35 Burst results for "Smithsonian"

Global coronavirus cases pass 30 million, doubling in 2 months

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:31 sec | Last week

Global coronavirus cases pass 30 million, doubling in 2 months

"30 million mark here. CBS is Elaine Cop Has the numbers of new cases rise sharply worldwide. The death toll now stands at more than 940,000. The worst hit nations are the U. S. India and Brazil. But there's a renewed spike in infections across Europe, where the number of weekly recorded cases in the region has topped 300,000 Johns Hopkins University Total show nearly 6.7 million cases in the U. S nearly 200,000 deaths. Four Smithsonian Museums just

Elaine Cop Johns Hopkins University CBS India Europe Brazil
New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

All Things Considered

03:20 min | 2 weeks ago

New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

"Appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft heads landed. Sure enough fuzzy satellite images napped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities, and I think that this is just one more reflection of that Jeff from feel. NPR NEWS Washington

China Mcdowell Brian Weeden NPR United States Us Air Force Alison Astronomer Loop Nure Earthy Center Washington Harvard Official Jonathan Mcd Jeff Secure World Foundation
New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

All Things Considered

03:20 min | 2 weeks ago

New Chinese Space Plane Landed At Mysterious Air Base, Evidence Suggests

"Appears to have successfully tested a new spacecraft. Last week's mission was shrouded in secrecy. But as NPR's Jeff from field reports, there are some clues about what China sent into space and why. Last Friday, a Chinese rocket took off carrying a mysterious payload. A terse statement on state media said it was quote A reusable experimental spacecraft, but they didn't give a launch time. They don't have any more details. No riel official footage of the Lord's Jonathan Mcd, Alison astronomer, Earthy Center for Astrophysics, Harvard and Smithsonian who specializes in tracking satellites and spacecraft orbiting the Earth. When he plotted the course of China's new craft, he found that it passed over a secretive military facility. An area called Loop Nure, where China once tested its nuclear weapons. There's an air base there, which has AH big runway that's aligned exactly in the direction ofthe the orbit of the space craft. On Sunday, China announced its new spacecraft head landed sure enough fuzzy satellite images snapped by a commercial company called Planet. Seemed to show activity on the giant runway right at the moment, the landing would have occurred. McDowell says that the evidence is circumstantial, but he believes China has just tested a space plane. Think of it. It's a little space shuttle a craft with wings probably too small to carry people that took off on a rocket and coasted back to Earth. The information of all hands together now that this wass A test of something probably a space plane that made a winged reentry on landed on the runway at Lop nor the US Air Force has a similar spacecraft called the X 37 B. It's been launched in since 2010. So if that's what China tested, why now it's a great question. We're not even really sure why the United States military is pursuing a space plane like it's been doing for the last Decade or so. Brian Weeden Studies face security issues with the Secure World Foundation. The U. S X 37 B program remains highly classified. Weeden says he believes it's being used to test new sensors and systems for the military. Think about if you're building a brand new satellite, and you've got a lot of fancy new technology that's never been in space before. That's potentially risky. But if you can apply some of that technology in space, let's say in the payload bay of a reusable space plane that could allow you to get a better feel for how about react. McDowell says that space planes which travel many times, the speed of sound, could also potentially helped with the development of so called hyper sonic weapons. Uh, honestly, he thinks China could just be copying the US if the Americans have one of those. That must be a good reason for it. So we better get one, too. The landing of the space plane or whatever it was, is just the latest success for China. McDowell says that recently completed its own satellite navigation system, it has a robotic missions going to Mars and several probes on the moon. China's firing on all thrusters in space on just really increasing its level of involvement on capabilities, and I think that this is just one more reflection of that Jeff from feel. NPR NEWS Washington

China Mcdowell NPR Brian Weeden United States Us Air Force Alison Astronomer Loop Nure Earthy Center Washington Harvard Official Jonathan Mcd Jeff Secure World Foundation
Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian's National Zoo

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | Last month

Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian's National Zoo

"The new giant panda cub at the National Zoo has sparked a fresh round of panda mania online. Everybody wants to get a peek at the baby, so the nationals who was pumping up their Internet capabilities to meet the high traffic on the popular panda cam. Traffic has gone up 1200% since May. Zhang's pregnancy was announced when she gave birth on Friday. Even zoo officials struggled to get into their own live stream. Zookeepers are using the camera to keep an eye on Mom and baby May Zhang a. 25 is the oldest giant panda to successfully give birth in the United States. And two officials say So far, the mom and the baby are doing fine.

Zhang National Zoo United States
Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian's National Zoo

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | Last month

Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian's National Zoo

"Giant panda cub at the National Zoo has sparked a fresh round of panda mania. Everyone wants to get a peek at the baby, so the National Zoo is pumping up their Internet capabilities to meet the high traffic on the popular panda cam. It has spiked by 1200% since Mei Xiang's pregnancy was announced when she gave birth Friday night. Even zoo officials had trouble getting into their own live stream. They use that camera to keep an eye on Mom and baby May Shang is the All this to giant panda age 22 to successfully give birth in the United States.

National Zoo Mei Xiang United States
Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian's National Zoo

Purity Products

00:38 sec | Last month

Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian's National Zoo

"Has been born at the National Zoo Officials at the National Zoo put out an alert on Friday that May Zhang appear to have gone into labour. And hours later, the panda cam recorded A wriggling cub picked up and cradled by its mother made. Zhang is an experienced mom, having given birth to three pandas have already been returned to China under a breeding agreement. But at 22 years old, they weren't sure she could get pregnant again with artificial insemination. She's the oldest giant panda to successfully give birth in the United States. A zoo spokeswoman calls the birth a much needed moment of pure joy at a

May Zhang National Zoo United States China
'The whole world celebrates' on-camera birth of panda cub

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | Last month

'The whole world celebrates' on-camera birth of panda cub

"Special furry delivery in the nation's capital giant Panda May Sean gave birth to a cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo late on Friday. That's their say she immediately began cradling and caring for the little baby Panda births, a rare since giant pandas can on ly get pregnant 123 days out of the entire year. CBS is Jimmy Mucus reporting

Panda National Zoo CBS Sean
Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian’s National Zoo

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | Last month

Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian’s National Zoo

"In the nation's capital giant Panda May, Sean gave birth to a cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo late on Friday. That's there say she immediately began cradling and caring for the little baby. Panda births, a rare since giant pandas can on ly get pregnant 123 days out of the entire year. CBS's Jamie you CAS reporting

Panda National Zoo Sean Jamie CBS
Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian’s National Zoo

The Consumer Team

00:22 sec | Last month

Giant panda gives birth at Smithsonian’s National Zoo

"And it was a special furry delivery in the nation's capital. CBS's Jamie Yuko, says details giant panda May Sean gave birth to a cub at the Smithsonian's National Zoo late on Friday. That's there say she immediately began cradling and caring for the little baby. Panda births a rare since giant pandas can on ly get pregnant 123 days out of the entire

Jamie Yuko Sean National Zoo CBS
Smithsonian National Zoo's Giant Panda Gives Birth

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | Last month

Smithsonian National Zoo's Giant Panda Gives Birth

"Of excitement at the National Zoo this morning, which is home to a new panda cub Mother made Zhang became the world's second oldest giant panda tohave, a little cub. The zoo team knew it was a crap shoot. It admitted the chances were slim made, John could get pregnant and give birth to a little progeny so you can imagine the elation. Just for the zoo, but form a John, who wasted no time tending her newborn and holding it in her arms. The road to this moment had many turns. There was the monitoring of her ovulation cycle, the artificial insemination, the waiting and the watching for signs of pregnancy and labor. For now, the suit team can't get any closer than you. Were I there watching the vocalizing Newborn on camera. You can too at w t o p dot com Search PANDA Hillary Howard w T o P News A

National Zoo John Hillary Howard Zhang
Birth of panda cub provides 'much-needed moment of pure joy'

News, Traffic and Weather

00:26 sec | Last month

Birth of panda cub provides 'much-needed moment of pure joy'

"The sound of new life at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington. 22 year old female panda May Jong gave birth Friday night to a new panda cub. You could hear the mama bear honking a few times as the cub was born, followed by the Cubs squeaking into the world, Zookeepers say mother and cub appear to be doing well mate. Zhang was artificially inseminated in March with semen from her mate.

Smithsonian National Zoo Cubs Zookeepers Jong Zhang Washington.
It's A Boy! Smithsonian National Zoo's Giant Panda Gives Birth

WBBM Evening News

00:22 sec | Last month

It's A Boy! Smithsonian National Zoo's Giant Panda Gives Birth

"Sean just gave birth to a cupboard. Smithsonian's National Zoo Zoo says it's Pana team heard the cup vocalize and glimpse the cup for the first time briefly immediately after the birth less than two hours ago. Zoo veterinarians only just confirmed evidence of a fetus on an ultrasound last week. Giant pen is at birth are about the size of a stick of butter. They're pink and hairless at first. Matt

National Zoo Zoo Matt Smithsonian Sean
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

