9 Burst results for "Smithsonian Environmental Research Center"

"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

In Defense of Plants Podcast

08:07 min | 3 months ago

"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on In Defense of Plants Podcast

"And for two years, I worked at Fermi as a visiting professor sabbatical replacement. Nice. Yeah. And I wrote the dean of Clemson after that and said I really appreciate the fact that you allowed me to come to Clemson even on probation and I just want to let you know that I got through and that not everybody takes standardized tests very well. So I never forgot doing that. Since then, I come in closer to home. I was in my office at Furman waiting to hear some job interviews and traveling. And we'll wait one night at about 9 30 at night. The phone rang, and I said, who is this time? And I picked it up and it was doctor lane Chapman in Illinois college. And she invited me for an interview and she said, we have your CD and we'd like to interview. That was very surprised that anyone would be calling me that late at night. Normally, and around. But I accepted that and the rest became history. It's kind of interesting that I came here with an older science building. There was no air conditioning in my office. It was 95° in the summer. Sculptures I took with me were in Tupperware containers. Wow. And I had no research lab. And so that was the birth of the orchid recovery program as infancy here. Wow. About four years later, we built a lovely science building here. I met my wife. Here she was a Professor of psychology, Elizabeth, and now we have a daughter, Audrey, who's now in college. And yeah, so it's really lovely setting here. One of the people I'd like to single out here that had a huge role in this formation is orchid recovery is Scott Stewart my student at the time here. He was an English major, and I contaminated his thought pattern. He became a biology major. He worked. He did some seed germination with C termination with the eastern periphery and it worked. And he had four publications that he co authored before he graduated. Wow. And doctor Mike Cain and university of Florida offered him a position in his lab to work on a PhD and he accepted, and so Scott Stewart went to work with doctor Kane and Gainesville. And now Scott is an executive director of the millennium park foundation in Chicago. So he's still connected to plants and it's fantastic that he's out there. Something right behind me in this interview here, the Zoom meeting. The phone rang in 2012. And there was a gentleman on the other line who had a British accent. And that was doctor this bar and Saracen. He was from the royal Botanic gardens queue in London and he invited me to be part of the team of researchers to go to Madagascar. And so I worked on a research project with them for 5 years and that one. Yeah, so I was there twice, and I was we were encouraged not to go there to collect samples because it was too far in the orchid fungi wouldn't make it, but we did anyway. It was a risk. And we got some really interesting fungi for markets in Madagascar. And currently my current projects I'm working in research and Ecuador and Cuba and also in Palau, which is in collaboration with the Smithsonian's environmental research center working with doctor Benjamin crane, doctor Dennis wiggum and doctor Melissa McCormick at CERC. Some of you I think on your podcast, you've heard about the North American orchid conservation center or neon. Yep, big supporter of them. Yeah, doctor wiggin founded that. And we're looking to make it continue after his retirement. And that's something we're up to. Right now, my big project on my desk, I have a lot of things to my right here. I have a lot of books and things and co authoring a book with Philip seton in the UK. He's a well-known organist on seeds and see germination. And the book is we think we're going to title it saving orchids in a warming world. And we're shooting for a deadline early summer and everything's going according to plan. So that's exciting. Yeah. Yeah, I'm very happy that I was offered to a research associate position at Chicago but Dana garden. So I'm working with Chicago on research and I'm continuing to teach here at all on college. So sorry to be a little no. But that's kind of my background. That's fantastic. I love those stories. And there's so many angles of just serendipity passion. A lot of things people will empathize with introversion, not really doing well with people but doing well with the natural world. That was me to a tee up until relatively recently in life. And you know, I barely got through the GREs. I suck at standardized tests. So there's things I think are gonna resonate and it's wonderful to see someone that's had such a successful career that's driven by passion and interest and following those threads to their wherever they lead you, but to really do it in a way that benefits the nature that you love so much and orchids especially. And what I love most in admire most about your work is that melding of these two worlds that are often treated as separate botany and mycology, but the recognition of just how important they are together. And when it comes to orchids, they are poster children for the importance of symbioses and the relationships between two different kingdoms of life. And so for those listening that aren't as familiar with orchids as some of us, why is this relationship between fungi and orchids so important? What's going on there? Yeah. Well, we have to go back over a 100 million years for that. It's first appeared. That's what most people think is somewhere in Asia, terrestrial orchids, a group of them with fleshy berries, perhaps by bipedal dinosaurs, maybe. That's not, you know, that's just speculation. But exciting. They came about as terrestrials we think and went into the trees and went with their seed dispersal mechanisms went off and conquered the world, except for a very slick cold places like Antarctica. But the fungus is, let's not kid ourselves here. When we see an orchid, first of all, we're walking across the landscape and we're walking underneath our feet are another world microbes fungi, springtail insects. You name it. And we often forget that, but when we see an orchid in bloom, it's obviously captivating most of the time of Sorkin's gorgeous indifferent. There never seems to be really common, but they're the first to disappear. So when you see them now and you don't see them in a few years, there's something wrong with the environment. And one of the reasons we think that is, is because they have this very close intimate symbiosis with fungi and they also need insects. But orchids, I want everyone out there listening to understand and let's be clear, they're not the innocent plants that you might think. They are master manipulators. Nice. Manipulate us for our because we like to grow them and we often kill them and they take our money. So everyone knows that. I think they manipulate insects to a large extent. Some of them don't even offer a nectar reward for the.

