processing speed the ability i think one of their one of their leaders on this quoted you know suppose you wanna to you know a vehicle going five hundred or fifty.

smithsonian danny charles stark
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"Long story short i guess the the it was her husband at the time found out and divorced her but he was also like this is really fucked up this is wrong and put this out for everyone to see so people started once they started digging into eric graydon's they found right now he's accused of sexual coercion blackmail invasion of privacy misuse of charity resources to fund his campaign all this stuff so not only that he dug into the mission continues contact lists and used his charity to further his political aspirations which is not legal so basically this guy that i thought was so perfect and looked up to is just total scumbag and what really bothers the this article came out today a bunch of other navy seals are speaking out saying we were telling you guys not to like just don't have a freedom voted for him just because he was a seal like really look into this guy because something ain't right and and they're angry because his whole campaign has whole thing is i'm a navy seal and they're saying you're making us look like garbage so well it's been the last decade that navy seals have really come to the forefront of our society through media in various ways books movies and you know they're they're part of their credo that's has do not advertise the nature of my work nor seek recognition for my actions has really seemed to fall by the wayside and i don't think it's by and large problem within the special operations community i think it's just a few bad eggs here and there because if you see that oh man people want to hear my story if i can make a lot of money that's that's very attractive so i understand that but from what i've read about this gentleman is that he hasn't necessarily told any lies but he's allowed people to believe what they want to believe simply because he was a navy seal which i think is a form of dishonesty would you agree chaps.

eric graydon
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"Writing my friends i tweeted you guys and talk about it a little bit too earlier i had a v appointment this week several for yeah checkup on tbi and some other stuff and when i was in there it only took me like fifteen minutes to be done that's unheard of unheard of and i asked one of my friends who worked at the va she is a psychiatrist and she was like well what year are you out of the military and she said are you looking for new compensation or old compensation or what i was like no it was just a checkup just to make sure that everything was the same and she's been that's exactly why she's like it was your five year out checkup no one cares anymore like it's just check in the box for them they go in they check your reflexes and you they get you out because they have forty other appointments that they have to do then day and i started thinking about like yeah it makes sense she just basically asked me she's like do you still have diarrhea times like yeah i do she said you still have any yeah i do she's like all right well we'll see in like three years so that all the appointment was about it's pretty incredible that they do that so if you have five years removed and you don't have anything on that on your record you're less likely even though it might take you a while to figure out i didn't have asthma before but now i can't breathe without an inhaler and i'm going upstairs it could be the burn pits who knows sure yeah if you don't have even if you're less years removed and you don't have something documented in your medical records it becomes more difficult to prove that the cause was something that happened in the military so to all our active duty military who are listening if something else you get it on paper go to the doctor and tell them what is wrong not because you're soft but because if you are going to need some sort of compensation down the line it is going to go a long way to help you to get there that was a good officer take.

asthma officer fifteen minutes three years five years five year
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"A serial number to quit ment but just basically anything that you need to make disappear and who knows what that afghan army and fears throwing in there when you're not looking sat there sappy played six cetera but yeah so pretty much depending on the way the winds blowing i remember there was times on my first limit where it was so thick and hazy in my tent that i you couldn't breathe conceived at night and that was almost constant sometimes depending on the weather and even on the smaller outpost just being right on the other side of a mud wall from one for weeks at a time so i'm looking forward to my children having multiple eyeballs all over their bodies at some point but yeah so they've actually people started developing illnesses that they thought were related to these burn pits but kale be the site responsible for a lot of the larger ones that was like a government contractor they were kind of exonerated in court i guess you could say because the reasoning of the judges was that the government condone the contract and therefore it was our government's decision to have them there so really they they can't be even accused of wrongdoing but recently with all the backlash and everything and so many people fighting to bring it back up again the courts of kind of overturned it so we're waiting to see right now if kale be can be held accountable for damages for a lot of people who have claimed to be suffering from this and i believe that people really do and have suffered from it from their lungs definite lum even mental the chemicals and everything i've had a couple of my military friends with cancer and they swear it was the burn pits so and i mean i'm just spitballing on that like who knows but i i believe absolutely after experiencing it myself that that could be a definite issue for people definitely because i mean even if you're not working by the burn pit you're inhaling all those fumes but then you have the the soldiers and marines who are operating the burn pit they wear those a lot of times she's those little like painters mess which yeah that's not stopping anything you should almost wear.