05:07 min | Last month

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Media <Music> set you up. <Speech_Music_Female> Jordan <Speech_Female> Bell I missed <Speech_Female> senior producer at <Speech_Female> stitcher now <Speech_Music_Female> but I was only <Speech_Music_Female> six years old when this <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> interview aired <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> plus I wasn't <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> reading G Q at <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the time. So <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I didn't know much <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> about what Oprah's <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> talking about here. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> This media scrutiny <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> tiger faced <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> until <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I met Albert Chen. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> He's a longtime journalist <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and now <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> my co pilot <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Music_Female> the series. <Speech_Music_Male> Hey <Speech_Female> Albert. <SpeakerChange> Page. <Speech_Female> Jordan. <Speech_Female> So we first <Speech_Female> met in December of two thousand <Speech_Female> nineteen. <Speech_Female> While you were still <Speech_Female> working at sports <Speech_Female> illustrated <Speech_Female> and you've been at sl <Speech_Female> for the better part <Speech_Female> of two <Speech_Female> decades working <Speech_Female> as an editor and <Speech_Female> writer covering <Speech_Female> a bunch of different <Speech_Female> sports <Speech_Female> <hes> and last <Speech_Female> year even wrote a book <Speech_Female> about the world <Speech_Music_Female> of online <Speech_Music_Female> sports betting. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Great so how <Speech_Female> does it feel having your <Speech_Female> whole career <SpeakerChange> summed up in <Speech_Female> like two cents <Speech_Male> I'll <Speech_Female> take it. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> When <Speech_Female> I reached out to you <Speech_Female> you <Speech_Female> know I was really hoping <Speech_Female> you'd want to get involved <Speech_Female> with the series because <Speech_Female> I <Speech_Female> knew, you could give me <Speech_Female> some direct insight <Speech_Female> into the sports <Speech_Female> world <Speech_Female> and when <Speech_Female> I I gave you my <Speech_Female> pitch for this show back <Speech_Female> in December <Speech_Female> I thought it went pretty well <Speech_Female> but <Speech_Female> I did <Speech_Female> recently find out <Speech_Female> that you thought this was a terrible <Speech_Male> idea <SpeakerChange> for podcast. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Well <Speech_Male> I <Speech_Male> didn't think <Speech_Male> it was <Speech_Male> I. didn't think it <Speech_Male> was a great. <Speech_Male> Okay. <Speech_Male> mainly. <Speech_Male> Because Tiger <Speech_Male> has been in the spotlight <Speech_Male> for so long <Speech_Male> that I <Speech_Male> kind of thought to myself <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Male> more is there to say <Speech_Male> about him. <Speech_Male> But. As <Speech_Male> we were talking, you start <Speech_Male> asking questions <Speech_Male> that I just didn't <Speech_Male> have great <Speech_Male> answers for <Speech_Male> even though <Speech_Male> I've been a part of the <Speech_Male> sports media machine <Speech_Male> for such a <Silence> long time. <Speech_Male> Even the <Speech_Male> very simple question of <Speech_Male> what is the story <Silence> of Tiger Woods? <Speech_Male> Is this <Speech_Male> a feel good inspirational <Speech_Male> story? <Speech_Male> Is it <Speech_Male> a cautionary tale? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Is it even <Speech_Male> maybe <SpeakerChange> a tragedy <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> right and to <Speech_Female> be clear going into <Speech_Female> this the <Speech_Female> story that I understood <Speech_Female> from <Speech_Female> the media about Tiger <Speech_Female> Woods. <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> that he was <Speech_Female> widely considered <Speech_Female> to be the best <Speech_Female> golfer like <Speech_Female> planet and <Speech_Female> then in two thousand nine, <Speech_Female> he had this massive <Speech_Female> sex scandal <Speech_Female> consequently, he <Speech_Female> was able to perform <Speech_Female> at the level of <Speech_Female> golf he'd been playing. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Female> he kind of <Speech_Female> fell off the planet <Speech_Female> for ten years <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> then all of a sudden <Speech_Female> twenty nineteen. <Speech_Female> I get this <Speech_Female> push notification <Speech_Female> to my phone in the <Speech_Female> spring saying tiger, <Speech_Female> woods won <Silence> the masters. <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> I was like Oh <Speech_Female> my God, this guy <Speech_Female> he's back, <Speech_Female> I completely forgot <Speech_Female> about tiger woods. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And I got <Speech_Female> to thinking are <Speech_Female> those few <Speech_Female> moments really just <Speech_Female> the whole story about <Speech_Female> Tiger Woods and <Speech_Female> also how do I know <Speech_Female> all this stuff about <Speech_Female> tiger woods <Speech_Female> when I don't <SpeakerChange> even pay <Speech_Male> attention to <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Right <Speech_Male> and the story of <Speech_Male> tiger has been <Speech_Male> with US <Speech_Male> long before <Speech_Male> push notifications, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> his life <Speech_Male> is just so full <Speech_Male> of contradictions. <Speech_Male> He's a <Speech_Male> multi racial <Speech_Male> athlete in <Speech_Male> a predominantly <Speech_Male> white sport <Speech_Male> with all <Speech_Male> of its racist <Speech_Male> history, <Speech_Male> and <Speech_Male> as a result, <Speech_Male> he's been propped <Speech_Male> up as <Speech_Male> this transformative <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> figure. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> And <Speech_Female> yet he's basically <Speech_Female> been absent from <Speech_Female> any real conversation <Speech_Female> about race <Speech_Female> in our country <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> even <SpeakerChange> now in <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> this really urgent moment. <Music>

Smithsonian prepares to reopen in Washington, DC

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | Last month

Smithsonian prepares to reopen in Washington, DC

"Well, most of our fabulous museums around here close still. But the Smithsonian's working on plans for a phased in reopening and there's a lot to work out behind the Smithsonian's closed doors. Some workers are taking care of business. I'm in all of our front line. Pete, Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch means the security maintenance and animal feeders who went to work when others stayed home. Those are in my mind. The heroes of this was now the museum's preparing for you. The one thing you don't want are hundreds of people. Waiting in line, You know, cheek to Jack's trying to get in so bunch wants time passes to keep crowds small, and they're learning important lessons from the recent National Zoo re opening, even in the zoo. What we've done is looked at what spaces Interior can be open. What's faces were too tight. It's a heavy lift, but he believes it'll make the Smithsonian even better. Hillary Howard w. T o P News

Lonnie Bunch Jack Hillary Howard National Zoo Secretary Pete
Washington, D.C. - House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

Weekend Edition Sunday

03:21 min | 2 months ago

Washington, D.C. - House Approves Bill To Create Smithsonian Museum For American Latinos

"A Smithsonian National Museum of the American Latino is one step closer to becoming a reality. The House approved a bill last week with bipartisan support in favor of it. And while the road to the museum opening is still long, the bill is sparking celebration and conversation within Latino communities. Here's NPR's Isabella Gomez. Salsa singer Celia Cruz. The traditions of the Dialogues, Martos Holiday alone is worth and the farm workers movement. The Smithsonian Museum of the American Latino can potentially explore Ah lot of the contributions of latte next people in the United States, but there are still logistics to work out. The bill now goes to the Senate. Then it gets signed by the White House, then the government to determine how much the museum will cost and where it will be. The location is going to be the biggest concern for me. That's a story the Rodriguez who's been lobbying for the creation of this museum for the past 15 years. And he knows where in Washington he wants it to be. You cannot Not be on the national Mall. There's also the cost, half of which will likely come from the federal government. The rest will be from donors. We all remember stories of how really stepped up for the American resume. We need to make sure that we have our donors like an overwintering. Bodegas estimates that building the museum from Scratch could take another 10 years, which gives lots of time to air some skepticism. Can one museum really encapsulate so many different cultures and experiences? Will it expand on what? Letting me that or let next identity looks like for Afro Latinos and indigenous people? My immediate reaction is I'm nervous simply because The branding of Latino lad, especially by stands. Broadcasting doesn't reflect the fact that Afro Latinos exists. That's got the knack Liston from Boston who studies the history of music in Latin ex culture. She says she thinks the museum is a good opportunity to finally have some tough conversations on race. Gender immigration. I think this is Ah, very exciting Start. If I'm gonna be honest, I do think that there's definitely a way for us to get it right. It just requires a level of honestly, I think some people are now becoming aware of that we didn't have before. And she's not the only one with some pause. Bala Santos is a museum educator in Chicago. She says she doesn't want the Smithsonian to brush over the struggles. Immigrants face when they come here. With an overly optimistic message. I would love to have Ah latte next museum where you could say they're actually structural inequities here. And it isn't about cease up. Whether it's about how are we setting up our society's? That's why museum champion is toward the Rodriguez says. Now is the time for people to raise their voices and explore those tensions. These are all historical moments they need to be laid out. It's not a story that's going to be very clean and print. That's not what we're trying to do, and it's not on the shoulders of one single Smithsonian Institution to tell that story. Well, a Santos says Now is the time for all museums across the US to reevaluate how they convey Latin ex

Smithsonian National Museum Bala Santos Rodriguez Smithsonian Institution Celia Cruz United States Liston NPR Isabella Gomez Martos Holiday Senate National Mall White House Washington Boston Chicago
Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy

Pop Fashion

03:47 min | 2 months ago

Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy

"You having a bad day. Every retailer in America. Absolutely. Tell me more. Let's talk about the list of bankruptcies. Since the last time you and I talked I Lucky Jeans G Star Rob Off Though Brooks Brothers chapter eleven. This was not a surprise. They have been struggling for a little while now, but I wanted to delve into this company just a little bit because it's an American brand. We have very few brands that are made in the USA. Have such a big heritage. They are two hundred and two years old for our country. That's pretty big deal. Nothing lasts for two hundred two years. Right that's almost as old as the Dang country. They filed for chapter eleven with plans to permanently close fifty one stores. There are a number of companies that are interested in possibly buying the company including Simon Property Group, Simon Property Group is interested. They are the company that owns all those malls. And the crazy thing about this is they just sued brooks brothers a few weeks ago and then dropped the suit for not paying the rent for not paying their rent. They took him to court for almost nine million dollars in unpaid rent, and then they dropped it and I'm guessing. They dropped it because they realized that this was about. Come around the corner, right? They have been slowly closing stores over the past two years and two thousand eighteen. They had nearly seven hundred stores globally now they have five hundred. They're saying of course because PAT stomach, but the truth is pants off changed over the past few years. Literal Pants think of all those Khakis who's wearing them anymore like the static for what you wear to work has changed really in the past decade, and they have stayed the same brand, which in many ways as good because they have a visual heritage and history. Eh, with apparel. They dressed Abraham Lincoln. They've dressed many many presidents. They also have. A history that I was just made aware of this week. I don't know if you know about this. Lisa but I did some research because I got a tip from friends that Brooks Brothers has a complicated history with slavery. This is not something that they talk about so there's not a lot of information out there on it, but I did find an article from Smithsonian magazine that said quote Brooks Brothers was the top of the line slave clothing slave traders would issue new clothes for people. They had to sell, but they were usually cheaper. Ooh, that is complex. I did not know this part of their at all. Do they ever like apologize for that? They don't talk about it. Because if you don't talk about, it never happened right. Wow, but they made the clothes said. They've made their clothes in the United States, but this past May. They started shutting down some of their factories, their factories New, York north, Carolina and Massachusetts were all starting to slowly closed down so. People knew that they were going to maybe off. Start off shoring some of their apparel, but it was in limbo. What was going on with the company and they really weren't saying anything yet, but the writing was on the wall less than an hour ago. Bloomberg reported that authentic brands group put a bid in for the company. Authentic brands. Group owns a bunch of brands including barneys. New York forever twenty one fredericks of Hollywood nine West Jones New York, juicy couture and sports illustrated. That's all over the

Brooks Brothers Simon Property Group New York America Smithsonian Magazine Pat Stomach Bloomberg Abraham Lincoln York United States Usa. Lisa Hollywood Jones Massachusetts Carolina
Washington - Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art accused of culture of racism

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 2 months ago

Washington - Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art accused of culture of racism