Scott Stewart Clemson lane Chapman Mike Cain millennium park foundation Madagascar Fermi Smithsonian's environmental re Benjamin crane Dennis wiggum Melissa McCormick CERC North American orchid conserva Furman Chicago Philip seton Dana garden Saracen royal Botanic gardens Audrey
"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

06:48 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Convention. Now One of talking politics will get back to politics to Marley. Well, I mean, if we make it back to politics denied, but I'd love to hear from you if you are a bird watcher if you learned something last hour from Wayne Peterson of the Mass autobahn of the Massachusetts director of the Massachusetts important Bird Area program. Think about it. Less than 40. Years ago, there were no American bald eagle's here in Massachusetts. Now there are 140 nests, according tto Wayne Peterson, and he's the man who would know I didn't realize how these the baby bald eagles so called IgE. Let's We're banded and that somebody has to go up into that tree. Get the EEG. Let Out of the nest, put it in a Pillowcase carried down tree being very careful on the way. And then there's a team that bans the The legs, the baby bald eagle, so they'll be able to track that eagle and identify that eagle. I'm fascinated by that. I absolutely and hope you are as well. Join the conversation. Bob's in Annapolis, Maryland. Bob ever get calls from Annapolis. I feel like I should salute. How are you tonight? Okay, Fine. Thank you. I want to mention something with the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center down in Edgewater 11 miles from here, and we also have a job, a wetlands and one of the environmentalists who does Bird's gave a big talk on our sprays and a couple of years ago. I didn't get down there, but he invited me. But he also does bio telemetry and they were going to upgrade the frequency band or the equipment. But also there was someone of bu years ago who also gave the book for the IEEE on bio telemetry for the animals and Birds. Guy named McKay, but he passed away a while back. But did I didn't hear the first part of your order than guy? Talk about telemetry, also for the birds tracking well, when you say telemetry is that a synonym for tracking or Yeah, Yeah, attracting, you know, so we talked about that a little bit on the the reason that I learned about it. Again, if you if you join a little late, I'm I'm on a at a friend's home. Here. The Greater Boston area not in the city of Boston, but fairly close on a good sized lake and we were visiting the Saturday morning and Ah hey, was talking about his his neighborhood and how wonderful it was and beautiful And he said, Plus, we have two eagles. They said, What are you talking about? He pointed up and saw the eagle I saw the Eagle Nest. And I had never seen an eagle nest before. It is huge. It is huge, and I learned a lot about it in the last few days, and I wanted to share it with my audience. I did not realize that the eagle population in Massachusetts and I'd suspect in Maryland. Was adversely affected by DDT, which was a spray that was used pretty regularly in this country to eradicate mosquitoes. Ah, and that that Delia While it was ingested by bugs in which request the Eagles eight and all of that, that the residue of the DDT get into eagle systems and the eggs were there were being laid. Well, we're not Mr T enough for eagles to sit on them and the population went away. And what way was that? I read about that huge, you know, And what I learned was that in 1982, So we're talking about what 38 years ago, 1982. There were no eagles in the Massachusetts area. No American Bald Eagle's, But now he says that there are about 140. Nest. All the progeny of two eagles that were brought here in 1982 and Were nurtured by human beings in and I guess in trees or in a tree near what's known as the Quabbin Reservoir. Eagles apparently like to be in big trees with big nests near lakes and reservoirs, So I just learned a lot about it. Get excited about it, and that's why I wanted to talk about it tonight. We have our spray tans Eso near the Naval Academy, Spa Creek and down when the Places in the Chesapeake Bay and we say their nests on Burley's also your nap. You know Annapolis. Yeah, well, you know this this I'm told that there's a lot of hawks That actually nest in in in and the exterior of some of the buildings in downtown Boston. Believe it or not, and they're the ones to get pigeons. Yes, Yes. You know a lot about this. That's exactly right. Just you know the Falcons New 30 years ago, they were going after the pigeons. Too many pigeons. Yeah, well, I mean, we can lose, we can afford to lose a few Bishan pigeons that that's for sure. And I didn't realize for many years weaves. We spend time on Martha's Vineyard, and there's some big Osprey. Nests out on the far end of of Martha's Vineyard. But again, I didn't really understand at the time I looked and it looked as if they were they were they were, they were nests. That were either created by the Osprey or or put up there for the Osprey they would like on these big long call polls is that normal? Does that make sense to you? Yeah, well, they're sprays to hear our own big booties. A bug away. Did you know Read and maybe you're right about what I said about it. I don't know if it was us or somewhere a bold eagle. Ah, knock down the drone. No, He never did Hear that story. I read that in the past week or two. And they've been USA. I think. Yeah, well, let's say that bald eagles are anywhere from 8 to £15 and wingspans up to like six or 6.5. Ft. Pretty pretty improbable, pretty imposing bird. Bob. I appreciate what you do in Annapolis. If I could ask we associate with more November card engineer from Penn and Boston, New Masters and Mike and Union society, so involved IEEE Electromagnetic power Building and Tosi system Engineering..

Eagles American Bald Eagle Annapolis Massachusetts Eagle Nest Bob Boston Wayne Peterson Maryland Marley Quabbin Reservoir Guy Edgewater director Mr T Martha's Vineyard Bird Eso Smithsonian Environmental Rese USA.
How Can Gingko Leaves Help Track Climate Change?

BrainStuff

04:01 min | 2 years ago

How Can Gingko Leaves Help Track Climate Change?

