15 Episode results for "Smith Canteen"

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness- Podcast Episode 014: Chef Keesha OGaldez Ep 014: Chef Keesha O'Galdez

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness

27:34 min | 2 months ago

Talking Journeys of Belonging 2 Blackness- Podcast Episode 014: Chef Keesha OGaldez Ep 014: Chef Keesha O'Galdez

"From the journeys of belonging to blackness lack. i'm india. Laurich will mark this job. You're listening to the podcast talking. Journeys out belonging to blackness slack. Joining us today is chef. Kisha ogle does. Kitchen is a culinary artist and educator. A natural foods private chef and entrepreneur based in new york city with clients along the east coast previously. She was an systems engineer. That worked in the nonprofit academic public in financial sectors for several years but whose entrepreneurial spirit goaded her to pursue her passion for culinary arts full time since completing the chef's training program at the natural gourmet institute for culinary arts in new york city. Kisha has grace kitchens as either a pastry chef. In restaurants as smith canteen in carroll gardens brooklyn amy's bread in smile to go in soho or as a catering chef at patina events and oliver chang in the midst of this work quiches entrepreneurial spirit kicked in and she founded and currently serves as executive chef of the gourmet diva focuses on organic vegetarian vegan and other health supportive dwts she is also the recent recipient of the duni fund which supports black women entrepreneurs. You may have seen chef kisha. On multiple episodes of epicurious fifty person prep challenge web series which has ten million views alone looking forward to learning more about healthy eating with key show. Welcome thank you for having me today. Well i'm really excited to have you on this. Podcast particularly interested in unpacking the stories of african descendants in distorts he's tell about themselves and their journeys to i have been following you and your culinary delights for some time now and i've been intrigued by your efforts to educate african descended and other people of color on accessing into eating healthy natural food options including deterioration vegan meals especially when these communities often times live in food desserts. I'm eager to learn about your journey. So are you ready. Ready right to adventure key show. There are paths that we take and processes we engage in to get us to where we are today sometimes. Those paths are processes or emotional spiritual intellectual and so on. How did you become interested in doing the work you do today. I know has definitely been a journey on actually looking back this year marks the ten year anniversary graduate from corner scores. You mentioned went to the natural gourmet institute in new york were. The school actually focused on more vegetarian. Holistic cooking and prior to that i was consultant at bank of america. So is the transition is used. His story of how from engineering to culinary arts definitely a lot of different transitions throughout the way needs. Always give back support system than after walls eight. Are i wanna make some money. So the kind of corporate but then in two thousand eight when the market crash everybody was laid off so that was definitely one of the pinnacle points out of me going into the culinary industry that you know were like. I don't really want to go back to corporate america Figure out something some way to make it on my own or kisha. When did this all start for you. That when i started just baking cakes i was talking to people more about you know selling cakes. Everything kind of what. I'm doing but more people started talking about their health concerns Love to support you. But i'm diabetic alert sports. But i'm a little bit healthier and that kind of piqued my interest more about healthy cooking. Other people considered the ways they eight but what about the ways in which you eight for myself and his way of life you go go home you make dinner but then you realize a lot of people don't have the skill set. Broadly eat healthier foods and vegetables Really within the first year. So just knowing that i can't cook by one Do better sited to national gourmet institute. Just learn more about connection about what we eat and how we feel. We'll definitely journey to being healthy army when many of us have been relegated to our home spaces due to the global pandemic really raises awareness. About will what is. I typically have in my household. What is it that i'm consuming. How can i be healthier in. Avoid putting on the covid pounds. What you're raising about the fact that you know. Unfortunately a lot of people in the united states tend to have chronic health conditions. Even though we are one of the most industrialized countries in the world. It's ironic and when you really think about the ways in which we function on our day to day even before the global pandemic we have these back to back meetings or in the space of grabbing go where consuming items so that we don't get that hunger headache sometimes just that habit of the grind. Many people do not slow down and take the time to say. Well what is that. I'm actually putting into my mouth at this moment. And is it really. The best food option to eat. Healthy is also very expensive. It's easier to go get something from the dollar menu at your local fast food restaurant than to stand some place and spend basically twelve dollars for one of those salads that way exactly and that's no conversation as well a wide as it costs so much to eat healthy in the google back and forth or i find out. Spend the money now because i don't want to be in the hospital. People are s for like most of the conditions. We have controlled by the things that we eat. Why not take back. That power diabetes. High blood pressure Change digest a little bit or be more. Cognizant of what we're eating you don't have to go through. Taking pills definitely is a mind game fat face good salt and all that great stuff is kinda mystifying. At healthy food tastes bad. How can african descendants demystify food. Who can we look to. You know even a lot of our ancestors they root vegetables and think about yams and plantains and all the types of queens but then like you said society by ween crap. Our lives are just fiddled with were busy going going going going. What is every meeting half the morning. Muffins coffee just evenly a tweet. Change can have fruit platter at least but were so trains. He's supposed to have a certain things. Birthdays got cake in saying can't trees every now and then but is that awareness to say no. I can't do better a lot of people who don't necessarily have access to the variety of different kinds of foods that we can consume. And i think sometimes as a result even from childhood. Some people's palates aren't very well developed and so it's just like the only green vegetable. They may consume as broccoli and so then when they get into adulthood and then someone is saying or encouraging them. You know he. There are other inexpensive but alternatives to broccoli. It's like oh. I don't do that or i don't eat or i've got to have some pork fat. Mix up in there. And i'm not fat. I love me some bad. But oftentimes the in inequality that manifests. But when i'm curious. And i think our listeners will be too. Is that if you if you think back to your childhood and growing up. What are who motivated you to become a chef or help to inspire your entrepreneurial spirit. Because i think it's one thing to say. I'm an engineer. I work as a consultant. Bake but for you. You made that leap. I was my kids. Who very adamant i want to be. a doctor. wanted to be a lawyer growing up. And i'm like a grew up in the bronx in new york to parents who are from belize in central america. Game to make sure the kids had a better life in that whole story spoke. My parents who really cook. I took on duties of cooking for the family. Okay so busy immigrant household. But what's your relationship with food. Food is definitely in my dna host. My aunts they do cook by in my immediate cluster of my parents and my sister. I was wombat provided food so just learning how to cook the back of a box. They're good at it but wasn't really something like oh passionate about or that. Our make a career of it always was good at math and science so honors classes so they kind of push wars math and science career vying. Men's love watching different world between wayne. He was engineer. Might seem kind of cool in for this down. I'll be engineer. That went to school at the university of buffalo and by never cooked in college. So you can access. Anybody went to undergrad with. If see me as a chef now how the hell that happened and this is all before social media. But why would people be surprised. It was something that people knew that could do and i wasn't really wanted to cooked. This yesterday was cooked as you had a eat fast forward Twenties saint got To fend for yourself but then also yet the entrepreneurial spirit was in a lot of people i knew around me because he talked about generational wealth Nine five years have a side hustle. Aguirre out of college started working in. It and i liked the cube life. At all i was like this is not for me. How'd you know it wasn't for you. The conditions of homeworking. Isn't it at one going. From nine to five i don't mind mandated twelve o'clock lunch and doing that day in day out my own. My guy in what about when you worked in the nonprofit sector. I enjoyed it. It is more like from working for more of a mission so this is kind of going through life figuring how yourself i need to wake up the more like oh i can create something and just go and do it. Only twenty million forms to get something done. What would you say was that point professionally that urged you to shift into the food industry being laid off kinda putting dog her misery and just kind of having that. What do i like to do what you like to do in your sleep. That's when i started to bake more in entrepreneurial spirit kicked in to give somebody else suffice even though you do like to cook to be able to do it under pressure and to think about it through the lens of money in how you monetize it holder from ballpark. What do you mean by that. A difference between business and a hobby or passion project is maybe passionate about something. But it's not something you necessarily want to as the business like i love nature by have no bishen to have hiking company realizing what i'm great at is looking at the numbers looking how to cook under pressure and to replicate thing and once you start to talk about the business of food who does the minute part of business you talk about client relations many development. And then you executing on food. Wow there's so. Many small moving parts to this industry was those little elements around in kind of putting together. I guess i'm actually. I'm built for much. Preneurs ship than on food is the conduit for me to express it in the field is so vast you can always find a home in at either interested in opening up a restaurant avenue catering business food blog. Food photography on yourself Yourself out being laid off gave you the space to recalibrate into think about what your next move is and by observation seems to me that there are certain elements around map and science that's already embedded in germane to culinary works and being able to be creative. You just activating a different part of your brain to execute. What was that leap of faith that you raise could've went back to find a job and i actually thought about that moment. Think i broke down crying on my god. I don't want to go through the interviews. That was a struggle is having that leap of faith faith in yourself if it fails. Guess what are you know. Jobs out there and this is kind of that moment in time. We're like no way left my job to do this thing. Sign use it as at that point where you know what you have. That time yet is also It's a blessing in disguise and kobe for me. Now is reflective of had that moment to in through all the disasters knows happening to take. That moment is what you're doing now which you wanted to be continued to you. Know that whole leap of faith is also about overcoming the fear and pursue something else and i think that was your entrepreneurial spirit driving to say this is not the end and is just the beginning and is definitely hard even going through the beginning of my culinary career to say. No i'm going to work for like twelve dollars an hour at thirty something years. Old back a humbling moment to say. Okay i'm going to do this. I'm not gonna be able to go out. Not gonna be able to save as much as i would normally would really have in overcoming latter fear nodes. It's not an absolute also kind of defining your own success. And what about seeds of doubt. You always had the talent on my guide because numerous ads make sure uber have a hundred thousand dollars. Sincere six figure business of whatever or seven figure know business. If you're not making that in your failure failure you know so defined what why you want. Have your business. Is it for money. Is it for the flexibility. You know why you're really understanding your why dow kind of push you through it for me. It's definitely the freedom more so the freedom to move to beat to my own but being entrepreneur it may not be a right way on the right way for you and your business in to understand that. Act to the road so kisha at this parv of the show. I always like to ask my guests. What is your passion. They building powerful purposeful partnerships through the medium of food is so broad. But yet you know the compasses. You know everything that i do a low okay. So break that down for us talking to people about food and working different companies kind of figuring out. How can i. You know magnify Mission making those different connections longs cravings underneath the umbrella. I'm the area nine. Think of food. In the same way as i think of music like with music when you hear particular song you feel transported to particular time there certain emotions that get triggered certain memories. I get triggered. Well i i think the same way about food. Also you might smell something you may taste and you're like oh i know what this is because the last time i had this something similar to this was when this loved one. May this for me. There are all these connections. People make around food. You know. there's a lot a purposeful in your efforts to engage people. How do you use food when you have corporate clients. How do you help or use food to help them. S achieve their missions. One case to have a pop up dinner series seven mass really one one. Great example have a theme and so i can bring in different sponsors and really meticulous is very was acting curator. Inexperience who you work with. What does their mission mean in desert. come together so my last dinner was a winter wild and was more about women's empowerment even the venue that shows a very light and airy and you're having Dance instructor snaking. Women feel powerful at the end of the day. Yes i just had dinner. Here's some food and you know peace be with you but you really think about what i want people to experience in using food as the backdrop or it or even the vendors you choose to work with in fact do have power like women black man you know whoever just give somebody opportunity in this industry near even when i worked in my corporate clients in a real understand where they want to get out of having a personal chef free you. How do you decide to show up in culinary spaces as a black person specifically as a black woman do have to be conscious. I am black woman and has more so against a class thing as a color thing. You know people who are higher new. I'm a luxury item. People can afford a high. You have definitely worth a couple of million dollars in. How do you show you have to know how to walk the walk in understanding the world they live and even splaine's people like even family members like wage Cooking for white people. I mean you can have this whole mammy at times like fall campaign. Well just in case you want to know. But i can see the whole perception of xactly a black woman cooking for donnelly white men. Sometimes it can play mind games. You don't think kleiner's dance what's going through your mind as a black woman cooking for you know personally or being transported to another point in time it is a different climate just knowing that this is a client business relationship by refilling some point. There's any race racial undertones or anything. I know this is not the place for me the blessed to have science where you acknowledge it. It's nice now looking at me. Certainly in the restaurants is different. You don't see that many black women Only one so either as a woman or as a black woman to begin both of both of it by i've been blessed to have words with different women in positions of leadership also soupy in environments where it is supportive you do hear a lot about the sabotaging does the negative stuff that comes out of restaurants but not every kitchen is like finding the right kitchen now. Works for you. How would you connect these experiences to what's happening now. With black lives matter and the scope of black lives matter. I'm glad that people are looking to support black women. Businesses like never before like more grants are coming open and is this really noticing that there is a problem. They do one build. You know blacklist definitely. It was not before although we have these different social movements that quite frankly the issues that they're raising are things that have existed. For very long time you have sexual impropriety and people using power differentials for sexual gain or or to engage in sexually oppressive practices and then you also have the fact that black lives matter and that many of our structures institutions. Don't acknowledge that it is. You're right prompting more open in very direct dialogue around the inequities that persist in the ways. That even in instances these intersect. Exactly it's kind of brutal it really is and you talk about. You know women's issues like you were on average in a restaurant twelve hours a day. Work like ballots haven't time off. Adequate childcare is a lot that even being a woman of color lisi's conversations are being having actions are being taken leave experiencing the pandemic of covid nineteen and so how has cove it specifically impacted you and your food education work. Are you seeing certain kinds of trends ways in which people are reaching out to you to help. Educate folks around food even in the midst of the pandemic definitely took more of an online not doing as much personal shopping hit using the p. Where but drive the the pivot and being able to connect to different people are people are would not have normally reached out to you know vice versa. People reaching out. I think it's more about how to be connected to people just on a human level how to do it. Through social media through different online he vents to help people just have a good time just to be able to make somebody smile. You know what my job is done. So give us an example of that. I just did you know cooking challenge. Where a focusing on natural foods in a wasn't overt message by all the ingredients that different i worked with were different fruits and vegetables. Nothing that's crazy like a sweet potato. Or you know basil Get yourself to jefferson ingredients. Ingredients that you may be you. Expect me prepare them in a different way in seeing how different people repair them may hopefully inspire you to get into. The kitchen is interesting to watch people. Cook. 'cause it tells a lot about themselves really in what ways so people don't like to follow instructions. Give a recipe nom de own a note. Here we go free stolid in the you wanna know why the dish may not turn out the way you like it or some people are apprehensive food and how you approach it does tell us about yourself. Now love it. You have been in several web challenges including the epicurious challenge with over ten million views. If you didn't know yourself and you're watching yourself. What would you watching yourself. Tell you the skirts on me. I definitely would follow a recipe. And i think that goes back to the engine that matt i wanna follow to a t and see how it turns out most added to myself. Let it go just flow definitely more savory food that you can you can do more free. Solid baking is more. You need to follow that precision in down pack. I'm a huge fan of the food network. In someone i sometimes. We'll watch the program. Chop there are no recipes like to follow to a t that is completely free style so you know if by chance you have someone who is listening in. And they are from the food network. Is this something that you would love to do. Or will your math science brain just sort of go like. Oh my gosh. They're all these other competitive elements that are happening. And then you've got to create this dish in like twenty five minutes. I watched Renown of all hell's no never You know do that. Then makes you think about food in a different light but then the the whole time thing is definitely reflective of in the real world as chefs. Like you know you guys get these dishes out. At a certain point in time nest. In there i just want to be whimsical. Like no is gold Yourself go through that process quickly quickly for me. I like to kind of draw over many years but that is a whole different. Need to really been in you action. So i think in theory. You would be intrigued by the opportunity but you're like from my mental health and sanity. That's not good fit. Because i always you always have to have new challenges in your life see overcome alpar saying no within like no. You probably might regret it in the future. The definitely take it in because you never know where anything lead you to to know that. It's not you're not cooking oil under the perfect circumstances questioning catering you don't have a full-fledged stove cooking on In a back corner somewhere in in a garage is awesome. No but you make happen if he'd actually have a passion food kind of figure out where you want how you want express your love for food so the would what lessons have you learned along the way fighting a mental guard sue. Starting business. don't have a go at working with a mentor or business. Coach new jersey. Those upticks in growth quickly as opposed to trying of tackle it by myself from just being lull. Vital'o the kind of thing when you're working by yourself by people talking to yourself to get different active in also from somebody who's been there seen the before they know what you're going through reference to how you want to tackle that problem of try to ourselves near up not moving as fast or as far as you could have one big lesson having a support group bag gets it. You can have your friends and family Friends and family but yet having a support group of business minded people because the conversation's totally different. In what ways you know for me growing up we did not talk about statements or in how the best market does not conversation to have with your friends and family but sometimes you need to be a different group of people to have those conversations. Where would one get a mentor. How does one find it when the field itself is so competitive and you know people want you to be good but not better than them in is that you have to kind of figure out who has your best interest at heart even your peers can be your mentors for different catering company some able to kind of bounce around so able to see different. The connor act out different businesses operate. So may not be a formal mentor ship. But you're getting something out of it you know you're offering her services as working. You know you're seeing how things happen then you can meet. Different chefs were either actress. Same level or above Say like hey. I want you to be my mentor. But there is that mentor by me. Being around people who liked to show what they can do. You've just ask nine hundred ten. Most people would very helpful in larger. Companies does have that competitive. Only one person be on top working. Traditional company is only one executive chef only figuring out and my ever gonna get to that leadership point. You might not win thin. Our respective company may have to leave the culinary organizations that you can join culinary alliances that you can't find mentors and look for somebody specifically What the organization is developed to do to mentor. women in the tally no industries. If you can't find one with any respective organization you can find one in a professional organization. Instagram we see people's pictures is reach out the anthem. And i think that's kind of the great thing about social media people lot more accessible launched our friendly people for the most part guests a bunch of deuce bags out there but finding responded say x. no keep trying to act the where we land Kisha what are you most excited about personally and professionally are are there particular projects ventures that you are currently engaged in ken. People kind of tap learn more about you learn more about these works and what you have going on indefinitely a lot of stuff. I do on instagram. So follow me on instagram. At gourmet see what new projects in events that are popping up different partnerships that definitely be formed in devon cooking. Classes are in the works as as well as anybody wants to reach out to have me you know as a virtual cooking coach now feel free to reach out and definitely excited about things that we can create and staying. Flexible is one huge aspect. As we don't know what does virus Are lanting going to look like but definite for me is stay flexible. What would i can't do. And where can people find you. What's your social media handle. And what's your website. Joe my is. Www dot the gourmet diva dot com and also instagram as gourmet diva perfect. until hopefully. we'll get to see cookbook. A cookbook is on the list. Somehow something maybe a different women. Powerful women have the recipes into this book or something. So something creative come out of it. They tuned on that as well. Thank you so much chef. Kisha for all of your jewels gems of knowledge and information that can help folks who are interested in pursuing their passion around culinary arts in a very formal way i think your entrepreneurial spirit really helps to speak to just the ways in which we can be creative not only in terms of our choices for fields and what we wanted to pursue but just even the kinds of activities that we engage in so this was really lovely. This fun. Thank you so much. You're welcome. thank you for having mary there. You have it. The journey isn't over but this episode is until next time piece.