"And board members of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art have written a letter accusing the museum of promoting a culture of racism. They say formal reports about racial bias and attacks have been ignored. The Washington Post reports. The group says in the letter to Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie Bunch that former and current black employees of the museum of experienced incidents of racial bias, hostile verbal attacks, retaliation terminations and degrading comments. Museum staff is predominantly white, with no curator, Sze of color. In response to the letter, the Smithsonian released statement emphasizing museums commitment to diversity. Coming up

National Museum Of African Art Smithsonian Lonnie Bunch Washington Post SZE Secretary
Inside Washington's Name Change

ESPN Daily

06:21 min | 2 months ago

Inside Washington's Name Change

"John How's it? Goin'? It's been a little bit busy. You might be having the busiest off season well, always busy right now to all the deck Prescott stuff, but but you pretty busy. It was on? July six and a couple of things happen. I told my wife said. I'm about to work in eighteen hours a day on July six. NFL. Opposite in what is going on, and it turns out. That was actually probably a pretty good day in hindsight. John covers the Washington DC based NFL TEAM FOR ESPN Since. We are talking about names I. Do feel it's necessary to point out your John Crime I- Amina climbs two different names not. Although I will say had some relatives. Years back did like genealogy, and at one point, it was kind real in Europe, so we could be related I. Just want to put that out there well. I do get mistaken for you. Know I think there's a similarity so. So back to the name at hand. John The Washington football team announced on Monday after much speculation many reports that they will be retiring their nickname and logo after completing review that began on July third. This has been a conversation for a very very long time, but the team's principal owner Daniel. Snyder has been on the record. Saying the team would never in all caps literally change its name, and then here we so before we get to why this happened. And what's GonNa Happen Next? I just want to ask you as a beat reporter. Did you ever think this day would come? Well. Let me let me step back from that pre. George Floyd, no, because in the past. We've had a deal with this topic many times over the years especially in the last seven. I think the rise of social media has kept it alive, but during that time the plan the strategy here for the reds for Washington was to write off the storm. Just weather the storm. Go go to reservations connect with native Americans and do something like that then when you saw the social unrest this year. You started to seep in your head like they're gonNA. Come after them again and I'll tell you when it really really thought they work to be about. Run at this time was. There was a stretch it about a week where George Preston Marshall, who original owner of the of Washington? And he named the team, and he moved the team from Boston, to Washington will statue was outside their old stadium are k. well. They removed the statue, not the team, but a company in DC that owns that land, so you tweet that out and I'd say. Say Ninety percent of the mentions after that on twitter, where about what about the what about the name? What about the name? The next day team says they're going to retire bobby? Mitchell's number only retired one of the number in their franchise history, so they tweet that out and I wrote a story. Put out there. What about the? What about the name? I've. There's just becoming way too much of everything. They did route this. If they put out a statement about George Floyd about black lives matter, it would always come back to their team name. It was to a level that I hadn't seen before. It does seem though at least from the outside that the true catalysts the thing that pushed this over the edge was the teams naming sponsor Fedex and Fedex asiyo. WHO's a minority owner coming out on the record against the name? Yes and I'm going to back up a couple of weeks before that because there some parallel timelines that led to I think this occurrence and one of which was Dan Snyder had reached out I was told by multiple that he had reached out to the League a few weeks before that, and had already started to engage in conversations with the NFL, Roger Goodell about a possible name change along that same time there's the group of eighty seven shareholders and investors were combined six hundred twenty billion dollars in the lead by investor advocacy groups, so they're the ones who targeted Fedex Habsi company Nike Bank of America. It wanders sponsors. If you don't sever your ties here, you know. That's what they want to sever their ties, and so that's what they're pushing. When Fed, ex came out with the statement. That's when when people I've talked to said. That's when they knew it was over. I WANNA to talk about those groups. All of the activists who've been working tirelessly on this for years, but I thought it might be helpful to break down why the name exists in the first place. Where does it come from? The name when it first. Started I guess or was mentioned throughout history was about refer to the color skin and there is. I've got her who worked for the Smithsonian magazine, went back and researched it and found that it was way that native Americans would refer to other to differentiate themselves from. Whites or blacks or whomever else was here, so they referred themselves the redskins than it seemed to segue into a negative connotation, which you know, you'd see posters or read about posters, offering rewards for bringing fifty dollars for bringing the scalp, redskin or bringing Redskin, in which meant the scalp, so it certainly segue into something. That was a negative connotation. So how did it come to be the name of this particular NFL franchise? That's a great question, so we go back to nineteen thirty two and for anybody listening I was not covering the team at that time so nineteen who? Shared a stadium with baseball's Boston braves, so they were called. The Boston braves the following year. They moved to Fenway Park with the Boston Red Sox, so the story that that no his come about from that is that they wanted some sort of. Alliteration with the Red Sox, and so they went with the Redskins, but they also had a coach Lone Star Dietz and several native American players on the roster, George Preston Marshall said he was naming it basically in part because they had a native American coach. Now there's controversy over long star deeds whether he was actually native American up, but that was the given explanation at that time.

NFL John Washington Redskins George Preston Marshall George Floyd Dan Snyder Boston Red Sox Fedex Prescott Europe Fenway Park Baseball Twitter Lone Star Dietz Smithsonian Magazine FED Reporter
Washington Redskins to review team's controversial name

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Washington Redskins to review team's controversial name

"Maybe changing their controversial name team says it is in discussions. The director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian says he's cautiously optimistic. Kevin Gover has said that the team's name is a racial slur that belongs in a rubbish heap and says, Just change the name totally leave us out of it. You know what the Indians have to do with football anyway? Golfer says When a team uses stereotypical names and images, the fans just can't handle themselves appropriately. And so they dress up in feathers paint on their faces. He says he's skeptical of the team's review of its name because it's statement doesn't mention meeting with the Native American community or leadership. Alison Keys. CBS News Washington to Women in Seattle

Kevin Gover Alison Keys National Museum Director CBS Football Seattle Washington
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

03:33 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Can no one emotionally. I suppose but you don't know the very heart of them you don't know the rhythms of him M- It took me years him in years until we got so close so piggy and Kermit. We could Ad Lib if I did grover and criminal ad-lib Fawzia Increments Lib Bernie Eh. You know because we we were really close but it took a long time because you wanna make wine riches Shah and now he's and gentlemen we are going to have a brilliant dance number by our own five bear and France. Excuse me once I get fuzzy Wuzzy. Be careful there's a very slippery place the stage out here right around here somewhere right there. Did you feel like sometimes maybe you were like a one of the great comedy duos Laurel and Hardy Abbott and Costello that kind of thing you know we don't we never think that way we were workers uh-huh and we love what we're doing but we let other people say that I mean I can't judge that all I know is that we had a lot of fun doing it with Jim hard work but a lot of fun and so I'm not in a position to say that stuff I that's somebody else that well I'll say it I think you are and it's been a pleasure talking to you. Thank you so much this has been such an illuminating insightful. And funny and sometimes disturbing conversation. I think it's been kinda creepy to who is not not right. There's elements agree. I would have used not disturbing. Okay that's really creepy. Kinda really low right right. You have no idea the look on his face right now. Oh thank you frank pleasure. Happy to be here Vienna. I didn't you know what he joined. Frank Off Ladies and gentlemen although he would never say it. He definitely is part art of one of the Great all-time comedy duos Frank. Oz and Jim Henson. If there's a legacy Jim Henson left behind it's more than just the characters the the movies or songs that sense of playfulness and joy. It's what kept the muppets. Relevant for sixty plus years and what will make them attractive after new generations of audiences for a long long time to come. We should all be so lucky. I'm Marty thanks. For listening. To Lost Austin the Smithsonian booth lost at the Smithsonian is produced by Mary Beth Kirschner our executive producer and editor. There is Ellen Weiss technical support from Robin Wise Fact Checking Danielle Roff and scripting by Alex. Berg mixing and sound design by Casey wholefood Ferdindand Galore original theme music by Casey Holford. Our supervising producer is Jordan bowel and our executive producer. Is Chris Bannon huge. Thanks to the SMITHSONIAN'S MASSONI INS National Museum of American history. Eric Gents Ryan Lintel men. John Trautmann and Laura Doff for all their help in making this show lost at the Smithsonian onion is a production of the scripts Washington Bureau and Stitcher. I'm your host of Monty. You can find me on twitter and instagram at Asif and facebook. Asif Montvale. If you like the show don't forget to rate and review it on the apple podcast APP. It really helps other people find the show Thank you so much for listening..

Jim Henson SMITHSONIAN Asif Montvale Shah Frank Costello Bernie Eh Eric Gents Ryan Lintel grover Casey wholefood Ferdindand Gal twitter France Casey Holford MASSONI INS National Museum of facebook Ellen Weiss Chris Bannon Washington Bureau
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