"Hey brain stuff lauren Bogilov here. You might have have a gingko tree in your neighborhood. It has wispy fan shaped leaves that turn a beautiful burnished yellow in the fall and possibly drops rotten smelling fruit. It looks different different from other trees. You might see on your street mostly because when you look at a gingko tree you're looking at the product of another time. Gingko Biloba is the oldest tree on birth. It's outlived odds. Relatives seen the dinosaurs rise and fall any individual Ginkgo tree may have seen a lot the oldest known gingko specimen stands in Zunga Mountains of China and is one thousand four hundred years old gingko trees have remained pretty much unchanged for the past two hundred seventy million years have survived three mass extinctions and might be a key to helping us understand something about how our current climate chefs will affect organisms in the future a group of researchers at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in edgewater Maryland are studying a grove of fifteen gingko trees each housed a plastic greenhouse tent and hooked up to a tank of carbon carbon dioxide that delivers different amounts of the gas to each tree some up to two and a half times the carbon dioxide concentration of modern earth's air in in this experiment called fossil atmospheres. The scientists are trying to reconstruct how the atmosphere of earth has changed over the past couple geologic eras through the ice ages is and periods when there was no ice at all in the polls and how it's likely to change in the future the Earth's atmosphere is made up of a variety of different gases including carbon dioxide the concentrations of which have a huge impact on the planet's climate scientists can get a pretty good idea of what past clients were like by looking at fossil plants. Thanks thanks to a little structure on the surface of their leaves called Sta Mata these are tiny holes that let carbon dioxide into the leaf and water and oxygen out the the concentration of carbon dioxide in the air determines. How many S- tomato are on the surface of the leaf using fossils of GEICO's from different places and time periods can help the researchers features put together a story of what Earth's climate has been up to for the past few hundred million years the researchers are doing all kinds of experiments with their tended fossil atmospheres atmospheres but they also want your help you can assist in this project by volunteering to help counts D'Amato on fossil ginkgo leaves in order to calculate the levels of carbon dioxide oxide in the atmosphere during specific periods in the deep deep past you can also send in Gingko leaves from wherever you live because although Kinko's are native to China they're popular in yards gardens and along streets worldwide may receiving specimens from citizen scientists all over the globe the researchers will be able to get a better sense of how various as features of the trees differ depending on whether they're planted in say Singapore Colorado which will in turn help them better understand how gingko grow differently depending on the climate in which they developed now or two hundred million years ago today's Episode Code was written by Jessica Lynch yields and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is production of iheartradio's? How stuff works for more on this and lots of other long-lived topics visit our home? Planet has two forks DOT COM. Tom And for more podcasts from iheartradio. The iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows in this episode is brought to you by the Rolling Stone Charts Rolling in stone is the definitive outlet for all things music bringing you. The latest news interviews and reviews rolling stone is your go-to source to learn everything about groundbreaking artists and now rolling stone is going even further to show you what it means to be on the rise introducing the rolling Stone Charts and Interactive Seta Music Charts that offer an in-depth in the moment view of the biggest songs albums and artists in Usak the rolling stone charts the definitive guide for trending breaking popular music in the age of streaming his at rolling stone dot com slash charts or search R._S.

China Lauren Bogilov Iheartradio Tom And Usak Zunga Mountains Geico Sta Mata Apple Edgewater Maryland Smithsonian Environmental Rese Kinko Jessica Lynch D'amato Singapore Colorado Tyler Two Hundred Seventy Million Ye One Thousand Four Hundred Year Two Hundred Million Years
