24 Burst results for "Smithsonian Magazine"

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

04:14 min | 2 months ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"And they had <Speech_Male> the calvin est <Speech_Male> propaganda pamphlets <Speech_Male> that ended <Speech_Male> up being our source <Silence> of history. <Speech_Male> Well in <Speech_Male> the wild west. <Speech_Male> Where do the <Speech_Male> gun <Speech_Male> slinging violent. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Everybody shoots <Speech_Male> everybody in the bar <Speech_Male> vision <Speech_Male> of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the wild west come. <Silence> <Advertisement> From <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> dime novels <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> people would go <Speech_Male> west and <Speech_Male> then they would write <Speech_Male> all these elaborate <Speech_Male> comic <Speech_Male> book esque <Speech_Male> stories <Speech_Male> just these cheap <Speech_Male> little short stories <Speech_Male> about their <Speech_Male> huge conquests <Speech_Male> and how <Speech_Male> they all the <Speech_Male> indians with their bare <Speech_Male> hands and <Speech_Male> all this insanity <Silence> <Speech_Male> and it was just <Silence> made up. <Speech_Male> It just <Speech_Male> sounded really good <Speech_Male> and for all the ignorant <Speech_Male> people back on the <Speech_Male> east coast that <Speech_Male> heard about the <Speech_Male> scary <Speech_Male> new frontier. <Speech_Male> They sold <Speech_Male> they <Speech_Male> sold. They wanted <Speech_Male> the comic book version <Speech_Male> of reality. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> that story got <Speech_Male> retold over <Speech_Male> and over and over <Speech_Male> again and then it got <Speech_Male> made into movies <Speech_Male> and books and <Speech_Male> everything <Speech_Male> else and <Speech_Male> today. <Speech_Male> It's the wild <Speech_Male> west. Even <Speech_Male> though it was mostly <Speech_Male> just kind of <Speech_Male> the boring <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> settled <SpeakerChange> west <Silence> more than anything. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So it's just <Speech_Male> it's kind of <Speech_Male> a weird rant but <Speech_Male> it's just important. <Speech_Male> I think to keep perspective <Silence> on. things that we take for. <Speech_Male> Granted <Silence> are so often <Speech_Male> not <Speech_Male> true. <Speech_Male> You know they're just <Silence> they just <Speech_Male> fit right. <Speech_Male> It was just a puzzle piece <Speech_Male> that fit <Speech_Male> and fulfilled some <Speech_Male> sort of <Speech_Male> need to tell a <Speech_Male> story or to hate <Speech_Male> somebody that they <Speech_Male> wanted to hate <Speech_Male> or it was really <Speech_Male> good fodder <Speech_Male> for a new digital <Speech_Male> currency. The use <Speech_Male> war <Speech_Male> wasn't of <Speech_Male> any use and <Speech_Male> it's price <Speech_Male> just kept increasing <Speech_Male> in price so <Speech_Male> clearly <Speech_Male> clearly. The only <Speech_Male> explanation <Speech_Male> was tulips. <Speech_Male> And there's no. <Speech_Male> There's no reason <Speech_Male> to go digging and finding <Speech_Male> out if tulip mania <Silence> <Advertisement> was true or not <Speech_Male> all you need <Speech_Male> all you're looking <Speech_Male> for is <Speech_Male> a good two sentences <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of fodder <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to explain away <Speech_Male> bitcoin. Because <Speech_Male> that's what's comfortable <Speech_Male> as what they want to do. <Speech_Male> That's the answer <Speech_Male> they want. That's the history <Speech_Male> they want so they <Speech_Male> just stop. <Speech_Male> This is basically human <Speech_Male> nature right. <Speech_Male> we're we're <Speech_Male> just biased <Speech_Male> machines. <Speech_Male> It's not like. I'm <Speech_Male> making any argument. That <Speech_Male> i'm immune to this. <Speech_Male> That's absurd no <Silence> of course. Not <Speech_Male> but it's <Speech_Male> just a perspective is <Speech_Male> just something to <Speech_Male> remember <Speech_Male> when when <Speech_Male> you hear these stories when <Silence> you look at this stuff <Speech_Male> just <Speech_Male> because something is <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> popular <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> just because something <Speech_Male> is well known <Speech_Male> certainly <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> does not <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> mean <Silence> <Advertisement> it is the truth. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> I will have the links <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> The original <Speech_Male> book <Speech_Male> by gold gir- <Speech_Male> that this article is <Speech_Male> kind of a response. And <Speech_Male> or i guess maybe <Speech_Male> a summation of <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> So if anybody does wanna <Speech_Male> dig into it <Speech_Male> and get some more details. <Speech_Male> I may i may <Speech_Male> break down and do it myself <Speech_Male> on. We'll <Speech_Male> see if <Speech_Male> you think it's worth another <Speech_Male> episode. Let <Speech_Male> me know hit me up. <Speech_Male> Shoot me a message on twitter <Speech_Male> or something. And <Speech_Male> say that yeah. <Speech_Male> Let's dig into tulip <Speech_Male> mania and see. <Silence> Just how crazy. It was <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> my image of the time <Speech_Male> is kind of like <Speech_Male> I incline <Speech_Male> inclined to think. <Speech_Male> There was probably something <Speech_Male> like the modern art <Speech_Male> industry. Today <Speech_Male> it did <Speech_Male> get out of hand. <Speech_Male> It did get ridiculous <Speech_Male> did have <Speech_Male> you know like you might <Speech_Male> have a painting of just <Speech_Male> like a white canvas <Speech_Male> with like a blue <Speech_Male> dot on. <Speech_Male> It sells for <Speech_Male> millions of dollars. <Speech_Male>

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"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

