25 Burst results for "Smithsonian Institution"

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"Story for years. The solder families searched for evidence of what had happened to their five missing children. And then finally. In august nineteen forty-nine they found a somber clue human remains specifically pathologist oscar. Hunter found the shards of four vertebrae all from the same body. And this time. The bones were undeniably from a person. It wasn't a repeat of the beef liver debacle. Except there was something suspicious about the backbones. They didn't have any of the scorch marks that you'd expect to see on a burn victim the state it unlikely that the vertebrae belong to any of the solder children to make sure doctor sent the bones to the smithsonian institution in washington d. c. for further analysis. The report that came back estimated that the deceased was around sixteen or seventeen years old and no older than twenty two. Maurice was the oldest of the missing solder children but he was just fourteen. Likely too young for the backbones to be his. The report did allow that in rare cases. A fourteen and a half year old boy can show the maturation of sixteen or seventeen year old. But that was highly improbable so it seemed like the bones were yet another dead end in the investigation. The pathologists hypothesized that they must have been present in the dirt that george had added to the site to create the memorial. That beg the question of where exactly george got that soil. But it didn't have any bearing on the mystery.

oscar Hunter smithsonian institution Maurice washington george
Smithsonian closing museums and zoo again amid virus spike

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Smithsonian closing museums and zoo again amid virus spike

"The Smithsonian Institution is indefinitely shutting down operations in Washington starting Monday because of the corona virus the Smithsonian said in a statement it's top priority is to protect the health and safety of visitors and staff infection rates in Washington or at the highest point since may the facilities first closed in mid March and started to re open in July the closure affects seven museums as well as the national zoo indoor buildings remain closed at the zoo meeting webcams were the only way to see the new baby panda cub born in August other museums gradually re opened due to the nature of the pandemic the Smithsonian did not announce a re opening date at Donahue Washington

Smithsonian Washington
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:33 min | 7 months ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Vaccine is Tracy Taylor. It's time now for the Katie our timeline with Steve Zinsmeister, and that's brought to you by the husband and wife Law team of Briar Law protecting the rights of the seriously injured in Arizona since 1996. It's August 10th and on this day in 18 46 the Smithsonian was created 17 years earlier, An English scientist named James Smithson died in Italy, leaving behind a will with a very odd request. He wanted his entire estate to go to the United States to follow. Found an institution that would be used for the quote, increase and diffusion of knowledge. That was pretty weird. Considering that Smithson had never even visited America, Congress accepted the gift anyway, including his money, mineral collection, library, scientific notes and his personal effects. The fortune was worth well over $500,000 which in the 18 hundreds was a ton of money. Congress used it to create a museum library and a research center today. It's actually several museums, nine research facilities, and there's even a zoo. And did you know that the National Air and Space Museum is the most visited museum in the entire World? President James K. Polk created it when he signed the Smithsonian Institution Act on this day. In 18 46 time Now to check on that ride home again. Detour Dan's in the Valley Chevy Dealers, Traffic center director. At least I know where they're at 10 eastbound Easter 35th Avenue is where you're going to find the one and only freeway crash. At the moment. It's off left in the median, not blocking any lanes you are getting through, but there's activity. They're both off, left and off, right? Just keep both eyes on the We don't stay in your lane. We've got a couple of service street crashes. Buckeye Western 59th Avenue, a record 24th Street McDowell Indian School west of 19th Avenue, a crash and we are still working. The closure of the Rio Slaughter Parkway east and westbound between priest and mill. Get with University East and westbound is dead. This traffic report brought to you by your family. Toyota dealers. It's a great time to get a new Toyota with low A P R financing and special cash back offers. Visit your valley, Toyota dealers or Valley Toyota. Dot com Today. Detroit Tonight 85 for Arlo Temp 1 10 tomorrow and then an excessive heat watching effect. Wind stay through Sunday as we get back right up there in the surface of the sun degrees again. Right now it's 111.

James Smithson Toyota National Air and Space Museum Congress Tracy Taylor James K. Polk Valley Chevy Dealers Steve Zinsmeister Valley Toyota Arizona Briar Law Street McDowell Indian School Rio Slaughter Parkway scientist Arlo Temp United States Italy Detroit University East President
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

The Charlie Kirk Show

04:25 min | 7 months ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on The Charlie Kirk Show

"Profile the half. Of what conservatives aren't? So what is your advice for? So I would take a different tack than I did and I think you're doing the right thing. So I Guess you don't have to be as aggressive as I. Trust me. Okay. I do that to give you guys cover fire. Okay. Seriously I do that. So I can say things that you guys don't. You can't always say because there's a huge cost. Share my stuff all that and just say, Oh, it's Charlie saying go after him. That's fine. What are they GONNA? Do that I do that to help protect you guys and put a shield and so you guys can live. I. Think that I think your approach is correct. Absolutely correct. It's persuasive one where you look at people not as a enemy. But as the opportunity I think that's a really good approach and I think that especially in an elementary school level. It's important to. It's it's is important to be able to communicate. Exactly. What we as Americans stand for and I think a very easy terrain if I were to give you advice on this is you should just ask people and this is a very uncomfortable conversation for some people to have is do you think race matters? And they'll say, oh no. Then why are we talking about it so much? And they'll say, well, it's because black people are doing worse than than white people say it's because of their race or other reasons. And if they say, it's because of their race within their eugenicist and the Anzac conversation right or maybe there's other reasons why certain communities that are black or Hispanic or whatever why they have different outcomes. Besides racism or despite the spite besides. Believing that one skin color might be awful skin color or a good skin color, which is an evil thing to believe and that's what's so amazing is that the left has actually personified the very same racism that they say that they WANNA fight. I mean he is the most racist people on the planet I mean, I I have to watch the Smithsonian Institution Black History Museum..