"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:19 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thompson spoke with both black police officers and parents as he wrote the opera every into the black parents they have this talk with their son at a very young age despite the talk the sun becomes a victim of police violence deliberately happens offstage since composer Jeanine Tesori we always knew we didn't want this this might seem to be on stage it really is about possibility deny it and the aftermath and the costs and the consequence for everyone and that you understand the ripple of fact performing this comes at a cost I think to all of us it's one that we all think is worth paying mezzo soprano Brianna hunter plays the anguished mother in blue very rarely do we get to so di rectally communicate our feelings about what's going on in the world it's allowed us to kind of grief and process a lot of trauma and she says she hopes audiences who CV opera can process those feelings too for NPR news I'm Jeff London you're listening to NPR news the great Pacific garbage patch is the world's largest accumulation of marine plastic debris it's estimated to be twice the size of Texas well the more than one point eight trillion pieces of plastic well this summer one intrepid swimmer and environmental advocate has decided to swim through it then the comp is swimming through the polluted stretch of ocean between Hawaii and California in hopes of better understanding more about the garbage that's accumulated there he's been documenting the experience in real time the effort is called the vortex swim and then along with a team of scientists sailors and photographers will be tracking in collecting data for the national oceanic and atmospheric administration the Smithsonian environmental research center and several other groups and we're joined now by been recalled who's currently on his boat in the Pacific Ocean welcome thank you for having me so tell us where exactly you are right now and what it looks like right now we're all about the new point between how are you also it's about the house in mind away from our it is a lot of the plastic in the oceans we know is broken down into small pieces but I've read that has you swim you find a larger objects what's the strangest thing you've run across yeah right most of the broken down so you may need to call to see everyone again how are you you have to have a special night so and then click local make coffee but what a nice we and we eat they created a lock up not like lance and not crazy but also arousal nine times that we have on the cross street is way up on bottled water on bottles of shampoos and are you going to issue a solo push through so we find everything that we are using up all right yeah yeah you said that these micro plastic these tiny broken down pieces even stick to you while you swim I mean what does this tell us about the bigger picture the effects of this patch of garbage in the ocean yeah what we are doing here we we wound up thank you so we could make that I also like and and you will get a work out there on the ice is seeing how all those Michael you kick you when they download Michael plastique with that look on their knees on these on aids and also you know look nasty character what are you holding on so in a white lie news break the plastic for food and eat them according to their armies and going off to change and where are the end of the porch and also so we not only on the line life devotion on us in there in the same time as well and of course you're far from alone in swimming through the ocean what do we know about how the marine life that lives there is interacting with these plastics yeah it's very interesting to see that anytime you see a big day for you you are going to have Ontario because he's been created around it so on the theory that we find that our fall on the coast yet we find the seats that are leaving usually are on the coast so it means that the economy jump for bench when there are new Harry asked and you have become and Stacy Stacy and the truth for our like each and so on but also more organic number we cannot yeah naked eyes request because by the bank back on your life because of that property could all over to that they bring all their species into annual that's Wimmer been the comp he's currently swimming through it the great Pacific garbage patch and documenting his experience.