03:06 min | 2 months ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"It will get endlessly retold as the truth. No matter how exaggerated or nonsensical it actually is and then via the law of least resistance it becomes the first and easiest thing the simplest story to stumble upon when digging through history and then five hundred years later. We are still talking four hundred. We're still talking about something. That essentially equates to a tabloid and a supremely exaggerated story of what was an isolated wealthy person's market and it's told to us today as some critically important huge moment in the history of chaotic and madness of markets. And then of course today the financially privileged journalists and click bait headlines a journalists who come across magic internet money obviously to them have had the which has no purpose whatever just speculation and it runs on the greater fool theory. Well here comes that four hundred year old anti-rich tabloid about tulips as defense of how to explain what this ridiculous bitcoin phenomenon really is. It's all just the tula bubble and it's not as if the i is not as if this isn't common right. I think i think we should think of most of history as an exaggeration. I mean there are so many stories that were in fact just the better telling or the more iconex story There's a great book called man i'm not going to be able to remember. I think it was either. It was either wired first story or possibly Fascinate by sally. Hogshead wired for stories by lisa kron or krone. Or something like that. But whichever one it was the the book talked about all of these huge moments or these like iconic stories in history. Like Paul revere and his Riding downtown to let everybody know the english were coming and how he somehow he was famous. He had a very get very american name and like so his story became the iconic one. Even though there was another guy which i can't remember his name funny enough Who rode like twenty times. The distance doing the exact same thing and let almost the entire east coast. No like he's spread. The word of like you know made. Paul revere basically look like an amateur in the same job and then there's like The red baron. Who was like really. I think it was fascinating because the idea was about branding and about how it is that the story ends like sensationalism of a certain type of narrative can just last for an eternity and it was about how the red baron.

Hogshead lisa kron Paul revere krone sally east coast
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

05:41 min | 2 months ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"It's one of the most important events in economic history to golders analysis. Her research where she says quote. I couldn't find anybody that went bankrupt. I wanted to get her book which they actually have a link to it on again on the smithsonian dot com website. And it's a it's an older article spec from thousand seventeen. But i wanted to get her book. They link to it And like thirty. Five or forty dollars. but you can rent it for ten dollars for a month. You just rent the pdf and i kind of wanted to skim through some of the chapters and cutting into the gritty details and probably wouldn't read the whole thing but i'd i'd hit some really interesting sounding chapters on just a and have Some good details to add to the show. But obviously if you've been following has been a little bit busy with other things and to be perfectly honest after thinking about it and thinking about how much time it would take probably just doesn't need a huge deep dive for the simple fact that you're you're diving into details of something that wasn't very exciting and was essentially a big nothing burger in the context of history And it's funny. How this sort of thing happens how this story just gets perpetuated and kind of the the picture that i held in my head How i'm thinking about this is that this is kind of like look at the state of journalism and click bait and propaganda that we have today and imagine if that was the only source of information that we had to make sense of what the world looks like today in fifty years or so you know what would actually be accurate. Would it be obvious from all the click bait headlines and the mass shootings and all this stuff that we actually have a continuously declining rate of violent crime and homicide over the past century. I mean sure. There's moments of volatility and and it looked at the most recent data. I i wouldn't doubt. Twenty twenty has an uptick. Some look what happened. We're in lockdown and we have riots and stuff all over the world But we've had many of those sorts of events and periods throughout the last hundred years but nonetheless. There's a clear an obvious decline in.

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

Bitcoin Audible

03:54 min | 2 months ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Bitcoin Audible

"And bitcoin are just a few comparisons. Gold has seen you have to understand dutch society at the turn of the seventeenth century for starters. The country experienced a major demographic shift during its war for independence from spain which began in the fifteen sixty s and continued into the sixteen hundreds. It was during this period that merchants arrived in port cities like amsterdam heroin and delved and established trading outfits including the famous dutch east india company. This explosion in international commerce brought enormous fortune to the netherlands despite the war in their newly independent nations. The dutch were mainly led by urban oligarchies comprised of wealthy merchants unlike other european countries of the era which were controlled by landed nobility as golkar writes in her book the resultant new faces new money in new ideas helped revolutionize the dutch economy in the late sixteenth century as the economy changed so too did social interactions and cultural values a growing interest in natural history and a fascination with the exotic among the merchant class meant that goods from the ottoman empire and farther east fetch high prices. The influx of these goods also drove men of all social classes to acquire expertise in newly in demand areas. One example vulgar gives is fish. Auctioneer adrian kernan whose water colored illustrated manuscript wail book allowed him to actually meet the president of holland and when dutch botanist careless clueless is still a botanical garden at the university of laden in the fifteen nineties the tulip quickly rose to a place of honor originally found growing wild in the valleys of the tian shan mountains at the border where china and tibet meet afghanistan and russia. Tulips were cultivated in istanbul as early as ten fifty five by the fifteenth century. Sultan mock med. The second of the ottoman empire had so many flowers in his twelve gardens that he required a staff of nine. Hundred and twenty gardiner's tulips were among the most prized eventually becoming the symbol of the ottoman rights. Gardening correspondent for the independent on a pa- vard in the tulip. The dutch learned the tulips could be grown from seeds or buds that grew on the mother bulb above the grows from seed would take seven to twelve years before flowering bulb itself could flower the very next year of particular interest to and other tulip traders were quote broken bulbs tulips who's pedals showed a striped multicolour pattern rather than a single solid color. The effect was unpredictable. But the growing demand for these rare broken bulb. Tulips led naturalists to study ways to reproduce them. The pattern was later discovered to be the result of a mosaic virus that actually makes the bulb sickly and less likely to reproduce the high market price for tulips to which the current version of tulip mania refers were prices for particularly beautiful. Broken bulbs rights economist. Peter garber since breaking was unpredictable. Some have characterized tulip mania among growers as a gamble with growers vying to produce better and more bizarre variations and feathering after all the money. Dutch speculators spin on the bulbs they only produced flowers for about a week but for tulip lovers. That week was a glorious one as luxury objects..