Smithsonian Institution Black Charlie
Washington, D.C. - House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:21 min | 7 months ago

Washington, D.C. - House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

"A Smithsonian National Museum of the American Latino is one step closer to becoming a reality. The House approved a bill last week with bipartisan support in favor of it. And while the road to the museum opening is still long, the bill is sparking celebration and conversation within Latino communities. Here's NPR's Isabella Gomez. Salsa singer Celia Cruz. The traditions of the Dialogues, Martos Holiday alone is worth and the farm workers movement. The Smithsonian Museum of the American Latino can potentially explore Ah lot of the contributions of latte next people in the United States, but there are still logistics to work out. The bill now goes to the Senate. Then it gets signed by the White House, then the government to determine how much the museum will cost and where it will be. The location is going to be the biggest concern for me. That's a story the Rodriguez who's been lobbying for the creation of this museum for the past 15 years. And he knows where in Washington he wants it to be. You cannot Not be on the national Mall. There's also the cost, half of which will likely come from the federal government. The rest will be from donors. We all remember stories of how really stepped up for the American resume. We need to make sure that we have our donors like an overwintering. Bodegas estimates that building the museum from Scratch could take another 10 years, which gives lots of time to air some skepticism. Can one museum really encapsulate so many different cultures and experiences? Will it expand on what? Letting me that or let next identity looks like for Afro Latinos and indigenous people? My immediate reaction is I'm nervous simply because The branding of Latino lad, especially by stands. Broadcasting doesn't reflect the fact that Afro Latinos exists. That's got the knack Liston from Boston who studies the history of music in Latin ex culture. She says she thinks the museum is a good opportunity to finally have some tough conversations on race. Gender immigration. I think this is Ah, very exciting Start. If I'm gonna be honest, I do think that there's definitely a way for us to get it right. It just requires a level of honestly, I think some people are now becoming aware of that we didn't have before. And she's not the only one with some pause. Bala Santos is a museum educator in Chicago. She says she doesn't want the Smithsonian to brush over the struggles. Immigrants face when they come here. With an overly optimistic message. I would love to have Ah latte next museum where you could say they're actually structural inequities here. And it isn't about cease up. Whether it's about how are we setting up our society's? That's why museum champion is toward the Rodriguez says. Now is the time for people to raise their voices and explore those tensions. These are all historical moments they need to be laid out. It's not a story that's going to be very clean and print. That's not what we're trying to do, and it's not on the shoulders of one single Smithsonian Institution to tell that story. Well, a Santos says Now is the time for all museums across the US to reevaluate how they convey Latin ex

Smithsonian National Museum Bala Santos Rodriguez Smithsonian Institution Celia Cruz United States Liston NPR Isabella Gomez Martos Holiday Senate National Mall White House Washington Boston Chicago
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:36 min | 8 months ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"About to hear is the fusion of entertainment and enlightenment. Glenn back program. Wow. Do we have a lot to go over with you today? I mean, just when you think, Okay, Well, I've heard it all. No, no, You haven't know you, haven't it? It's 2020 on so it just doesn't stop Charlotte mein the God, probably the most influential radio broadcaster for Black America. Has doubled down and has now now saying that Jews are running the world, I guess s o. We have we have that Candice owns responds to it. In quite a forceful way, and I've got a couple of questions based on what we found out from the Smithsonian Institution yesterday, the Smithsonian they decided to We were not sent out a cute little cute little pamphlet. I guess on what the white culture means. I'll wait until you see this all coming up in one minute. This is the Glen Bank program. Yeah. Oh, it's gonna be a lot kind of be a lot of fun today. Just a ton of fun First, Let me tell you about ah blinds dot com blinds dot.

Smithsonian Institution Glenn Candice Charlotte Black America
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