Thompson
"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:20 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thompson spoke with both black police officers and parents as he wrote the opera every parent into view black parents they have this talk with their son at a very young age despite the talk the sun becomes a victim of police violence he deliberately happens offstage since composer Jeanine Tesori we always knew we didn't want this this must seem to be on stage but it really is about possibility deny it and the aftermath and the costs and the consequence for everyone and that you understand the ripple of fact performing this comes at a cost I think to all of us it's one that we all think is worth paying mezzo soprano Brianna hunter plays the anguished mother in blue very rarely do we get to so di rectally communicate our feelings about what's going on in the world it's allowed us to kind of grief and process a lot of trauma and she says she hopes audiences who CV opera can process those feelings too for NPR news I'm Jeff London you're listening to NPR news the great Pacific garbage patch is the world's largest accumulation of marine plastic debris it's estimated to be twice the size of Texas holding more than one point eight trillion pieces of plastic well the summer one intrepid swimmer and environmental advocate has decided to swim through it then the comp is swimming through the polluted stretch of ocean between Hawaii and California in hopes of better understanding more about the garbage that's accumulated there he's been documenting the experience in real time the effort is called the vortex swim and then along with a team of scientists sailors and photographers will be tracking in collecting data for the national oceanic and atmospheric administration the Smithsonian environmental research center and several other groups and we're joined now by been recalled who's currently on his vote in the Pacific Ocean welcome thank you for having me so tell us where exactly you are right now and what it looks like right now we're all about that Nick going between how are you because it's about the problems in mind away from our a lot of the plastic in the oceans we know is broken down into small pieces but I've read that has you swim you find a larger objects what's the strangest thing you've run across yeah right most of the broken down so you may need to call to see everyone again are you you have to have a special night so and then click local record but what a nice swim we need they created a lock up our mission you re not like crazy but also all arousal nine times that we have on groceries were up on bottled water on bottles of shampoos and are you going to issue a solo for sure so we find everything that we are using up all right yeah yeah you said that these micro plastics these tiny broken down pieces even stick to you while you swim I mean what does this tell us about the bigger picture the effects of this patch of garbage in the ocean yeah what we are doing here we we why not thank you so we could make that I also like and and you look at our work after on ice is seeing how all goals are Michael you can't you win a day on what Michael plastique with that all that is on the lease on eight and also you know look nasty character for parking out holding on so in a white lie new speaker plastic food and eat them according to their armies and going off to change and where are the end of the witch and also so we knock on the on the wind right and the ocean and put us in there in the same time as well and of course you're far from alone in swimming through the ocean what do we know about how the marine life that lives there is interacting with these plastics yeah it's very interesting to see that any crime used to be there for you you are going to have Ontario because he's been created around it so on the theory that we find that our fall on the coast yet we find you are leaving usually are on the coast so it means that you come and meet young for bench when there are new Harry asked and you become and fifty spaces and the troll for our right each and so on but also more organic number we cannot yet naked eyes request because the bottom and back on your life because of that it all over to that they bring all their species into annual that's Wimmer been the comp he's currently swimming through it the great Pacific garbage patch and documenting his experience thank.