golkar adrian kernan holland university of laden tian shan mountains east india Sultan mock amsterdam spain tibet gardiner istanbul afghanistan russia china pa Peter garber
How Xerox & Some Dalmatians Saved Disney

Kottke Ride Home

01:50 min | 3 months ago

How Xerox & Some Dalmatians Saved Disney

"The new one hundred and one dull nations villain origin story crew ella seemed to be a real love or hate flick or more like a lukewarm dislike or confused enthusiasm based on reviews with titles like weird but i think i like it whatever the reaction the film seems to have been pretty far from what people were expecting mostly because it has almost nothing to do with the one hundred and one puppies that made guerrilla deville famous but sixty years before this any chaotic punk tinged origin story the world got its first film adaptation of dodie. Smith's nineteen fifty six children's novel the hundred and one donations and despite being positively obsessed with the movie as a toddler. I never knew that the canine cartoon marked a crucial turning points in the history of animation. And one which disney may not have ever made it to the other side of had. The movie not worked out. One hundred and one donations marked walt disney animation studios twenty second full length feature animation having been preceded by classics like snow white. Pinocchio fantasia and peter pan. It began development in the late fifties following the box office bomb of sleeping beauty which took six million dollars to make but only earned back five million sleeping. Beauty used the dominant animation technique of the time that required artists to hand trace drawings on transparent celluloid or sell sheets according to smithsonian magazine reported on this moment in animation history. Disney movies usually have one to two dozen cells per second so in total sleeping. Beauty had almost one million cells. That's one million drawings done and traced by hand a ton of work for a movie that ended up costing the studio a million dollars.

Dodie Walt Disney Animation Studios Ella Pinocchio Fantasia Disney Smith Peter Pan Smithsonian Magazine
Because of Vaccines, Ultra-Cold Freezers Are the New Hot Buy

Business Wars Daily

03:58 min | 10 months ago

Because of Vaccines, Ultra-Cold Freezers Are the New Hot Buy

"In a sea of stress. Inducing headlines there is one seemingly perennial bright spot these days vaccine news the scientists researchers and doctors that have been working on a covid nineteen vaccine seemed to have made great strides toward finding effective inoculations to help protect us from the virus. Pfizer was the first to announce its vaccine in early november. The company said it showed more than ninety percent effectiveness but the vaccine also has an inconvenient distribution issue it has to be stored at minus seventy degrees celsius. That's colder than antarctica in winter. Maderna's vaccine announced later in the month had similar efficacy rate and similar storage needs. Both vaccines must be sold in special ultra cold freezers throughout their journey from manufacturing plant to where the vaccine will be administered. Those super cold freezers cheap. Their price tags may be as high as thirty thousand dollars but those frigid freezers are selling like hotcakes. Hospitals in government entities have been snapping them up to help distribute the vaccine to the masses even employers are getting on board. Automaker ford bought twelve ultra-cold freezers last month. In an effort to ensure its employees can get the vaccine tra- cold freezers. Aren't your garden variety ice cream and frozen pizzas storage units. They're typically the domain of university labs in hospitals that need to store cell extracts dna or other specialized materials at extremely low temperatures. Both a ba leading vaccine's use a relatively new technology called synthetic messenger are in a or emaar in a which attaches to the virus helping the immune system recognize attack it. The challenge is that ima- a needs to be kept super cold. Keep enzymes from breaking down according to smithsonian magazine when the team at so low environmental equipment manufacturer of these units got wind of the pfizer. Vaccines storage requirements. The company started ramping up production so low vice president dan hesler toll cnbc quote. It's been crazy. The company stockpiles been depleted in orders or taking six to eight weeks to fulfil one of solos biggest. Competitors thermo fisher. Scientific was ramping up production at the fastest rate in its history according to a company spokesperson talking wwl a local abc television affiliate in asheville north carolina. The company expects fourth-quarter earnings to grow about sixty percent over the same period last year driven by covid nineteen response but even with ultra low freezer manufacturers. Hard at work to meet demand. These vaccines have unveiled another weakness in the supply chain the cold chain. Most vaccines need to be kept at a specific temperature until they're administered. That's typically around thirty five to forty five degrees wired reports but the super low temperatures that the most promising covid nineteen vaccines require. Make it tough to distribute the vaccines widely in the highly developed north american economies. Let alone in places where equipment capacity isn't close to sufficient like parts of africa. Asia and south america wired estimates that upward of twenty five percent of all vaccines are lost because of a lack of reliable coal chains in some countries. Just one ten. Health centers have a proper vaccine refrigerator according to that report and that includes rural hospitals in the us. Allen morgan chief. Executive of the national rural health association told stat news that poorer hospitals can't afford the pricey ultra-cold freezers nearly half of us. Rural hospitals were operating at a loss as of april of this year and the pandemic has only made things worse that means that workers and residents in these areas may not have access to the vaccine. It's possible that the manufacturers may update their cold-storage guidelines or that new vaccines. That don't require such ultra-low temps may come along. But for now lack of a stable co chain to distribute the vaccine to some people who need it most is a situation with legitimate chilling concert

Maderna Pfizer Smithsonian Magazine Dan Hesler Thermo Fisher WWL Antarctica IMA Ford Cnbc Asheville ABC Allen Morgan
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Hello to your next trip with the Expedia Now, Kay to weather Ah, dry and mild weather patterns settles in to wrap up the weekend. Expect morning fog and afternoon sun to continue over the next several days. Daytime highest Cruella bit Sunday down to 70. Temperatures weren't back into the mid seventies for much of the week ahead in the K two Storm Checker Weather Center. I'm Hannah Olsen. Okay, Let's start with a little fun fact. You can use this in your resume trivia games. What was the first GIF anybody? What was the first gift? Okay, eventually thought of the dancing baby. Remember the dancing baby just like you do. I'll go around No, according to the Smithsonian magazine in June of 18 78 before the rise of Hollywood or even silent movies. The ward. My bridge shocked the crowd of reporters, they say by capturing motion. He showed the world that something they thought about they had never really ever seen. He showed the world every stage of the horse's gallop when it sped across the track. So the very first gift was a horse bets. You never want to look a gift horse in the mouth, though. Uh oh. You know what Sit dies at his crack myself up. I listen. Welcome to the Kim. Commander show. I'm America's beloved digital goddess here with you once again, and we have where we're not working section. Are they here? Oh, good. Okay. They weren't here in the last hour. Michael, you're really gonna have to talk to them. And But yes, just to let everybody know we are practicing save social.