10:16 min | 9 months ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"On these small boats pork rinds welcome back and we have secretary of the Smithsonian Institution Lonnie bunch with this money let's take a step back where are we on this arc in the cause for civil rights you know in some ways this is both a moment of optimism but it's a moment that in some ways we've been here before I think that this is a time that there are great differences there are more people involved it's a diverse group of people trying to fight for change but to be honest as an African American I'm tired of mourning I'm tired of sort of carrying the burden but what I realize is that the challenge for all of us is this is a time for America finally confronted tortured racial past it does seem as if there is a majority of white America now sees the inequality in maybe it took the health pandemic the economic pandemic and the examples of more per police brutality all happening within this ninety day window perhaps to get there how do you take that momentum and turn it into some policy fixes well I think first of all you're right that this is a moment where America can really grapple with questions of race have the conversations they need to do and turned out the policy for me as a historian I always look back and I'm listening to the words of my year of Ella Baker who said in almost fifty years ago that until the death of a black mother son is important to this country as the death of a white mother son we who believe in freedom cannot rest so for me until we get to that day it means that now is the time to push and not rest to demand change it was interesting yesterday to see the the marines announced that they were basically going to ban the any they didn't want any other active duty soldiers to have Confederate flag paraphernalia it's symbolic what is this it is this the moment that we saw Confederate memorials taken down in Richmond and in Birmingham the state of Alabama is fighting the Birmingham one do you think this is the moment that we finally start to get over this Confederate memorial dialogue that we've we've we've seem to be running in circles on around what I hope is that this is a moment that we can candidly assess our history that we can look at the Confederate monuments and recognize that some of them need to come down because they represent not just a historic moment they represent white supremacy and segregation so I see this is the time that America can finally look at itself and be candid about what needs to change I also think it's a time where you're really seeing allies across the board you're seeing whites in Europe caring about this you're seeing black and white people coming together I'm in the United States I think this is the moment and the key for me is will there be leadership at the national and the local level to affect the kind of change that this moment is allowing us to do is president trump redeemable on this but in this moment say it again I lost you is president trump redeemable in this moment I think it's important to realize that this is something where all Americans need to own this that this is not a black problem this is a quintessential American problem and my hope is that leadership from the national all the way down to the local will recognize this is a time to bring the country together because it's winter in ways that are very very painful but this is a moment to take that pain and sees the promise of America the problem is that means that we could finally live up to the stated ideals of this country that's the challenge for all political leadership candidly that's the challenge for all Americans to say this is our moment of change and transformation a lot about him not to leave it there Pritchett your appreciate you coming on and sharing your perspective and and staring at from that historical context that you always do so well thanks for coming on good to see you Sir thank you Chuck good to see you the panel is joining us from their remote location washing post columnist Eugene Robinson NBC news White House correspondent Kristen Welker and senior editor of the dispatch in a time magazine columnist David French David I want to start with you he wrote a very passionate column to over the weekend about sort of your own personal experiences and trying to explain to white America what institutional racism miss expound upon yeah you know I think when a lot of white Americans especially conservative white Americans hear word like systemic racism they feel like it's a personal affront to them that the system that I'm a part of this racist and I'm in the system and I'm racist no I'm not but when I try to do is break down and explain and and I got a very unique very unique perspective on this when we adopted our youngest daughter from Ethiopia and a lot of our family's experience has changed quite substantially and and what I tried to explain just look let's let's just look at this and say if you had three hundred and forty five years of legally enforced racism that was protected by violence military violence up until the in the in the civil war and then vigilante and often official violence up through the Jim crow era the consequences for that are not going to be on done rapidly and they're not going to be completely undone in the fifty six year since the Civil Rights Act and we have to understand that and grapple with that honestly and it took for me it took me to understand that to see the different experience at my youngest daughter had living in this world and my oldest daughter for example it took me seeing that and it's unfortunate that it took me seeing that when all of the facts were in theory available to me before but it was the experience that changed my mind and heart about this yeah you did Robinson I mean that that is what many civil rights leaders of the sixty cents put yours you know try to put yourself in somebody else's shoes to try to understand how they are being impacted right but but I don't know but we can't wait for you know I do David's experience is is is instructive and it and it was a great piece but we can't wait for it for every family every white family in this country to become multi racial are too good to van address the issue of of white supremacy and the original sin of this country that is never been expiate it that would that has never been dealt with fully armed and so yes we we ratchet forward we make some progress it's always comes very scratch Italy it's never smooth and easy I do think this is potentially one of those really important moments when when we can move forward but it will not be without conflict I do not expect our leadership up from the from the federal level certainly not from president from art or expect to see more action on the local level and and I I think the protests will continue this is an election year people are gonna be active in out there and and you know I think this is this is going to keep Bob Morton and and I frankly hope it does you know Kristen Welker there's there's two photos from Monday that I think when you put them side by side it's quite the contrast Joe Biden I was about the middle of the afternoon on Monday he's with and I I I with I believe an African American church and he took a knee in a photo a couple hours later president trump does the now infamous photo op in front of St John's church holding a Bible I I don't know if the contrast can get clear with just two photos it is a remarkable split screen shock and we are seeing a tale of these two men and how did how former vice president Biden is signaling that he would lead Biden essentially trying to show that he is someone who would lead with compassion that he's willing to listen this is clearly the type of image that will appeal to core Democrats howl Independencia that remains to be seen as a something that can energize and bring in new voters and for president trump's part he's trying to make the case that he's the law and order president something that appeals to his base but talk I go back to that moment when he went to Saint John's church I was with president trump and was there asking him repeatedly about his water plans to deal with what these protesters are demanding change and he has yet to really a new rate that Chuck his response to me was to show she made he shook a reporter's again on Friday when they tried to ask him what is your plan and do you see this as fundamentally an issue of systemic racism Biden is trying to draw a contrast he's spoken about his plans to address this crisis shock you know it is notable as you're right president trump is it's been reticent to sort of embrace what many Americans seem to be agreeing to with these protests Roger Goodell ended up I mean it was interesting NFL players put together a powerful video making some demands of the NFL and Roger Goodell and I want to play a little bit of it here.

secretary Lonnie bunch Smithsonian Institution
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