Thompson
"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:20 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR news. This is all things considered Nelson Chang. And I'm Audie Cornish. The Galapagos islands are like a biological arc in the eastern Pacific Ocean. There giant tortoises and swimming iguanas and numerous creatures found nowhere else is one of the world's most protected places. But scientists have discovered that dozens of exotic species have invaded the Galapagos underwater NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on this unexpected finding marine biologists James Carlton remembers when he first got to thinking that the Galapagos islands may not be as pristine as people thought on my first visit to the Galapagos collected some samples from both bottom barnacles sponges and other hitchhikers that was nineteen eighty-seven Carlton didn't know if those creatures he found were native or not so four years ago he and a team of scientists decided to return and take a closer. Look, we didn't know quite what to do. Expect what they did know was that on land. There were lots of invasive species species that are not native to the islands, but in the surrounding ocean. Scientists only knew of five invaders everything else presumably was native when Carlton's team looked underwater. However, they found a hoard of invaders and now we have fifty three which is a rather stunning increase marine biologist. Gregory Ruiz says they found exotic species on pilings docks and mangrove roots. They hung plastic plates underwater in all sorts of alien invertebrates latched onto them at the Smithsonian environmental research center in Maryland, where he works Ruiz shows me, the invasions lab, researchers here track invasive species around the world, this is a organism that we've found in the Galapagos tuna could also known as a sea squirt a tiny tube-like animal. He has more invaders in glass bowls filled with alcohol barnacle. Nls LG, CNN enemies. They're described in the journal aquatic invasions recess rising tourism in the Galapagos means more boats, docks, pilings, transportation and homes. For invasive, these organisms aren't just footnotes in the biology. Text zebra mussels invaded the Great Lakes and caused havoc the tiny parasite called MS X has killed millions of choice tres in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast James Carlton now, professor emeritus at Williams. College says tracking invaders helps authorities stem they're spread he expects other tropical areas or heavily invaded as well. And in a protected place. Let the Galapagos he says their presence means something's been lost. We value a world that we think represents nature before we began altering it before we began removing species, Abby species and changing the abundance of species, even in the Galapagos that were. World is disappearing. Christopher Joyce NPR news. At the northern tip of Quebec tucked in a valley and hugging the ocean is the Inuit community of Saleh wheat. And that is where the singer songwriter Ellis Sabi grew up we still hunt, and we still speak our language, it's a very proud and very unique place. But it has a lot of hardships to.

Galapagos James Carlton NPR Gregory Ruiz Christopher Joyce NPR Audie Cornish Pacific Ocean Nelson Chang Williams Christopher Joyce Ellis Sabi Saleh Smithsonian environmental rese Great Lakes Quebec Chesapeake Bay LG
Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