Storm Checker Weather Center Expedia Hannah Olsen Smithsonian magazine Kay Commander Hollywood Kim Michael America
Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy

Pop Fashion

03:47 min | 1 year ago

Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy

"You having a bad day. Every retailer in America. Absolutely. Tell me more. Let's talk about the list of bankruptcies. Since the last time you and I talked I Lucky Jeans G Star Rob Off Though Brooks Brothers chapter eleven. This was not a surprise. They have been struggling for a little while now, but I wanted to delve into this company just a little bit because it's an American brand. We have very few brands that are made in the USA. Have such a big heritage. They are two hundred and two years old for our country. That's pretty big deal. Nothing lasts for two hundred two years. Right that's almost as old as the Dang country. They filed for chapter eleven with plans to permanently close fifty one stores. There are a number of companies that are interested in possibly buying the company including Simon Property Group, Simon Property Group is interested. They are the company that owns all those malls. And the crazy thing about this is they just sued brooks brothers a few weeks ago and then dropped the suit for not paying the rent for not paying their rent. They took him to court for almost nine million dollars in unpaid rent, and then they dropped it and I'm guessing. They dropped it because they realized that this was about. Come around the corner, right? They have been slowly closing stores over the past two years and two thousand eighteen. They had nearly seven hundred stores globally now they have five hundred. They're saying of course because PAT stomach, but the truth is pants off changed over the past few years. Literal Pants think of all those Khakis who's wearing them anymore like the static for what you wear to work has changed really in the past decade, and they have stayed the same brand, which in many ways as good because they have a visual heritage and history. Eh, with apparel. They dressed Abraham Lincoln. They've dressed many many presidents. They also have. A history that I was just made aware of this week. I don't know if you know about this. Lisa but I did some research because I got a tip from friends that Brooks Brothers has a complicated history with slavery. This is not something that they talk about so there's not a lot of information out there on it, but I did find an article from Smithsonian magazine that said quote Brooks Brothers was the top of the line slave clothing slave traders would issue new clothes for people. They had to sell, but they were usually cheaper. Ooh, that is complex. I did not know this part of their at all. Do they ever like apologize for that? They don't talk about it. Because if you don't talk about, it never happened right. Wow, but they made the clothes said. They've made their clothes in the United States, but this past May. They started shutting down some of their factories, their factories New, York north, Carolina and Massachusetts were all starting to slowly closed down so. People knew that they were going to maybe off. Start off shoring some of their apparel, but it was in limbo. What was going on with the company and they really weren't saying anything yet, but the writing was on the wall less than an hour ago. Bloomberg reported that authentic brands group put a bid in for the company. Authentic brands. Group owns a bunch of brands including barneys. New York forever twenty one fredericks of Hollywood nine West Jones New York, juicy couture and sports illustrated. That's all over the

Brooks Brothers Simon Property Group New York America Smithsonian Magazine Pat Stomach Bloomberg Abraham Lincoln York United States Usa. Lisa Hollywood Jones Massachusetts Carolina
Inside Washington's Name Change

ESPN Daily

06:21 min | 1 year ago

Inside Washington's Name Change

"John How's it? Goin'? It's been a little bit busy. You might be having the busiest off season well, always busy right now to all the deck Prescott stuff, but but you pretty busy. It was on? July six and a couple of things happen. I told my wife said. I'm about to work in eighteen hours a day on July six. NFL. Opposite in what is going on, and it turns out. That was actually probably a pretty good day in hindsight. John covers the Washington DC based NFL TEAM FOR ESPN Since. We are talking about names I. Do feel it's necessary to point out your John Crime I- Amina climbs two different names not. Although I will say had some relatives. Years back did like genealogy, and at one point, it was kind real in Europe, so we could be related I. Just want to put that out there well. I do get mistaken for you. Know I think there's a similarity so. So back to the name at hand. John The Washington football team announced on Monday after much speculation many reports that they will be retiring their nickname and logo after completing review that began on July third. This has been a conversation for a very very long time, but the team's principal owner Daniel. Snyder has been on the record. Saying the team would never in all caps literally change its name, and then here we so before we get to why this happened. And what's GonNa Happen Next? I just want to ask you as a beat reporter. Did you ever think this day would come? Well. Let me let me step back from that pre. George Floyd, no, because in the past. We've had a deal with this topic many times over the years especially in the last seven. I think the rise of social media has kept it alive, but during that time the plan the strategy here for the reds for Washington was to write off the storm. Just weather the storm. Go go to reservations connect with native Americans and do something like that then when you saw the social unrest this year. You started to seep in your head like they're gonNA. Come after them again and I'll tell you when it really really thought they work to be about. Run at this time was. There was a stretch it about a week where George Preston Marshall, who original owner of the of Washington? And he named the team, and he moved the team from Boston, to Washington will statue was outside their old stadium are k. well. They removed the statue, not the team, but a company in DC that owns that land, so you tweet that out and I'd say. Say Ninety percent of the mentions after that on twitter, where about what about the what about the name? What about the name? The next day team says they're going to retire bobby? Mitchell's number only retired one of the number in their franchise history, so they tweet that out and I wrote a story. Put out there. What about the? What about the name? I've. There's just becoming way too much of everything. They did route this. If they put out a statement about George Floyd about black lives matter, it would always come back to their team name. It was to a level that I hadn't seen before. It does seem though at least from the outside that the true catalysts the thing that pushed this over the edge was the teams naming sponsor Fedex and Fedex asiyo. WHO's a minority owner coming out on the record against the name? Yes and I'm going to back up a couple of weeks before that because there some parallel timelines that led to I think this occurrence and one of which was Dan Snyder had reached out I was told by multiple that he had reached out to the League a few weeks before that, and had already started to engage in conversations with the NFL, Roger Goodell about a possible name change along that same time there's the group of eighty seven shareholders and investors were combined six hundred twenty billion dollars in the lead by investor advocacy groups, so they're the ones who targeted Fedex Habsi company Nike Bank of America. It wanders sponsors. If you don't sever your ties here, you know. That's what they want to sever their ties, and so that's what they're pushing. When Fed, ex came out with the statement. That's when when people I've talked to said. That's when they knew it was over. I WANNA to talk about those groups. All of the activists who've been working tirelessly on this for years, but I thought it might be helpful to break down why the name exists in the first place. Where does it come from? The name when it first. Started I guess or was mentioned throughout history was about refer to the color skin and there is. I've got her who worked for the Smithsonian magazine, went back and researched it and found that it was way that native Americans would refer to other to differentiate themselves from. Whites or blacks or whomever else was here, so they referred themselves the redskins than it seemed to segue into a negative connotation, which you know, you'd see posters or read about posters, offering rewards for bringing fifty dollars for bringing the scalp, redskin or bringing Redskin, in which meant the scalp, so it certainly segue into something. That was a negative connotation. So how did it come to be the name of this particular NFL franchise? That's a great question, so we go back to nineteen thirty two and for anybody listening I was not covering the team at that time so nineteen who? Shared a stadium with baseball's Boston braves, so they were called. The Boston braves the following year. They moved to Fenway Park with the Boston Red Sox, so the story that that no his come about from that is that they wanted some sort of. Alliteration with the Red Sox, and so they went with the Redskins, but they also had a coach Lone Star Dietz and several native American players on the roster, George Preston Marshall said he was naming it basically in part because they had a native American coach. Now there's controversy over long star deeds whether he was actually native American up, but that was the given explanation at that time.