10:10 min | 9 months ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Of the Smithsonian Institution Lonnie bunch with this money let's take a step back where are we on this arc in the cause for civil rights you know in some ways this is both a moment of optimism but it's a moment that in some ways we've been here before I think that this is a time that there are great differences there are more people involved it's a diverse group of people trying to fight for change but to be honest as an African American I'm tired of mourning I'm tired of sort of carrying the burden but what I realize is that the challenge for all of us is this is a time for America finally confronted tortured racial past it does seem as if there is a majority of white America now sees the inequality in maybe it took the health pandemic the economic pandemic and the examples of more print police brutality all happening within this ninety day window perhaps to get there how do you take that momentum and turn it into some policy fixes well I think first of all you're right that this is a moment where America can really grapple with questions of race have the conversations they need to do and turned out the policy for me as a historian I always look back and I'm listening to the words in my year of Ella Baker who said in almost fifty years ago that until the death of a black mother son is important to this country as the death of a white mother son we who believe in freedom cannot rest so for me until we get to that day it means that now is the time to push and not rest to demand change it was interesting yesterday to see the the marines announced that they were basically going to ban the any they didn't want any other active duty soldiers to have Confederate flag paraphernalia it's symbolic what is this it is this the moment that we saw Confederate memorials taken down in Richmond and in Birmingham the state of Alabama is fighting the Birmingham one do you think this is the moment that we finally start to get over this Confederate memorial dialogue that we've we've we've seem to be running in circles on around what I hope is that this is a moment that we can candidly assess our history that we can look at the Confederate monuments and recognize that some of them need to come down because they represent not just a historic moment they represent white supremacy and segregation so I see this is a time that America can finally look at itself and be candid about what needs to change I also think it's a time where you're really seeing allies across the board you're seeing whites in Europe caring about this you're seeing black and white people coming together I'm in the United States I think this is the moment and the key for me is will there be leadership at the national and the local level to affect the kind of change that this moment is allowing us to do is president trump redeemable on this but in this moment say it again I lost you is president trump redeemable in this moment I think it's important to realize that this is something where all Americans need to own this that this is not a black problem this is a quintessential American problem and my hope is that leadership from the national all the way down to the local will recognize this is a time to bring the country together because it splintered in ways that are very very painful but this is a moment to take that pain and sees the promise of America the problem is that means that we could finally live up to the stated ideals of this country that's the challenge for all political leadership candidly that's the challenge for all Americans to say this is our moment of change and transformation a lot about some have to leave it there pre check your appreciate you coming on sharing your perspective and and staring at from that historical context that you always do so well thanks for coming on good to see you Sir thank you chip good to see you the panel is joining us from their remote locations washing post columnist Eugene Robinson NBC news White House correspondent Kristen Welker and senior editor of the dispatch in a time magazine columnist David French David I want to start with you you wrote a very passionate column te over the weekend about sort of your own personal experiences in trying to explain to white America what institutional racism is expound upon yeah you know I think when a lot of white Americans especially conservative white Americans hear word like systemic racism they feel like it's a personal affront to them that the system that I'm a part of this racist and I'm in the system and I'm racist no I'm not but when I try to do is break down and explain and and I got a very unique very unique perspective on this when we adopted our youngest daughter from Ethiopia and a lot of our family's experience has changed quite substantially and and what I tried to explain just look let's let's just look at this and say if you had three hundred and forty five years of legally enforced racism that was protected by violence military violence up until the in the in the civil war and then vigilante and often official violence up through the Jim crow era the consequences for that are not going to be on done rapidly and they're not going to be completely undone in the fifty six year since the Civil Rights Act and we have to understand that and grapple with that honestly and it took for me it took me to understand that to see the different experience at my youngest daughter had living in this world and my oldest daughter for example it took me seeing that and it's unfortunate that it took me seeing that when all of the facts were in theory available to me before but it was the experience that changed my mind and heart about this yeah you did Robinson I mean that that is what many civil rights leaders of the sixty cents put yours you know try to put yourself in somebody else's shoes to try to understand how they are being impacted right but but I don't know but we can't wait for you know I do David's experience is is is instructive and and it was a great piece but we can't wait for it for every family every white family in this country to become multi racial are too good to then address the issue of of white supremacy and the original sin of this country that is never been expiate it that would that has never been dealt with fully armed and so yes we we ratchet forward we make some progress it's always comes very scratch Italy it's never smooth and easy I do think this is potentially one of those really important moments when when we can move forward but it will not be without conflict I do not expect our leadership up from the from the federal level certainly not from president trump art art spec to see more action on the local level and and I I think the protests will continue this is an election year people are gonna be active in out there and and you know I think this is this is gonna keep Bob Morton and and I frankly hope it does you know Kristen Welker there's there's two photos from Monday that I think when you put him side by side it's quite the contrast Joe Biden I was about the middle of the afternoon on Monday he's with and and with I believe in an African American church and he took a knee in a photo a couple hours later president trump does the now infamous photo op in front of St John's church holding a Bible I I don't know if the contrast can get clear with just two photos it is a remarkable split screen Chuck and we are seeing a tale of these two men and how did how former vice president Biden is signaling that he would leave the Biden essentially trying to show that he is someone who would lead with compassion that he's willing to listen this is clearly the type of image that will appeal to court Democrats howl Independencia that remains to be seen as a something that can energize and bring in new voters and for president trump's part he's trying to make the case that he's the law and order president something that appeals to his base but talk I go back to that moment when he went to Saint John's church I was with president trump and was there asking him repeatedly about his water plans to deal with what these protesters are demanding change and he has yet to really a numerate that Chuck is response to me was to show show me he showed reporters again on Friday when they tried to ask him what is your plan and do you see this as fundamentally an issue of systemic racism Biden is trying to draw a contrast he's spoken about his plans to address this crisis shock you know it is notable as you're right president trump is it's been reticent to sort of embrace what many Americans seem to be agreeing to with these protests Roger Goodell ended up I mean it was interesting NFL players put together a powerful video making some demands of the NFL and Roger Goodell.

Lonnie bunch Smithsonian Institution
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

03:17 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on Throughline

"From the late. Eighteen hundreds on huge numbers of immigrants coming to the US and radically transforming the landscape of cities across the country. Americans have had a pretty you know fraught history of whether they love or hate immigrants as well started collecting quote race information about Asia Chinese initially and our I immigration restriction laws. Really were aimed at the Chinese. And it's that debate eventually leading to the questions of whether those immigrants or those people whoever those people happen to be at the time are really like quote the rest of us. How do you distinguish between nationality and race in your classification? What do you mean by? The word race is not the racial classification by color that is commonly known but a race classification which was agreed upon. At least I understand someone connected. With the Smithsonian Institution worked out the classification of races leading up to the Nineteen ten census. Senate hearings were held to try to make sense of these new groups and had a classified them refer to the polls as a race. They're not a race at all. As I understand the word race it is a nationality would refer to the Irish as a race. They're not a race. They are part of a race. Suppose they were Jews. Who came from Spain? Would they be classified as Jews were? Spaniards? That would depend a good deal. On what the man claim to be. I do not think that has anything to do with the general just of it all is that people were divided. You've got an anti immigration movement. That is basically arguing. Is that a substantial proportion of the immigrant. Population from Europe are racially defective. And that's when you start getting head measurements being done To show that the polls are you know are not fit for democracy and so forth. People couldn't agree on how to define race not to mention what those racial categories should be and new emigrants didn't have a say in how the census was created. There's a lot going on here. One is what gets put on the census form in other words. What the categories are you know? White Black American Indian Chinese Japanese Korean Hindu and so forth how those put on the census in a particular year then. There's the other question which is wants. The data collected how they're published and interpreted one of the most crucial things they interpreted was who among these immigrants was considered white. I mean you wanted to be white not because it was so great to be right necessarily but that meant you got the best and you got the schools you were given jobs your you know. Your person was acknowledged you will able to live as a full human being if you were considered black or non white person. This is only blacks as in the everybody else. Who's non white you get the passport to Hell.