All Things Considered

02:52 min | 3 years ago

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

"Cornish. The Galapagos islands are like a biological arc in the eastern Pacific Ocean. There giant tortoises and swimming iguanas and numerous creatures found nowhere else is one of the world's most protected places. But scientists have discovered that dozens of exotic species have invaded the Galapagos underwater NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on this unexpected finding marine biologists James Carlton remembers when he first got to thinking that the Galapagos islands may not be as pristine as people thought on my first visit to the Galapagos collected some samples from both bottom barnacles sponges and other hitchhikers that was nineteen eighty-seven Carlton didn't know if those creatures he found were native or not so four years ago he and a team of scientists decided to return and take a closer. Look, we didn't know quite what to do. Expect what they did know was that on land. There were lots of invasive species species that are not native to the islands, but in the surrounding ocean. Scientists only knew of five invaders everything else presumably was native when Carlton's team looked underwater. However, they found a hoard of invaders and now we have fifty three which is a rather stunning increase marine biologist. Gregory Ruiz says they found exotic species on pilings docks and mangrove roots. They hung plastic plates underwater in all sorts of alien invertebrates latched onto them at the Smithsonian environmental research center in Maryland, where he works Ruiz shows me, the invasions lab, researchers here track invasive species around the world, this is a organism that we've found in the Galapagos tuna could also known as a sea squirt a tiny tube-like animal. He has more invaders in glass bowls filled with alcohol barnacle. Nls LG, CNN enemies. They're described in the journal aquatic invasions recess rising tourism in the Galapagos means more boats, docks, pilings, transportation and homes. For invasive, these organisms aren't just footnotes in the biology. Text zebra mussels invaded the Great Lakes and caused havoc the tiny parasite called MS X has killed millions of choice tres in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast James Carlton now, professor emeritus at Williams. College says tracking invaders helps authorities stem they're spread he expects other tropical areas or heavily invaded as well. And in a protected place. Let the Galapagos he says their presence means something's been lost. We value a world that we think represents nature before we began altering it before we began removing species, Abby species and changing the abundance of species, even in the Galapagos that were. World is

Galapagos James Carlton Cornish. The Galapagos Gregory Ruiz Pacific Ocean Williams Christopher Joyce Smithsonian Environmental Rese Great Lakes Maryland Chesapeake Bay NPR LG CNN Professor Four Years
"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on KCRW

"Pacific Ocean. There giant tortoises and swimming iguanas and numerous creatures found nowhere else is one of the world's most protected places. But scientists have discovered that dozens of exotic species have invaded the Galapagos underwater NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on this unexpected finding marine biologists James Carlton remembers when he first got to thinking that the Galapagos islands may not be as pristine as people thought on my first visit to the Galapagos collected some samples from both bottom barnacles sponges and other hitchhikers that was nineteen eighty-seven Carlton didn't know if those creatures he found were native or not so four years ago he and a team of scientists decided to return and take a closer. Look, we didn't know quite what to expect what they did know was that on land. There were lots of invasive species species that are not native to the islands, but in the surrounding ocean. Scientists only knew of five invaders everything. Else presumably was native when Carlton's team looked underwater. However, they found a hoard of invaders and now we have fifty three which is a rather stunning increase marine biologist. Gregory Ruiz says they found exotic species on pilings docks and mangrove roots. They hung plastic plates underwater in all sorts of alien invertebrates latched onto them at the Smithsonian environmental research center in Maryland, where he works Ruiz shows me, the invasions lab, researchers here track invasive species around the world, this is a organism that we've found in the Galapagos tuna tuna could also known as a sea squirt a tiny tube-like animal. He has more invaders in glass bowls filled with alcohol, barnacles, algae, CNN enemies. They're described in the journal aquatic. Invasions Ruiz says rising tourism in the Galapagos means more boats docks and pilings, transportation and. Homes for invasive these organisms aren't just put notes in the biology. Text zebra mussels invaded the Great Lakes and caused havoc the tiny parasite called MS X has killed millions of wasters in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast James Carlton now, professor emeritus at Williams. College says tracking invaders helps a thirty stem. They're spread he expects other tropical areas or heavily invaded as well. And in a protected place. Let the Galapagos he says their presence means something's been lost. We've a world that we think represents nature before we began altering it before we began moving species, Abby species and changing the abundance of species, even in the Galapagos that world is disappearing. Christopher Joyce NPR news. Los Angeles has begun a process a multibillion dollar program to build more housing for the homeless. And that is of course, the good news. The bad news is that construction has been very slow, and it's been really expensive with some units, costing almost half a million dollars to build each. So officials are looking for ways to bring down those costs and to speed up the construction that includes holding a contest and more on that from KCRW saw Gonzales. I'm in a cavernous room in downtown, Los Angeles and around me standing next to models and architectural drawings are people who say they have solutions to end L homeless crisis..