05:55 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Sixty one. The muppets were created to be adult entertainment. But Henson Jason was still figuring things out and the early muppets often look very different from how they look. Now I mean kermit. He wasn't even a frog. He was more of a a lizard like thing. I'm honored to be the Fujio with two very distinguished. NBC New Moon. You know how to bed is giving his news off controlling in precise. Well we want these guys just to relax and enjoy a couple of moments of conversation here. I we have tried. I'd lay NBC News. New New York may not be quite full former. Why don't you just call me curb it and I'll call you Well what would you like me to call you. Oh okay okay. Trump Huntley so Hinson knew what was unique about television right that it kind of created its own. proscenium that the screen that you're looking at blocks out whatever you don't don't WanNa see right and you can move the camera and you can zoom in on faces and that sort of thing right which was never the case puppet shows before so the public that he created were made from really flexible materials. They were very very expressive. They had big faces and the puppeteers themselves could watch closed circuit television with the PUP above them to see what they were doing real time so that they could be reactive they could work together in ways. That puppeteers hadn't been able to do before while salmon friends was on the air. Jim Henson also landed a Gig using his muppets to make commercials for the Wilkins. Coffee Company. You're getting on the Wilkins Coffee Bandwagon over you either. Go with Wilkins are you. Just don't go in the span of just four years Henson wrote directed and performed more than a hundred and fifty ten seconds slapstick. Ads for Wilkins. If if you don't drink coffee you're not there all. That's a lot of in fact without Wilkins coffee. You're nowhere. I watch these day. He had two characters. Wilkins won't kipnes. Were muppets and one of the best known is the character. Wilkins has a canon. And he's pointing it at won't Kipnes and asked him what he thinks of Wilkins coffee he says never her had it. And he shoots him with a cannon explodes and then he wilkins turns the cannon towards the viewer. And he says. What do you think of Wilkins Coffee? You know people who don't drink Wilkins coffee just blow. We're up sometimes a lot of what I mean. Can you imagine if you're like a coffee. Executive in Washington DC nineteen sixty rate in this twenty year. Old Kid comes in. I want to market your coffee. I WANNA puppets like shooting each other right and threatening each other. If they don't drink this coffee they're going to get killed. But you know he didn't have all that history of advertising people he's just thinking like how would I get my attention in. How would I make myself laugh and get thinking about this puffy and have a positive association with it? Everything that he did was like ten years ahead of its time. The coffee commercials made Wilkins a bit of a star. But the first celebrity muppet it was actually Ralph store. A starlet maybe but not not not star role for the SCRUFFY FY Brown dog with a round black nose and long floppy ears who became a recurring character on the Jimmy Dean show in one thousand nine hundred sixty three bet that you gotta Lotta offering things after the show you call right after the show you know. She's running scared. Jimmy Dean this variety show the country musician and Dan Ralph was kind of like his sidekick so this is a big break for the muppets and Jimmy Dean we kind of lean on the fence posts and talked to Ralph good old boy dog and they'd make jokes and sing songs things together. The people loved Ralph off way more fan mail than Jimmy. Dean never did on the show right now we got. I'm Jim Henson's ads for the Wilkins. Coffee Company got him more commercial. Work the muppets that start in those commercials. Shawls often wound up becoming celebrities in their own right row. For instance was as spokes dog for purina ordinary dog food. Leave you flat. Try Purina Lina Dog. Joe Wright the commercials were good work but what Jimmy Johnson really wanted was for his muppets have a TV show of their own and and then in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine. The Children's television workshop asked Jim Henson to create some muppets for its new kids. Show Sesame Street. I'm I am a friend. Yeah we both come from the same neighborhood sesame street. Isn't that cute little children show with but then came big bird. Oscar the grouch grover fuzzy bear elmo burden Ernie and cookie monster and they were soon one of the most popular segments of Sesame Street. You know he was really excited about the opportunity to work with sesame street and and really loved it you know. He didn't charge a fee. Basically to work on sesame street you know he did this out of the love of the project and but over time he never wanted them to be seen as something just for children right and that's the risk that he always ran especially when he would work on the children's television projects so I think the rest of his career. After the success of Sesame Street he was always fighting against this perception option that he was a children's entertainer and so everything that he did was trying to prove the puppets. You know. We're just as funny and just as entertaining to adults. Children Take Long for the good times good with good printing whether or not he wanted to. Jim Henson revolutionized educational programming and that gave him the opportunity to prove that he had the chops to entertain adults as well as children. Gary.

Wilkins Wilkins Coffee muppets Jim Henson Wilkins Coffee Bandwagon Coffee Company Henson Jason NBC Dan Ralph Ralph store New York Dean Jimmy Trump Huntley Jimmy Johnson Kipnes Washington
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

09:33 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"I know you have an appetite for American history in a recent episode of the sport full called when black chefs created plantation food. Dan Travels to Thomas Thomas. Jefferson's plantation Monticello to learn how enslave chefs brought dishes like Mac and cheese and French fries to America and the other half of this two part series the spark for explores what white people mean when they use the word plantation in food. Branding one bogeyed reason to listen to spoke full me. I'm Dan guest this week. Hugh me explain why I'm a human deducted subscribed right now in stitcher apple podcasts or your favorite podcast APP we're standing in front of a relatively nondescript white door that says please leave all bags outside of this room no food or drink allowed in this room. I shouldn't have been MARTINIS awesome Monte here. Well actually I'm not sure where I am exactly I I am lost at the Smithsonian but what do you call these filing cabinets Arab museum storage cabinets state of the art. Yeah I'm with Curator Ryan Ryan Lentil man at the National Museum of American history staring at some surprisingly high tech storage cabinets say are sealed gasket gasket so that they create little micro environments in there so that if there are fluctuations in the humidity and temperature in this room and protects stuff. That's inside. That feels like it would be helpful just forever. It's very nice. I feel like I should clarify. I am not here for the cabinetry. I am here because I'm searching. I'm for ten. Iconic objects from American entertainment and one of them is just a cabinet door away. While they're here are Lovett's Kermit the frog here. The muppets have been around for more than sixty years. And based on how many shows and movies. They've they've been in. They haven't had a day off that whole time. Between the muppet show sesame street fragile. Rock the muppet movie and much more. The the muppets have reached hundreds of millions of people. All over the world. That good Cooking monsters in the letter of the alphabet from and one of the most recognizable. Muppets kermit the frog. He's been around since one thousand nine hundred fifty five. I four boxers you will find kermit was created by Jim. Henson a brilliant puppeteer who fashioned the famous frog from an old green coat that his mother throughout this is the actual code. That's the code and You know he's made from materials that were around Henson's house right right you know. He's you can see the gene sticking out of the bottom there to those are Jim Henson's jeans where the hand went yes anymore. Item to call your attention but they talk become much too numerous to mention like frye forty passed away in nineteen ninety. Jim Henson created hundreds of muppets. Many of them are well known but there are a whole bunch them up. It's from the early days that most people haven't even heard of those. Muppets are artifacts from the very earliest days of Jim Manson's long and storied career. Earn name is Lou Nike. The but don't leave food within her. Reach our baby. Those early muppets date back to the nineteen fifties fifties from a show called Salmon France. Some of them go back. Even further to Hansen's early days at the University of Maryland and now the Smithsonian's National Shnell Museum of American history has more than thirty of those original obscure muppets. This is your IQ Mush Mellon gunk. Thank chicken liver. There's Pierre the French rat. Those early muppets paved the way for the muppets. Hor Today household names the world over. There's there's Fauzi grover and that's Buni. Yep Wow that's pretty cool count von Count Right and and then of course. There's my all time favorite the bell of the ball. Miss piggy herself Miss Piggy in all her glory. She's wearing a ballgown like she's decked out to go out of town later I'll talk with Frank Oz Jim Henson's right hand man who gave miss piggy her voice and persona what is it about puppets and pepper tearing that you wish people would ask you that they don't I wish they don't ask me anything really. Yeah thank you good night. Everyone not because I'm not a puppeteer Miss Piggy and I also talk to her designer. Bonnie Erickson who by the way asked me to pass the message along to Miss Piggy when I visited her storage. Tell her that I send send my love. Her seuss's been asking about her. Okay are so uh have exciting are is it to have the potato the Smithsonian. It's it's awesome. It's it's one of the things that as a curator when you take people in to see them and you open up that cabinet and they ACV's characters that they've seen throughout their lives just kind of like bursting out. It's an awesome moment of the collection ends up sort of behind the scenes and the muppets Out A lot we we try to keep at least one up on display at all times because you can tell so many stories with them you know right. Now we're using cookie monster is out. He's helping us to explain the arts and culture support philanthropy. So there's an exhibit here called giving in America and this philanthropic angle of children's television workshop. It's organizational mission. He's a great philanthropist. That's a bit of a strategy guys. Basically all he does eat cookies mostly about cookies. If you well guess what is in the box. Yeah I'll give you a cookie. It a horse at the cow. It's a technical pogo. Stick our rump. Rose most no no no no those those are those are those are wild guesses. Meanwhile about cookies but we had miss piggy out as one of the Leading Female Comedians of the twentieth century. which was kind kind of an interesting take? But I don't know if you know this. But she was allowed to wear the hope diamond for for the cover of Smithsonian magazine. Wow how great is that. I'm talking to Bonnie Erickson who designed and built miss piggy when Miss Piggy. He came to the National Museum of American history and twenty thirteen. The museum wanted to make sure that her entrance was just as glamorous as she would have if wanted. And that's why Miss Piggy got to do a photo shoot for Smithsonian magazine wearing one of the most valuable objects in their entire Haya collection. Is She the first popper to where the hope diamond I would think so. I'm pretty sure beginning. The two of them together was no easy task. The forty five carat hope diamond required. A secret pre-dawn escort and an armed guard and so to speak but at the end of the day Bonnie Me Ericsson thinks it was all worth it and the necklace fit her perfectly. Of course I actually got the touch. Chester teeny bit. Because I was adjusting thing it on her neck and we put it on and with the dress she was wearing. You'll have to look it up. I'm sure it's online. She looks absolutely beautiful singing. Star this show singing so now that they're here at the museum there among the most popular objects that we have which I think is kind of a crew there continuing doing resonance with people and that they're important in American life the term up. It is another Jim Henson original. It's a word. He came up with at the start of his his career to describe his puppet act. But what exactly muppet means and where it came from was never really something Jim. Henson nailed down to specifically typically at different times he would say was a Portmanteau of Marionette and puppet that he was putting them together or that he was riffing on mop it. which is what kids are called? Sometimes you no like little ragamuffin. Type that name for children but he never really came up with a good explanation for it or at least it would change really what it meant. was that this was a new style of puppet and so he created this what some puppet scholars have called the American folk style of puppetry. It's not easy being green. Who what's cool about Jim? Henson is that he never intended to be a puppeteer. He really wanted to work in television when he got the school and he started. Take some classes in puppetry and then got an opportunity to do this. Puppet show in the local television station he thought okay. Well I can do that. Really WanNa work in television and so let me give that a try by the puppet show he was offered actually had a great lead in it led into the tonight show and so he had like. I think it was five minutes or something every night you know to do the show unburned. Henson's I e show was Sam and friends a local TV series in Washington DC. Henson started the show when he was a college freshman. Freshmen in nineteen fifty five running two episodes a week until nineteen.