Asia Chinese Spain US Smithsonian Institution Senate Europe
On This Day in History: The Hope Diamond Was Stolen

This Day in History Class

02:55 min | 1 year ago

On This Day in History: The Hope Diamond Was Stolen

"Day was September. Eleven seventeen ninety two the hope diamond along with other other crown jewels was stolen when six men broke into the house where the tools were stored the history of the blue diamond dates back to the mid seventeenth century we when jean-baptiste to Varney was in possession of a diamond and that was about one hundred fifteen metric carat the diamond most likely came from a mine in India India and Taverny described its color as violent. The diamond was one of the many stones he still to King Louis the Fourteenth of France in sixteen sixty the eight it was re cut several years later and became known as the French blue. The diamond is blue because of the small amounts of Boron present it in seventeen forty nine. King Louis the fifteenth had the court jeweler reset the diamond and a piece of ceremonial jewelry decades later during the French Revolution King Louis the Sixteenth and Marie Antoinette attempted to flee France and the crown jewels were given to the government in September of seventeen ninety two while the King Marie Antoinette were imprisoned thieves broke into the royal storehouse and stole the French blue diamond during a a nearly week long looting of the crown jewels according to some historians one of the thieves took the diamond to Howrah thin to London where he tried to sell it the diamond's whereabouts for the next couple of decades are unclear but in eighteen twelve a large John was recorded as being in the possession of a London diamond diamond merchant named Daniel Eliason that demand was likely the modern hope diamond cut from the French Blue King George the fourth worth of the United Kingdom later acquired the stone and it was probably sold upon his death to pay off debt once the diamond came into possession the hope of banking family it became known as the hope diamond since then the stone has been sold several times reset and re cut the diamond made it to the US in nineteen eleven when Pierre Cartier sold it to American heiress Evelyn Walsh McLean in nineteen Kim fifty eight Harry Winston Inc donated the diamond to the Smithsonian institution it weighs forty five point fifty two carrots and the Smithsonian me an institution describes is color as fancy dark grayish blue the pinned it surrounding the diamond is made up sixteen white diamonds and it's necklace chain contains taints forty-five white diamonds. The hope diamond is now housed at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. It has a reputation for being curse since it's associated with a bunch of unfortunate events. There's a good chance these rumors were a marketing ploy to bring attention to the hope diamond

King Louis French Blue King George King Marie Antoinette France Smithsonian National Museum Of Marie Antoinette Smithsonian India India London Evelyn Walsh Mclean Taverny Daniel Eliason Pierre Cartier Boron Jean-Baptiste Varney Howrah Harry Winston Inc United Kingdom United States
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"Uncertainty towards the tips about relationships among particular species so at the same time that i'm collecting more ecological information. I'm trying to get more genetic information using new techniques that are being developed for the composite by jan mandel and vicky franken collies at the smithsonian institution in elsewhere to try and studies plants in a you know really get into the thick of how they radiated in this area that could be that could be a future conversation dot com for sure i mean this is something i definitely wanna. Keep my finger on. The pulse of this is super cool so you know you're out there looking at all these plants. There's what you said over eighty different species of parentally whether there's eighty four species in rock daisy tribe yoga but there's five five different genera in the tribe. Oh the biggest one is parentally which has about sixty eight species the other for general each of them have about from one to three species each and one of them is very novelist. It's a monetary genus called like capsules at found on an island <hes> about one hundred twenty miles house of coastal chile all right but the other ones the other ones are there's actually a genus endemic to baja california a maria that is really interesting and then there's a common shrub widespread shrub actually para komi cow data that that <hes> you can see in a wide diversity the different areas in the west that is also found this tribe awesome so do you personally in exploring all of this have any favorites or particular particular incidences that make you gravitate towards one species over another <hes> i. I really like the ones that are very specialized in difficult to get dude. Eh you put so much work into it and then you get this amazing reward this plant one of the plants that up there on my list is called parentally innuendo and it's found in the southern inyo mountains of eastern california and when i first started doing fieldwork on this group it was it was the first plant not that i went to go look for and the reason why is because right in the middle of its small range is a mountain called conglomerate mesa that has been slated for for an open pit gold mining project which would effectively slice the range of this endemic plan half..

jan mandel smithsonian institution vicky franken california chile
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on 1A

"Never the only one but i couldn't see it until i got into intuit and just accepted that this is for me. Yeah i mean it drives me nuts. How come the rest of the world gets to play rhythm and blues or hip hop and black people in america guy to justify country or rock or anything right. It's just you know it doesn't it first of all culturally we belong there because culturally belongs to all all of us who created that music right it will music belongs anybody who wants to play it but you know you're talking about being culturally connected to it. We all are culturally connected to it and if you know what the history is that's why when i'm in that space i wanna know history so i can come back and say well. You know first of all like it because i like it you know when i met a celtic festival. I can talk about the black gales gales of north carolina you know by people who spoke gallic. You know what i mean like. I can know that history then. I can also say if i want to say guy song if as long as i'm paying respect to the culture that it's coming from you know that's that's my thing. Are you respecting whereas coming from our you've knowledgeable about why you wanna sing. Are you thinking about these things. When you're singing a song that you feel like maybe you're not a part of. It's not part of you. There's all of these things swirling around in this kind of music and i'm just like why are we the ones always having to explain ourselves and none them white dudes playing the blues have to justify why they wanna play the balloons. You know what i'm saying. It's just i don't know it drives me nuts. I'm gonna be honest. I should also the a number of us. I should also note that a number of you shared stories of going to country music concerts and being treated with tremendous politeness and respect so i just want to acknowledge those of you who said that your experiences have been very very positive rian. Our time is really really short but what's next for you. I'm working on an opera opera. What's next yeah working on an opera for about a muslim senegalese man who was stolen and sold into slavery and lived in north carolina for fifty years and rose autobiography and air base. That's a whole nother aspect of african american culture that we don't talk about a lot so that's kind of my thing but that's all that's why opera why not ah. I was asked if i would write one so i said yes. We'll go ahead then. That's part of our culture to black. People have been involved in classical the music for a long long time so you know it's all these layers whenever there's a chance for them all to come together. That's what makes me it makes me excited. We will look forward to the next project from reenact giddens folk singer and songwriter. Her latest project is with the female folk. Group are native daughter's reaction. Thanks for talking to us. Thanks for having me will head out on the song pollyannas hammer one of the tracks from the songs of our native daughters album. We should also thank our partners at smithsonian magazine. Smithsonian institution is celebrating. Its year of music. Thank you can read the magazines profile on reality giddens at smithsonian.

north carolina Smithsonian institution smithsonian magazine intuit america fifty years
Special Report: 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 launch