Kisha Laurich Kisha ogle natural gourmet institute for smith canteen carroll gardens brooklyn amy patina events oliver chang duni fund kisha natural gourmet institute national gourmet institute new york city university of buffalo bishen america soho new york east coast
It's Our 200th Episode!

Radio Cherry Bombe

39:00 min | 2 years ago

It's Our 200th Episode!

"You're listening to heritage radio network were member supported food radio network. Broadcasting over thirty five weekly shows live from Bushwick Brooklyn. Join our hosts as they lead you through the world of craft brewing behind the scenes of the restaurant industry inside the battle over school, food and beyond. Find us at heritage radio network dot org. Hi bomb squad. Your listening to radio cherry bone. And I'm your host carry diamond each week. We talked to the most inspiring women in and around the world to food today. We are celebrating a big milestone for cherry bomb, the two hundred that bestowed of our podcast first. Let's thank our sponsor, handsome brook farm, pasteurized, organic eggs, handsome, Brooke farms secret to making rich, flavorful eggs is simple. The most possible space the best possible feed and lots of love. It's a healthy and humane recipe that makes your omelettes cakes custard 's and everything in between taste better to learn more and to find their eggs. Visit handsome brook farm dot com. I can't believe we've hit the two hundred Mark when the podcast launched almost five years ago podcasts were still a relatively new thing. But we loved the idea of bringing cherry bomb magazine to life through audio. Why did we name it radio cherry bomb? Fun. Fact, I was a big REM. Mm fan and always loved their song Radio Free Europe since the debut of radio cherry bomb. We've interviewed literally hundreds of women each of them with a unique and special story to tell I've met so many great people through the show and we've run the full gamut of emotions on air. We've cried with Kim Malik the founder of salt and straw, and Michelle Mannix of cook space, we've laughed with Lisa q Fetterman and Amy guitar and Melissa Hemsley and we've dreamt of running away to Venice with sky Mackel pine and Chom McCoy only one guest made me nervous. And that was Nigel Lawson Nigel is brilliant. So you really need to be on your toes when you're talking to her to celebrate our bicentennial episode. We thought we'd revisit some of our favorite interviews. Here are few shout outs. And even do a special edition of our speed round before we get on with our celebration. Let's hear a word from our sponsor handsome brook farm. Pasture raised organic eggs. Handsome brook farm believes that organic and pastured is the way to go. When it comes to eggs pasture-raised means better lives for hens better lives for small farmers and better eggs for you. It's also better for chefs who depend on rich, flavorful, eggs, handsome, Brooke farms owned flock of amazing chefs their mother hens count on. It Suzanne Phan is a mother hen. She's the chef and owner of buttermilk kitchen in Atlanta curious, how chef Suzanne makes her French toast with caramelized bananas. The ingredients include whole milk, Chiba bread and some handsome brook farm eggs to make each slice as fluffy as can be. Or if you're like me and have a serious love affair with Pimento cheese. You can make her preventive cheese, omelettes, Suzanne, whips up three hands of brook, farm eggs. Let's the omelette set than adds red pepper. Jelly thick cut bacon, and my beloved Pimento cheese to put a delicious southern spin on. Breakfast favorite. You can find chef Suzanne's, delicious, egg Centric, recipes and videos on handsome brook, farm dot com. If you're looking for handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized eggs, you can find them at Publix Kroger sprouts, farmers market freshdirect and many natural foods stores across the country. Hi, this is Gabby and Diana from Smith canteen. And we wanted to say happy two hundred episode. Hi, I'm Lauren Goldstein, and I'm so excited that there have been two hundred episodes of radio cherry bombs, so far the first episode of radio cherry bomb aired on may seventh twenty fourteen. Our original host was Julia Tursun who many of you know, in love. Julia went on to host her own podcast and writes such beloved cookbooks as now and again and small victories. Hi, and welcome to the first ever radio cherry bomb show. We're coming to live from Burda's and Bushwick Brooklyn. I'm your host. Julia Tertia in one of my favorite interviews of Julius was when she talked to the barefoot Contessa, I kn- garden here. I kn- considers the lobster. I'll tell you another memorable meal that I had which was memorable for the wrong reason. Those are always good. Better under. Was coming for dinner. And I just I in the same way. I wanted to do something surprising. I'm sure everybody's serves this incredibly elegant meal to check and I wanted to do just the opposite. So what I decided I would do is my kitchen clam bake, which is in my first book, we huge pot, and you layer to 'tatoes and sausages, and shrimp and clams mussels, and and then you put corn and lobster on the top new pour a whole bottle of white wine in and you steam it for thirty minutes, and it's just it's like one of those like crazy good Neal's. And you put a big bowl it dump it into a huge bowl in the middle of the table. And I gave everybody, you know, white chef's aprons at their seat. And they just it's his hands on you. Just I dive into the phone will what in order to fill the ball. I decided I would take a lobster. Sam keep the Mormon the evidence than then serve them a little later. And we just had a wonderful time. We had a great dinner and the next morning Jeffrey woke up and said, oh that was so good. That was just a listen. But I don't remember having a lot. All they're still in the oven. Slow. We've all served a meal where you got to serve the bread. But I can't remember forgetting to serve the main course. So the next time I thought Chuck leaves the next day. And I said next time, I think I'll serve the lobster. It's unbelievable. We had a really good time. And that's the memorable part say. Yeah. That sounds very memorable. Hi, I'm Caroline shift known as pastry. Chef and I wanted to wish cherry bomb a happy two hundred episode, and you're the bomb. In addition to our regular radio show. We've done a few special episodes in miniseries. We did the super women's SuperFood miniseries and twenty eighteen about wellness with our friends at the Calderon Hannah Bronfman and others for our most recent miniseries. The future of food. We traveled to twelve different cities to hear from a wide range of bomb squad members, chefs farmers, restaurateurs bakers, a poet and more one of my favorite moments from the tour was when Sarah Keefer of the vanilla bean blog talked about her chocolate. Chip cookie recipe going viral her cookies didn't crumble, but other things did. Hi, I'm Sarah. I'm going to admit that I'm terribly nervous right now. I tend to write in stories, and so on I started to write what I was gonna write tonight. It just kind of came out in story for him. So I'm going to do what you're not supposed to do which is read your notes, but I need to tonight. So that's what I'm going to do with last September. I was pleasantly surprised to find a recipe from my cookbook make its way into the New York Times the highlighted recipe was for a chocolate chip cookie. That uses a technique now known as pan. Banging humane have heard of this where the baking sheet is tapped or banged in the oven. While the cookies are baking, creating ridges and crinkles around the edges of the cookies, although this has evolved, and some people are actually taking them out of the oven and dropping them on the floor to get these ridges being in the New York Times food section was a bucket list item. I never thought would happen. And I was ecstatic a few days later, Fox News picked up the story, highlighting my cookie on all its local news outlets and online nationally, my pan begging, cookie. Had officially gone viral. And I like to point out that if both the New York Times and FOX are reporting on the same story that it can't be fake news. It's my cheesy dead joke. I started getting emails and messages from people all over my Instagram was full of people pan. Banging their cookies and tagging me and photos, local TV stations came to my house and film me making cookies newspapers called asking me questions, and I was flown out to New York to make cookies at an event, it was a whirlwind of a month. And I found myself as one dozen social media addicted to the mentions hearts hashtags and positive feedback. The question of how do I get my recipe to go viral started being post to me, and I didn't have a good answer for anyone? There wasn't any formula or secret that I somehow cracks and I like to think and hope that it was because I had worked hard on making cookie baking. But there was one element that kept it trending. And that was for as many people who love this cookie and raved about it. There were also plenty of people who absolutely hated this cookie and thought it was ridiculous that it had been invented the comments section to the New York Times under this recipe. Is filled with comments of people angry that these cookies exist. They are too greasy to buttery too big to sweets and people are furious about the pan. Banging it's too time consuming. It's not worth it. And my favorite complaint was that. It was too loud. I had someone ransom me in an Email about that. So all I had some good press and saw my Instagram follower. Count increase rapidly over the month. My cookies went viral. I also had to process an except that there were piles of people out there who hated what I was doing. And maybe hated me for doing it as someone who avoids conflict has wrestled with being a people pleaser all my life and has been diagnosed with anxiety and OCD the set off a string of emotions I could accept that. My recipe wasn't for everyone. And I wasn't offended that someone wanted something different in a cookie. I always say just as curious so that there's always room in the world for more chocolate. Chip cookie recipes. But it was hard to accept that. People would write off my whole career and hard work over a cookie are that they assumed something of me because they didn't even like the picture of my cookie. I also had to deal with the press presenting me wrong while I was flattered and so thankful to be included in the New York Times. My book wasn't mentioned, and I didn't see any sales due to the article both for not being mentioned and the recipe being available for free. They also highlight on my Instagram career over my book career, the local news had a headline that read local mom gets in the New York Times also skipping over my career. And presenting the idea that you know, if this mom can get into the New York Times, anybody can do it. I was conflicted and frustrated that I couldn't control the narrative of my own recipe and story I wanted to bake the cookies for everyone and tried to prove they were good enough that I could bake. It wasn't just some hack influence there who lucked out and that I knew what I was doing. I found. Myself obsessed about a cookie I stopped reading comments on the news articles than on my blog, and I stopped answering questions about them in my messages and emails I started actually regretting the cookies and their technique as I anxiously, analyzed how many people viewed me through these cookies loggers started posting their own versions of them changing just a few ingredient measurements. Or sprinting them sprinkling them assault and calling them their own others tried to make the same cookie without all the fuss of pan. Banging these new recipes were born for my original, but they weren't mine anymore, and I had no control over where things went. I started believing all the misconceptions. I was worried about I wasn't really a Baker those cookies are click bait, and I'm just a local mom who lucked out. It was actually in the act of parenting that I finally got over the weird spiral. My daughter was doing a report at school and she needed to pretend to interview someone famous. As she was looking through a list of possible options, I slightly mentioned to her that. Well, you know, your mom was in the New York Times. Maybe you could interview her she didn't even look from the paper. She was reading and said, well, you weren't really in the New York Times your cookies were maybe I could interview them. She's right over there too. I. I found myself laughing as I heard my ego crack in half. Oh my God. I am worrying about cookies. Yes. They are buttery and sugary and delicious as hell, but they can't bring clean water to Flint or stop the next school shooting. They won't give women equal pay or take the stigmatism away from mental health issues or remove the injustice of racism. They won't bring peace and only temporarily bring happiness they can't even do the simple task of keeping people civil in the comments section of a newspaper article. I thank my daughter for her honesty. I apparently needed a good dose of it. After that. I found myself pleasantly at peace with my cookies, they aren't really mine anymore. They belong to the pan bangers of the world. And I am thankful for each. And every one of them. I still make them often. They are house cookie. And each time. I pick up the edge of my baking sheet and drop it four inches in my oven. I watched a ripple form around the edge of my cookies and know that those crispy edges. In gooey chocolate. He centers will give me a moment of joy. But they do not define me for it is only a cookie cherry, Bob. This is Rochelle Oliver with islands vice magazine just want to say you light my fire every episode happy two hundred radio cherry bomb is only possible because of his incredible community. And that includes the guest hosts who've kindly stepped in for me over the past few years. I want to say thank you to Jane lark worthy. Clancy Miller, Jesse Sheehan Gilly, Houston, and Donna yen. Let's give a listen. Hi, everybody. Welcome to radio cherry bomb. I am Jane lark worthy. I'm Clancy Miller. Welcome to radio cherry bomb, I'm guilty Houston. And I'm Donnie yen low bomb squad. This is Jesse. She in. Another reason we love making radio cherry bomb is that it allows us to share highlights from cherry bomb events with listeners all over the world. One of those events is our annual jubilee conference. We've held jubilees in New York City, and San Francisco, and this April we are bringing into Brooklyn last year, Sharon Richardson of just soul catering gave one of the solo talks. And I think it was one of the most powerful moments in cherry bomb history. As Sharon is about to tell you journeys must be told here. Sharon Richardson from jubilee 2018 sharing her journey. This is the first time we've aired this clip. Hi guy. So my name is Sharon Richardson, at I am honored to be here this morning with you lovely beautiful women. I have already met some wonderful people here. And I'm just really glad that Quadir and Kerry invited me to be a part of the so thank you. So when Kerry asked me, so what are you going to talk about, you know, give me a few days when we think this over and so something came up in my spirit, and so my pieces call redemption. The foundation what do you know about being saved from era or your own choices or being saved from what older people call sin when you're just five years old? Daddy, came to get me to show me with no little girl should have to witness my mom passed out on the floor from the night before she had come home from work drunk again. That is said I need it for you to see this. Because you never believe me. I wasn't only child going through this all alone. Seeing my mom the mother that I loved who fed me who nourish me and told me that she loved me unconditional and seeing in this condition. I was very sad. My thoughts to myself seeing my mom like this is she dead becoming a caretaker became my life. Moving forward. Caring for those who I felt needed me. This was my job growing up as a wounded healer. And I can't take it to my friends partners lovers and friends and members of my church in girl scouts. Everything I became the kids of these people. So what's the age of sixteen who would know a who would believe that? I would collapse into the abyss of no return needing saving grace one day. H thirty. The worst happened twenty seven years ago on may fifth nineteen ninety my abusive boyfriend was murdered after walking into my apartment carrying my two year old son, my daughter who was eight years old at that time did not know or have a clue that she would become the next kid tak- in the family for my job as I knew it as caretaker had ended that evening. The courtroom guilty sentenced to twenty years. The feeling of darkness came over me hearing, the jurors hearing my family, and my mom yelling as she hit the floor, then the metal gates closed shutting behind me with a baby in my womb. The memory of blood in my mouth the scars on my face. The black is it was then that my path towards redemption had begun. Hours turned into days days turned into nights still moments returned in my thoughts. The years started to move forward after may nineteen ninety the prison doors opened, and then they closed I can only imagine what was next. There was no looking back the very keys that I turned as a correction officer was now being turned on me. I was the one behind the prison doors now, I laid in a coal cell on a metal slab with a mattress not made for humans deepened, my thoughts. I had to find solitude understanding and freedom. I had to find peace. I had to find remorse inside of me, a non forgiving place at that time, I told myself this, and I believed it after all someone died. It was my fault, right? Swiss it in my thoughts, my heart bleeds, as the tears continue to fall, I reminded myself in an instance, he did molest my daughter, he did beat my son. He told me that he loved me yet he bruised and busted, my skin. I needed saving. I needed understanding. I need it resolution. I needed to find me and fas- time not waiting moving slowly for the lessons in my life. Didn't come and don't come when they when you want them to. Yet over and over again, in my mind, I knew that I had to find peace Beverly Hills correctional facility. NYC ID ninety one g eighteen fifty four in myself in shock there had to be away back. Was there love in this doc plays core prison? I asked myself my upbringing as I remembered had seeds that will plant it in my soul, my West Indian spiritual family despite the many family floors needed watering. I thought time passed and I felt the seeds growing during the twenty years of my incarceration, I began to meet people with stories and melodies many with tapestries painted with all sorts of colored paths roads hills and valleys, I've found my spiritual healing in higher education at many levels that awakened my cognitive thinking allowing me to embrace a different phenomenal walk towards my freedom. What was dock started to have some light? Arrived. My journey took me to my mother's bedside visit eighteen years later, and this time my memory served its purpose for I would see my mother, again laying down on a different bed a bed that I thought that I would never see mom was on her deathbed. She could not speak only him. She had suffered a stroke. She was helpless all of mommy's choices and decisions had caught up with her now. And I was thinking I'm losing, my friend. I'm losing my buddy. I was so sad. But I had come to say goodbye, you can go now. I said, I we'll be okay, mommy. I promise you this. The ride back to the prison in handcuffs and shackles gurgling as my childhood belt bellied up the correction officers asked me, are you? Ok Sharon, I could remember weeping and weeping on that ride back. So why food people ask me why food? I return back to the prison with my friends cooked food, lots of it. They were allowed to stay up. And wait for me to come back. I couldn't believe it we ate, and we cried I told them about my trip. I told them about my mother's condition. We ate, and we cried some more that night. I told my story that led to that day. We all shared some sort of story that night, and then we had desert, and then we went to bed my day of redemption in that hour, I had begin to feel it all in one moment. I had arrived, and I didn't even know it my day of redemption in that our I was giving back all that was taken from me. And then I was released may six two thousand ten who knew what the journey and front of me would hold today. I am the. Proud but humble CEO and founder of just so catering. A Justice involved catering business a social enterprise a catering business at highest formerly incarcerated women, we cook so food, and we share stories to wonderful people of New York City people who love to eat and never sleep. So food comes from a sofa place inside those that cooked this food. It comes from a journey. Journeys must be told. It's where soul food is derived from its richness and face its ability to reach people. This is a story of redemption, a story a gif a story a gift to you. Or who city one of many stories told one of many given one of many to inspire all. You won't be surprised to learn this. But Sharon got a standing ovation for her talk. Another favorite moment of mind was our one hundred episode which we recorded in early twenty seventeen in Los Angeles at Headley and Bennett headquarters, I interviewed author Ruth rifle and chef Nancy Silverton, which was so much fun. The two women have been friends for decades and had a lot of history to share Ellen Bennett, the founder of Headley invented and one of my favorite people in the food world, kicked things off with a talk called the art of the hustle Ellen entered the room via zip line true story and offered this advice for the bomb squad. I always wanted to do that. Now check it off the bucket list. Okay. Hi, guys. So. Every week. We have a staff meeting at our office. And we always end up the entire meeting is finished with me giving the team of pep sock. So I thought it fitting for tonight to give you guys a little pep talk about life. So my the words that I really really live by and I wake up to every day is wake up and fight. And I feel like it basically means it's in you to get up to do it to get out there and make some stuff happen. And it consists of literally just deciding that you can do it. And every day I decide that today I'm going to do it, and I'm gonna make some stuff happen. So I always get up and these days I've been going to boxing and yoga and spinning and I don't have a lot of time. Because now, I have all kinds of stuff and obligations. I have to do. But I cram in the time, and I make it happen. And I feel so much better. And we're just so lucky to be alive and to have like arms and legs and a nose in a head that work, and why miss a day of this. Awesome life, and you just have to really get out there and fight. So. That's my first part of my pep talk. The second part that I love is the front door is an open climbing through the window. What does that mean? It means don't just stop because you ran into a wall or you don't see an entrance or you don't know how to get there or you don't know somebody that knows somebody everything that we've done with Headley invented. It was very much. We were just like we're going to find a way. And if there isn't a a front door, you climbing through the window, and if there isn't a window you make a window, and if there isn't a window or a wall, you go through the back garden, and you just find a way, and you get scrappy, and you have to just be okay with being scrappy, and once you're okay with being scrappy, it's kind of like all rules, go to hell, and you can just do it. And so just just do it. Okay. My other one is I really feel that like sheer determination will get you very very far. There's been a lot of times. I mean, I was a line cook, I'm a CEO. Now, I can't even tell you the meltdowns behind the scenes that happened to make stuff happen. And it takes a lot of determination and just sheer willpower to push through all those times, and you kind of have to be your own cheerleader. You have to just say, hey, you can do it. Get up k cry a little bit. Maybe wine, maybe punch a wall or something. But then get back up and keep going because it's in you and I've run marathons before. And the reason I wanted to do marathons was because I was like, okay, if you can run twenty six miles and not die. You could pretty much do most things in life, and if you've ever run when you get to about mild twenty you really feel like you're going to die or maybe you already did. Your legs are still moving and you still keep going another six miles, and you're like how my physically still on this earth right now. And then you get to the end of it. And you're like, oh, you proved yourself wrong, and you kinda proved yourself, right? You could do it. And you always could. And then you were like, okay. I am stronger than I think I am. So you really are stronger than you think you are. You just have to push through the uncomfortable painful, awful, nasty parts. So basically stretch your mental muscles. Don't give up wake up and fight hustle, your heart out, and you can make something awesome happen. And right now, we are in the time of the woman. I mean, it's like, we're we're here we're doing it. And it's so exciting. And so I feel like it's our freaking duty to get out there and prove to the world that we are. Awesome. And we are here in numbers, and we bring so much heart and soul to everything that we do. So like, let's prove it to the world. Let's fuck and kill it. Ladies. Okay. So thank you. Oh, and my last one this is a good one. I can't forget this one. They aren't bumps in the road. They are the road. I mean, how true is that? There is no easy way. There is no little side access road to success. It really does look like a work suit. And then you just have to get out there and do it. I mean, it really truly truly truly so hustle work, your heart out, you're gonna make it it'll be awesome. And then we will all cheer you on to. Such good stuff from Ellen. You've heard me do speed rounds with so many people over the years. But now the tables are turning and I'm going to be put on the spot with our associate producer, just Seidman. Just did not let me see the questions in advance. Here. We go. Hi, kerry. Hi, jess. Are you excited? Nervous. Now. Don't be nervous. Okay. Question. Number one, paper, plastic or reuse of Okada reusable Cup, always always favorite food from your childhood. Oh, gosh. Favorite food from my childhood. I had a lot of them. I loved my mom's tuna noodle casserole. I left Kraft macaroni and cheese. I'll say those those are delicious favorite magazine, and you can't say cherry bomb favorite magazine. That's that's a tough one. I have so many. You know, what I love gentlewoman? I think that's a fantastic magazine. Okay. Recipe. You know, the best I make a really good pasta with broccoli, rob and sausage, and it's really simple and delicious and so easy to make can you spatchcock chicken? I can spatchcock chicken. I did that last night. Did I tell you? I was going to do that. Did I thought it would be fun to share? Okay. It's easier than you think song that comes on at a party. And you're like yes this song. Oh, gosh. Anything by new order. Bizarre love. Triangle? Maybe amazing amazing favorite holiday for its food favorite holiday for its food. I would have to say Christmas Eve because that's the big holiday with my family. My siblings and nieces and nephews and everybody gets together. And my mom always makes a really fun appetizer spread and we have she makes little a little hot dogs like the mini wieners wrapped in, you know, Pillsbury crescent rolls and can't get enough of those one food that you could eat for the rest of your life ice cream favorite movie. Oh my God. My favorite movie it used to be the breakfast club. But as Molly ringwald pointed out, there are some things, but that movie that great, but I have some others. I love I can't just pick one love Star Wars and The Empire Strikes back The Royal Tenenbaums love and attornal sunshine of the spotless mind. That's the best movie. I think that's my favorite movie. Okay. Worst job you ever had this one. I'm kidding. I two hideous jobs. I sold hot dogs from a hotdog truck on Staten Island when I was a teenager that was just hell, and then I worked in the Staten Island mall at a cart and sold. Like really shitty cat stuff like this cat clock. And all this stuff. They were just. Yeah. Favorite coffee shop in Brooklyn. Smith canteen, right answer. Okay. This brings us to if you had to cook dinner or any food celebrity who would it be? And what would you make? Oh my God. That's a really hard question. Oh god. I love so many people who would it be if I had to pick one food slim, you know, what I. You didn't say if they're living or dead. This is kind of a morbid way to end the speed around. But you know, we always do the who'd you be trapped on a on a desert island with and my answer is always Anthony bourdain, and I would always be really surprised when other people's answer wasn't Anthony Jane's, drew. You know, I still I still think it's such a big loss to the to the food world and the world at large his passing, and I would love to I would have loved to have made Jennifer him and just gotten to know me better and understand, you know, what makes them tick. And what? I don't know. Just just have a conversation with him. I always thought I would interview him, and we came really close to having him on radio cherry bomb once and he didn't want to do the interview for for various reasons related to me too. But I regret not having had the chance to interview him. Totally so okay last question. What is the question? You wish more people asked you. I never think about that. I like interviewing people, I mean, I don't mind being interviewed. But I I like interviewing other people, and I think that's the been the common denominator through my life back to when I was editor in chief of the high school newspaper today, I just like telling other people's stories, so. The the thing that that all think is why didn't I ask that person that question instead of why didn't someone asked me that question does that make sense? Yeah. It totally makes sense. All right. Do you have any other speed round things? Just apologies for always turning speed round into a non speed round. I will admit something on a future episode of radio cherry bomb. I did the speed round. And I not I was acid. I asked to someone and I turned it into very long format conversation. We need to come up with a name for the cherry bombs speed round the nut quite speed. It's like the walking round. Okay. Thanks, jus-, things Kerry. Yeah. I'm Jeff men. Waldman Rodriguez, and I am the founder and hot bread kitchen and managing director at daily provisions. I'm Jessica Edwards and avid listener first time caller longtime listener two hundred. Episodes of Jerry palm brilliance. Congratulations carrying. For all that you do. I'm my name's Christina. I am the co founder macaroni parlor, and I am signing tongue co-founder of macaroni. Parlor. I'm also the co founder of meow parlor, and I'm a co founder of cat camp and eight thousand cats we have a lot of cats. We love food and we really loved hats. And we both went to wish carry and the whole cherry bomb posse a happy two hundred episodes. Please. No, it has been an honor and a privilege to host the show as Sharon Richardson said earlier a story is a gift, and I feel I've been gifted two hundred times over because of radio cherry bomb. It's been privileged to learn and grow and change with all of you the show is nothing without our listeners. So thank you for tuning in each week. We can actually see a map of where listeners are and we'd love knowing that the show makes it around the world each week. Thank you to the wonderful sponsors for helping keep the show on the air. And thank you to carry gold for throwing are two hundred episode party. You can see pictures from the party on our website. And thank you to the team at heritage radio the home of radio cherry bomb. We have some news. We will be launching a second podcast in a few months with a new host. We're doing another radio cherry bomb tour across the country starting in late spring, and we'll be visiting San Diego. Nantucket Baltimore, Phoenix and several other cities and starting with this episode. We'll. Transcripts available on our website. So the show will be accessible to even more people. Thank you to handsome brook farm for supporting the season of radio cherry bomb for more. Visit handsome brook farm dot com. Radio cherry bombs, associate producer is the one and only just Seidman just I love working with you. I hope you know that. And our theme song is by the band Challah. Thanks for listening everyone. You're the bomb. Thanks for listening to heritage radio network food radio supported by you for a freshest content and to hear about exclusive events subscribe to our newsletter. Enter your Email at the bottom of our website, heritage radio network dot org. Connect with us on Facebook Instagram and Twitter at heritage underscore radio. Heritage radio network is a nonprofit organization driving conversations to make the world. A better fairer more delicious place, and we couldn't do it without support from listeners like you wanna be a part of the food world's most innovative community rate. The shows you like tell your friends and please join our community by becoming a member. Just click on the beating heart at the top right of our homepage. Thanks for listening.