Frank Oz Jim Henson Miss Piggy Jim Manson Bonnie Erickson National Museum of American America Smithsonian magazine Arab museum Ryan Ryan Lentil Hugh Dan Travels National Shnell Museum of Amer Jefferson University of Maryland Monticello Lovett Mac kermit Lou Nike Thomas Thomas
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

02:11 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"The <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> broken <Music> and <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> cannot <Music> do yeah. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Well <Speech_Music_Male> it's nice to meet you. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> to meet you. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> Hey <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> so <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> next <Advertisement> time <Speech_Music_Male> I'm lost at <Speech_Male> the Smithsonian <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Weyerhaeuser <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> here <Speech_Male> are <Speech_Male> muppets. <Speech_Male> Kermit <Speech_Music_Male> the Frog Aug- <Advertisement> here. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> I'll <Speech_Music_Male> meet the muppets. <Speech_Music_Male> And not just <Advertisement> the ones you know. <Speech_Music_Male> I'll meet some <Speech_Music_Male> of the earliest ones <Speech_Music_Male> including the very <Speech_Music_Male> first kermit <Speech_Music_Male> made from an old <Speech_Music_Male> green coat coat that <Speech_Music_Male> Jim Henson's mother <Speech_Music_Male> throughout this <Speech_Music_Male> is <Speech_Music_Male> the actual coat. <Speech_Music_Male> That's the <SpeakerChange> code. You can <Speech_Music_Male> see the genes <Speech_Music_Male> sticking out of the bottom there <Speech_Music_Male> to those Jim Henson's <Speech_Music_Male> jeans <Speech_Music_Male> lost <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> at the Smithsonian is produced <Speech_Music_Male> by Mary <Advertisement> Beth Kirschner <Speech_Music_Male> our Executive <Speech_Music_Male> Producer and editor <Speech_Music_Male> is Ellen Weiss <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Technical Support <Speech_Music_Male> from Robin <Advertisement> Wise. <Speech_Male> Fact checking from <Speech_Music_Male> Danielle roff off <Advertisement> and <Speech_Music_Male> scripting by Alex. <Speech_Music_Male> Berg <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> mixing and sound design <Speech_Music_Male> by Casey <Advertisement> Holford <Speech_Male> John delore <Speech_Male> original <Advertisement> theme <Speech_Music_Male> music. Casey <Speech_Music_Male> Holford. <Advertisement> Our supervising <Speech_Music_Male> producer <Speech_Music_Male> is Jordan bowel <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> and our executive producer. <Speech_Music_Male> Is <Advertisement> Chris. Bannon <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> huge. Thanks <Advertisement> to the Smithsonian's <Speech_Male> National <Speech_Male> Museum <Advertisement> of American <Speech_Male> History Eric <Speech_Male> Jansen <Advertisement> Ryan Lintel <Speech_Male> men John Trautmann <Speech_Male> and and Laura <Speech_Male> for all their <Speech_Music_Male> help in making <Speech_Music_Male> this show <Speech_Music_Male> loss of the Smithsonian <Speech_Music_Male> is a production <Speech_Male> of the scripts Washington <Speech_Male> Bureau and <Speech_Music_Male> Stitcher. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> I'm your host <Speech_Music_Male> of Monty. You <Advertisement> can <Speech_Music_Male> find me on twitter and <Speech_Male> instagram <Advertisement> at <Speech_Music_Male> all safe and <Speech_Music_Male> facebook <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> at off Monte <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> if <SpeakerChange> you like the show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> don't forget <Speech_Music_Female> to rate and review <Speech_Male> it on the Apple. PODCAST <Speech_Music_Male> APP <Speech_Music_Male> really helps <Speech_Music_Male> other people find the <Speech_Music_Male> show. <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you so much <Speech_Music_Male> for listening <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement>

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

08:11 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Can be rough to fine really grave modern furniture and decor. That's affordable feels as good as it looks folks and just generally makes you happy. I mean it took me three years to find my coffee table but industry west is all about making it easy to discover And Bhai bold design the can keep up with modern life especially curated by the CO founders. They have a host of products that can best be described as new classics six beautiful functional pieces capable of becoming timeless and a bonus. Unlike most furniture retailers they offer free swatches and unmatched customer customer service. So if you're interested in surrounding yourself with killer design that can make even your highest traffic rooms feel like a getaway visit industry West Smithsonian listeners can now get twenty percents off just visit Industry West Dot Com and enter Promo Code Smithsonian at checkout. That's Industry West Dot Com and Promo Code Smithsonian for twenty percent off. So many of us think we don't have time to learn a new topic or pick up another hobby be but we actually do with the great courses plus this educational streaming service makes learning so easy and accessible. There are thousands of lectures and practically any any topic you can think of with objective indepth information from some of the best teachers in the world and the great courses plus fits into your schedule anytime anywhere. I recommend my listeners. Check out the course. America's founding fathers created a partnership with the Smithsonian this course includes more than thirty lectures ranging from George Washington's doubts to Thomas Jefferson's books to Aaron Burr's treason make learning part of your daily routine with the great courses plus my listeners. There's have access to a full month for free so you could check out everything from the history of American baseball to taking better photos. And all that's in between just sign up now through my special special url the great courses plus dot com slash lost remember. That's the great courses plus dot com slash lost. Remember when I'd finished mastering the record here in Hollywood at capital it was about five in the morning and I had the masters of the album. The mothers recalled him in the back seat of my car. And I pulled up on La Brea highland behind a truck that had a bumper sticker that said death to disco. I remember very clearly thinking well. Geez we're too late bill. OAKES was the music supervisor for the soundtrack to Saturday night fever. It was kind of Sobering moment because all I heard the last six months of our life was these songs putting together on an album meant to be the greatest disco record ever and there was. There was a backlash as there is to everything there was a backlash to the. BG's later there's backlash to the Beatles you know back continues earlier. I remember saying to bury your good company where there's a back now. She men's you on the market oaks was the head of our S. L. Records one of America's most successful independent labels named for Robert Stig would who managed the. BG's how old were you around this time if you if you Yeah I was embarrassing me as at twenty two when they made me president of records which was I think probably because I was the only person in the room because I was selected over a large number of candidates. Believe me right but I was I'd been working with the Beatles my my former employees with the Beatles so I had some of them as an assistant now and I thought after Beatles the BG's will be a piece of cake but of course. The beaches were every bit as idiosyncratic as the Beatles is truly also Europe. Paul McCartney's assistant also while it wasn't specifically pulled but because because pull ended up not speaking to the others became more poor I was there for the last year and a half of their existence really so I was F night that it'd be a abbey road that are when they were barely talking to each other so it was kind of interesting Preparation for work in the music. Business Robert Stig would and bill Oakes optioned the rights to a New York magazine Article by English rock critic Nik Cohn called tribal rites of the new Saturday night it. It followed the weekend rituals of working class teenagers in Brooklyn who lived for their nights of dancing at a local discount. Polyester Nick liked was the fact that in the boroughs in Brooklyn where he went. It was a Saturday night thing and it was blue collar and people are learning to dance. Do the hustle. And they were notified ratifies about it that people would just making sure they looked totally cool. You had to dress up to get in I. I grew up in the north of England and we would sneak into clubs in leads. It's like a monkey. Well I can if I if I want to if I want to cover that with the now that they had the rights to coins article. Bill OAKES and Roberts thing would wanted to get the BG's on board at the time. They were in France working on an album. Barry Robert Morris Gabe all remember that fateful meeting outside Paris Saturday night fever. We'll written not with Saturday night fever in mind. Some songs that were heard in Saturday night view one part of our new studio album which we were recording at the time and just used in the in the film the funniest thing about that is that we didn't even know the film was about actually opening you. It's about a man who works in paint young guys and blew his wages every Saturday night and this club disco national thought. We didn't even know lots of NFL. We didn't. They didn't seem that interested. Funny enough this about the movie and You know they would do rub but said in a way I think he said what have you gotten. They had a few songs kicking around and staying alive was originally. I think recording Saturday night but when they came up with night eight fever Robert Dole night fever as standalone title of the movie. Sounds of it so I can thriller a horror movie so we put together Saturdays. I denied it was movie was shot as Saturday Saturday night. The BG's came up with night fever so we combine the two on paper making a movie based on disco featuring the music of dated sixties. Rock Act seemed seems like it would never work but still wouldn't give up the final third. Oddly fitting piece of the puzzle was John. Travolta who at the time was just a TV maybe heartthrob up until about television. Stars hadn't really transferred to the big screen. Henry Winkler hadn't made it as a film actor. So when rob had a Beverly Hills Hotel press conference announcing a million dollars for Meena Vinnie. Bob Arena from welcome back Carter. That was crazy. We'll you guys surprised. The film comes out the soundtrack it goes. You Know Bananas was it was just. It was beyond our expectations. I was going going as Robert Always said this according to plan. He's very sanguine dry right. He would say this is exactly what I plan but I think even he would have to agree that that the fact that the movie opened and suddenly paramount getting colds about they need extra security at the theaters. Because of all the downsizing the aisles you go to parties in one thousand nine hundred seventy seventy eight anywhere in the world. They put on not even united one album last hour and a bit you know and then you just go back to side one right and was the album released before the film came out. Yes it was a famously rubber pte had paramount degree to increase increase the number of screens. We're opening on. According to how high the first single went when it was probably early days of synergy between the record business and the film is this time. Paramount didn't didn't seem terribly interested in our little disco movies. They referred to me these selling the record in every city. Why are you only putting it out in four hundred screens? So every time I'm the record went up another notch we had. How did you love out every time when I got to number one? We got another two hundred screens. Some kind of a row made with Barry Diller.

Beatles bill Oakes Brooklyn America Smithsonian Robert Stig Robert Dole Barry Diller La Brea Barry Robert Morris Gabe fever Paul McCartney England Henry Winkler France NFL New York magazine Nik Cohn Hollywood Robert Always
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

04:55 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Saturday night fever was a low budget film. A Guy Italian American kids in late Seventies Brooklyn who were disco crazed i John Travolta Played Tony. Minero who was like a disco Superhero by day. He lived with his parents and worked job in a small paint store and at night he was king of the dance floor at the local disco. What's your favorite Moment from Saturday night fever. It's obvious but the first shot just just remains so kind of ingrained and that kind of walked down the street in Brooklyn shoes panting up. That's right checking out the suit. The wind kind of moving on such a staying alive. Just kind of one of the great scenes nineteen seventies cinema. Sure in the opening scene of Saturday night fever Tony wearing a tight black leather jacket. Red Silk Shirt open collar and a gold necklace. This is strutting down the sidewalk to the beat of staying alive. It's pure disco and he hasn't even gotten to the club yet. There's there's a moment in that very seen that I remember. So I'm this little kid. I finally get to see Saturday night. Fever five or six years after it had originally come out and there's a scene where he goes up to the pizza place how to to commit to and he gets two slices of pizza and he says give me two one on top of the other you and that's my. That's my little kid as much as you can do that. And that really solidified America for the two slices of pizza and they will put one on top of the other and you can get together and he walks down the street with the like you. I discovered them through Saturday night. Fever as many people that and then went back and found earlier stuff. You know fanny be tender and how do you mend broken heart put. which is you know just so many of them? I can think of younger days when pink for my airline everything man could want to do by the mid seventies the BG's were considered considered a dated sixties band. But that was before Saturday night fever soundtrack for that film made them the centerpiece of the disco movement. The Disco Disco Ball. If you will and twenty years later they were inducted. Into the rock and Roll Hall of fame very good was knighted in two thousand eighteen the last surviving fiving member of the band but that night eating brings up a good question the BG's with three Brits who were raised in Australia. So why I don't have anything from the Bee gees in the Smithsonian. What what is their legacy in terms of American entertainment? Yeah you know the BG's these represent this global phenomenon in many ways. Coming out of England relocating to Australia and then completely taking over the charts in the United States and other parts of the world redefining the sound of what was on the radio in the late. Seventies that in itself is enough for us to you think about ways in which we should try to better understand that in represented in the collections. At the museum. You can bring something from outside. It gets redefined defined in America it gets popularized in a way and then broadcast back out to the rest of the world. And it's it's why the Smithsonian's interested Gidron exploring those moments when those combined influences or so palpable and visceral for so many people in the country for me. What it represented was I was located in England? You know I was Living in the north of England and there was something aspirational national hopeful and sentimental about the BG's with also a thumping sort of beating sexuality. And I remember because all of my a white English friends were listening to led Zeppelin and heavy metal and they were sort of banging their heads. It would this kind of rage that young thirteen year old boys have on the other side. You had R&B and because of whatever racism that Indian family please. I didn't have any black friends so the BG's almost represented this kind of inflation of R. and B. and rock and roll and the in this dance music and tell me about the power of dance because I remember it was one of the great things about the. BG's was that you could dance to the music. And I think that's what was so powerful about seeing John Travolta in that film.