Bill Cunningham

01:23 min | 1 year ago

Special Report: 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 launch

"Remembering the Apollo eleven mission fifty years later with a twelve thirty reporter Bryant Culp's breaking down despite fifty years ago they were rocketing their way towards the moon today marks the anniversary of the beginning of the Apollo eleven mission NASA headquarters in Florida today where the launch to place their remembering Neil Armstrong the other is astronauts who made the trip within buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins are there to remember their friend all lunar modules to move rocks relics of the Apollo mission on display around the nation one that's been out of you for over a decade is the space suit that Neil Armstrong was wearing when he said until today when the Smithsonian Institution launched a Kickstarter campaign to help preserve this invaluable piece of American history they raise a half million dollars in five days to do it vice president Mike pence helped one veil Armstrong's restored and preserve space suit at the national air and space museum Jim Ryan ABC news aplicar that same suit Armstrong wars on display at the Cincinnati museum center and part of the Neil Armstrong space exploration gallery here at union terminal is the actual flight jacket that he wore under the suit as well as a communications cabin microphone that Armstrong used daughter his first words he took those first steps

Bryant Culp Florida Neil Armstrong Michael Collins Smithsonian Institution Mike Pence Cincinnati Museum Center Reporter Nasa Vice President Jim Ryan Abc Fifty Years Million Dollars Five Days
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Steve Inskeep. And I'm Rachel Martin today. Tourists in Washington DC no longer need to be disappointed. By the limited museum offerings as of late, thanks to the end of the government shutdown the Smithsonian Institution reopens, its museums along with the national zoo, it all happens this morning as NPR's Rebecca Ellis reports. Getting it all up and running was no easy task this Massoni. Museums are springing back to life. The end of the shut down the national museum of natural history's five hundred furloughed stack. Members all came back to work Monday, but many arrived to find things a little out of whack. Some of the museums videos wouldn't play properly because the software have become outdated. The museums project manager Chaban stars says the fluid that preserves the dead squid had turned you can see looking in there. It looks kind of cloudy and the Easter Island sculpture was not yet ready for its debut. We had moved this beautiful Easter Island head that a lot of people recognize as dumb dumb from the movies. The figures look like had a starring role in night at the museum as a talking sculpture desperate for some chewing gum. Dum dum. You'll give me yesterday afternoon. Staff with securing the head in its new location near the entrance ready to greet visitors last Friday when it was clear the shutdown was coming to an end the Smithsonian Institution sprang into action. He promised open everything by Tuesday. This meant a hectic Monday for Chaban stars. Imagine you had to shut your home down for thirty eight days. And then all of a sudden opened the doors except she points out. It's not a home. It's a three hundred thousand. Square foot building that's over a century old. And it's not just a few guests coming into your home is going to open. Welcome over fifty thousand visitors potentially the first day you open the door, no Smithsonian museums spent the day scurrying to get their exhibits presentable for the crowds. At the hersher museum and sculpture gardens director, Melissa choose has staff spent much of the day lugging water around for an installation that displays people's pulses. In ripples. We drained it. And now we have just a little up again. In manhattan. The Cooper Hewitt's head of exhibitions Yvan Gomez finally got into the building to see how the museum's exhibit on color had fared in her absence. She'd been worried about leaving out a bunch of rare books like a seventeen or four treatise by Isaac Newton on prisons. We had four hours to shut down indefinitely. The books were fine. There was just a lot of dust. We did they cleaning mainly dustings, no bugs or anything. Like that. By today. She says it should be sparkling. We're excited to be open to the public is our mission Chaban stars. She can't wait to hear the footsteps echoing through the entrance to the natural. History museum. It was a dark kind of calls space. It felt very lonely. We miss our visitors. The museum's director Kirk Johnson.

History museum Smithsonian Institution national museum of natural his Steve Inskeep Easter Island Rachel Martin hersher museum Washington DC director NPR Rebecca Ellis Isaac Newton Chaban Kirk Johnson project manager Yvan Gomez Cooper Hewitt manhattan
Michigan, Smithsonian Institution and Grand Rapids discussed on KDWN Programming

KDWN Programming

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Michigan, Smithsonian Institution and Grand Rapids discussed on KDWN Programming

"A rock that was used as a doorstop for decades at a Michigan farm has been identified as a meteorite central Michigan. University says the twenty two point five pound space rock was identified by their department of earth and atmospheric sciences after the owner brought it to them out of curiosity. It was first discovered by a farmer in the nineteen thirties and the new owner came into possession of it. After the farm was sold in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight and has been using it as a doorstop, the Grand Rapids man was apparently inspired to investigate. After seeing news of meteorite hunters finding shards and selling them for thousands of dollars the chunk of iron nickel was valued at one hundred thousand dollars. It has been verified as a meteorite by the Smithsonian Institution.

Michigan Smithsonian Institution Grand Rapids One Hundred Thousand Dollars Five Pound
Two Ebola Patients Who Received Experimental Treatment Have Recovered

24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Two Ebola Patients Who Received Experimental Treatment Have Recovered

"More Than twenty three percent struggled with that hardship followed by problems paying medical bills or not seeking medical help because of expenses reported. By about. Eighteen, percent and thirteen percent of families reported missing a utility Bill payment, at some point during the year I'm Julie Walker It could've been cold weather that helped our species. Replace Neanderthals in Europe according to a new study researchers from the university of Cologne in Germany found the periods. Of cold weather coincided with the disappearance of our evolutionary, cousins followed by homo sapiens but they're not sure if the Neanderthals moved or just. Died off scientists have long debated what happened to, the Neanderthals that lived in Europe and Asia. About forty thousand years ago the latest research drew on climate archaeological and ecological data and at a new

Congo Ebola Europe University Of Cologne Julie Walker Smithsonian Institution World Health Organization Apple Germany Rick Pops Uganda Romania Asia Sudan Forty Thousand Years Twenty Three Percent Thirteen Percent
Senator Claire Mccaskill, Sean Ross and Sean Hannity discussed on WBBM Morning News

WBBM Morning News

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Senator Claire Mccaskill, Sean Ross and Sean Hannity discussed on WBBM Morning News