James Carlton Galapagos Gregory Ruiz Williams Pacific Ocean Christopher Joyce Christopher Joyce NPR Los Angeles NPR Gonzales Smithsonian environmental rese Great Lakes Maryland Chesapeake Bay professor million dollars four years
"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"smithsonian environmental research center" Discussed on Science for the People

"Hi, everyone. Just a quick note about today show. It is a live show and the meeting for the American Association for the advancement of science is loud and proud. So please don't mind. The crowd noise. We promise our guest this week are worth it. We've snagged three amazing experts to talk about micro-plastics rafting barnacles and bird poop because science with people. There's always room for bird coop. Okay. So we're about to get started. And the way this works for all the people who are enjoying science. When people the first time signs of people is an interview only podcast. And so I'm going to give an introduction. And then I'm going to start asking these fabulous scientists questions about classics, and it's going to be depressing. Amazing, and I brought this plastic coffee, and I feel bad or any? I'm just gonna don't don't look. Okay. So welcome to our science who the people live show. Thank you. I'm bethany. Berkshire science writer at science news and society for science and the public today. I am delighted to be here on the podcasting stage at the American Association for the events of science. And we've got the invitation to record a live show here. I just started digging through the program, and it's it's so wonderful to be here. It's like an embarrassment of riches in terms of content. But a couple of the sessions really stood out to me and all of those were on plastics. We are surrounded by plastics right now, they're plastics in my coffee there plastics in our smartphones. They're plastics in the chairs you are sitting on the close. We are wearing it. Plastic wrapped the food you probably ate for lunch. If you ate lunch, please eat lunch, and that classic eventually ends up in the environment. And as scientists have found a truly shocking about of it ends up in the ocean. When a lot of us think of ocean, plastics, we might think of like whole plastic bottles and tennis rackets, and I don't know boats. Big chunks, but a lot of the plastic in the ocean is actually way smaller than that. These plastics are micro-plastics which are smaller than five millimeters in size. That's about how. The size of a LEGO give or take I should've brought my goes, but small plastics can have big effects. So today, we're going to talk about plastics in the water where they're going. How much there is how we track it. What on earth we need to do about it? And I'll just go ahead and tell you guys right now that they found plastic in the beer, so we'll start there. To to cover this incredibly depressing topic. I'm here with Jennifer, Jennifer, Provan, sure, Chelsea Rochman, and Christina Simpkin. Jennifer provider is unit head of the wildlife health group at the Canadian Wildlife Service Chelsea Rochman is an aquatic ecologist at the university of Toronto and Christina. Some cannon is a marine ecologist at the Smithsonian environmental research center. Thank you so much for being here. Even though I know here's another session on plastics right now when I'm sorry. Thank you for having us. So I wanted to start a little bit with the scale of the problem. Chelsea do. We know how much plastic is in the ocean by weight or volume or tanker trucks Wales. So measure, we don't know how much plastic is in the ocean. In terms of in general, we have some estimates of how much is floating on the surface of the ocean. And we have estimates of how much enters the ocean every year. So the number that we're often given is that we estimate and this comes from Jamba. Wchs work that eight million metric tons of plastic enters the ocean each year. And so the elephants are the blue whales is that if we lined people up along all the coastlines around the world shoulder to shoulder, and they all had five plastic bags, and they threw them all in at the same time. That's how much enters every year..

Chelsea Rochman American Association Berkshire science Christina Simpkin Jennifer Jamba Canadian Wildlife Service Smithsonian environmental rese tennis writer university of Toronto Provan eight million metric tons