government contractor cancer
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"Guys got look like an eighty year old man yet yet it it up up like somebody kicked his dog they might anyway it's been a big newsweek this week all kinds of shit are happening last week we gave president trump all kinds of credit for nuke for north korea it looks like that deal might fall apart because what's his name fucked in the national security adviser bolton looks like fucking everything up bowl looks like a guy that fucks everything up if you walked into a room you're like you're gonna fuck something out yeah goes bolton classic bolton textbook bolton clock and boy do i have to change my name he's the one who sucks no talent ask later on in the show we'll have on miranda summers low she is she's going to be a great interview gates going to introduce the entire show again to look forward to that we're going to have a brand new reintroduction of the entire week's podcast date and just a few minutes i'm excited for that but we wanted to talk this week there's news out there that general portray us and others are talking about the burn pits because if you've been to deploy area in iraq or afghanistan or syria or libya or wherever you are going to see burn pits all over the place so what's going on with that kate yeah so why don't you start with what's a burn pit what's the burn pit in the states it's known as a place for s'mores in good times maybe your uncle gets a little too drunk embarrasses the family but overseas talking about your holiday army overseas it's where pretty much whether it's an enormous base or a tiny outpost somewhere you have to get rid of your waist and it's not like they have dumps they can take it to out there you burn it so every every spot where there's military personnel at their big old hole and they burn literally everything on the smaller outposts you are going straight from the the wag the plywood porta shitter with your shit you're throwing it while you're walking ten feet you're throwing it in the burn pit and there it is so not just human waste not just human wastes like everything chemicals what else would you say gets throat in them gosh will you know uniforms equipment that you don't need anymore that's not a.

president north korea iraq afghanistan syria libya kate eighty year ten feet
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I think there's an answer u e u recount where they'd somebody tried to set fire to their house early on they firebombed it i mean they wanted these people to shut up and and frankly uh there are some people today that weren't that are not happy with i'm the film being made i there's there's still tension in alabama with so i recently in the election you know i takes a long time for this mentality to change how did this opposition as you described it manifests itself where people complaining about how was told her just the very fact that there were some people went to speak with us at all we tried to speak to some of the more prominent business people in and they just shut us out and then the few people that we do speak to her in the film you can you can sense there's there's a kind of tension or or a sense of denial um it's it's it's hard to understand in fact why they agreed to speak on and i'm glad they did because it's important for people who see this film to see that some of the six still exists so all these years later those 1944 would we talk about seventy plus years later is her name does is still have some sort of a um i i guess do people recognize that name in alabama i wish on quite sure they do some of them say they don't but they do there was a book the came out in 2011 written by daniel maguire called at the dark under the street which is what inspired this film and on that made quite a that that that help make a fuss and in fact it's part of what inspired some of the legislature to issue an apology to rashid taylor on the family feels a came a little came very late and probably not quite as much as it should have been on but it did happen eventually end our film certainly will draw more attention to her sh there is a small exhibit of her in the smithsonian museum in dc um but i i just hope in the in the.

alabama daniel maguire rashid taylor smithsonian museum
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Election you know i takes a long time for this mentality to change how did this opposition as you described it manifests itself where people complaining about how he was told or just the very fact that there are some people went to speak with us at all we tried to speak to some of the more prominent business people in and they just shut us out and then the few people that we do speak to her in the film you can you can sense there's there's a kind of tension or or a assented denial um it's it's it's hard to understand in fact why they agreed to speak on and i'm glad they did because it's important for people who see this film to see that some of the six still exists so all these years later those 1944 what we talk about seventy plus years later is her name does is still have some sort of a um i guess do people recognize that name in alabama i wish on quite sure they do some of them say they don't but they do there was a book the came out in 2011 written by daniel maguire called at the dark under the street which is what inspired this film and on that made quite a that that that helped make a fuss and in fact it's part of what inspired some of the legislature to issue an apology to receive taylor on the family feels a came a little came very late and probably not quite as much as it should have been um but it did happen eventually end our film certainly will draw more attention to her sh there is a small exhibit of her in the smithsonian museum in dc but i i just hope in the in the.