NFL John Washington Redskins George Preston Marshall George Floyd Dan Snyder Boston Red Sox Fedex Prescott Europe Fenway Park Baseball Twitter Lone Star Dietz Smithsonian Magazine FED Reporter
The Murder of Emmett Till

Retropod

03:32 min | 2 years ago

The Murder of Emmett Till

"Emmett till his tragic murder in one thousand nine hundred fifty five is a monumental moment in civil rights history. The African American teenager was tortured tortured shot wrapped in barbed wire and tossed in a river by white men seeking revenge for what till had allegedly whistled at a white woman in a grocery store when till's mother Mamie Elizabeth till mobely viewed his lifeless body swollen beyond recognition his teeth missing and I hanging out the only thing she could use to positively identify him was a the ring he was wearing Lord. Take my soul she cried according to a two thousand three interview with The Washington Post in her grief and outrage. Till's mother wanted the world to see the barbaric act committed against her son. She called the Chicago defender under one of the country's leading black newspapers she called Ebony and jet magazines too and she invited them to his funeral on the south outside of Chicago then. Maybe did something that would change history. She asked for an open casket skit at his funeral. I think everybody needed to know what happened to Emmett till his mother said according to PBS fifty thousand people attended the funeral in saw till's body the evidence of a vicious and hateful attack though open open caskets were an African American tradition. Till's body presented challenges not just in how he appeared but also and this is hard to say how badly it smelled. Simeon Wright till's cousin told Smithsonian magazine that the funeral home scrambled for a solution finally settling on the extraordinary step of putting glass over the casket to contain the odor otherwise right said no no one would have believed what till endured the result was profound the emotional photos from the funeral showed Mamie as she approached her son's casket. Her body seemed to buckle. Photographers captured her leaning over the casket to which photos of the smiling boy had been taped inside inside the litter. The funeral gave the nation in image. It hadn't yet seen what a lynching really looked like the brutality the anguish the sheer sense of wrong in this Massoni interview right said the photos led to renewed vigor in the fight against racist and a few months later a woman named Rosa Parks refused to give her seat on the white section of a bus prompting a year long bus boycott in Alabama led by an up and coming leader in the civil rights movement and the Reverend Martin Luther King Junior King may till's murder a centerpiece of his sermons and speeches the crying voice of Little Emmett till he'd say screaming from the rushing waters the evil of racial injustice the justice.

Little Emmett Mamie Elizabeth Murder Emmett Chicago Mobely PBS Rosa Parks Simeon Wright Alabama Smithsonian Magazine Massoni Martin Luther The Washington Post
Emmett till's Open Casket Funeral Lead to Vigorous Fight Against Racism

Retropod

03:32 min | 2 years ago

Emmett till's Open Casket Funeral Lead to Vigorous Fight Against Racism

"Emmett till his tragic murder in one thousand nine hundred fifty five is a monumental moment in civil rights history. The African American teenager was tortured tortured shot wrapped in barbed wire and tossed in a river by white men revenge for what till had allegedly whistled at a white woman in a grocery store when till's mother Mamie Elizabeth till mobely viewed his lifeless body swollen beyond recognition his teeth missing and I hanging out the only thing she could use to positively identify him was a ring he was wearing Lord. Take my soul. She cried according to a two thousand three interview with The Washington Post in her grief and outrage. Till's mother wanted the world to see the barbaric act committed against her son. She called the Chicago defender under one of the country's leading black newspapers she called Ebony and jet magazines too and she invited them to his funeral on the south outside of Chicago then. Maybe did something that would change history. She asked for an open casket skit at his funeral. I think everybody needed to know what happened to Emmett till his mother said according to PBS fifty thousand people attended the funeral in saw till's body the evidence of a vicious and hateful attack though open open caskets were an African American tradition. Till's body presented challenges not just in how he appeared but also and this is hard to say how badly it smelled. Simeon Wright till's cousin told Smithsonian magazine that the funeral home scrambled for a solution finally settling on the extraordinary step of putting glass over the casket to contain the odor otherwise right said no no one would have believed what till endured the result was profound the emotional photos from the funeral showed Mamie as she approached her son's casket. Her body seemed to buckle. Photographers captured her leaning over the casket to which photos of the smiling boy had been taped inside inside the litter. The funeral gave the nation in image. It hadn't yet seen what a lynching really looked like the brutality the anguish the sheer sense of wrong in this Massoni interview right said the photos led to renewed vigor in the fight against racist and a few months later a woman named Rosa Parks refused to give her seat on the white section of a bus prompting a year long bus boycott in Alabama led by an up and coming leader in the civil rights movement and the Reverend Martin Luther King Junior King may till's murder a centerpiece of his sermons and speeches the crying voice of Little Emmett till he'd say screaming from the rushing waters the evil of racial injustice the justice.