New York Times Sharon Richardson New York City Kerry founder bomb magazine Suzanne Phan Ellen Bennett Brooklyn Instagram Brooke farms Headley Bushwick Brooklyn Smith producer Europe Fox News Nigel Lawson Nigel Seidman Julia Tursun
Chef Iliana Regan Burns It Down

Radio Cherry Bombe

49:30 min | 1 year ago

Chef Iliana Regan Burns It Down

"Hi i'm so fierro chef and wellness enthusiast. Did you know that nearly three hundred and forty thousand or one in five new york city children rely on soup kitchens and food pantries to eat especially during the summer months when school is out the folks over at food bank for new york city want you to know that unlike school hunger doesn't take a break help them. I'm an child hunger by providing meals to families and children in need during this challenging summer months visit foodbank n._y._c. dot org to learn how you can volunteer spread the word and and more hi bomb squad. You're listening learning to radio cherry bomb and i'm your host carry diamond each week. We talked to the most inspiring women in and around the world to food. Let's thank today. Sponsors dancers likud on bleu culinary schools and traeger wood fired grills. I hope everyone has had a great summer. I am in total shock though that fall is right around on the corner in all honesty didn't have that much of a summer because it had to deal with everything around the closing and the sale of my coffee shop smith canteen r. I p smith canteen but i can't really complain because i was in ireland last week and i had a really epoch time. I was on a carry gold press chip and it was pretty life-changing. I'll be posting the highlights on the cherry bomb instagram and on my own insta- at carry bomb so be sure to check it out lots of scones butter. Cow's grass us just wait. What else is going on. I'll be back on the road for the radio cherry bomb food for thought tour we are coming to are you ready. Asheville north carolina columbus ohio kansas city missouri houston philadelphia and miami to record live episodes and to hang with the bomb squad in each city. Tickets are on sale right now at cherry bomb dot com thanks to our friends at carry gold for sponsoring our tour since i've been spending so much this time with the carry gold folks. I keep trying to talk them into giving me my own signature butter you would wouldn't you. I have the whole thing planned out. It would be called kerry gold carrie diamond very original just. Did i tell you this just as our producer. Just has no idea what i'm talking about. So carry gold carry diamond would have sparkling irish irish sea salt incorporated throughout the whole stick or maybe on top and the packaging could be sky blue my favorite color better than black. My other favorite color black butter packaging probably doesn't go over that while in supermarkets but you can see it right. I haven't succeeded just yet in convincing the executives but stay tuned all right and all of you know or at least i hope you do. We are doing a jubilee conference. In seattle. I am so in love with that city as you can probably tell from the cherry bomb instagram because we've been instagram ramming a lot of seattle content so many cool people so much great food chevrolet ericsson's places chef rachel yang's restaurants london plane in rachel's ginger beer franken joe's plant based ice cream kamo nagy for homemade buckwheat noodles and other deliciousness early bird tickets for jubilee seattle are on sale at cherry bomb dot com right now so again. Don't miss out because i've been traveling so much. We have a special guest host this week. My friend jordana rothman she the restaurant editor at large for food and wine magazine and an all around awesome human being jordana talks with elena reagan the talented talented and wildly creative chef behind elizabeth restaurant in chicago and the brand new milkweed in in michigan's upper peninsula also elena somehow somehow found the time to write a memoir called burn the place which is outright now if elena. 's name sounds familiar. Maybe it's because she is in the cherry bomb cookbook. She's she's on the cherry bomb one hundred and covered her wedding in issue twelve of cherry bomb magazine the one with sophia row on the cover clearly we lovling reagan stay tuned for elena enjoy down his very honest conversation about elena food journey the power of memory and how she came into her queer identity before. Are we get to their conversation. Let's hear word from our friends at likud on blue. Are you daydreaming about culinary school again. Think make this the year your dreams become reality with cordon bleu the legendary culinary school study classic french culinary techniques in cuisine and patisserie sorry as part of their exclusive nine month lebron diploma and graduate into a world of opportunity. You also can extend your course of studies to include culinary management and dedicated internships likud on blue has locations in more than twenty countries around the world and located within some of the best food cities out their london ottawa madrid bangkok tokyo and of course the spiritual home of cuisine and likud on blue harris turning turning your d- dreams into reality closer than ever visit court on blue dot e._d._u. For more and let your culinary adventure begin. I got this book on monday. I had read an excerpt from it. I was sort of thought that i was going to have to rush to get it all in and then i just like completely jammed through it because it's so exquisitely exquisitely written and it surprised me zero percent to read that you had studied writing and that that was one of your great passions in life before you decided to cook i guess and i just what strikes me the most and particularly actually in the beginning which i think makes a lot of sense because in the beginning you are a child and you are are remembering what it felt like to be a kid which is a sort of wild exercise in general to really put yourself in that place and you write in this way that is incredibly vivid ad in sort of non linear bursts and it sort of reminded me of like trying to tell someone a dream before you forget it or just recounting a memory that there are pieces missing from and it felt very very human and i just wonder how did you you put yourself in that frame of mind to sort of get into the into the sort of like richness of memory like. Did you have to go through a process to to remember these things things. I didn't have to go through a process. I think that i recall those memories frequently through probably hobbies throughout all of my life and throughout my adulthood like i could probably written just a whole book of memories from childhood. You know l. like and not moved past anything beyond the age of ten or beyond the age of leaving that farmhouse so i it didn't have to really do much mentally to prepare the way i wrote the memories or the memoir piece of that was how i would probably tell it and exactly how <hes> i remember the actual visions of of it so as i moved on through the book being you know having studied a little bit of writing probably when you get to the middle section you know when we talk about being you know my drug addiction and everything else might get a little bit more vulgar with that's who i was at the time and then at the end end. It probably wraps up a little bit more with less profanity which is a little bit now. How i am as an adult i mean unless i haven't and had coffee than it would be a different interview. I would be causing a lot more because that's how i feel when i don't have coffee but i've i've been caffeinated this this morning. So i'm fine. I thought a lot about about the role of of food obviously it's a food memoir but one of the things that really struck me as the sort of shifting nature of what food represents to you and to the various people who are important to you as you tell it in your in your life and i i i feel like there's a incredibly vivid and sort of astonishing and disturbing story early in the book about out you know this sort of formative moment with your father and your uncle at your grandfather's farm looking for central's which are on the cover of your book and your lifted up by a tornado and you know sort of edge very close to potential trauma that you you know don't articulate too much but it feels like something quite dark might have happened. Were you not rescued at that last moment by another family member and then at the end of that moment you talk about the cooking of cheryl's and and with butter and with your father and and and this incredibly tender moment of him sharing how you would prepare them and so and that moment it feels like food is restoration and recovery the end sort of grounding in nature comfort and almost coddling in some ways and then you know later in the really wonderful chapter about your mother. Jenny's this where she's making pirogies food becomes a sort of battleground and this like pride and this sort of you know withholding or giving as a as a gesture and is is really incredible to see how it is such a powerful vessel and sort of follows you negatively through the book and i wonder as an adult now and with is it nine years sobriety yet ninety nine and a half congratulations obviously a ton of clarity. You're married. You're a business owner. What role does or what sort of metaphorically does does food represent to you now. I think that it well. I would think that it's still goes to that same place of comfort. I think that you know just like alcoholism can be a family diseased and in inherit. Ah inherited trait whereas you know you might not always have the affliction of the actual addiction to the alcohol at some of those 'isms that people talk doc about can really get passed down. You know it's not in the book but every single serious partner i have ever had every single one in n._s. Is not an exaggeration. Their father has died of alcoholism. You know so it's like there's no coincidence that we all find each other somewhere and and that like somehow this thing becomes really a part of genetics and family behavior and learned behavior and so i think i was with moms so much as a child and for her as i describe in the book that food was the expression of love like that was the way that she absolutely felt love as a child and so. I think that that's where still stands with me today but but you're right there is some battleground to it and if i think about it you know my mom ended up hating the garden in the the the things that my dad you know he did the the growing she did the canning and for her that was kind of a job. She's like you know it wasn't her passion like she does love cooking food but i don't think like she wanted necessarily all of that in that way and so undis- thinking like out loud but i guess it is kind of a battleground because as much as i love food and cooking and preparing and sharing that experience with others and and and really expressing myself through it because i do find it to be equally creative outlet is i do writing. I think the running restaurant though is like you don't just as the chef and the owner and the business person of it. I don't just get to create the beautiful dishes i create them and then i have to teach the staff and then i have to reteach the staff when they do it wrong and then we have to serve it to people and i have to hope that they seasoned season right and then i have to do payroll and pay the sales taxes in because they do all of those components 'cause we're slow so small like account higher management team and on an h._r. Department you know that is like my internal battle you know because i have to have this restaurant that i wanna maintain gene and that i love but at the same time there's so many things that are so just really like atrocious that i hate and so that i mean that's actually a good segue to lead into burn the place and the prologue of the book where seriously unlike i wanna molotov-cocktail of cattail this fucking place down you know but i can't because i think that now it would be really obvious who did it yeah so that's how now you know as i've been thinking out loud talking through some of these interviews with others to is that you know i'm discovering during that burn the place also is you know also a maybe a metaphor too for just where i'm at in life and figuring out what i wanna do next because i i'm almost forty and i don't want to have this restaurant when i'm fifty five as i get older all the employees stay the same same age anywhere between twenty two to twenty six. Sometimes i'm lucky i get somebody over thirty and either they are just a really really hard worker and understand the business and so they're really great to work with or you know they already know everything and then. It's also really hard to work with so i i don't wanna be fifty five in dealing with twenty year olds that are you know not my own like i would like to have of my own family and maybe when i'm thirty five i have to be dealing with fifteen year olds but i just definitely i just don't want it. You've begun on the process of finding something else for yourself. It sounds like you have an in upper upper. Peninsula in michigan called the milkweed in which which you know i mean the photos look amazing and i was you know in your. I think it's in your epilogue where you're talking about. The silver bullet with ana and it looks like you've made that into one one of the rooms at the at the end which is so beautiful there a few things i want to talk about in in particular i guess we'll pivot into the woods <hes> because it sounds like that's where you're headed now. Which is only natural for you because that's where you started. It strikes me like sort of towards the end of the book where you're talking about going back to your grandfather's land with your father her and there's this fear that really lives there for you for you and your father but also you're compelled towards it. Even though it scares you you ha you have to sort of go. Deeper into the woods to find mushrooms and your father sort of standing on the edge of the woods and calling you back you mentioned that you wondered at one point if he he might have been a victim and it strikes me that the ways in which you sort of learn to work with the land to harvest us mushrooms and to can and preserve and and gather in some ways is sort of controlling that fear right like maybe e learning to make the land work for you is sort of getting <hes> getting in front of the fear that very much exists there and it's it's sort of <hes> getting to a comfortable place understanding that you have to live in lockstep with that fear that you can't be busted by it and you can't kill it so you have to make it work. Does that resonate resonated all. I hadn't thought of that but now i'm like movies. This is like a really interesting therapy session because you know at the at the cabin now. It's completely wilderness. It's not like that farm where my grandfather had about a week ago. I went out to go foraging and i had to go about like so we're buried about like like eight miles down a dirt road in the middle of like some small mountains and just sick sick trees. There's nothing around and <hes> for like miles and miles and then we're at least thirty miles from any service so had to go to pick some things because along our trails as we're driving in and out i watched very closely of what is there and and so i knew that some various getting ripe so i drove about twenty feet and i saw a black bear it was probably like six feet tall and probably four hundred pounds in this is <hes> underexaggerating 'cause. I don't wanna like over exaggerate and i think it was weird. Graduating was was like so. I don't know it was so huge that all aw is it was holy shit in it was running across the road from one part of the woods to the other it was so black that it was almost silver over or blue and had a little bit of the brown nose and it was just incredible like it was like breathtaking and a little bit heart-stopping shopping at the same time because i had never seen an animal that huge in the wild before and so now the evening comes on and i are outside and the dogs are in the yard and it's about nine p._m. And we hear a huge huge growling a roaring not that far away and a lot of thrashings through the brush and so it sounded like the the bears were maybe fighting or playing playing and so we got the dogs in the house and we went inside and where we're at because it's so wild they're not used to being fed by humans and so they're really not that dangerous because they're going to run before they like. That's probably why that one was running because he heard my truck coming so they're not that much of a threat but there is still a fear and so this last time i was there i can't on won't let me go foraging we now. She's almost like the version of my dad where i was going to a piece of land where i knew that there was lots of do berries and and strawberries and i was like i gotta go pick them so she took the shotgun that her dad gave her her stepdad and had the bullets in pocket. She has no idea how to fire it and is like i'm gonna go with you and so i was picking berries and she's standing there with a shock unlike in case a bear comes like one like shell actually hit it into like that it might actually die because that's probably not gonna stop of a bear if it's as big as the one i saw so but then the next time when i went out by myself i was going to look through look for mushrooms through the area where we have a lot of pine and i put on this full mosquito outfit and i took the bear mace with me 'cause she kept saying take on take your gun unlike we're the people and we don't like guns but the thing is is like kind of when you're in the wilderness everybody that we've met up. They're like well. If you're going out foraging you should take a gun with you and i was so i got this bear mace in my like little pouch where i keep myself than i put the foraging things but i was going down by the river which we suspect they probably hang out a lot to go catch fish and eat and things like that so <hes> i felt like i was was actually constantly looking over my shoulder but this time it's not for like bad humans. It's like for like real wild animals a the point that i would feel really remiss if we didn't get to talk about actually is the queen asked this book. If you're comfortable talking like everything i could probably think about yeah. Isn't that goes in there. This is the gas food memoir of at the moment so i highly recommend those of you looking for queer stories stories and food get it. I want to talk about gender with you because it's a topic that just keeps coming up in this book and in many ways feels like something that you're sort of working working out as you are writing it. It's such a <hes>. It's such a character in the book gender and your sort of tussles with it and exploration of it you talk a lot about sort of in the first chapter of the book finding out that you weren't a boy and it feels like in some ways the times when you are reminded of your are female mess or moments in which the power was sort of taken from you and i wonder too as you sort of an. I think he's do you get here in the course of the book weather. That sort of questioning of gender is about that. You are questioning you know sort of or wishing that you might have been a boy oy or if it's the sort of childlike understanding that you were gay from you were gay were born gay and you're a gay woman and before or you sort of understood what was available to you you sort of had this understanding okay like i want to be with women and a person who is with with women is a boy yen. No that's exactly right because when i think at least that's how i think as an adult what was going on for me as a child sort of <hes> hetero normative yeah because we're too because like when i realized some some of those things from i mean i think before i could even talk. I mean my mom said i would scream bloody murder if they tried to put me an address press you know so from a very early age and at that point. It's not that you know like oh. I wanna be with a woman then you know like so but then as i was maybe like three and four and five and i can realize now like okay. That was definitely early where my head was with it. I must be a boy because i like girls without that obviously being sexual in any way but seeing like you said like the the hetero normative relationships in yes like then <hes> you know i didn't hear about gay people or know what they were or no that that was an option he know and when i finally did kind of have little clues into it then if it was a gay a man usually like i don't know what if boy georgia's gate. Is that crazy that i'm like boys as everybody like <hes> he's gay gay a it's sort of like you know when you when you say a word out loud for the first time we've only ever read and you realize you don't know how to pronounce well actually but that moment is so cool in the book actually because you i mean that for me that was my <music> absolute favorite most poignant moment when you're leaving the farmhouse and you are leaving the boy behind and then there's this instantaneous s. pivot into an admiration of people who occupied this middle space so boy george annie lennox and it feels so right that you sort of get to this place where you're like. It's not it's not this binary thing borough people who occupy the space and maybe there's something in that for you you know as a kid washing. I was like oh my