fever Tony America Brooklyn Minero Smithsonian England John Travolta Australia Zeppelin United States
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

03:06 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"<SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> At this point <Speech_Music_Male> the is almost <Speech_Male> a quarter order century <Speech_Male> old. An entire <Speech_Male> generation <Speech_Music_Male> of American kids have grown <Speech_Music_Male> up <Advertisement> playing <Speech_Music_Male> and watching soccer <Speech_Male> and <Advertisement> American <Speech_Male> soccer teams now <Speech_Male> compete on the <Speech_Male> world stage where <Speech_Male> they inspire via a <Speech_Male> love for the game in <Speech_Male> a new generation. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Laughter> <Laughter> <Laughter> <Laughter> Twenty <SpeakerChange> five <Speech_Music_Male> million Americans <Speech_Male> say play soccer <Speech_Male> at some <Speech_Male> level and that doesn't <Speech_Male> count people like me <Speech_Male> who <Advertisement> want to <Speech_Male> play but can't <Speech_Music_Male> because I'm <Speech_Music_Male> not very good <Speech_Male> twenty first <Speech_Male> century. American <Speech_Male> soccer has firmly <Speech_Male> established <Speech_Male> itself as a mainstream <Speech_Male> sport. <Speech_Male> And it's all <Speech_Male> because of one <Speech_Music_Male> player. <Speech_Music_Male> Pele <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> take <Advertisement> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> out <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> a troll <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> as their <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> own. Aw and there's <Speech_Music_Male> no question <Speech_Male> that <Speech_Music_Male> his presence <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Music_Male> when people <Speech_Male> say that the <Speech_Male> United states <Speech_Male> is no <Speech_Male> longer a <Speech_Male> sleepy <Speech_Male> backwater <Speech_Male> of soccer. <Speech_Male> It was all <Speech_Male> due <Speech_Male> to his presence in <Speech_Male> in in this <Speech_Male> country goes goes to <Speech_Male> amazing <Speech_Male> years. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Music_Male> that's quite a gift <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Doc <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> David <Speech_Music_Male> her. She was a soccer <Speech_Music_Male> columnist for <Speech_Male> ESPN and <Speech_Male> is now a writer <Speech_Male> at large for <Speech_Male> the magazine. Gene 8-for-8 <Speech_Male> <Silence> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> next time <Speech_Music_Male> on loss to the Smithsonian <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> particular <Speech_Music_Male> that I wanted to pull out <Speech_Music_Male> So <Speech_Music_Male> suits suits worn <Speech_Music_Male> by the beaches. <Speech_Music_Male> Oh my God <Speech_Male> matching. That's <Speech_Male> huge for me. <Speech_Male> Matching suits <Speech_Male> from their nineteen <Speech_Male> seventy tour <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> with their shoes <Speech_Male> watt <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> fan <Speech_Male> on this planet <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> Silver <Speech_Music_Male> Shimmering <Speech_Music_Male> Shiny <Advertisement> suits that <Speech_Music_Male> represent one of the <Speech_Music_Male> best selling selling <Advertisement> soundtracks <Speech_Music_Male> of all <Speech_Music_Male> time <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Advertisement> lost at <Speech_Music_Male> the Smithsonian is produced <Speech_Music_Male> by Mary. <Advertisement> Beth Kushner <Speech_Music_Male> our executive <Speech_Music_Male> producer and editor <Speech_Male> is Ellen Weiss <Speech_Music_Male> Technical <Speech_Music_Male> Support from Robin <Speech_Music_Male> Wise. <Advertisement> Fact checking <Speech_Music_Male> from Danielle <Speech_Music_Male> Roff and <Advertisement> scripting <Speech_Music_Male> by Alex. Berg <Speech_Male> mixing and <Speech_Music_Male> sound design by Casey <Speech_Male> Holford and John <Speech_Music_Male> Galore original <Speech_Music_Male> theme Music Music by <Speech_Music_Male> Casey Holford. <Speech_Music_Male> Our supervising producer <Speech_Music_Male> is Jordan. Bell <Speech_Male> and <Advertisement> our executive <Speech_Music_Male> producer is <Speech_Music_Male> Chris. Bannon <Speech_Male> huge thanks to the Smithsonian's <Speech_Male> National <Speech_Male> Museum of American <Speech_Music_Male> History Eric <Speech_Music_Male> Jansen Ryan Lintel <Speech_Music_Male> men John Trautmann <Speech_Music_Male> and Laura Doff <Speech_Music_Male> for all <Speech_Music_Male> their help in making <Speech_Music_Male> this show lost <Speech_Music_Male> at the Smithsonian <Speech_Male> is a production of the <Speech_Male> scripts Washington Bureau <Speech_Male> and Stitcher. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm your <Speech_Music_Male> host <Advertisement> of Monty. <Speech_Music_Male> You can find <Speech_Music_Male> me on twitter <Advertisement> and Instagram <Speech_Male> at also <Speech_Music_Male> if and facebook <Speech_Music_Male> at Asif <Speech_Music_Male> Monte <Speech_Music_Male> if you like the show <Speech_Music_Male> don't <Advertisement> don't forget <Speech_Male> to rate and review <Speech_Male> it on the <Advertisement> Apple. PODCAST <Speech_Male> APP <Speech_Music_Male> it really helps <Speech_Music_Male> other people find the show. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Speech_Male> so much for listening.

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

14:51 min | 11 months ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Who's going into labor? She's nuts panicky bunker. These people have babies babies before they have a hospital. The hospital is still buzzing over that we already have three babies morning hospital three in the other one in a car and I wanted to build between floors people care where when or how many to be interested into nine modern birth control methods. Do that. Listen to this guy de the black kettle. You showing the black man who was far more educated than the bigot and without making a stereotypical Mendoza but it is a truism that you people do have more children than you can nominate handle. Randall was curious socioeconomic. Nothing personal well. Let me explain something to do what. How many children we have is because we love love each other to talk very intelligent means to what you know smile see? Shut up you face and then you realize. Interestingly only that he is then racism toward or prejudice towards your character as a Hispanic. So yeah it broke the stereotyping. Yeah I know this from my neighborhood you know. What the heck's I knew but I never saw the portrayed on TV so we love that rascal of that aspect and so did I? We're we're very comfortable with it. And I don't think he saw that on television that of a black man being racist towards a Hispanic and that's another trump. Yeah you you broke the stereotype cleaned the book. You baby on paper Funke you. You have a newspaper boy. The elevator story episode later won an Emmy One twenty two emmys for all in the family or producer. Norman Lear showed very real struggles for people like archie bunker and archie arguments with strangers in an elevator or with his family family at home represented huge cultural and generational shifts. That were playing out across the country. Norman Lear as a quote that he wanted to put the audience audience in the show. There wasn't about these fantastical people or stories that it was really an attempt to show. This is what's going on in people's homes. Why not have a show about that so people could really relate to it? I think it's interesting said we're talking in the past as if these were like you know. Here's what was going on at the time. Women's issues issues about representations family happened and then now we don't have those kind of any more but I do think you know it showed that really exposed American. The fact that we're still dealing with those shows how precious he was saying. These are the things that define America over over the course of his career. Norman Lear produced created or developed more than a hundred television shows and in two thousand seventeen. He was a Kennedy Center. Enter honoree many people from layers career and life came out to honor him and so did Archie. And Edith's chairs these chairs are the the actual chairs that edith and archie sat in and they are on loan to us from the Smithsonian Institution. On the family was pioneering pioneering Sitcom it made satire of viable primetime option for television networks and in so doing it paved the way for shows like the daily show and countless others. I was beyond honored to get the opportunity to talk to Norman Lear via skype. I could see his hat. You got it the face the faces right under it. He showed up to our interview wearing his signature. White Boat Hat. Can we tell the camera down a little bit here. Yes there we go nice to meet you. I see you again rather good to me. We have seen one another another before we have. We've we've we've Run into each other a few times. Says where's your hair longer. Why do I do? I not look the same. Maybe it's the you could be my eyesight at ninety six. Also a full disclosure Norman. I met a few years ago. When he gave gave me some funds for a peabody award winning web series I created call hall in the family which may or may not have been inspired by a show?.