Little Emmett Mamie Elizabeth Murder Emmett Chicago Mobely PBS Rosa Parks Simeon Wright Alabama Smithsonian Magazine Massoni Martin Luther The Washington Post
College library evacuated due to smelly fruit

Joyce Kaufman

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

College library evacuated due to smelly fruit

"The story the college library. Due to what was at the university of Canberra. It was a very serious situation. They thought it was a suspected gas leak they had to evacuate hundreds of people out of this library. They got it done under six minutes. And they're sweeping the building trying to figure out what this smell is that they have wasn't a gas leak. It was fruit. It's called durian. It's a smelly fruit. And I don't know why anybody eat this stuff. It's described by the way, I'm not familiar. It's the Smithsonian magazine compared it to turpentine an onions garnished with a gym sock. Oh, jeez. It has a creamy stringy texture, but a smell that is just got awful. Pretty good to me. I don't know. Why people eat that

University Of Canberra Smithsonian Magazine Six Minutes
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

The Ross Bolen Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on The Ross Bolen Podcast

"So here's the deal eventually because of marital issues or like a general lack of interest in ordinary life in despite his lack of sailing experience bona decided he should turn to piracy in the summer of seventeen seventeen here's what the smithsonian magazine has to say about it's inexplicable move to a life of crime stead bona had no knowledge of seafaring having sailed only as a passenger so he's never he's never even never even sailed he's only been a passenger moreover he had no apparent reason to rage against the establishment bono was born in the sixteen eighty s in barbados and according to the transcript of his seventeen eighteen trial had the advantage of liberal education in quote after retiring from the army with the rank of major bona bought an estate and settled in as a member of respectable society where he spent a decade raising a family until he suffered some kind of mental break he just broke bad went full walter white a contemporary account of bonus careers suggested that quote some discomforts he found in the married state in quote led to quote this humor of going pirating in quote but it seems unlikely that nagging wife alone could be enough to drive lawabiding gentleman to piracy so in summation apparently this dude with either so bored or he just snapped or his wife was such a raging pain in the ass that he said fuck it i no longer want to be a normal rich dude i'm going to become a pirate that i respect that is insane so with zero fucking knowledge of shipboard life he didn't let that stop him from contracting a local shipyard to build him a sixty ton sloop which he quipped with ten guns and he named it the revenge this was obviously a weird asked move most pirates either seized their ships by mutiny or by boarding them or by converting a privateer vessel into a pirate ship this guy just.

smithsonian magazine barbados sixty ton
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Twenty ninth two thousand eighteen terms and conditions apply that is casper dot com slash savings for ten percents off your order what does this project 'nigma that was pretty interesting it was another genetic thing this it was it was neat though in that like this australian researchers said hey we have something called internet anamar is right in willing participants so everybody starts sending in your brain scans is that who proved the complexity of the neural activity was the most important thing was that project no that was a different one that was there was a new scientist or no scientific american article that the explored that idea as the the synthetic proteins that create intellect or intelligent but the project 'nigma basically found that there is a single mutation on a specific gene where if you have see instead of t i think yeah you have a bigger brain and they corey lead to more intelligence yeah but again using the iq test well what i'm tired of the studies that throw out the results that don't make fun headline you know there was this one from smithsonian magazine from december last year that well they wasn't from them from the proceedings of the royal society b and smithsonian reported on it but it was a study of country mice and city mice no way well bunch of animals but they found that city mice in vol i don't even know that is via weli very voles what does that like little reginald okay they're very sweet they they are monogamous a boll weevil no that's the bug voles like a like a pretty dog you should look very in the idea that they're very sweet is even better you wouldn't like shoot one for being on your property no i mean some people would but not good people.

scientist smithsonian magazine smithsonian corey reginald
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

The Cracked Podcast

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on The Cracked Podcast

"Just picture how easy is probably fine and yeah it didn't get distributed in samples to a few doctors and they did administer because like i said it was already getting administered around the world so there worse seventeen cases of deformities in the united states before the before she had shut it down but that's tiny compared to other countries absolutely we are sure she saved a bunch of kids they definitely didn't work but like you say at the time the common wisdom was just as what what they do in in cosmopolitan europe so let's do it here what you what you just said about the risk of someone in her job being just too busy or distracted to be fully on the ball with this terrible drugs like she see according to washington post story about her when she started up at the fda they stuck her in a very tiny cubbyhole of an office and like an old prefab world war one building so like once once shop does that you kind of check in right you would think no she's on the ball fixing stuff she needs a movie this is like oscar material here we need to get meryl streep on this role let's look next at this is something that is ongoing right now and and particularly technological which is exciting to me this is a group called project mosul and there's a great rate of them in smithsonian magazine where one of the sort of side effects of there being a lot of activity of terrorist groups in the.