god. What is that you know and just being absolutely enthralled but yeah even even i mean i know as as the book goes on i am still kind of like was working it out and honestly i think that as a child though if if i was a kid now in that same exact kid i think you know in with knowing you know it's so much more widely talked about in tv and news and everywhere that i think people even living in rural areas still have much more of an understanding of what gay and lesbian and queer and trans and all those things are that i probably would have been asking my parents to change my gender but i dunno no. It's it's really hard to say because now you know as an adult. I know like <hes> i don't wanna be male like like why would i want to be one of them but it doesn't still mean that on the inside i don't feel a duality you know and so it's it's it's interesting because like on and have these conversations a lot about clearness gender and trans and all these things because it's so fascinating and there's so many things to discuss but when i meet men a leg when women sometimes me other women they feel natural competition and i don't feel that with women but when i meet men i feel it with them immediately and i know the other men sometimes feel that with men and i don't think it's that normal that women feel competition with men or maybe they do when they're an industries like i am but i felt that my whole life and so i don't now if that's a testament to my gender or like who i am on the inside in if that puts me in that middle space of the them are just kind of like i am not either or if that's a learned behavior from my dad who who was clearly pretty sexist and you know obviously still sexist things like i can't hear women's voices. You know like no matter what i love him but he's you know he's still that dude that is like oh my god and growing up in that environment and also now currently in this work environment that is male dominated where it's like yeah i feel like i have to work harder as a woman in harder harder to get recognition and you know like a lot of things <hes> like even think i wrote in the book like if i look like brad pitt ah fight club like there would be. I would be like so much more famous like that. Book would probably be on the best seller list right now. If it was the same exact freakin can story. We'll talk about restaurants for a moment <hes>. Oh that's so complicated because it has has struggled since day one like we were undercapitalized when we started and this is just like the honest truth and for for the first month i was there all the time but then i had to go back and open elizabeth and i kind of took my eighteen to continue b-team to elizabeth and things were just being mismanaged from like food costs to too many employees on etc etc in that has to be my fault because because i'm ultimately in charge of that but it just like if i wasn't at one restaurant one fell apart and then the other one would fall apart if just depending on where i situated myself in ultimately elizabeth is the helm you know that's the one that makes everything else breath and i was like guys if i lose this restaurant then everything goes you know so i have to focus there and we just could i eventually found a really great team there because obviously it turned over a little bit in the beginning in a great team that stuck but by the time they stuck it was already like the newness were off and people stop coming thing is much and so it slowly got slower as things got better and better you know this is such a typical. I feel like chicago. Restaurant story probably happens a lot in new york too and even with all the great accolades like esquire and she q. and all the leonardo local critics and stuff like that it just just just just dies down because new things open and people get excited and you lose focus indus in an mom they get distracted and so you know it just became one of those things where like i tried everything from like little special like oh mukasa dinners that i did our little themed dinners or you know creating rahmon in kids that we sold or just whatever it was that i could think of that fit within our brand but then those are only become like short term like little bandaids and we just never caught up from the beginning and elizabeth had loaned kids like eighty two thousand dollars that like you know so it became a part like oh my god like i can't pay this back now and one thing after another so it just becomes one of those things where it's mike okay. When are we finally going to pull the plug and i kept keeping it open for the two guys who worked there who were really really great. My manager who i talked to be my g._m. And my chef de cuisine i guess i waited until they had talked about it enough and brought it to me. The say like i think we need to close and then i was like you're right. Do and i don't know you know that was actually something i was discussing. A lot in therapy therapy was like i have to closest restaurant and i do not know how to do it because i do not know how to approach these guys about it and so we were talking a lot about boundaries because it's like why can't you just do it. Like why can't you just go to these people and say this is not working and we have to close it like i'm the boss. I'm the owner her for a while. I was worried about the investors and feeling bad and for most of them. It's like a good write off for them for their taxes. You know the loss still i was just struggling with it and it wasn't about like ego and having to stay open. I like really don't give a shit. I am so freaking happy. Yeah it is closed closed because even though i wasn't there every single day and i had those guys in charge both of them i've made space for at elizabeth and i think they're extremely happy that they're going to somewhere that is not constantly feeling like it's an failure mode and i had tim my guy who was the she am. I had taught him how to do the bookkeeping and watch you know the bank account and all those things so he was doing that same like juggle struggle game that i generally oversee but i was watching it happen as it would go down the day. He sent me a text message. It said hey chef. Can we talk when you're back in town because i was already ah milkweed i was like yes you know 'cause. I knew it was going to be about that because if he saw the bank account that morning which i had already saw i was is like like i don't know where the next dollar's coming from like. I don't know how we're going to do this. You know and i am out of like ideas because a lot of the things i do at elizabeth i love but like i teach eight week cooking horse and most the time in the past that cooking course like soon as i got the money from it. I would give the two kids the you know like i was stretching myself thin to the point where it's not good for any of the businesses either well. I'm still teaching the cooking course course 'cause i love to do it but as an example like i would just take on all these extra projects to try to keep fueling that one and it was getting to the point point where like it just like honest like oh my god. You're gonna go insane. You know well you can see when you get to the point where you know you're you're <unk> feeding one to keep the other alive and you get to a point where you both could be threatened because of that and i think it's really important to you. <unk> frame the idea of success and failure in restaurants like it's like our businesses not comparable to other businesses in many ways and so the idea of something failing is really like sticky you know and i think that clearly there are a lot of like emotional and business lessons to be had for you that you're articulating now. I mean you train these two people who are going to have a meaningful positive effect on the flagship restaurant and and you were talking talking earlier about sort of like the biggest struggle being managing people and teaching and i think you know i always think about that. One historic restaurant closes or like a restaurant. That's been open for ten years or something. That's historic. Maybe a stretch there but important to its community you know had longevity and and the idea of something failing after a decade of like feeding community is just sort of absurd and i think that it's it's important to and obviously this is very new for you but i think in time kosuke closing i mean but i think in time sort of extracting the the winds from that experience will be a a meaningful the exercise yeah yeah and i think too. You know you talk about process so much in the book. There's the whole the yes chef chapter which is so much about sort of like once you sort of click into place. You're chef like this is who you are teaching that is really hard like you talk about the sort of are indeed behind getting a donut right and your articulate so much like what goes into making something not just good but consistent something that can be replicated and the same can be said of the experience of being a business owner and it sounds like <hes>. Maybe i'll be your next book. The chapters about you know my current life in mostly about the career career as i realize even as you were talking about the yes chef chapter like my mind started a drift a little bit not that you're not a great speaker or interesting but i'm like. I'm like i want to have anything to do with it like i would tell my editor like i cannot write this in these like you have to put something about your career in there. I mean you're what you're describing your so. It is much easier to look back on a journey and be like okay. Hey like here are the lessons that i learned and here's the boat put on it and here's because that's behind you and i mean it's deeply confronting to write about who you are as a person now because you're not even forty like you're still writing it. You're living it and so the idea of like capturing an amber is like disturbing. I mean it's because so much has changed from the time of writing do right yeah in even is so in that chapter. I just tried to best convey what like the day a of in the life feels like maybe to take some of the shine off of what people think is glamorous because like i really don't. I don't think that this job is full of glitz and glamour like when i meet people and they say oh. What do you do like what i met honest family for the first time they were like oh. I hear you're a chef. What would you do and i was like yeah. I just i cook at a restaurant like because i didn't want to. You know like i didn't won't questions. I didn't want to talk about it like i just i didn't even want to say it was my own restaurant like i'd rather just say like a line cook. It like mike you do that all the time when i'm traveling on the road because when people find out that i'm a food writer. Their first question is frequently. Do you know guy fieri ears. You know i i can't manage it but i will say you know what i do and then i get you know occasionally like incredibly tender things in return and i'm like that's the dice rolls. Let's rams people will be like. I want you to know about this. You know this restaurant or the recipe. Ask my mom used to make and it's like an incredibly sweet. I'm so glad we had the conversation but more frequently. It's like yeah like people asking me about you know guys. I don't know fear were not buds man. I really my lane. Why i want to ask you like i didn't know how our conversation was. Gonna gonna be because i know that you just are are really clear that you hate talking and so i was like is she gonna wanna talk to me but like like i don't know. I feel like we might get along. I don't know but i guess a question that i always have people who don't like talking about themselves. This is like what do you wish. People were asking you all <hes>. Probably nothing like appear. That's the weird thing. 'cause it's like well. You wrote a book and you have this like you know restaurant that people are interested in and like of course you're going to have talk about these things. And how can you so honestly express everything through food in through you know actually writing about yourself and you know that's. It's like that's a really weird. Thing is like because i am such an introvert and like i guess it just depends on on what the context is in the situation about like the talking you know my job has become more than a chef is a problem albums offer which is interesting and it's fun but the part that i don't like is people needing me to come solve the problems four four of them when it's something that they can easily solve themselves for that i can. I give them actual authority and autonomy to do and i guess i'll i'll end by ending where you end in the book. Which is this really sort of beautiful meditation <hes> really emotional beautiful moment of you and ana in the wilderness <hes> just sort of moving around in your silver bullet and finding places <hes> <hes> layer heads and you talk about not being afraid anymore because you have this this person and you have this and the confidence johnson the <hes> steadiness that she brings. It's an interesting place to end particularly right. Now i think in america because you're sort of like a road trip moment that you're talking about sort of feeling safe places where you might not have expected to feel safe as a queer woman with her wife you you know out in the wild and i wonder i'll be franken. Say that in many ways i feel more than i've ever felt i feel afraid and a a to the extent that you know my partner and i have talked about like we actually need to have a sort of exit plan. If things sort of cross a certain threshold in this country. Where do we go like what what do we do. And at. What point do we do it. You know because i come from my ancestors did flee early and you know and and that's why i'm alive for you know and so i think about that and i and i wonder if you're reading it today. Do do you still feel the same safety. Well i mean i that last seen with you know that was actually last summer <hes> but the thing is is milk. Weed is my exit plan. It's in the upper peninsula and we're thirty miles else from lake superior and when you cross lake superior at that point you're in canada so there you have really are exoplanets plan this canada's well. We'll see come to milkweed in. It's completely off the grid. No it's going to be the last place that people are going to be looking for a bunch asia lesbos inquiries so what we'll do is just wo cross thanks to jordana andolina. We'll be right back with a special speed round after this word from traeger. Let me introduce you to traeger woodfired grills accompany that has revolutionized cooking outdoors. I had the opportunity to see traegergrills up-close and inaction at a special event. We did the summer in the hamptons and let me tell you. They are beautiful pieces of equipment. Some of our favorite chefs proved just how versatile and easy traegergrills are to us. We we had grilled grapes. Yes you can grow grapes and they are so tasty they pair beautifully with barada and grilled bread. We also had delicious grilled vegetables beef tenderloin tenderloin that was as soft as butter and even a stone fruit gallant. I had no idea you can make baked goods on a traitor but you can traegergrills infuse your food with woodfired flavor. You can't say that about a charcoal or gas grill cook alfresco and do it hot and fast or low and slow however. Are you like try it on a traitor visit traegergrills dot com to learn more welcome back everybody we're slipping in a little speed round with one of the newest team members a cherry bomb miss audrey pain audrey was intern earlier this year and she is now a full time staffer. A cherry bomb and i personally couldn't be happier. Audrey handles all things retail works with our stockists and is our number crunching analytics queen right audrey correct correct. I thought it would be fun for everyone to learn a little bit more about audrey so we're doing a speed round with her ready. I'm ready. Are you nervous. Yeah this is this. Is your official radio cherry bomb debut right for the most part. Ah yeah okay believe at that. Which city is the superior culinary destination sydney or melbourne melvin. Which city are you from. I'm from melbourne and i love food because i grew up. What did you study in college is business besides me who who is your favorite podcast host kerr swisher and scott galloway of course mine too these days one food you would never eat oh. I hate live. I've never really never eaten liver. I've eaten it but i never again. Will i love liver. Oh all right food. You miss from australia. It's a little cliche. Hey but i do get like meat pie cravings sometimes yeah okay tell us what a meat pie because i really not entirely sure it's basically just a beef stew and then cooked in pastry but it's a fun leg weekend lounge like easy treat bakery treat. Is it something you would make it at home nor really unless you're really into cooking so easy to buy okay song that makes you smile. Tales of our wondrous came out. I've i've got you existed is really fun. Oh good okay yeah. I forgot to mention your resident taylor swift fan so taylor swift. If you're listening and you want to be on the cover of cherry bomb we'll see if you want to just hang out all right. Tell us what a flat white is. A flat wide is a coffee that i believe is is from melvin and it's basically like all the good things in the world. It's basically just a shot of a suppressor and then the heated up milk but nor froth got it yeah okay. Have you ever worked as a barista. I worked at a movie theater and a hat to make coffees as part of that <hes> now you you tell me that yeah but i was bad but i think you expect to coffee. Everythi saw like it's five that is one hundred percent correct restaurant. You would love to eat at one day. It has has to be a female staffer. Forget it. I'm going to see i've never been you've never been we can arrange that monsieur chef missy robbins missy. If you had to be trapped on a desert hazard island with one food celebrity who would it be and why maggie bia she is the grandmother of australia i think and i used to watch her shows after school and it's just comforting and i think it would be very fun time the grandmother of australia or the grandmother australia cooking cooking yeah. Tell us a little bit more. We're about her. She has a pheasant foam in the barossa valley and she makes these great products and she is going to be the new master chef australia. I first and she's very into home cooking. She's very famous for using burji and everything verge you okay. I i have never cooked with virtue which she make you <hes> meat pies on that beach. Oh definitely definitely okay. That sounds good. You australians have so much hometown bride for master chef australia. I think has changed the way that my generation views food because it's on five nights nights awake and avenue paik it got higher ed ratings than a lot of sports finals so it's like a huge thing being and they talk about you know everyone's food dream and i think of lot to educate people on how to cook better food at harm at five nights a week <hes> that's crazy yeah and some of the episodes will bay half of it is the competition and the other half. It's a mazda claw. So it's three hours. Ah yeah that's impressive and it's launched so many careers. Has it ever made you cry. Yes it's very emotional so since you said a lot about their food dreams what's your food dream audrey pain and then we'll let you go. My future dream is to have a cafe it is. I haven't abused you that notion. No i was like a cocktail kerry. She'll be like you're crazy well. No you can run the cherry bomb all hearing for the first time mm-hmm is something we are working on so if you listen to all the way to the end of the show you just got a little news nugget there people and <hes> now. We have something else to add to audrey job description <hes> all right audrey. You're the bomb. You're the bomb. That's it for today. Show giordano rothman. Thanks for filling in for me and elena reagan. Thanks for coming by radio cherry bomb be sure to check out a lena's memoir. Burn the place and then make plans to visit elizabeth or milk. Weeden elaine is interview was was recorded at the wing in dumbo. Thanks to the wing women as always and thank you to today's sponsors trigger woodfired grills and the cordon bleu culinary. Sorry schools don't forget. We'd love if you could support. The hunger doesn't take a break initiative from the food bank for new york city visit foodbank n._y._c. dot org furthermore radio cherry bombs a production of cherry bomb media our show is edited engineered and produced by just seidman cherry bombs powered by lauren page goldstein goldstein audrey pain kia damone and donna yen our publisher is the one and only kate miller spencer and our theme song is all fired up by the band challah. Are you fired up. I know i am thanks for listening everybody. You're the bomb. I'll have what she's having hi. My name is suzanne raffled and i'm the owner of camp craft cocktails. Do you want to know who i think is the bomb sauna. Ah very qadri owner of diaspora co op a food business that sells single origin turmeric from india. Sauna is the bomb because she works next directly with indian farmers ensuring pay equity and equality product while disrupting and decolonizing food systems when she's not immune boom by sauna lives in oakland california with her pit bull lily and partner in life rosie uh-huh thanks.