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

08:39 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Lost at the Smithsonian Rusted Monte is brought to you by bear bear creates medicine to treat allergy symptoms so allergies don't get in the way Have a good time. From advances in health to innovations in agriculture bear is advancing science for a better life at bear this is why we science wrong I am lost at the Smithsonian now in the bowels of the Smithsonian the upper bowels up rebound does this is the fourth floor you're luckily I'm not alone that other voice you hear is Eric jets that curator for entertainment and sports at the National Museum of American history I am going to use my to open the door Eric not only knows where we are he also knows where all the best staff at the Smithsonian is kept which is good because I'm looking for ten objects from American entertainment one for each episode of this podcast I want things with cultural value things with history things that need to be kept refrigerated good God man it's freezing in here supposed to be this cold Sixty eight degrees Fahrenheit which is not that cold but I'm Indian so for me it's very this freezing room is full of sports artifacts including a bicycle hanging from the wall of Lance Armstrong's bicycle that he rode in the Tour de France these are seats from ebbets field in Brooklyn or the dodgers played what are we going to look at now well I was going to show you this opening a metal cabinet and inside aide are pair of red shorts with the initials G. F. and that stands for George Foreman the ornament those from the rumble in the jungle exactly who's a big what does the waste on that he was huge eighty to waste shorts I'm looking at a a robe with the name Mohammed Ali this is amazing that was worn while he was training the rumble jungle when I got to Africa I had one hell of a rumble I had to be ties behind first proclaiming king and Joan goal I don't doubt that some of you already know about the rumble in the jungle but just in case you don't use a little context maybe of it all the time the rumble in the jungle was one of the most important sporting events of the twentieth century perhaps even the most important depending on who you talk to it was a boxing match that took place in what was then called Zaire and is now called the Democratic Republic of the Congo it was in one thousand nine hundred seventy four between Abbott Allie and George Foreman Foreman was twenty five years old at the time and our Lee was thirty two so as far as everybody watching the fight was concerned that made Ali the underdog but Mohammed Ali wasn't watching the fight he was in it and in his mind he wasn't the dog all this will be the biggest upsets Sonny Liston and I think it is befitting that I go out a boxing just like I came in defeat the big bad monster that nobody could destroy it's difficult to really wrap your head around how big of a fight the rumble in the jungle really walks it's estimated that a billion people watched it on TV one out of every four humans alive in nineteen seventy four was tuning in to watch George Foreman and Mohammed Ali fight for the heavyweight title. This was the golden age of heavyweight boxing sticking I'm going to be three terms as far as I'm GonNa Punch Wheel Alley it was a comeback story he was trying to take back the title that had been stripped from him in nine hundred in sixty eight when he refused to go to Vietnam the real enemies of most people are right here in Vietnam no I will not go ten thousand miles to continue the domination of white slave masters over the DR the people of the Earth Mama Delis career was defined by his conviction born Cassius clay he changed his name to Mohammed Ali when he converted Islam he was outspoken and the way he spoke was a significant as what he spoke about some say is rhythmic poetry laid the foundations for apt all he was like a combination of Lebron James Colin Kaepernick and Kendrick Lamar Rasa would allegation I believe you inspirational as any politician author or celebrity mohammad-ali altered history speaking about Ali Barack Obama on said he shook up the world and the world is better for it Obama even went so far as to keep a pair of boxing gloves in his private study in order want to win so I can come home and speak for the brothers living in rat infested houses sleeping on concrete in a ghetto gang on television speak so God I'm your too a new survey let me get this man night last it's really quite amazing to have here Sebastian Smithsonian storage would looks like an unassuming Terry cloth training robe with simple black lettering says Muhammad Ali and above is his signature so little frayed at the edges here a little yellow represents an icon and alleged who was the greatest that sports has over-produced comes early you can see in their very calm against you got these you American African American boxers George Foreman Mohammad-ali Ali is he lost his title it and now he was trying to the current heavyweight boxing champion the odds were stacked against l. e. right out of the gate because he was older form and had undefeated formidable opponent Yes for sure when I meet this man if you think the world was surprised when Nixon resigned had connections with the people in Zaire thought this would be like this great new sort of mass spectacle that would elevate interest in not only the flight but also the nation's ear and also like you know they had this big concert in this James Brown in addition to being a major sporting event the rumble in the jungle was also a major musical event James Brown was there be king was there the spinners were there and the man who is this global spectacle well that was none other than legendary boxing promoter Don King Jitney super chains to come into one phone and do one thing six thousand miles from home that was blackness both celebrated and exploited in some ways in order to get people excited about the fight at the time that kind of a new concept.

Smithsonian Rusted Monte Sixty eight degrees Fahrenheit twenty five years
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

06:58 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Britt road the yellow founded now tell me you too yeah not not be diluted so he saved Hollywood history by stealing from mgm this Robin Hood Type Character so he he basically took the is the first prize was the gavel for Mr Smith goes to Washington so they sent these slipper stewart they'd been in her closet for your she taken them out to local schools and showing them all wait wait the most private options and probably private collector right over the years the people who worked on production at MGM said we must have had seven or ten pairs of shoes something like the four th they're here by these individuals at an auction and it hasn't been seen in years now they've got it somewhere locked up in a in a drawer somewhere yeah yeah wow now do you guys here at the Smithsonian just feel like I just think we wish they weren't those other payers out there is there is there is there a heist movie potential it Smithsonian curator steal the other fair and destroy them does it does it feel like it takes away the value of what you have here not at all no the I mean it was a once in a lifetime thing when the FBI brought this other pair here and we could compare them after we done all this research on the materials that the other day was made of and how they were constructed to be able to look at another pair so closely and we actually figured out that that pair was a matching pair to ours because ours are mismatched on the inside you know it says Judy Garland one and Judy garland six on ars so we're thinking from the first pair six pair there's are the and there's some evidence that she might have been wearing these pairs mismatched in the filming of the movie There is no stop you away are actually not the mismatched pairs and if you look at them closely and I have you can actually see that they are slightly.

mgm Mr Smith Washington FBI ars Hollywood Robin Hood Judy Garland
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"When did it really reach its height of popularity you know was successful at the time and you know people liked it but like I said it was just not the movie that everybody remembers from that year and you know it was released once or twice but then nineteen fifty six it played for the first time on television well I remember when I was a kid and I grew up in England I wasn't familiar with the wizard of Oz until it came on at Christmas and it was one of the the live standard movies that would play and so it did become a tradition. It's crazy you know that we every time we sort of refresh our exhibit with the Ruby slippers right people say like well are they still as popular as we still need to have them out they are still just as popular and especially with young people right they run into see them this is like their thing at this Museum that they want to see and it's pretty astonishing you know that again like no other movie from Nineteen thirty nine like gone with the wind is not popular among six-year-olds right eh but there's something about this and you know the wizard of Oz when that movie was made the story was already old rightly the book first came out in one thousand nine hundred it was kind of the Harry Potter of its day at that time right but then when they made this movie you know thirty nine years later already when the when the MGM film was made they had to put this title card at the inning and they said we had a An iphone is that a screen capture from the movie yeah so this is what the title card that came before Oh for the movies in the nineteen thirty nine release it says for nearly forty years the story has given faithful service to the young in heart and time has been powerless to put its kindly philosophy out of Russian so they're saying you know like we don't even understand why everybody still likes but like we can't stop this Juggernaut of a story you guys love this and to the young in heart we dedicate this picture so you know they're saying like it's still here so I heard the ruby slippers were originally was to be the silver slippers inbounds books are silver and this has led a lot of people to to have theories about that the books are really about bimetallism which was this political issue in the populist era in the early twentieth century that people wanted to switch from a goal to a silver standard and and the silver shoes were supposed to represent his belief in the system which may be you know like but when they were making the movie and they were sticking with the original silver shoes from from the book great they realize they're filming in technicolor and technicolor is an expensive process and suddenly Silverado goal doesn't look that great like what if they made them ruby that might pop right and so they tried it out and loved it I was find interesting these sort of lucky kind of accidents that happen in terms of like creating something for a practical purpose than ends up having its own own mythology around it but who who knew that they would resonate in such a way I don't know I mean think of all the other adaptations of that there have been right there Chris wicked right there's return to is the sort of scary one wasn't there also complete remake of the wizard of Oz at one point there's always some new twist rates so like like the wizards the African American cast version like the the James Franco version the ause the powerful Ostlund ause the empower yes yes you know that's kind of trying to update this for modern more sophisticated audiences maybe or something like that but what remains at the center is the sort of story of of Dorothy rate this character who's you know an everyday person she's longing for more she gets thrown into this crazy situation and finds out that she has the power all along to get what she wants right so she kind of like learns to rely on herself it's that American rugged individualism great example of the Mono myth of this euros journey right Joseph Cambell about you know somebody who's born to simple means but finds out that they have a secret power and you know with the guidance of some learned person learns how to use it and with a group of friends is able to overcome this adversity changed world rate so that's the wizard of Oz as much as it is star wars over the Bible disgraced Luke Skywalker darth gail now is my kinda great dinner party but only one of these heroes has their shoes on display not in a galaxy far far away but here on earth where they are subject to light humidity and the ravages of time so how does the Smithsonian the and keep the ruby slippers in tiptop shape for all the people making pilgrimages to see them how old he slips eighty years old yeah so how do you maintain ain't that they came to the museum and we cleaned them up and made sure that they were protected which is the main thing museums do is just make sure that they're not getting too much light the they're not getting dusty but we never did this sort of in-depth conservation that that we do today with objects that we know how to take care of materials better and so we did this kickstarter campaign where we raised three hundred and fifty thousand dollars to hire these worlds specialist in shoot conservation basically and they came in and studied Israel so they used x ray spectroscopy to be able to figure out exactly what minerals and elements reused in the construction of the sequence they found really interesting stuff there's a layer of silver electro plated onto the sequence when they were being made so that they have extra shimmery shine you know when the lights are hitting them so we learn you know through this real analysis a little bit more about movies and the people who are making them and how they they knew how cameras and lights worked in making these costumes to take advantage of what technicolor had offer of what you know shooting on set close at with you know the certain type of lighting would offer like people think well the slippers kinda faded when you see them in person aren't as faded as you might think they were a darker Burgundy type color because they knew there was gonna be so much light on them that was the only way to make them look bright red ruby if there were any lighter than that would probably look like you know pink eye with all that light on our these sorts of things that we kind of figure out we can reverse engineer here how much damage has happened to the shoes and what should we do in the future based on how they were actually designed to begin with and then you know our conservative Don Wallace actually went and need every single sequent on the shoes and she figured out how much damage was done what we could do to preserve it for the future and then rotated them all so that they're all imperfect alignment and cleaned every one of these forty eight hundred sequence with like cue tips basically so they're going to continue to be on display for years to come because we did all this work the ruby slippers are as impressive as they are today because of Don Wallace so I knew I had to meet her walking into like what looks like a laboratory a of like machines are coming up don invites us into her laboratory for an extra close look at the Ruby slippers so close that the wicked witch of the West would be green with envy but she's waiting to begin with pinging anyway which would be super jealous of how close I get.