united states meryl streep smithsonian magazine europe washington post
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"No it's not actually say yes it is from the good thing that i found this but what had happen was as i was reading through sheldrakes book there was this actor that he threw about princess diana he said there was this general consensus that princess diana this is from paparazzi and other photographers and whoever else the princess diana was increasingly sensitive to a camera being pointed at her in fact one of the paparazzi said it was possible that she had the most extreme example of somebody who knew that that will being photographed so i thought that's just really strange but i guess yeah i mean she was one of the most hounded people in the world by the paparazzi no medavoy she was on a y'all to whatever else they'll photographs of maybe she did get this hot and sense of being able to spin around and see and she what she would apparently the photographer would say that would capture her and she'd be looking the other way actually turned around the other way and she was spin around and stash strike down the camera with this look and let's just a really strange kind of you know ability that she would have and then as i'm just googling around open up twitter just randomly and the first thing that comes up in twitter it's from the smithsonian magazine and it's princess diana knew exactly how to be photographed twincities weird it's just coincidence it's just really strange because it was i had i wasn't doing any searching it just came up on twitter it wasn't like google results had somehow allocated it to me again year in league with the devil came my senior around with this wage abode at not in.

diana twitter smithsonian magazine google
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:15 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Here & Now

"Flu season in the united states will be a tough one what what will the first wave of the next pandemic look like and we'll we know it's coming well well though it's coming because we do monitor that stop there's a lot of surveillance we won't know until it starts moving through the human population just how lethal it's going to be as i said two thousand nine was was milder than a normal flu season uh but there are probably many events we didn't know about just like that uh so does because it's a new can fire is doesn't automatically mean it's deadly however you know it could be i am we have no way of knowing until it arrives so in that case what does nineteen 18 have to teach us today as we prepare for this next week number one i if you want society continue to function i think you need to tell the truth i think number two or maybe this is the most important husbands to take the disease siri salim put some resources and defining a universal vaccine there are measures you can take that you know it which would work for any infectious disease or seasonal influenza that could do some good but they're not gonna do tremendous amount of good for example washing your hands as simple as at sounds that helps you protect you the socalled nonpharmaceutical masud ecointerventions i mentioned a few minutes ago are are pretty much self explanatory they generally refer to social distancing i mean that's a self explanatory but not coming to work when you're sick absolutely i basically keeping yourself up away from from other people but since this has to be sustained over a period of weeks in ah it's not feasible to just like yourself in a closet even in a lethal pandemic that that's not going to work very well all right you've given us a lot to think about in a time of year when you know people are sneezing and coughing all around us so that's history and john berry will to his recent smithsonian magazine piece about the 1918 flu pandemic i'd here now dot org john thanks very much higher very welcome thank you.

united states siri salim seasonal influenza john berry flu sneezing smithsonian magazine
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Pocket Now Weekly

Pocket Now Weekly

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Pocket Now Weekly

"When comparing it to the iphone ted apple's chief design off certain me that remark while being interviewed by smithsonian magazine for having been given its american ingenuity award sell i let's take things back to the top and talk about how lg has continued to fail over the years i understand that you had a rule rents going on on york cheryl to give the digest of what oh yes oh i i've where things are not like sort of appropriate for the kind of polish presentation that we put up on pocket now i've been doing some are just like little blogs like i i been doing travelled lives and things on my own personal channel youtubecomignbeyond now by but this last week i really wanted to see if i could take a look at every major manufacturer that we reviewed and see if i could pinpoint what i thought their biggest mistake of the year was and so i've already got videos up on samsung motorola lg i'm going to put up goals uh this evening the day that this podcast a streaming live and lg it's it's been a consistent issue with with eljisr mobile division over the last couple of years that they've started putting on some really interesting pressure with their vcr east phones i think they finally figured out what they want to do with the g series moving forward by it doesn't matter if the company is starting to execute on producing better products if they're night advertising those products if they're not really trying to get on get up you'd get boots on the ground to interact with consumers and so hearing this move this management decision scrapping the the person who's currently in charge.

iphone apple smithsonian magazine lg motorola york
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Other vogue arodys flowing pretty freely so i was shocked when you are shocked okay so then here's the thing the magazine that you were writing for was maximum golf magazine and it sort of tell me if i'm wrong but you know with the goal was to be edging okay part of part of it so when you wrote the article at the end of the article you put this quote in their yes okay now it put some people say okay well that wouldn't be in golf magazine in the magazine you're writing for that was sort of an it so you did put it in there but it was not published in fact it was changed although the co marks remained around it too there is nothing in the world like first class talent that's correct okay a few questions from this first why why was it changed to changed it so it would've been changed by the editor in chief of the magazine so at the time i was like writing a book doings of teaching and just writing magazine articles and so i n and assigning editor he he would have had the fight with the editor in chief about at the signing editor a guy named joe bargain uh i think they had a bit of set to about it a joe was very upset about it his boss i guess bigfooted omon made him change okay said that so that's just be clear about a couple thinks that was joe is confirmed in need that this happened this is what what you were told cropper and that he had earned chief is now at smithsonian magazine he has not understood commented so so so explain to me they literally kept the quotes around at that but that's what he set so that was just a false thing that somebody put it in there and changed its changed the context of and everything all right so so you know the word obviously is very important because now up you know pointing they are times he's telling people on that might not be my voice and tim 'cause i don't i don't talk like that idea i don't use that word now first of all as i always want me so we're not debating whether it's his voice in the tape because it.

golf magazine editor joe cropper smithsonian magazine editor in chief joe bargain tim
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:42 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Here & Now

"Not just animals but also people have inflammation that continues for years after a stroke uh we think that the cell secreted products that we put in are actually causing a response in the brain 'cause we see in a new abnormality on the mr scans that appear at a week at disappear at two months and that temporary abnormality that appears then goes away is correlated in terms of its size with the recovery at twelve months and 24 months so we were studying exactly what that is now in the laboratory we think it actually is a beneficial form of inflammation that stimulates these circuits uh you know we always end up saying it i'm not a brain surgeon but i you know whatever you our brain surgeon with what you know is there something that people can do to better improve their health or may be avoid a stroke or sure there preventitive measures which are very important including controlling blood pressure not smoking eating a healthy diet exercise is key avoiding obesity uh those are all uh generally good uh strategies to try to avoid a stroke and then there's something you can't change as very well and that's the genetics the genes your born with you as going to say because sonja kunz the thirty one year old terrific health and the stroman thirty gary steinberg chair of neurosurgery at stanford university he's in washington dc to receive an award from the smithsonian magazine when of its american ingenuity awardwinners this year for his.