elena reagan new york elizabeth partner michigan seattle cordon bleu bomb magazine business owner chicago editor likud melbourne elizabeth restaurant australia Asheville kerry ireland Audrey
Episode 175: Girls Gone Wild

Radio Cherry Bombe

46:39 min | 2 years ago

Episode 175: Girls Gone Wild

"You're listening to heritage radio network. Were member supported food radio network broadcasting over thirty five weekly shows live from Bushwick Brooklyn. Join our hosts as a lead you through the world of craft brewing behind the scenes of the restaurant industry inside the battle over school food and beyond. Find us at heritage radio network, dot org. Hi, everybody. You're listening to radio cherry bomb, and I'm your host, carry diamond. Each week. We bring the pages of Terry bomb magazine to life through conversations with the most inspiring women in and around the world of food. I'm calling today show girls gone wild because we're talking to some very adventurous people in this episode. I, let's thank our sponsors Likud on blue. If your daydreaming about culinary school, maybe it's time to say Bonjour to Likud on blue, learn more about the legendary culinary school's. Most prestigious professional qualification Legrand diploma by visiting court on blue dot EDU and Bob's red mill. Bob's red mill is an employee owned company that's been offering organic gluten free and stone ground products for decades visit. Bob's red mill dot com today and use the code cherry twenty-five for twenty five percents off your order. That's a great deal. Ladies. And vital farms. Pasteurized eggs, vital farms. Pasteurized eggs are better than cage free. They are bullshit free. Try for yourself to get your coupon for vital farms. Pasteurized eggs had divided farms dot com. Backslash cherry bomb. We have some housekeeping for you. Cherry bomb will be hosting a brand new event. This October, it's called cherry bomb university. The tagline is the school for smart cookies. We're taking over food, the food and finance high school in Manhattan on October twenty. Sixth, twenty, seventh and twenty eighth. We have a fun assembly planned for Friday night with ready professor, Christina Tosi than we have classes on Saturday and Sunday. Plus the smart cookie. Bake off each day. Tickets are on sale right now on cherry bomb dot com. We have a great weekend plan for you, and we would love to see all of you smart cookies there. So our first guests are calling in today from a campsite in northern California. They are chef and adventurer adventurer. It's on a word. I say that often adventurer Sarah Glover and photographer. Louisa Brimble. Sarah is the author of wild adventure cookbook, a gorgeous cookbook that just came out this week. Louisa took all the incredible photographs. Wild is such a bold gutsy celebration of life food and the outdoors, and I'm so excited to talk to them. We will be right back with Sarah Glover and Louisa Brimble after this word from Likud on blue, are you daydreaming about culinary school? Again, make this the year, your dreams become reality with Likud on blue, the legendary culinary school study classic French culinary techniques in cuisine, and patisserie as part of their exclusive nine month, Legrand diploma and graduate into a world of opportunity. You also can extend your course of studies to include culinary management and dedicated internships. Likud on blue has occasions and more than twenty countries around the world and located within some of the best. Foodie cities out their London, Ottawa, Madrid, Bangkok, Tokyo. And of course, the spiritual home of cuisine and Likud on blue Paris, turning your daydreams into reality is closer than ever visit court on blue dot EDU for more and let your culinary adventure begin. All right. I am so pleased to welcome. Sarah Glover and Louisa Brimble of the wild adventure cookbook to radio cherry bomb ladies. Are you there. Oh, yeah, you know. So funny the whole time I'm talking about you and I'm like, wow, I hope to God. They're actually on the line. So I'm glad you there. A dream in the Russian river for a while. Okay. Well, it sounds like you're sitting in an airstream and the Russian river forest little who sounds a little rough, but I love you both. So we're going to, we're going to stay out this. All right. I just have to say, I love this book so much because it is so gutsy, Sarah, you surf you snorkel you fish, you light fires, you cook you camp. You bake cakes. Like I honestly think every and I'm not being paid to say this, but I really think every woman listening, every person listening to the show should go buy this book and pledged to be more adventurous. And especially if you have a pre teen or a teenager on your life, definitely buy buy it for them by it for yourself. I put the book in that same category as like good night stories for rebel girls or the movie wonder, woman. You know, it's just something we ladies have to support because if we want to see more things like this, we need to support projects like wild. So I'm so that's it. Thanks for calling in. All right. So so anyway, Sarah, tell me, I'm really curious. Were you born this way? Are you know, is adventure being adventurous nature? Is it nurture? How does that happen? Well, I can be. And I get my nam with away. You know, we'd wipe up into honing into the door and at a big Brown by and the from young a, you know, I'd be living up the apricot tree, or, you know, hang in the back yard on, I love the outdoors and in night on the definitely being offered me and I really enjoy being out on an side of things with naturally progressed from there. I've got five brothers. I spent a lot of fun event for them that I do what I would do. I think that maybe a little bit of it, but obviously being feminine. At the same time. I've been interesting just like being keeping woman enjoying cooking lobbing being in the outdoors, and you know the ocean. By Bennie that I find peace in reflection against the need, and we'll be my life. Biography Ryan. You know what I believe in. That that that a little bit about how it happened, maybe myself so ladies, you know what? We're having a few technical difficulties with the call. So I have an idea what if I am do some questions that I plan to ask you and maybe you can answer them via Email for me and I'll put our interview on Instagram with some pictures from the book. Does that sound like a good work around for this. And we'll put the handles for your Instagram accounts because your Instagram accounts or as fabulous as the book to people are going to want to follow along. All right. Well, I'm such a fan of both of yours. I look forward to meeting you both in person one of these days, and we're going to keep pushing this book because we just want to see it, be a huge bestseller. So congratulations. Thank all right. Take care. All right. Thanks for dealing with our little tech issue there, but, but I did want to give you a chance to at least hear something from Sarah, Louisa. But like I mentioned, we'll continue the conversation on Instagram. All right. We will be right back with our next guest. Sarah Schneider of New York's eg shop right after this message from our sponsors. Does this happen to you? You need a dozen eggs. You go to the supermarket, you head to the eggs section, and you are so confused by what you find there. You freeze. You want nice eggs on hand because maybe you want a cheese and herb omelet for dinner or an honor of our next guest and eggs sandwich, right. And you know, quality eggs, make a big difference end you're decent person. So it's important that chickens have a good life. But as you stand there, you think to yourself, I have no idea what all these words on the egg cartons mean. So you shrug pick one and continue shopping, stop right there. You are a busy lady. You don't need this bullshit in your life. You need bullsh-. Shit free eggs, which is where vital farms pasteurized eggs come in their pasteurize hens Rome outside and one hundred eight square feet of space per hen. Those cage free hens. They never go outside. I tasted the difference once I tried vital farms, eggs, try for yourself to get your coupon for vital farms. Pasteurized eggs had divided farms dot com. Backslash cherry bomb. All right now it's time for our Bob's red mill minute. Okay, we have a fun thing to talk about today, and this is probably not what you're expecting because for each of our Bob's red mill minute, we've talked about big goods and things like that. This is a baked good, but it is not for you. It is for your dog. We're gonna talk about homey. Talk biscuits. Now I know a lot of you in the bomb squad are proud pet parents, and you have a dog or two or maybe three. And I'm wondering how many of you have made dog treats from scratch. If you've never done this before we have an easy recipe for you that will share online, it's from my pal. You know her well, Gabby Viggo our head Baker. Smith canteen over in Carroll gardens, Brooklyn, Mike coffee shop, which is right across the street from cherry bomb h. q., not not. A lot of people know that. So my life pretty much is running back and forth between the two places. But Gaby loves dogs so much. And we have the cutest dogs in our neighborhood. So she decided to make some treats for them to sell at the canteen. Why save all the good stuff or the humans, right? So they're just four ingredients in this. There's Bob's red mill whole wheat flour, chicken stock, banana. And 'cause Gabby is a little crazy. She makes peanut butter from scratch for the dogs. So like I said, we'll tweet out the recipe later, but it's super, super simple, and the only special equipment you need are rolling pin and a cookie cutter. Gabby uses one in the shape of a dog bone, of course. So anyway, we'll send you the recipe also about dogs. If you are thinking about maybe adopting a dog, and you know here on cherry bomb were proponents of adopt, don't shop. Check out our friends, social teas that's t. e. s. on Instagram. Because they're always looking for folks to adopt the dogs. They rescue and for foster parents. All right. So anyway, Bob's red mill. Thank you for supporting radio cherry bomb and don't forget with Bob's red mill. You're not just getting quality. You're getting flavor, packed food. The tastes amazing visit Bob's red mill dot com today and use the code cherry twenty-five for twenty five percent off at checkout. All right. So finally, our guest has been so patient. We got the hang out all day yesterday and now today, her name is Sarah Schneider, and she is the owner and co, founder, founder owner and founder of egg shop, which has two locations in New York City. Sarah was working in the fashion world as a denim expert with brands like Levi's AG and true religion when she decided to scramble her life a little, she was obsessed with egg sandwiches and thought the world needed an egg focused restaurant. So with no restaurant experience, she quit and opened her for a spot. She's here to talk to us about her. Excellent. Journey, Sarah Schneider, welcome to radio cherry bomb. Thank you for having me I wrote. I'm so happy you're here because I finally feel like I met someone as crazy as I am. I am crazy crazy in a good way. Yeah, right. So spontaneous. Exactly. So I got to meet Sarah for the first time yesterday and we hung out and talked, and she is remarkable, and I really, really happier here to tell your story because you're proof that like if you have an idea, you can kind of sometimes bring it to life. I'm proved that ignorance is bliss. Right? What you don't know, can't kill you. Exactly. So let's start at the beginning. Where are you from? I grew up in San Diego. I moved to New York when I was twenty one a baby baby and running around and working in the denim industry for sixteen seniors was the plan to get into fashion, like, did you grow up, loving fashion, loving fashion magazine? I always sort of all over the place. I was like, I'm gonna. I actually went to UNLV for two years, and then I moved down and LV. What is the university of Nevada? Las big, wow. You went to college in the big, it's crazy. I didn't even know. What's left after two years of my, this is no good for me, and I moved to LA crazy to go to school New Orleans greatest that takes the cake. Yeah, it was too much so I had to run away and go to LA as if that was better. And I had I had big dreams of being an actress and quickly learned like that wasn't for me. I didn't want it bad enough we. That's so interesting. Yeah, I did musical theater growing up in, you know, can you sing? I wish gonna tell you talk about crazy. One of my dreams is the cherry bomb like talent show, and we've already locked in a lot of people for this. I mean, I have music that I've written and recorded comes out. If you dig enough people. So we've got like Kalou Henry who wrote back pocket pasta. She can sing Jane lark worthy who's guest hosted for me a few times, big singer, joslin and Erica formerly of white gold. Oh my God. It's the butchers. They are trained opera singers. That's next level, right? Yes. So I'm, I'm slowly working. It's going to I'll do like a little country rock vibes for you by twenty twenty. We will get this off the ground, not sooner if not like next week. Me. So. Okay. Musical. Like tell us what kind of music. I mean, just in high school, you know, I was like swimming and singing and doing musical theater and and I really thought that I wanted to be an actress and when I moved to LA I realized really quickly that I just I didn't want it as bad as everyone else. And I was working in a lucky brand jeans store at the time decided to visit a girlfriend of mine who was living in New York. And I was supposed to come here for a week and I called my parents and I was like, pacman Steph. I'm staying here and I was just really lucky and got a job in the store here and quickly sort of moved my way up into the wholesale world. And all of a sudden found myself, you know, slinging denim fewer for the next fifteen years. That's amazing. What's the denim? I mean, tell people what the dental morals is like for people who are like, what does that even mean? Sure. Denim. I mean, so I worked on the wholesale side of things. So I was a salesperson who had worked directly with buyers whether it was like Barneys or neiman's, and Saks, and we would sell in the collections to these buyers. So if you've ever walked into a store and you see what's merchandise in there, like that was a product of what I was selling into these people. It was super creative actually, and I loved it and I loved Denham because it was not pretentious, but you know, super fun and just felt. Felt like my style and the dental. Moral is so interesting because it's so trend based. So trying to base and you have to, you know, every band has its own sort of core what they do best. And so wherever you were working, he sort of had to take that into consideration and then figure out how to lay on trends for whatever brand you're working for and how that sort of worked for that company sort of like how you work in a menu. Right? You know, you have a go to jeans brand. Now. I have to say I'm still hugely vice fan and then Rachel Komi is like my other go-to. I'm Rachel Komi jeans. I love her all pants by hers, like I'm wearing them. Right. Yeah. Okay. I'm definitely made well jeans, girl and Levi's dwells. Great to made while has great downloads of fits. They've great hall jeans, right? So I get the tall jeans off the website. I'm shorty. Jeans for everybody that exactly all the ladies. All right. So this whole time you're working in denim, you have this burning passion. For example, ges tell us why you are obsessed with the exam, which I mean, okay. So I moved to New York. I'm twenty one. I'm super broke. I'm, you know, I'm working in denim, and I'm going out a lot as you do when you first moved to New York, China make friends and and meeting people and. You know, your little hung over and egg sandwiches are acceptable and they're not expensive, and you can get them twenty four hours a day. So it just sort of became my thing. And as I got older and I had a little bit more money in my pocket and started to sort of give shit about what I was putting in my body. I sort of became obsessed with the idea of having a restaurants that just had all the options. Like, why can't I be super healthy today? Or why can't I be really hung over and be able to find an egg sandwich. And nowhere the ingredients were coming from organic eggs and all that jazz, you know, and and I was like, I went out all the time a brunch. Cruncher never heard. It's embarrassing, but it's true, you know, and the like early two, thousands, you'd go have brunch and drink all day and like have fun days out on a Saturday. And literally nobody had examined, maybe they would have won on a menu and it was such a Colt, New York City thing, right? I mean, it's quintessential New York exile which is, and in my mind, at least that was my experience. Yeah. I guess for me. Growing up here, which is always an option. Sure. But the egg sandwich was definitely my go-to hangover sandwich. Yeah, like a corner. Deli on like any. Yeah. Yeah, you know, just eg ham, cheese, making, whatever the greasier, the better. Probably I would always say like if you ever see me with a corner, deli egg sandwich and a diet coke on my mind. You know, it's my one hangover of the year. That's still my go-to Danko Conan examined before now, it's like down the one time of year. You know, back in the day, maybe like four. Your time to catch up. Okay. So, okay, so exam, just so you're talking about opening this examines restaurant, new friends, probably thought you were like just carries right, but just how people would talk about like, oh, I'd love to have a bed and breakfast one day I was that it or were you serious? I, I don't know that I was serious at first. It was sort of like a joke. I'd be like, oh, I can. I get an egg sandwich. I want to be healthy egg Wade's, fed a spinach on, you know, healthy yummy. Brad wasn't an option anywhere, and I think my friends just got so sick of hearing about I was calling it a jump at the time like, oh my gosh. Yeah, I was like just like eneg shop like egg sandwiches, and they really got fed up. It was like, you need to shut up or do something about this and you know it was. It wasn't something I considered because I was out of the corner world. I wasn't in the hospitality seeing like I had no relationship to it. So how'd you ever serve tables been a waitress any of that? Yeah. When I was in college, I was like the head host at Spago but like series it was. It was a big job when I was young. I think Tom super big job. So I show much value. You never told me about like learning all these things. Data's head hostess. I want to keep it in. Yes, so so I did sort of understand the ins and outs of restaurants in, you know, I was a salesperson. I feel like I'm good at understanding sort of like what people like and what they want and how to integrate that in. So when we started talking about it, I envisioned started coming, you know, as it became something that seemed like it could be a reality even though I was terrified. Wow. Yeah. So so let's talk through the next step show at at what point did you know this could go from just like a fun idea to a real thing. So my husband now my now husband boyfriend at the time was like, okay, let's just let's just write a business plan. Let's let's see what the numbers look like. And and we had a good friend who is in the hospitality world who helped us sort of cultivate that and understand what even the hospitality or restaurant business plan looked like. Had you ever written a business plan? No. And so as we were doing that, and we were. Fleshing out ideas of what I really wanted the menu to be like. It was like, okay, I'm not a chef. I have this vision how God's name them gonna find someone to to want to work with me on this. And that was really terrifying. It was like, who am I going to approach in? How. So I literally started talking about Ed shop to anyone who would listen and seeing if you know anyone, if you know any shafts. If you have any ideas of people who'd be down to be a part of this and intrude New York fashion, like a proper New York moment, I ran into a friend on the street. I was blah, blah, blah about eg shop, and he's like, you have to meet Nick Corby. He's Shepard Smith and bills, but he's always looking for cool and interesting ideas. And he said of a meeting and and I almost didn't go because I was so nervous and embarrassed to talk about my extent which idea to an actual chef. He's gonna laugh at me, so I love it. So you have this idea that you're so passionate about, but on one side of the mirror fight. Yeah, I because you think the culinary world thinks examiners are Joe. I mean, right? I thought like nobody's done this. It doesn't exist. I'm not reinventing anything. So like maybe there's a reason it doesn't exist. Right? You just doubt yourself as you do when you have an idea and you're not. Super comfortable with the world that it entails. I heard some great. I might have been master of scale that podcast. I love about business and entrepreneurs, and they said something like, think of all these ideas like spanks, you know, and just all these crazy ideas that would you have invested in that if somebody came to you and they listed all these startup companies and most of them, you're like, no, that probably sounded like an absolutely insane idea. But then those insane ideas are the ones that wind up being shirt, Nicole parts of our lives. And I think we all just like we're intimidated because we think someone else would have been, you know, ahead of the game in Artie of thought of it if it was going to be something I would work, but that's just not true. I mean, we're all it takes a lot to start an actually follow through with an idea to conception, right. And there's so many moving parts, anything. A lot of us don't have the support around us or the financials or whatever it takes to to see it all the way through. So you do brought up by nannies. Let's talk about that next because that's always. Always of interest to the bomb squad. So it's not like you came from money and somebody was like, here you go, Sarah, go have fun check. It was. It was funny. It was like, okay, I've I have a savings account and it's it's great for where I am in my life and it's like, am I buying a house