England fifty thousand dollars thirty nine years eighty years forty years six-year
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

06:27 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"Hey it's awesome I lost at the Smithsonian I don't Oh we're not in Kansas anymore were in the National Museum of American history looking at fancy shoes how started to spin an air tornado and do you remember when the wicked witch house crash and Dorothy took the wasn't a winning my feet these shoes oh I see these aren't just fancy shoes there Dr `this ruby slippers from the wizard of US must be very powerful or she wouldn't want to just come to the Smithsonian justice the Ruby slippers they were definitely in my top two I have Abraham link gins top hat as well this anymore impressed by though okay the ruby red slippers because I remember watching the movie as a child and the the monkeys scared me today he's a scary I want those most of all the wizard of Oz is a classic American film and if you haven't seen it yet I mean okay who hasn't seen this movie who are you people yourself a favor pause this go watch it right now and come back it's that good I'll wait welcome back or maybe you never left I truly have no way of knowing so anyway let's continue in the wizard of Oz you already know that after Dorothy gale's house fell on the wicked witch of the east she received magical powerful ruby slippers but outside of Oz there are cultural artifact and there's a lot more to learn about them do you know that it's not the only ruby slippers. I did not know that what if I told you that this is a mismatched pair in the sense that they are not from the same pair one is from pair number one and one is from para number six so many people come to see the ruby slippers that the carpet in front of their display case has to be replaced regular really why is it that eighty years after Judy garland put them on the Ruby slippers still have the power to attract kids parents grandparents and sure even podcast hosts giving it's weird that this many people come to visit a pair the old shoes from one thousand nine hundred ninety eight I don't think so I think it's like a big symbol of our culture these magical slippers that take you home wherever you are right smajic no the ruby slippers have one of the most popular artifacts at the Smithsonian so in this outcast where I'm picking ten iconic objects from American entertainment how could the ruby slippers not be one of my choices this is a a very large around and this pictures on the walls and then there are large quotes pay no attention to that man behind the curtain toto either ruby slippers have their very own gallery at the National Museum of American history they're in a temperature controlled glass case in the center of a very large very dimly lit room in fact most of the light in the room is on the slippers themselves you know you come in and the thing that's got the last eight on it like shining down from heaven the ruby slippers now is there a reason why it's so dark in here I'm talking to Ryan Lindemann a curator of the entertainment action and an expert on the ruby slippers we want the shoes sparkle so it makes it Kinda like you're you know you're walking into a Temple Indiana Jones ray aw so we estimate that since nineteen seventy nine when we got them I mean a hundred million people have seen them breath y you know it's it's pretty incredible and other than like maybe the Mona Lisa I don't know that any other museum can really claim that one thing has been seen by so many people how exciting is this for you on a scale of one to ten George Washington's uniform but it seems like people really want to see Dorothy slippers I've seen people to Europe and just fall down on their knees seeing props from movies because they matter so much to people it's sort of a constant reminder that your job is fulfilling when you see that happen or that people's lives are empty rolling she's wearing the ruby slippers he gave up so let me ask you this no rubies knock slippers so what's the big deal that's the million dollar question isn't it you know why why does this movie matter so much to people and they come in and make pilgrimages to DC to see these shoes worn by a little girl in a movie eighty years ago right you know the slippers are I think in a one the best sort of physical representations of the Glamour of Hollywood and like this magic of movies and and you know you start to think about this movie coming out in nineteen thirty nine when you know there's the Great Depression like World War Two is on the horizon and like how much this must have mattered to people to see this movie that was just full of so there's always something that draws people back to that film.

Dorothy gale US National Museum of American Kansas Abraham eighty years million dollar
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

10:17 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"It is that temperature control is climate controlled in order to maintain the range of instruments that are here now I'm in the musical instrument collection At his a essentially what looks like a typewriter you know it looks like it can national typewriter far fewer keys than it has a sign on it that says we all deserve to be able to further our knowledge right that's what the great courses plus is all about founded on the idea the education should be accessible to everyone they make it possible to learn from the brightest minds out there including professors from Harvard Yale and Stanford as well as experts from national geographic and my favorite the Smithsonian I wish they had this when I was a kid this is college level learning without student loans or the pressure I'm working grades and the great courses plus APP makes it possible to watch or listen to lectures at any time I highly recommend the course how to view appreciate great movies for example you can export and break down the steps of the hero's journey through the plot of the wizard of Oz unlock a world of knowledge with the great courses plus right now they're giving my listeners a free month of unlimited access to their entire library but you need to sign up now through my special you are L. The great courses plus dot com slash lost that's the great courses plus dot com slash lost.

Harvard Yale Stanford
"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Lost at the Smithsonian with Aasif Mandvi

"The why don't we go inside okay here Hi It's awesome Bonvie and I am off at the Smithsonian again one of these days I'll find my way out of here if I don't freeze to death I blue of the National Museum of American History Guitar Cases Cabinets with the windows see inside seeing a couple of pianos isn't this place has everything and I mean everything there's Princess Electric Guitar Grandma's flashes turntable is like a jungle sometimes it makes me wonder how evening gowns from the supremes strapped the various violins posters costumes they're over five thousand objects in here it might appear that there is some disorder in the room really know exactly where everything somewhere report sides we're on top of things here we're kind of in the process so that voice you hear that is curator John Trautmann nobody was the stories behind the objects in this room better than he does but I can only pick one object for today's episode and the very first thing he wants to show me isn't Some Flashy Grand Piano it's a meet up travel case instrument travel case it doesn't look like much but there's something written on it it says my bread and butter has always been the nylon string Jose Feliciano.

Bonvie Smithsonian supremes Jose Feliciano National Museum of American Hi John Trautmann
"smithsonian" Discussed on Household Name

Household Name

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Household Name

"Hey this is Sarah Wyman. I'm one of the producers of household name they're going to be new. Episodes of household name in your podcast feed very soon but in the meantime time if you want to keep up with us. There are two great ways to do that. I you can join our facebook group. Just search household name podcast and you can subscribe to our brand news newsletter. There's a link for you in the episode description but in the meantime I don't want to send you off empty-handed so while we work on new episodes of household household name I want to share another show you can listen to and I think you're really going to like it. It's called lost at the Smithsonian and it's a new pop culture history podcast from Stitcher pitcher but explorers the little known stories by an iconic artifacts at the National Museum of American history. The host is off Monte who you may know from the daily show and in every episode Mavi examines the impact of a fascinating cultural artifact think fancies leather jacket. Dorothy is ruby slippers. Even Jim Henderson's early prototypes for the muppets. Here's Monte coming across the Robe Muhammad Ali war while he trained for his famous rumble in the jungle against George Foreman. The Robe is a reminder of the political and cultural context of the Times made this one of the most important sporting and entertainment events of the Twentieth Century Tree back in Smithsonian storage would looks like an unassuming. Terry cloth training rogue with simple black lettering says Muhammad Alley and above is his signature so little frayed at the edges here a little yellow represents an icon and a legend who was the greatest that sports has ever produced here comes early. You can see in their very calm. It's age against you. They've got these two American African American boxers George Foreman Muhammad Ali is he lost his title Losses Bertel. Yes he was trying to jump to the current heavyweight boxing champion. The odds were stacked against L. E. Right out of gate because he was older form and had was undefeated formidable opponent Yasser when I'm meet this man if you think the world was surprised when when Nixon resigned wait allow with forms and in terms of the actual the fight in Zaire how did that come about it was with Don King I think they had connections with the people in Zaire and thought this would be like this great news sort of mass spectacle that would elevate interest just in not only the fight but also the nation of Zaire and also like a you know they had this big concert and James Brown in addition tend to be a major sporting event. The rumble in the jungle was also a major musical event James Brown. was there be king was there. The spinners were there this global spectacle well that was none other than legendary boxing promoter. Don King Jitney Super John's they come into one fold and do one thing six thousand miles from home that was blackness that was distributed to accept blackness to help platelets trust practice and into associated separate blackness. We all citizens of the world. It ain't about us being we WANNA be against. Nobody cares about us saying that we for each other so that there was this celebration aberration connecting African culture with African American poultry that both celebrated and exploited in some ways in order to get people excited about the fight by the time that was kind of a new concept but in terms of rumble in the jungle considered one of the most important sporting events at twentieth century. Why do you think that was no long run. There's a lot of big events but they don't always hold up so you have this huge audience championship fight that was like incredible years the Ali Lee story itself and I'll ease rope widow finish to that fight where you got let himself get punched basically and tricked form in and new yet one shot right and was able to accomplish it and that was huge. Ali's rope a dope finish was the key to his victory. He let himself get backed up against the ropes then used his arms to block as many a forms punches as he could once foreman was worn out. Ali made his move. We'll get into rope-a-dope put up a few minutes but just no it was all about outsmarting his younger opponent. Mohammed Ali dancing around the national anthem. I mean I know that like for myself growing up in a Muslim family and my parents grabbing India in the sixties and you know all the fact that he was this outspoken black Muslim. I think there are a lot of Muslims around on wall who sort of took ownership of him in some ways you know like he's one of us and I just remember as a kid the idea of sort of giving giving the middle finger to colonialism and the oppression by not going fighting in Vietnam. Why should I go and fight the White Man's man's war. What have they done for me as a black American so I think there was a real resonance about this fight being in Africa of all places right. I I think if it had been in America I don't think it would have had the same impact sure right yeah. The international scope of it was important and you know he won three lost at one three times james the belt so like that kind of like just adds to this kind of legacy stature that he had also so smart and funny he we know how to use his controversy to kind of help his bank account as well as the bugles fighting so. I think all around just like really is remarkable the term that he's worth remarking upon because he so distinctive when I got to Africa I had one hell of a mall. I had to be toxins behind. I for proclaiming to be the King of the jungle..

George Foreman Muhammad Ali Zaire Muhammad Ali Africa Mohammed Ali Ali Lee George Foreman Smithsonian Sarah Wyman Don King Jitney National Museum of American hi foreman Twentieth Century Tree Don King Muhammad Alley Monte James Brown Jim Henderson
"smithsonian" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"smithsonian" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"Really cool it'll be smithsonian time so you gotta give us a year i i just learned why we clap by the way oh really believes the mark and you know it was fun i just i was like i don't know how the fuck you doing this i'm here for yeah now we now we again and still talking after not yet he's still talking shit okay all right here we go that interview is brought to you by simple contacts goto simple contacts dot com slash cbt or enter the code bt to get these contacts simple contacts as the most convenient way to renew your contact lens prescription and reorder your brand of contacts from anywhere in just minutes it's vision care for the twenty first century instead of heading to the doctor every year to renew your prescription for something you wear every single day take a few minutes out of your day to do it on your own time in your own terms need to renew your prescription take five minute vision tests from your phone or computer it's reviewed by a licensed doctor you receive a renewed prescription and reorder your contacts and all you need is your current contacts and internet connection in just ten feet of space if you have an unexpired prescription just upload a photo of your doctor's information in order your lenses right then and there there are a million things demanding your time and contacts on just shouldn't be one of them with simple contacts you knew your prescription and reorder your context from anywhere in minutes no more doctors offices weight rooms it takes less than.

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