alabama daniel maguire taylor smithsonian museum dc
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Millennial Money

Millennial Money

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on Millennial Money

"Free days so you can really yokota if you're a museum person go to all the museums that you want to explore on that particular day and you know samalbek cash for something you you really want to do so as we mentioned this free museums and fruit things to do so let's just talk about so maybe maybe some cities that we've mentioned on on this podcast or you're going to maybe do in the future about what is there to free to do in in those cities yeah and the first city is d c that we have talked about and i recently went there and just a few months ago for the first time and if there's so many different free things that you can do in that city they have hundreds of things listed on the washingtonorg literally hundreds the which is amazing megacity like that has so many cool free things to do yeah everything from cultural and music to historical things like the smithsonian museum which includes seventeen museums galleries and the national zoo there's so much you can do for free those are all free because those text it taxpayer dollars that actually pay for for those museums which is really awesome oh it's our our monies and pass heads were money go is is is to the smithsonian museums but those are some of the best museum we got the air and space museum yet the cultural one there's so many really cool museums there in dc that i absolutely love one of the other things to the people might not think about is the white house tour library of congress and capitol buildings all have like a free component either a free tour or you can just go check it out for free and i think a lot of times people don't think about that but white house one you have to contact your local representative so you have to try to get a ticket and everything and they don't always have tours all the time but both plenty times a year that they do so those are coughed or.

smithsonian museum space museum dc congress representative white house
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"The native community to try to build back path abe also underlining it all it here try to take independent people out of poverty and rhode island a lot of people don't realize that even today in 21st century indigenous population in rhode island is over five below the white majority and threetimes below the on average rhode island no i income and that's pretty staggering when you think about two thousand seven wound and across the nation that is true with wow and uh we're trying to do something about it through comic widen nam nam and we have about thirty five different partner in from uh university who agent he had to uh nonprofit an or profit that are all participating in our network and finding opportunities he hit grow unique partnership that create jobs or if no opportunity and things like that and seven on speaking with lauren spears the executive director of the tunnel clog museum where next weekend you're having a big event we are we right faded about it we it the cranberry think giving which is an event that we've had for years and from benita community the narragansett community thanksgiving um but we do it in conjunction with the smithsonian museum gay lie if people go on their website museum gay live beaten get in free pick it become visit our event and add our event we have all kinds of things going on from end two on saturday the 23rd and we have i his crowd back at amp eight narionburg market got need it marked an art vendors there's going to be a traditional dance amlie fashion show that the cranberry anc giving ceremony led by now again tribal elder don job at cranberry inc giving dory i'm gone by polit a general if an edible on the gift not plant presentation by art indirect but balloon monroe's it narragansett aimed and dory's by our education staff a cranberry dining a demonstration by north through here on news radio array and many many other active need they'll.

abe rhode island partner executive director tunnel clog museum narragansett community monroe dory rhode lauren spears smithsonian museum cranberry inc narragansett
"smithsonian museum" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

01:52 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian museum" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"As a social justice activist her work is cited in books journals articles and film she's received numerous awards in honor as an oral history of ruby sales is housed at the library of congress and she was selected as one of fifty african americans to be spotlighted in the new smithsonian museum of african american history and culture in washington dc which is scheduled to open this year she has made the struggle for racial justice one of the center pieces of her work through this spirit house project since two thousand seven she has worked to expose the statesanctioned deaths of african americans by white police security guards infratil vigilantes by combining compiling a national database on these events offering spiritual financial and organisational support to families and by exposing these activities there church and community meetings forums and press conferences around the nation and these include what she calls teachins and preach ends which i find very intriguing mm and ruby when i was getting ready to interview year there two sources that i found that we're wonderful for me for preparing and one was a series of conversations you did with vincent harding who we miss and who is such a great via such a great person and and also a panel that you did the american academy of religion meeting last year with serena joel in this case you told me about this after it happen and said it was just so astonishing and i've been quoting from this panel ever since including in a conversation i had with patrisse cullors of black lives matter a few months ago.

congress african americans washington dc serena joel social justice smithsonian museum of african vincent harding american academy of religion