and having babies or my pursuing this passion? And it wasn't really question for me. I knew that I was going to pursue this passion, but it was terrifying, you know, and and raising money is is really challenging. And you know, you're for me, at least we got friends and family to support and invest, and you know, it's people that you care about, so you're you hope you're leading them down, but when you say invest, like how much money you're talking about like shirts. So we raised about four hundred thousand dollars for the first shots a lot. It's a lot. Yeah. I, although I speak to people now that own restaurants, like you only respond thousand dollars. Mike. Yeah, you, how do you raise a million like added no background in this? An all French. On family. What was the biggest check? You got fifty thousand dollars. That was very helpful. And then Louisville really believed in you. That was like one major person. And then I had a few other people that came in for twenties, and then tons of fives and tens, which you know is really generous re because, but it's also safe when people go, okay, I can give you five thousand dollars. That's a lot for a lot of us. But it also like I, I'm, I'm to be okay if I lose this and I'm not gonna we're still going to be friends with this. I feel terrible about I have such a hard time taking people's money. It's really awkward and and you really have to define it before like, hey, guys, I might be taking this money but cannot guarantee you're getting this back. So this is in good faith. You know, like if all goes, well, we'll all be high fiving each other and a few minutes, like or a few years. But yeah, it's it's, it's uncomfortable for sure. But for us reaching out to people who didn't know us like that wasn't an option at. We didn't have any sort of history. Like again, believing in someone that you don't know is is challenging for. For example, ges, so you found investors, you found Nick yourself. How did you find your first location? Oh, man. We were looking everywhere at the time. I was living at forty three canal street on Ludlow and canal had been there twelve years and the space below my apartment became available and it was five thousand dollars a month. I was like, this is it? This is a space at my landlord had been there forever. He was like, yes, great. We're going to do this. But it had been a copy shop. So there is no infrastructure. And unfortunately, last minute was like, oh no. The raise all of a sudden would be four hundred thousand dollars just to build the space outright with with nothing just to vent it and do all that jazz. And when that felt through, I was really disappointed. It had felt right, like it's it's below my apartment. It feels like this was meant to be. So we went back to the drawing board and my walk everyday had been from Chinatown to. So when I was in the dental world, and so I was super familiar with new alita and sort of Chinatown in that area. And I saw this old a real estate agent showed me this old space. It was called page on Elizabeth and Ken mirror, and it was tiny, but it was built out and it had a vent and it had a bar and all the things you need and I walked in and I just like, you know, you have those moments as this is it. This is this is a space. It was. It was set up properly, but it was small. It was like how many seats twenty four seats. It's like, okay, if no one shows up and won't be the end of the world, you could wrap your head around the space that side exactly to have those cute doors. Oh, so sweet. It did. Yeah, it's such a great space. So it's a no leader. Tell people the address again, it's one fifty one Elizabeth street and it was cool because you know there was a few places at that time that we're around there, but it still felt sort of new. I mean, butcher daughter was kitty corner and black seed bagel was down the street, so it just it felt felt like the right vibe and. Yeah. I mean, it was like si- signing that lease was the most exciting and terrifying thing I've ever done. So opening a restaurant is so hard. Oh gosh. Anybody who's done it knows it's just like it's a beast and you're waiting for them to turn on the gas and all these different things. Getting a liquor license, going in front of a liberal board to get fingerprinted. I mean, remember getting fingerprinted when I got our liquor license. Yeah, all of the paperwork and all this sort of like nuance things that you go through besides figuring out your menu and yourself, and all that jazz is is a lot to take it. And then the background check for the liquor license yet. I remember, you know, and even if you're like a good person, it must have been like the Catholic school thing. I was just like, oh my God. It's like, I haven't done anything. What are they going to dig up? But you still make things in your head. Exactly. So. All right. So you got this place open. What was the first day like. So I had hired this wonderful girl. She worked around the corner as a as a barista and she'd run her own little shop and she's like, you don't need anyone else like I can handle the space, just me. I'm like, okay, great. I don't know what it's going to be like it's gonna show up. And when I tell you it was a shit show. It was such a shit show in the best way possible, but it was like, I mean, she was behind the bar whipping up coffees and cocktails, and I was serving and bussing tables probably for the first three to four weeks and there was like, oh, great, okay. We need a higher a server, at least. And even then like I don't think I had a buzzer for the first like year, like I was truly doing it all with one barista and one person on the floor, what kind of hours you're working. So when we opened, I was convinced that we could do dinner exam, which is in Jameson 's, but so as eight AM to eleven PM. Oh, that's ambitious. And, oh my God, you must have never slept. I didn't sleep. And when my husband my now husband at the time was coming in like trying to nights for me. And eventually after two months moved my baby sister out from San Diego. And I was like, you're running nights and she's here for like eight months. And did that because we were dying? Yeah. I mean, it was it was intense, but you know, eventually we figured it out, but I was in the shop properly working with no manager for the first two years. Well, yeah, we there was a our first Labor Day. So we opened mid August twenty fourteen. It's our first labor. Day, you know, again, no idea of how busy are going to be a walk in. I have abrasive there and no server shit. Okay. Well, we'll figure this out serving the next thing. You know, there's a line around the corner. There was no help. My sister happened to be in town staying at the hotel. Next worship was three months pregnant with my brother-in-law sh. She comes over UNITA host. I grabbed my brother-in-law. He starts literally serving tables. I'm running food. I mean, it was just like it was chaos. And so you know the best of the worst days like that was one of the best of the worst days, like art people like what we're doing, but like I gotta get situated now. Oh my gosh. Okay. So that is crazy. Yeah. All right. Let's fast forward a little bit. Oh, so you so you don't have to dinner now. So changed just stopped doing dinner yet, and that's so hard to make decisions like that. Like I told you Smith canteen, I decided to close a three o'clock that three to five Sherry was just motion. It's a motion all and it. It hurts a little. Yeah. You really. You there's so many things to measure, right? It's like, I people want this, but like it's it's losing money unless it's not good for staff. And at some point you have to make decisions that are just based on facts and like what's good for the business. And as much as I wanted it to work. I mean, we, we just stopped doing dinner. So we did it for four years and it was super fun, and it was a great part of the business for time needed. But I think now it's like it's fine. Let's just focus on what we do and do it the best we can do same. Yeah. And even know it stings a little. You know, I'm sure you're going to do the same. Like we're going to start doing special events and parties and all that stuff. And still you're just like those two, our anything going back to like, you know, when you have a vision and like something's become the reality and other things don't like this. This just that part didn't work. You know, it's like the other in and I'm super grateful for for what is working. I should plug the special events that we're doing. We're actually doing a special event. With cocoa cake lands. Lindsey sung who several of you know that's an early October, and then we're doing an event with sister pie with Lisa from sister pie in Detroit, and it's fun. We're doing cookbook events for them so you can come by the cookbook and try some of their baked goods and meet some folks from the bomb squad out of town. All right. So he did that. So let's fast forward you now have to locations. So things worked out. You obviously found some servers. I staffed up. We figured it out, where's your second location? So we opened in Williamsburg last June. It's one thirty, eight north eighth street, and it's its own beast. You know, like it's about three times the size and you think, you know what you're getting into when when you do it again, it's like, okay, no, this is going to be challenging. And I know this is going to be challenging and like nothing works out the way you think it's going to be like the things that I thought were going to be difficult or easy, breezy and new challenges arise, and and here we are and I love it. I mean, the space is gorgeous. It feels like she's a little bit more up if that makes sense. You know, I think so. Feels has a bit more of a cafe by been. This is like feels like a proper restaurant, even though we're serving the same food, but it's like it's just it's, it's more accessible if you are hungry right now, I want to be even Hungary or look at the Instagram account for as an egg shop. NY excel, NYC NYC and it'll you'll get a sense of everything they do. It's not just examples anymore. You've got salad so many beautiful fast. It's evolved, you know, it's like, I think we were talking about this yesterday carry. It's I really wanted the menu to be to have something for everyone, so you can be super healthy or Super Bowl Jin. And if you don't eat eggs, there's there's still options for you, which is cool. What I mean. I know this is like asking share who's your favorite child, but what's your favorite thing on the menu? Hopefully I think my favorite sandwich is called the pepper boy and it's scrambled eggs. Greer bell pepper pepper bacon on a roll. As quintessential leg examined as it gets, but it's to listen and probably more of a hangover than a healthy option, but but it's fabulous. What's the most adventurous thing on the menu right now? That's interesting. We have a Beal t Benedict that I think is really cool. You know, we were trying to think of interesting ways to do Benedict, so Beal t- flavor without it's Super Bowl. I also love in Williamsburg. Unfortunately, we can't do it because we don't have the space earlier, but we do a whole program called going back to Kelly and it's breakfast, burritos. And those are like my all time favorite. And we do a so Cal which is paying a mosh my southern California roots Carne Asada fries salsa. Verde. Apple before I got here, I should have had. I should have had a problem. We'll do it. So what's your food lifelike at home now? Like you spend all this time in these restaurants. Sometimes you get a little burnt out in your you go home and you're like, I really just want a yogurt or something. Yeah. I mean, I'm embarrassed as I have one day off right now on Mondays and I went home and I like made a scrambled egg with bell peppers and avocado say, this is crazy. Is it like my really this obsessive eggs are just like it's the civility of it. Accessibility. I, you know, I dabble in cooking. I have to say my husband probably has become the cook or the chef of the house. We, he's obsessed with slow cooking and that Superfund. And then we moved recently into Glen and we have a barbecue and all we do is girl fun. It's really my favorite thing just like whether it's veggies are fish or like we're right by the meat hook in Williamsburg, which is delicious. And so you know, we just, yeah, it's really, you have to get Sarah's book wild adventure going to into grilling. Yes, is grill and everything so, but like on a beach, it's amazing. That's my. Have you had a proper vacation speaking of each? Have you had a vacation then? Why actually did I have to say we just we were super lucky. We went to France for a wedding, and we did Paris and wine country, and you know, you need to became from your vacations. Like how much wine can you drink in two weeks and sort of the gist of that trip. But yeah, I mean, we've been really blessed in our staff. And our team, like most of my team in SoHo and Williamsburg has been with me since the beginning. So there's there's trust there, which is really nice. And you know, it's hard to find a good team, but once you do, it's as you know, becomes like family and they're your support system. So the fact that we trust them to go away, it's dreamy. That's great. Yeah. And you and I also were talking yesterday, we brought up Danny Meyer patron Saint LARs restaurateurs and I some good advice I had gotten from Danny was advice that his grandfather had given to him because when he opened his first place, it was just one problem. He looked at it as one problem after another. And his grandfather was basically like you just need to re sort of frame your thinking like things will come up constantly when you own a restaurant. It's just or even a little coffee shop. It's just one thing after another, but if you look at them as problems, you'll just shouldn't even be in the business. Yeah, I mean, you'll lose your mind. Yeah, you have to find a positive, right? But if you just look. Get them as like things that need to be solved and almost look at it differently. Reframe, you're thinking and look at them as like, it's like a puzzle that needs to be. Yeah, you're playing tetris all the time. Exactly. I like miss pacman. Totally. Yeah. So, yeah, so it's like playing pacman every day every day. And and I think you know, when I first opened, the restaurant was like all of these problems would arise, and I didn't realize that this was actually part of owning a restaurant. So I was only automobiles. It's me are restaurants, Bailey, like all these things were super overwhelming. And when you do realize decision part of the business and problem solving and finding solutions, the things is, is your day to day. It's like he can breathe and be like, okay, we'll just how are we going to do this, but it is so easy to feel, feel overwhelmed. I feel like that all the time. Now we have just stop in the middle of the day and be like, oh my God. I'm so I was not a yoga person before I opened the restaurants and I very quickly. It was like, I'm losing my mind here. Like the stress levels were crazy. And I and I started doing yoga, and it was truly like my outlet for my mental sanity for you. Do you still? I do. I've I've gotten into orange theory recently, which is a whole other thing. I'm like becoming obsessed with French theory. It's like it's it's running weights and the rowing machine in an hour class, and you have a trainer telling you what to do, and it's just like you don't even have time to think so it's a lot more cardio driven. So I go to that for my for my health and my body and then hot yoga Moto or corporate our for my sanity. Wow, I love that. Yeah. Okay. Good advice. Yeah. All right. What else can we talk about? What is next for egg shop? World domination. I'm just finally like being able to breathe. Yeah. I mean, we I really, really would love to see shop in every major city across the country. I think it's something that that works and it's acceptable and it's understandable, and it's fun. I mean, that's the idea. I think we we tried to create a brand with the restaurant as well. It's like we're taking our food seriously and not. It's like the best ingredients you can have. But like we have funny names, you know, like the grain bowls called the spandex and the the the beast is one of our sandwiches. You know, it's like, let's let's have fun with this and enjoy ourselves while we're working our asses off. Yeah, so we're, you know, we're figuring out what's next. There's a few cities that we have in mind, and you know, there's other again, when I got into this, it was just it was so eggs shop driven, and now that I'm like, oh, okay. Maybe I sort of have this figured out. It's like new possibilities come up and maybe there will be another restaurant that is. Overture would you do you consider doing another console, maybe? Yeah. I look at someone like Vicky Freeman who is amazing and she was just very kind to me when I started out and I appreciate that because I didn't know anyone. No, Vicki tell us Vicky, Herman. So she owns Rosie's and cook shop and a few other restaurants in the city. And so her, she's a restaurant tour and she doesn't have a single concept, right? So she has these different concepts and she's just a bad ass, I think. And I think any woman who's kind to this other woman getting involved who doesn't really know what they're doing, like immense so much to me at the time. I think we talked about this yesterday, like I wasn't a part of the community. I was super intimidated and it's still something I would like to get more involved in, but she was just really gracious that I really appreciated that. Well, now you're part of the bomb squad problem. Some old. Lucky. So anybody who's listening if you know folks who want to invest in a very hot concept. DM are getting touch with the egg shop website. Weird or things have happened right guide. We had gen palca on the show who runs magnum PR out in San Francisco and has the Ridler champagne bar out there and she put together this really interesting fi like investment strategy. She had thirty three different women invest in the wind bowel. Isn't that amazing? It's so cool. She did a show on it. It was still one of my favorite shows, but I think she is teaching a class on how to raise money at cherry bomb university staff. I know I think that's going to be one of the most popular classes, but but seriously, if anybody's listening has advice for Sarah or connections or wants to invest like in touch by not, and I am going to connect you to my pal Riley. Yes. Any en talked to him connections, any of you guys have out there? Yeah. So it happened and say, hi to me, if you're ever in the shops, you think a lot of times people come in and they're all get a note or something. I saw you. Please always say, hi, like I'm in there for a reason and like I like meeting our guests in women that come in people don't always do that. Yeah. The chef is back there toiling away by his or her cell. Twenty around. It's like, please always say, hi in love that. Especially if you're in the industry like recently gene from vinegar hill came in and she like, you know, I actually was serving her and I thought it was her, but it wasn't sure. And she finally with this, is your place, isn't it? I'm like it is, and she was awesome. And so we just sort of like started chatting. What so stuff like that really goes a long way. I love him. People say, are you the owner. It's like, why? Because I'm sweeping and I'm doing that. I'm doing that. Insane. So yeah, that's always fun, but definitely say hi and go, go visit Sarah at egg shop. You've got two locations to choose from Williamsburg one or the Nolita one, and I love sandwiches. So why the hell not Gary. I saw you have a soft scramble. Yeah, like Tarquin situation is that like an open face sound? We do over Kotte scramble scramble, scrambled outlook so goods. That's one of the newer sandwiches, and it's recorded scramble with trouble on sour blue link. I'm soft scramble. I loved the law. Like if if you could take thirty minutes to make those scrambled eggs who has thirty minutes. People are so particular about how they like their eggs. I miss scramble girl to, but yeah, it's it really is amazing how many ways you can make an egg, you know. And I think it's sorta says a lot about who you are before I let you go. I just want to get another piece of advice from you. I don't know if you have this at your fingertips, but you're a career changer and you had an idea and you just went for. Sure. And I think a lot of people have ideas and they're just they don't know how to take it to the next level, like just, yeah, what? What's that mental thing that got you to do that? I think like always put out your ideas into the world like, don't keep them to yourself because the more you put it out there, the more like it starts to trickle and people here. You and things start to move and there's momentum Bill. The other thing is know what you're good at. No, you're not. No, no. Like no your strengths. And when you need help, find people in surround yourself with people who can support you. That has been the number one most important thing for me. That's great. Well, I'm so happy to have us a new friend and a new. Industry buddy. It's a pleasure. Absolutely. Absolutely. I'm sure we'll be hearing a lot more from you. Well, thank you for your time. Thank you. Appreciate it. That is it for today show. Also thank you to Sarah Glover and Louisa Brimble make sure to grab their wild adventure cookbook. So you can start planning your next culinary adventure. And again, a huge thanks to Sarah Schneider. If you're thinking about grubbing brunch this weekend and urine NYC, be sure to check out eg shop. Also thank you to our sponsors. Bob's red mill vital farms, pasteurized eggs, and Likud on blue culinary school. Thank you to our associate producer just Zeidman and to the ban trial law for our theme song don't forget. Tickets are on sale for cherry bomb university happening, October twenty six, twenty seventh and twenty eighth in New York City. See cherry bomb dot com. For more radio, cherry bomb is a joint production of cherry bomb magazine and the heritage radio network. Thanks for listening. Everyone. You're the bomb. Radio, cherry bomb is powered by simple. 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Episode 192: Are You Stressed All The Time?