blood pressure sonja kunz stanford university smithsonian magazine gary steinberg washington thirty one year twelve months two months 24 months
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on TechFan

TechFan

02:05 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on TechFan

"That may i fans fans are going nuts it's wiser for him at legit now it's i can hear now it's definitely a flash running a glare to finance market at up our edgar woolard act book route as i go to the sis too much process in for ignoble actual reason so we can wrap up the supper soda tekfen own thanks for coming on the last two weeks i fight is fun to talk to him out really doing it is i enjoy doing is out of people i glistening does babbel all i tell you what eisner it is somebody posting about the new atari not thrill atari but the new atari uh counter coming out in some lady is involved that was at the original atari and the keep using the same pitcher and has you on it it does yeah oh carol shaw care shawls involved in it now and they keep running this old photo that you're sitting at the dust playing a video game or pretending to play with him and everybody standing around you including l l l cornyn carol sean you've got your porn stash going on whether it is on i you i i'm honored that picture carl's actually enters the picture taken note that came out of the smithsonian magazine when they did it that i was play i was big walk in when we were doing r a cast of a game you know we always had do these these game revised non the guy who created that game i just learned he passed away recently which is due back it made no sense at all it was it was just a bunch of things moving around on the screen or if the i didn't couldn't figure out what became winds and i think i had just said oh my god it's the attack of the killer i uds because that's what this little things a guy and everybody busted laughing and then we notice the photographer was they're taking pictures and that's the photo that was making us ron on facebook because of the the satari thing and if you're in that photo i almost tiger but i was working x i have the beret ethical i have to find it in so it was funny.

carl smithsonian magazine ron facebook eisner carol shaw two weeks
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"And how does that i mean just kinda keep bringing a little tent and then you put it up it's exactly like going camping accept you could die why are there they're pairs unmarried to john carter his worse it's not like an in faith they thought it was funny no i love it i i really love this audience i never thought that summit lake somebody being like who reads the smithsonian magazine would get like huge series yes there are terrible terrible creatures on mars called humans no yeah so it it it is it is like camping in that you have to protect yourself from whatever's outside so one of the biggest things that we got to protect against this as radiation the same guys mccranie's and that made the fantastic forward terrible movie saying this this interstellar radiation does a lot of damage can swell materials that can cause them damn brittle so we have to have layers of metals and polymers that are very thin that absorbed the defects that are caused by radiation on top of the kind of things that absorbed the impact of the micrometeorites on top of being able to survive temperature shifts from minus three hundred plus three hundred degrees celsius you understand with that idea speaking of interstellar radiation who's your favorite superhero you want me to say wolverine my favorite superhero is right now is is black panther and it's been for a while you see the trailer early excited i got my blood going in my bread pressure up the via that's the winds and a relaxing movie.

smithsonian magazine john carter three hundred degrees celsius
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:41 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Well let's let's let's stop jabar inning get this crime ing k all right where did where was where was his from by the way uh well one of the articles we researched was from mike dash is the smithsonian magazine the degrade work great work um there's another guy name and aimed at upper lee who we ah have to give a shout out to who has like a whole site called ask ed that's dedicated to this murder guest research to for like 55 years or something like they did he write one of the two books probably sure yeah he's widely known as the expert on the voice care act marinos everything there is to now he's got a really fascinating taef your even remotely into true crime in this thing float your boat go check out ed's site in you'll just spend days porno yet one thing i realised in researching this was it was way easier to get away with murder yeah and 1912 yeah um yet there's there's a lot of um agreement that had this been done today yet they were too caught the guy very quickly scher but he had 1912 it was like a you wear gloves in new just confounded their only means of detection basically cmn eyewitness three much so we keep saying 1912 specifically like you said june 9th 1912 well in a little town 10th and well it was one of those things where crossed over into midnight rent so june 9th 10th depends on your still party potato potato the list cavill issa prey yet but at 508 each second street invalid sky away which is in the county of montgomery.

mike dash smithsonian magazine scher montgomery ed murder 55 years
"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"smithsonian magazine" Discussed on 1A

"And here with us to discuss it our four scientists who knows a thing or two about solarscience speaking to us in partnership with the smithsonian magazine davebalts is the program director for the nationalsciencefoundation's division of astronomical sciences he overseas solar physics there davidwelcome to one a thank you carrieblack is the associate program director in the nationalsciencefoundation's atmospheric and geospacescience is division high carry high thanks so much for having me also with this alex young via socie at director for science in the he'll he'll physics science division at masses goddardspaceflightcenteralex welcome thanks for having me and ernest right is of visualize or at nasr'sscientificvisualizationstudioatthenasagoddardspaceflightcenterthank you ernest for being with us scraped to be here all right so the eclipse has a lot of people geeked out including the four view which is why you're here but for people who never really got excited about eclipses they're used to seeing their neighbors run outside looking up looking down at a pinhol piece of paper kind of a thing and they just don't pike kinda get why this eclipse is a big deal while they can't wait for the next eclipse carry black what is it about this eclipse that makes it such a big deal well what's really fantastic about it is that it does stand the entire continent so people can see it anywhere on across the entire unitedstates actually people will be able to see at least some portion of at davidbalts talk about most of the eclipse is that the us gets to see if most of them don't span the whole country how much do they usually spanned is usually are certain tracks that eclipses 10 attack or they all different.

program director associate program director us smithsonian magazine alex young ernest pike