"To get across during, her interview on FOX last night during. The hour long chat with Sean Hannity are said the tweet that cost to. Her hit TV show has been misinterpreted after being. Imparted by her host to. Do so boss book into the camera to former. Obama administration adviser Valerie Jarrett Khushi like into a character from planet of the apes I'm so sorry that you thought I was racist and that you thought that my tweet west racist because it wasn't. It was political she says the same goes for President Donald Trump and his supporters Barr says they are not racist they just have a different. Opinion I'm Oscar wells Gabriel WBZ. News time six fifty two Hispanic. Members of congress are renewing their call for a national museum devoted to Latino. History and culture campaign began in twenty four shortly after The federal government authorized construction of, the Smithsonian Institution's African American. Museum advocates of the. Latino museum masturbated could cost up to seven hundred million dollars they want the government to pick up half. Democratic US Senator Claire mccaskill Missouri's reacting to a report that Russian hackers tried to breach your computer network calling it outrageous Missouri Senator Claire mccaskill a democrat so she will not be intimidated by Vladimir Putin and, she calls the, Russian president a thug and a bully her comments. Follow a Daily Beast report that Russia's g. r. u. intelligence agency try to hack mccaskill computers in August of last. Year but were. Unsuccessful mccaskill, is up for reelection this, year and her seed is considered vulnerable Jackie Quinn Washington thirty. Nine year old Sean Ross will. Remain in prison. A little longer than expected in. A plea deal South Dakota judge suspended most of his five year sentence for breaking into a. Cash machine but then Ross flip the judge office He was leaving the courtroom that'll cost him an extra two months behind bars Roth appealed to. The state supreme court but. Got no sympathy Kristen Stewart Naomi Scott and eligible. Then scare Getty ready to become angels the actresses will be co-stars the Elizabeth banks reboot of Charlie's angels the movie is due in theaters in September, of next year all, it's not what we have, to say here in Chicago it's how we say. It the public opinion firm yougov, conducted a survey about local. Accents at Chicago came in dead last two percent found our accent attractive of, rather attractive well behind New York and Boston Texas rent, highest Twitter's following..

Senator Claire Mccaskill Sean Ross Sean Hannity Senator Claire Mccaskill Misso President Trump Latino Museum Valerie Jarrett Khushi FOX Smithsonian Institution Gabriel Wbz Kristen Stewart Vladimir Putin Chicago Donald Trump Obama Administration Congress Yougov South Dakota Mccaskill Naomi Scott
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"So as a mom i imagine this would be a bit of a challenge how how do you how do you realize this vision for assault and beat themed birthday party i didn't know what hopping gosh what are we going to do to make this stop me birth they've already come to life and so we started to have a pot law but of course not meat on the menu i message defend of mine who decorates case 'cause creations like her senate can you make me stop me kate so that was the first question head for one and so she really done an excellent job we headphone saw beef buckets for decorations that my sister wrangled up for me and we definitely we don't just to be clear was there any actual meat in the cake now very specific he didn't actually want out me in her cake she wanted bonilla see she's totally totally different one girl she's got her own mind her own now they when something's in her head she sticks with it and then goes with someone she said she wanted to stop me party i knew there was no tournament roxanne hooky on the saint john's boring show earlier today it's hokey through her daughter grace assault meet theme birthday party at greece's request thanks to her mother's constant storytelling money thompson has always known a lot about our great grandparents what she didn't know was that many of their possessions had been carefully preserved for generations at the smithsonian institution in washington dc this month she and three other women were able to travel to the institution to see those items for themselves now they are calling for those artifacts to be returned to canada money took thompson is originally from coral harbour none of it we reached today in carleton place on tario.

assault senate saint john greece thompson smithsonian institution washington dc carleton place bonilla canada
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

WRFR-LP Rockland

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on WRFR-LP Rockland

"But wasn't it yeah he was at all right all right must have been a quail and that's what they use to do it in the old days they used to rate with the tail feathers of a chicken then the chicken getting away out the feathers for us oh oh i say look you'll gabby me and handed is digging on getting ten thousand dollars but these letters ten thousand goodness money isn't a lot of money and when we get it we each gonna take our share and put it right smack in the bank what you're gonna do what you wanna do at ten thousand in financial circles that's what's called sinking fund sinking fun how you figure what if you start thinking that money in the bank you ain't gonna have much fun that's thinking no no no you might be able to help us on selling these letters now we were figuring that we might take them down to the smithsonian institution and what and dc now what you think bad very bad king fish you don't stand a chance i know chance what your take them to a professor have he's a collector of everything and get his address for you yeah well now does sound like a good idea i'll go down there to see him i'd rather not answer that if you don't mind why not like george washington i can't tell well the two dollars a desk mcmillan can't.

smithsonian institution professor mcmillan george washington ten thousand dollars two dollars
Starfish Aren't Fish

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

01:46 min | 3 years ago

Starfish Aren't Fish

California Research Associate Smithsonian Institution Writer Julian Perry Marshall Medina Scully Beth National Museum Of Natural
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It so so you're this and on a program is that it has anz met right right okay so what's the what's the relationship between ends met and nasa and how that all worst together well her rigidly and smith was set up as a three agency agreements so uh the the it was funded the actual antarctic search were meteorites was funded through the national science foundation because they have uh the they do the uh scientific research in antarctica okay um nasser uh funded the curation now and allocation of a meteorite samples here at nasa johnson space center and then the smithsonian institution did the initial a classification uh and um was the long term repository for the meteorites collected in antarctica uh that since then since then uh they've changed it in now nasa actually funds the tactic uh uh the anz met research component uh um nsf still supplies logistics but nasa pays nsf four those that those logistics because they they are the uh the amine they have all the logistics in antarctica and end the rock still go ultimately to the smithsonian a chipped for initial uh classification and rocks set higher no longer actively being a research by scientists in the world end up being permanently curated at the smithsonian institution so that is uh that is still the way things are run all right so so is at the ones that people are researching and and actively studying are all than house here at the johnson space yes of with summak sank exceptions we don't have the necessary facilities to easily a deal with a metal rich meteorite so iron meteorites uh uh estonia iron meteorites automatically go uh nope i'm going to pull that back iron meteorites automatically go to the smithsonian institution oh because they are equipped for to cut a medal in and make uh uh samples available on we do do the stony meteorites here i forgot about that um uh because i've gotten some from here um and there is so as those that have a significant stony component are still uh worked on here until they become uh uh no longer of scientific is the interest a habit but no even though they go to the smithsonian for a permanent curation there they're not dead to science so to speak so i can request the samples that have been housed at johnson space center for years and now transfer transformed permanently to the smithsonian uh.