Radio Cherry Bombe

52:03 min | 2 years ago

Episode 192: Are You Stressed All The Time?

"This episode is brought to you by Ramona organic Italian wine spritzers in a Cam. Hi, I'm HR executive director, Katie Moseman watt ler with a preview of this week's episode of meat and three our weekly food news roundup. So everyday the shutdown continues to grow is another day that there will be a backlog this week. We're looking at the unexpected ways the government shutdown has impacted our food system. There are nearly one point six million New Yorkers who rely on snap to keep them in their family every single day. There is a real impact on our friend. Neighbors. A lot of farmers rely on commodity loans at the end of the year. Since offices are not open. Those loans aren't available to them. Tune into this week's meat and three on heritage radio network. That's EMMY AT plus sign T H R E available wherever you listen to podcasts. Hi bomb squad. Your listening to radio cherry bomb. And I'm your host Kerry diamond radio cherry bomb is the number one female focused food podcast in the country. Each week, we talked to the most inspiring women in and around the world of food. Let's thank our sponsor handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized, eggs, handsome brook farm secret to making rich, flavorful eggs is simple. The most possible space the best possible feed and lots of love. It's a healthy and humane recipe that makes your omelettes cakes custard 's and everything in between taste better for more on handsome brook farm, and where to find their eggs. Visit handsome brook farm dot com. Let's talk housekeeping. We have a brand new newsletter to kick off the new year. It's called the bomb squad buzz, and you can sign up for it on cherry bomb dot com. Just scroll to the bottom and click newsletter to subscribe, we've got lots of special features, including our women of the week. Our place of the week and our book of the week. We also include some behind the scenes from cherry bomb. HQ updates jubilee. Prep and our dear cherry bomb advice column. Sign up today and get the bomb squad buzz in your mailbox every Monday and speaking of jubilee tickets are on sale right now at cherry bomb dot com. Thanks to everyone who has already purchased tickets. We are very excited to see you on April seventh in Brooklyn. Let's talk about today's show. Our guests are to entre preneurs, author and wellness coach, Katrina, van wick and macho full tea company, founder Hannah Habes they were each dealing with stress related health issues and took matters into their own hands. Katrina, a mother of two. And former model was feeling run down all the time when she was introduced to the world of adapted Jains, I'm sure you've all heard this word before. But if you haven't adapted our plant based ingredients that help the body respond to stress Katrina as a big believer in the power of adapted Jains, and she's written a new book on the subject. It's called superpowers adapted. Genyk herbs and mushrooms for energy beauty mood and wellbeing. She's going to explain more to us about this intriguing category of the food and wellness world. And as for Hannah, I'll tell you more about her later in the show before we get to my interview with Katrina. We have a word from handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized, eggs, handsome brook farm believes that organic and pastured is the way to go. When it comes to eggs pasture-raised means better lives for hens better lives for small farmers and better eggs for you. It's also better for chefs who depend on rich, flavorful, eggs, handsome, Brooke farms owned fly. Of amazing chefs their mother hens count on it Janine booth is a mother hen she's the Australian chef behind the southern inspired route and bone restaurants in New York City and Miami want to learn how chef Janine makes her sweetcorn spoon bread. The ingredients include some scallions sharp, cheddar cheese a touch of heavy cream. And of course, some handsome brook, farm eggs. Or if you're like me and you're obsessed with deviled eggs, you can recreate her drunken deviled eggs. She combines homemade pickled beets with handsome, Brooke farms flavorful yolks to put a fresh Tangy spin on a classic party favorite. You can find chef Janin's, delicious, eccentric, recipes and videos on handsome, farm dot com. You can find handbook brook farm at Publix Kroger sprouts, farmers market freshdirect and many natural food stores across the country. And now enjoy my conversation with Katrina. So Katrina so excited to have you on the show. Yes. Thank you for having me. I've been able to spend a lot of quality time with you over us debt. We did a fun event at books or magic. Yes. And the Bank you to everybody who came out to that. And you and I were saying how it was such a great audience because they were really engaged they pack the place, and they had a lot of questions. Yes. I was so impressed with their questions. It's always like, you know, people are paying attention are truly listening when the questions are good. And there were no one on their phone. No, not at all was amazed by absolutely the fact that they had so many questions shows that people just general have so many questions about this topic. Yes. So it was very smart of you to write a book and put it out right now. Yeah. It was the book that I was needing really because there wasn't a book like this out there. They're very they're great books on written by herbalists for other herbalists, and the language is much heavier and more complex, and this sort of more information. May be than most people need. So. Yeah, that was the point I needed I needed this book. So I'm just gonna go right in there and ask you what is an adapted. So an adaptive Jen is a plant that has the ability when ingested to help the body better adapt to stress that means if you are someone who's really rundown and tired might help give you some more energy get you back up and running and vice versa. If you really kind of anxious and nervous and stressed out might help calm you down. So so a lot of it goes back to stress for sure. Yeah. Which you know, the modern issue for sure, and I think we have to define stress too. Because I think a lot of people just think of stresses like work stress or the stress of being a mom or financial pressures things like that. But I'll let you talk about that. What are some other stresses that we don't even really think about or no are happening? Yeah. No, absolutely. And it's sort of hard to define stress. We hear that term all the time. We all use it. I'm so str-. Rest. But what does it really mean? And like you said, yeah, there's the typical work load stress, but there's also internal stress if you have like an infection in your body or something going on the inside that's stressful for the body your phone, ping. Every second is setting off. You know as your system is still noticing. Oh, there's someone's asking me to do something and needing something from me, which can also cause a lot of stress and most of us are on our phone all of the time or have it with us all of the time. So we're like constantly getting kind of triggered so many of us are living in a state of what we call chronic stress. So instead of having an immediate thing happen where we get stressed. And then we show back down, which is what we're supposed to do. And that's healthy. And we should have those reactions happening. We're stressed out all the time. So that means our blood is pumping through our limbs as if we're going to fight or flight run away from something. And it's not in digestive system is not in our reach productive system. So we're not I just. In her food as well. We're not sleeping as well. We might not have the easiest time having babies all of this can go back to being stressed all the time. And then the one I think about a lot. These days is the environment for sure and the stress of the environment. And let's take your city, for example. The noise pollution, the air pollution, all of those things. Yeah. People don't realize how much we're exposed to today versus just what our grandparents were exposed to. So aside from being an author. Tell us what your job is today. Yes. So I am a health coach a certified health coach, which means I I do a lot of different things. But one of the things I do is that I work with people one on one helping them with health diet lifestyle changes usually over a period of time. So we work together for four months or six months really implementing healthy habits that hopefully that oh need me at the end of our work together. That's really my goal. And then I also do some consulting work. I hope with some you know, some restaurants with their menus. Like that which is really fun and do you work in conjunction with traditional doctors? No I worked for a long time with a functional medicine doctor needs works better. With what I do because they're much more open to the idea that food is medicine, and that lifestyle changes, dealing with your stress exercise, all that stuff is really what's crucial and healing or preventing disease, which is even more important. So before I talked to I didn't even know that there was a thing called a functional medicine doctor. Yeah. And it seems to me that every doctor should be a functional medicine doctor. Yeah. But I I remember not recently. But back when I was working in at other magazines, and and had a big corporate job and was like stressed a lot. I would go to the doctor, and they would immediately want to prescribe something. And I was always surprised that they didn't I ask? How are you sleeping? What are you eating? What's going on in your life? It was just right. I don't. Feel well straight for the pill. Yeah. I definitely feel like that is changing and is changing with you know, how our awareness is changing as patients, but is also changing just because the the diseases and the trouble that we're dealing with. This changing is not necessarily as much and acute infection that we go to the doctor for it's like, I have chronic headaches, or I'm not pooping, or you know, like these kinds of problems that are not such traditional quick fix problems. And so for those types of problems, we need someone to get to the bottom of it. What's the root cause here an often it can be helped or even fixed completely by changing your diet? Changing the way, you're sleeping changing your stress all of that. So that's wonderful. If we can fix someone's problem in those very low impact ways and not have them dependent on medicine for the rest of their life. That's just amazing. So I think there are more and more. Doctors coming up now who maybe a younger generation, you know, who are much more open to this. And how great it's great. Yeah. I definitely see. There's a big change happening for sure. So is it the fact that everybody's just so stressed out? These days in life is so crazy that adapted Jin's have become a big thing. Because I do they've been around for thousands of years. But why all of a sudden have they become so popular so buzzy people are so curious about them. Yeah. I think there's an accumulation of different things. There's definitely the fact that. Yes, people are stressed. People are not sleeping. Well, there's these common threads that a lot of people are dealing with. And they're looking for more sustainable, healthier alternatives to pharmaceutical medication. So I think that is part of it people are more aware of what those kinds of things can do to you with term use. And they're looking for options. I also think there's been some companies out there who seen that and really packaged well and educating people and make it kind of cool and chic and an accessible by just branding and marketing it in a way, whereas like, oh, this is for sleep. Okay. I can I can buy this. Now, I do think the good thing of all of this is that it's opening people's eyes to the fact that there are alternate of options out there for them not everything has to be a pill. Pharmaceutical and not that there's anything wrong with Josh medicine. Thank God, we have doctors when we break arms or one hundred percents or have cancer. I mean, you know, Dr save lives. There's no way around it. But I do think it's good to to just know that they're options out there for you. Yeah. And to question things, I think that's the other thing. I there's nothing wrong with questioning things and looking at alternatives. No, ask ask your doctor. How about if I did this is that safe? Can I try that? And you know, visiting with Atherton's, for example, and one of the questions that came up on our talk books. I'm Jake was, you know, anytime at I can't take this and sure there are moments where like, oh, you on certain medications where this is actually contra indicated you shouldn't be taking it. So it's always bring it up. Your doctor, and if especially if you're dealing with specific issues or on medication already, but starting to ask questions and bringing their attention to it as well and tell them how it's helping you. If it is because doctors are always their job is to listen. And if they don't listen find another one if you tell them I've been taking CD for sleep instead of what you prescribed and it's working even better. So is it okay? If I go off what you prescribed. And I mean, most doctors would be very okay with that. And they would love hearing those kind of stories I think I think doctor, but I do think many are now are more open minded, and they're sort of also, you know, they're living in this world. Have they have to keep their eyes open. But one thing I wonder why why do people come down so heavy on the going with Paul chose of the world on the Amanda Chantal bacon. So for those listeners who don't know her. She's the founder of a company called moon, juice out in California. And they started as a juice company. But now they do lots of of different things supplements. And powders people are so critical of them and call them snake oil sales people and all of that. But why why aren't people's critical of like Coca Cola or McDonald's? I mean, I think they're doing more harm foreshore for not just Americans the whole world. But I don't see the people behind those brands attacked on the same level that like a Guana thorn. Amanda are attacked in the media. Yeah. And in the common, it is very interesting. I mean, there's no doubt that these these big big corporations have a lot of power and a lot of money. You know, so they can silence. A lot of things and hide a lot of things and they're very powerful in terms of their media coverage, and what media is sort of willing to see and ignore depending because they oversizing all of that. So there's complicated, and you know. Our healthcare system is complicated. And pharmaceutical companies are also very powerful. And they don't want people to know about these natural turnips that are just as good as their drugs because the newspeople aren't buying their drugs anymore. So I think there's there's a lot of that. But I also think those both two examples of two beautiful strong women who are not afraid to say what they believe in just for themselves to get out there. And I'm so impressed with them because that is not easy. And how much of it is the fact that they're women challenging these really big industries. It's time. It is time. Yes, it is time. All right. Let's talk about some Dopp Degen's tell us what some of the more common. Ones are short some many have heard of things like Maka and go, gee, berries and go gee, buries her adapted. They aren't adopted Jin when yes you yes. I do, but they're also sort of referred to us just a general SuperFood. Because. They're really high in vitamins and antioxidants, and they great for their great energy boost usually have them around are all adapted in superfoods. No, so well, I mean, you could probably say that, but a SuperFood is really seen as like a really intensely nutritious nutrient dense, right? So that can also include things like liver and oysters if you want to or Chia seeds, or so there's a whole bunch of foods that I would say very nutrient dense so eating just a little bit of it. We'll give you a lot of neutral. You know? They're all good for you. They're just not interchangeable of the definition. Okay. So back to adapt Maka. Yeah. You said one great for hormone health. Go do berries yet. Go gee, berries as common when people have heard about us Maganga, you might have seen around a lot. Which is really I think that's a great sort of I adapted to try of the ones you've heard of some of the mushrooms like rec- is quite common is actually one of the most studied plants on the planet. So even though these things are seen as sort of Woohoo out there. You know, the scientists are aware there's something here that we need to look at what have they uncovered about reshi. So we usually great for immunity, and it's generally really calming. It's a great thing to take at night. If you're trying to help your self sleep better or deeper a lot of the doctrines are especially being studied right now for their immune system regulation their immune benefits because so many people are dealing with immune issues, autumn, unices, and cancer and chemotherapy and bouncing back from chemotherapy. So they're doing a lot of research on adoptions and some of these mushrooms around the topic. So we'll see in a few years there. What the revealing for us? But I'm hopeful this episode is presented by Henry's wine and spirit ago to shop for anyone interested in natural wines and boutique spirits, there's a large selection of everything from orange wines pet NATs and reds from around the world whether visiting the shop in person or online looking for. Gift for a loved one or that. Everyday dependable bottle. You're sure to find lots of interesting wines at Henry's. There's free shipping on orders over three hundred dollars on the website, Henry's dot NYC and case discounts. When you visit the store located in Bushwick. Cheers. Let's talk about how you can cooperate these into your life. I would like to know how you incorporate them into your life. But then I'd also like to know how to do it as a beginner this. Yes. So let's start with you. Yeah. I still consider myself a beginner. I went on this journey writing this book because I was intrigued by these. So I'm still experimenting with many of them and using them in new ways and all of that. So I would still Sam pretty much a beginner. Although it's been a little while the first time, I took it after would probably ten years ago. But then I was taking it simply as a supplement as a pill, and it's totally fine to do that too. It was sort of recommended to me, I guess by an acupuncturist at that point. So I've been taking it for a long time, but sort of incorporating more into my everyday sort of rituals and routines. A little bit newer, but often just added to my coffee in the morning or my macho in the morning, everyone at the bookstore. The other day was surprised to learn you drink coffee was surprised that you drink macho. Right, but people were surprised to drink coffee. I know it's like a love hate relationship. I definitely can't have too much of it. But I do love the whole smell. I love the taste of it. And of course, I like the little boost in the morning two very young kids. So right now coffees my friend. But now, and then I I give it breaks which I think is a good thing to do. I'm full on pro coffee, obviously, I own a coffee shop. Oh, yeah. What you put in your coffee or your macho? So I'll put a strugglers, which at least in the fall and winter season, very Munis thing. So that's really important right now. I also put McCain uproarious most of the time, which is a real mood booster this dopamine effect, which is really cool. So you feel kind of mood lift, and it also can help you have more. Vivid dreams to sleep deeper, which is great. But how about throughout the rest of the day you take? So I might in the afternoon snack with some like macho in it like a macho snack ball or something that also has some good fat and little nuts. Maybe some made with dates or something. Sweet. I definitely have a sweet tooth. I love snacking on gee, berries throughout the day. I need energy. They're great for that. And then at night, I will have usually like maybe like a turmeric law. Tay thing with a few adopted added like we see that's calming by haven't had my struggle is in the morning at that. Then and then left satiric for nice in anti inflammatory, and it's generally calming wonderfully tasting so I love that. No. I love those golden milk law. Taes? Yeah. I'll make them from time to time with turmeric and ginger. Yeah. And we were talking about are they adopted Jains are they superfoods. What are they who decides? What's that's the real question? I don't know if anyone if. There's a jury out there who gets to decide what's an adopted. You know, not. But the people who pick the emojis, right or some council out there. We don't know who they are. But they're picking the adapted to I think same guy that would be really funny to America's not in adopting him because it doesn't have that ability