anz nasa smith nasa johnson space center smithsonian institution summak johnson space center antarctica
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"You know you could survive on just what you get from uh the antarctic programme down in america when necessarily be entirely comfortable uh wearing the same clothes you know for seven weeks but you could hear it so so you're this and on a program is that it has anz met right right okay so what's the what's the relationship between ends met and nasa and how that all worst together well her rigidly and smith was set up as a three agency agreements so uh the the it was funded the actual antarctic search were meteorites was funded through the national science foundation because they have uh the they do the uh scientific research in antarctica okay um nasser uh funded the curation now and allocation of a meteorite samples here at nasa johnson space center and then the smithsonian institution did the initial a classification uh and um was the long term repository for the meteorites collected in antarctica uh that since then since then uh they've changed it in now nasa actually funds the tactic uh uh the anz met research component uh um nsf still supplies logistics but nasa pays nsf four those that those logistics because they they are the uh the amine they have all the logistics in antarctica and end the rock still go ultimately to the smithsonian a chipped for initial uh classification and rocks set higher no longer actively being a research by scientists in the world end up being permanently curated at the smithsonian institution so that is uh that is still the way things are run all right so so is at the ones that people are researching and and actively studying are all than house here at the johnson space yes of with summak sank exceptions we don't have the necessary facilities to easily a deal with a metal rich meteorite so iron meteorites uh uh estonia iron meteorites.

america anz nasa smith nasa johnson space center smithsonian institution summak antarctica seven weeks
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"You have to prove nothing proved nothing not better than anybody move on way else's and then those of see what else fun the sound been that may entertain the masses out there i dunno archive stuff how i sounded a nineteen ninety six maybe one of those would be good is only a minute long savage archive meds for depression october 1994 you need like a minute a minute and a half savage archive smithsonian changes world war to history october nineteen 94 okay let's hear our sounded a 1994 on this little piece clip o2 jim fire away i'm really angry at the smithsonian institution because what they tried to do they try to make the us into the bad guy in japan the good guy they were going to feature the plane the enola gay which of course dropped the atomic bomb on japan in that tragic conclusion to world war two in the pacific and there was a longwinded speech about you know written up that the the us was the bad guy i won't go into all the details and they actually try to revise history at the smithsonian until a historian caught them you manchester who teaches at wesleyan university and is the author of a biography of general douglas macarthur who commanded the pacific forces during the war said that the people at the smithsonian made an initial low estimate of how many people would have died if there was an invasion instead of the atomic bomb he said that was preposterous and he says it was part of an ideological campaign of those who wish to say the dropping of the bomb was unnecessary so all linked to uh absolute outrage by veterans groups the quislings at the smithsonian institution changed the exhibits to reflect a us point of view after world still as the united states it's unbelievable before these of veterans groups got involved there was only one paragraph about pearl harbor can you imagine that and the earliest script on the exhibit at the smithsonian it's just made the japanese into a pacifist people with defending themselves now i'm not heeded bash japan but good god do you know that they a photograph showing japanese prisoners of war was included with no photograph of american prisoners of war at.

world war smithsonian institution japan wesleyan university united states manchester douglas macarthur
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on Hidden Brain

Hidden Brain

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on Hidden Brain

"How stopping some years ago with rick parts at the smithsonian institution's human origins program he is a paleo anthropologist and something he said stuck in my head he told me that the thing that distinguished early humans from other species was are remarkable capacity to adapt to different conditions uniquely humans levin very cool places in very hot places at altitude and sea level some of us live long periods underwater or even in outer space most of that isn't about our physical abilities it's really about the mind there's a lot of children that old saying when one door closes another opens i want to leave you with a lovely poem by elizabeth bishop singer amy man happened to be at npr and we asked her to read the poem for us one art by elizabeth bishop the art of losing isn't hard to master so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster lose something every day except the fluster of lost door keys that our badly spent the art of losing is it hard to master than practice losing farther losing faster places and names and where it was you meant to travel none of these will bring disaster i lost my mother's watch and look my last or next to last of three loved houses went the art of losing isn't heart master i lost to cities lovely ones and vaster some realms i owned to reverse a continent i miss them but it was in a disaster even losing you the joking voice a gesture i love i shan't have lied it's evident the art of losing not too hard to master though it may look like right it like disaster.

rick parts smithsonian institution amy man npr elizabeth bishop levin
"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian institution" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"The first lady's collection at the smithsonian institution the first lady will deliver the vanilla silk offtheshoulder gown to the national museum of american history in a ceremony on friday the smithsonian says the first lady's collection has been among its most popular exhibits for more than a century in now features 26 dresses worn by jacqueline kennedy laura bush michelle obama and others pam coulter cbs news washington divers have been a work off the coast of newport beach california cleaning up a mixture reeve there was created back in 1988 my amana thought he was creating a better ocean habitat rudolf striking berge reef comprised of some 1500 old tyres two thousand plastic jugs a hundred sections of pvc pipe styrofoam fishingnet none of materials a coastal commission says striking berge research was deeply flawed jim chenevey cbs news looking very nice for this evening skies we saying mainly clear for tonight a bit chilly though for the overnight hours once again going down to a low of forty nine degrees tomorrow nine sunday mostly sunny pleasantly warm for the afternoon highs right around eighty raise clear to partly cloudy for tomorrow night with a low of fifty one and it's we worker way in you friday will have sunshine mixed with some clouds ice again right around eighty degrees i'm accuweather meteorologist danielle knittle have you ever notice that politicians are good at an art called pandering news newsradio one or two point nine karn we are and no pandering zone there is no wiggle room here for our.

smithsonian institution michelle obama amana berge reef jim chenevey danielle knittle national museum of american hi jacqueline kennedy washington newport beach california berge accuweather forty nine degrees eighty degrees