to help the body better adapt to stress, however, it's certainly a SuperFood. It's really anti-inflammatory. So it's it's great from any other reasons, but it's not considering afternoon if you are out there listening to radio bomb, and you haven't made anything with turmeric yet. What are you waiting for? I want to hear from you. I wanna find the one person out there who hasn't. That's a great example of it's real food. Right. It's been around forever. It's an a ton of different recipes. It's been used for a long time people have known about its benefit and also the way it's been used. And prepared. Traditionally is also the way that term Rick is best absorbed. So it's usually end Stu where it's been cooked with something fatty with coconut milk, or whatever key exactly or and there's always some pepper added and some Chilean spices. So that makes it more bio available to our body. So we're more likely to actually absorb those benefits that we want from it one of the criticisms of adaptive Jains and that whole world that it represents is the expense. And that it's something reserved for people who have money and the time and all of that. If you are curious about these things they are expensive. How do you get into it? Yeah. I would have modest means. Totally. No, I completely get that. It's a little overwhelming. And I certainly having to do the research for this book spent a good chunk of my advance. So I I mean, I I was in an health food store, and I picked up a thing of reshi, and it was fifty dollars. And I was like oh my gosh. Yeah. Yeah. And there's a huge range here. There's definitely some can give big bag of Maka for fifteen dollars or you can get a small jar of reecey for fifty dollars. So there's a huge variety. There's a couple of things to keep in mind. First of all, you don't need a lot. So like a quarter teaspoon day. It's probably a great dose to start with which means that dry might last a year. Even though it seems like a lot of front spread over taking it every single day. It's not a huge investment. So that's something to remember. There are also other places to get this stuff from you wanna make. Sure you getting it from a trusted source but going to your local herbal shop. If you have something like that where you live. There's also resource online mountain rose herbs where you can buy all of these afternoons and a lot of different herbs and flowers and things like that in bulk and their organic they're really transparent about their sourcing. You know, you can get beautiful rose pedals there. You can buy different teas and like camomile, for example. But you can also buy a lot of the adapted. They are in bulk or even whole so you can buy a whole Rishi mushroom or slices of Richie and you can grind that yourself. Which saves you a lot of money, and you probably shouldn't go overboard like I can I can see I can see the temptation out there to by a few of them in next thing. You know, you've got a lot with like ten superfoods and adapted incident near like oh God. What did I just do? So start small right small start with one of them. And I say that in the book to pick one or maybe two, and then you have to stick with it for a while if you're gonna. Really notice if it's doing anything for you, one time just isn't gonna be enough to tell you so stick with it for a month or two, and then you might tell oh, I'm not a stressed out. Like, I was last month. So afterwards can be really powerful like that. But you have to stick with it. Well, the book is great. It is such a good beginner guide to adapt to jen's powders, and the recipes are really fun. Yeah. They're they're definitely fun and easy. I'm not I'm not a chef. I'm a home cook. And I don't have a lot of times. Most of the recipes definitely reflect that I'm definitely trying the hot chocolate one this weekend. I think we're gonna get a little snow. What can you walk us through that one? Yes. So you just warm the milk, and then you stir in the powder. It's so easy. And that's really it. And you can sweeten it. But if you don't want to sweeten you don't have to and what kind of chocolate do you use? House rock cow powder, which has a lot more anti-oxidants in it because it hasn't been heated and altered. So that's my go-to for for the most sort of nutrition benefits, and I love chocolate so bags of it. All right. We're going to do the speed round try to remember it off the top of my head. What song makes you smile? Oh, that's a tough one. I mean right now, it's probably baby shark. Maybe shocking. I don't even know about well any or parent out there. We'll know exactly what I'm talking about. Because all the kids loved the song, and it's horrible. But the like my daughter who's twenty one months, I've I played the song. She just starts dancing. She does this shark movement with her hands she'd like wigs her like moves or hips around. She's so adorable. And of course, that will make me smile. Okay. Wait. I the song is awful. But what it does to my daughter? You know, I need to ask you to sing that song. No, babied, active duty. On just goes on and on like awful because this song lyrics or bad wasn't meant to be a pop song. But it's become this whole phenomenon. Oh my gosh. Okay. I somehow missed the baby shark phenomenon. I'm gonna you are lucky I'm gonna I'm gonna not don't play it. In your head. All right. What is your purse snack of choice? Probably like turt- green grounded Smith, apple or go. Gee, berries, the finally and I use your. Yeah. I love them. And I also usually have some sort of pack of nuts, or like, a squeezy pack of almond butter something like that. Okay. Last book you read or attempted to read? Yeah. I was scared. You wanna ask you this? I've two young kids. I don't read books besides work related things. So probably the last book, I read was the four tendencies by Gretchen Rubin, which is all about like habit forming and different people's tendencies super interesting, especially as someone who coaches people it super helpful to understand how how someone's habits can can kind of stick what they need. So learning about myself like, oh, I'm someone who needs that accountability versus like my husband who's a rebel. Who's like, that's the he needs the opposite of that. What is your most used kitchen implement, the Vitamix dream vacation destination? I wanna go back to Thailand. I haven't been in fifteen years where he met your husband. Yes. And it's probably changed so much when we recognize it. But all right. And our last question if you had to be stuck on a desert island with any food celebrity who would it be? Gwyneth paltrow? I think she's really brave. I really like her cookbooks actually as someone who has had a lot of food intolerances. She has a lot of recipes that are free of certain things that can be difficult for a lot of people and for my clients as well who are trying to live dairy free, gluten free or whatever it is. There's like a lot of great still really delicious nutritious recipes. But also thinks he's like a seems like a really fun person. Well, if you Gwenda get stuck on a desert island, keep a diary, and we'll publish Cheri magazine. We will be having down to. Definitely she's on board. I expect nothing less. We'll katrina. Thank you so much. Thank you. It's been getting to know you and thank you for doing cherry bomb university. So fun. That was great. I hope you're doing it. Again. I think we are. So stay tuned and thanks for putting book out into the world. It's a subject that that people are very curious about and you've done a really beautiful job explaining it in a way, that's understandable. So thank you. That was certainly my goal. So I'm glad you say that. Thank you. Bye Katina by I hope you enjoyed my chat with Katrina. Now. Let's talk about Hannah Habes, the founder of macho as I had mentioned earlier Hannah also dealing with some stress related issues. Things were so bad. She was actually losing her hair a friend introduced her to macho and it was the wakeup call. She needed. She fell in love with the special powdered green tea from Japan started making lifestyle changes and got her health back. She also decided to make macho her mission she sells organic macho online and works with. Coffee shops that feature macho like my coffee shop in Brooklyn Smith canteen. It's some of the best macho I've ever had had also has too much shops in New York City. Enjoy our conversation you remember where you had your very first Cup of Mata. Oh, yeah. I remember very well. I was in my home and Portland. And and I just remember I had received a gift so like a ritual set from a friend in Japan, and it just couldn't have come at a better time. I was working in the for a huge CPG food company. We looked at your Lincoln. Okay. Yeah. We fully stocked. Yeah. Here's good. And it was a little I opening. I mean, you know, you work for these big companies, and you see how decisions get made. And it's not about ingredients. It's about the bottom line. You know, and I started I was consuming so much packaged food a heavily heavily processed food. And I just started noticing my body. Sort of deteriorating. So I did you grow up that way. I did I grew up eating like terribly, but I was really active. My mom worked for Nike. My dad was my tennis coach. So I was it wasn't until in my twenties. When I kind of slowed down being active and living this like in college, I was still working out. And when I got a fulltime job, I kind of stopped and still eating growing up healthy things as well. But definitely package foods as well. But I would say when I started working for this this big company, I kind of quit the healthy any healthy eating and just was only eating chips and granola bars, and you name it. And I think in my twenties, I kind of started all the sudden, you know, our bodies go through changes, I started becoming more dairy intolerant. I started having all these digestive issues. I found out sort of. Going to a family dinner later that year with my sisters that they were also actually having similar problems. So all around the same time. We were developing these sort of intolerances that we never had in our throughout our childhood. Did you go to a doctor? I did I went to several doctors because they had a ton of hair loss that I couldn't figure out, and you know, it is a vanity thing when you have hair loss, but it's not necessarily it really is even more devastated when a guy. Yeah. It was it was really so young. Yeah. It was in my early twenty s and so I saw these doctors, and they ran all these tests, and I had some like iron deficiencies. I definitely think I was going through a period of just a lot of stress too. And I think my diet was contributing to that because I wasn't exercising. I was just wasn't as happy, and I was having more stress and hormonal issues. That maybe the doctor couldn't see from their typical blood tests reports that they were taking so in the irony being you're working for a big company. So you probably had pretty good health insurance. Yeah. Yeah. I had great health insurance. I could see any doctor. So they work you to death. But they make sure you have good health insurance work you to death. I was drinking at ton of coffee. I mean, I was on the road a lot because I was in sales. So I was traveling. And yeah, the last thing I was thinking about was what I was eating. When did you have the light bulb moment that either I want to know more about macho where I want to make macho my business every day after work. I would I would go online and just research as much as I could about clean eating diet. Like what I could do not necessarily dieting. But just how I could change. What I was you know, doing every day, and that was when macho sort of came into my life, I found myself after I drank it. I just remember telling my mom, I was like mom, I just feel like. This. This is this is what I need to be doing. And you know, she was like Hannah don't quit your day job, which most moms would probably say, and I just knew that I had to do something with it. I didn't know what I was going to do. But I knew that I was passionate enough. And I started telling all of my friends, I was like this macho missionary where everyone I everyone. I would be at a party and find myself telling, you know, everybody at the party about mantra, and so with reusable cups. Yeah. When you when you're so passionate about something. It's all you can think about so how long did it take from there to the creation of macho full company it took a while? So I got another job still in the food industry, and with a smaller sort of family owned company that was to this day look back, and I'm so grateful. I had that experience, but moved to New York with them, and I kept sort of this exploration and passion around macho, but I kept my day job. And so when I moved to New York, I. I started kind of looking at the market trying to figure out what I could do and around that time had the realization that, you know, maybe it would be easiest not easiest, but sort of maybe the best way for me to test Imatra would be to go to coffee shops and to help them bring it to their menu. When did you come up with the name multiple so macho so I actually didn't launch until a year after I started sort of calling on? I actually didn't even have a brand I was just kind of importing mantra mantra full came about really because when I was writing down all the different things that macho sorta made me feel like, you know, healthful mindful all of these words that that sort of came to mind, and that's how it was born. So you had a side hustle. You were importing macho had you gone to Japan. Yes points. Yeah. I didn't have a lot. Of capital to to go to Japan. But I did make one trip that was a big question. How have you funded? All this. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I didn't have a lot of capital at first. And honestly, I strap the company so hard and and and thank God. I sort of didn't quit my day job because it did help me pay my rent, and sometimes when you are so passionate about something just wanna quit everything it start immediately. So you go on this first trip to Japan. How in the world? Did you get these people to trust you to? To be willing to work with you give you their product. Yeah. This white girl who shows up in Japan your first trip there. Yeah. Yeah. I remember the first the first night, I showed up in Japan. It was like the first three restaurants. I went into the they kind of know sorry like two full or they make say something else. And that was hard. So gosh, if the restaurant towards don't even want your business, how did you convince farmers? Yeah. I think it was the passion that it wasn't just you know, this person coming and trying to make a business or make a dollar off of them. They're very genuine, and they believe in relationships, especially business people. It is all about relationships, and they really value you coming and actually being there and seeing their operations and spending time with them. So I was a little nervous going into them because they're mostly men affected say they were all men, but there was a shared sort of mutual respect for the tea. So you're importing macho. You're just randomly calling on these coffee shops trying to convince them to use this macho you're importing how is that going bursts of? So I'm not gonna lie. The first like couple months was not easy. And. I was going to these coffee shops. And they knew this was in New York City where now you almost go into most coffee shops have a macho offering, but this was back in twenty. I wanna say twenty thirteen so five years ago and these coffee shops, it was like no way. I mean, a we're going to like this is a whole new process for us. This is going to slow down. You know, this is gonna take away from our workers focus of making coffee because as you know, mantras, not just a steep t you don't just to teabag. It's now, you know, putting powder wis canned whisking, and it's it's a process. So I got a lot of knows at first a lot of knows. It wasn't until I had a couple coffeeshops kinda take a chance and say, okay, let's test this for like tested for a week or two and see how it goes. And you know, there's one coffee shop. I specifically remember so and the guy who still accustomed ours. Was like, yeah. Let's let's try. It was our first my first. Yes. And I just remember I went in there like to kind of check up every week. I'd go and I'd see more green cups. And he said he said, yeah, it's picking up and we go over week it started picking up. So at that point. It was that you know, that was a good a good win and a good feeling that. Okay. Somethings working here. When were you confident enough to quit the day job? It took a while. I had my day job for a year. So I waited until essentially I was bringing in enough money where I could start kind of paying myself a little tiny bit. And even then it was it was hard to to make ends meet. But I was busy enough where I felt like okay, this this I can make a fulltime job out of this. I had probably like thirty thirty accounts at that point. So let's talk about the macho full product shirt because it's not just. Just you're random macho. Yeah. And that was really which you could have done right decided. Yeah. I just had some awesome brand with some like decent Madre. But wasn't my sort of intent, and I was really passionate about trying to develop like a direct relationship with a farmer and that took a little while. Because obviously, it's not easy to go direct to the farm as with any commodity that you source. There's brokers involved there's bigger team makers involved. So the first product launched was with a bigger team maker. But I wanted to start thinking more like a coffee brand would of I want to go direct trade. I want to figure out how we go direct to farmer. And so I did I went to tea Expos. You know, women on my team who's Japanese started reaching out to like the head of agriculture in Japan to to do some research on how we could start working with more directly with farmer, and there's not a lot of farmers. The interesting thing about mantra is there's not a lot of farmers in Japan that sell directly themselves they'll just sell to a bigger team maker and the tea maker will kinda mix. They'll blend up macho from different farms, and then you kind of lose sight where it comes from. I didn't want to be sourcing this macho that had I had no transparency into where it was coming from. And so we found this farmer, and this was back in twenty fifteen twenty sixteen we found a farmer who was doing everything he's innovative, and he was going direct, and he was using solar panels to shade grow the mantra. So he was kind of bringing all turn. Unitive energy to his community and just everything about his story. And how he was growing the macho I just fell in love with and we really just bonded over my passion for Masha and his passion for for growing. And we now have a couple of his grades of macho that we carry out much full that kind of our best selling items. Now, walk us through the different grades of a lot of people have heard the words ceremonial rites. A ceremonial is kind of this like buzzword in the US. Now, the funny thing is when I go to Japan Japanese, people are like what is ceremonial mean? And I'm like, well, I guess this is a made up term because we see ceremonial or culinary culinary. Yep. So it's ceremonial or culinary and ceremonial. It should mean that it's a high enough grade where you should be you can drink it. So it could be used for a tea ceremony. It's going to be smooth. It's should taste less bitter. It should also have higher concentrations of L. Johny, but culinary mantra is you know, it's going to be a little more bitter. It's gonna be definitely cheaper. It's the leaves that are sort of more matured, and and just don't retain as much of the like sweetness the ceremonial leaves. So there's a couple harvests in Japan. The first harvest is where the best ceremonial leaves come from. If you're drinking macho I would say go for the ceremonial grade. Because you know, you've tried carry like, you can tell a difference when there's, you know, this better mantra versus something that's really smooth. And you know, a lot of people will have culinary mantra. And they think that's you know, what mantra is. And it's sad because it makes me sad because that's not the experience that that you can have with mantra Saharan, I harvest the baby leaves are used for ceremonial great. So that means, you know, they're they're sort of sweeter throughout the top of the plant. They. They have higher concentrations of amino acids, and then culinary is more of like second and third harvest. So Japan has a couple different harvest throughout the year. The best leaves are picked in like may for the first harvest. I new participated in heartless. Yeah. That's when I typically try to go, the how do you drink your much in the morning? So I'm sort of a purist. I kind of keep it simple. I do like mostly mantra and water, and then I'll kind of top it off with a touch of fresh almond milk. So I thought I do do you cook with macho? I do a little bit. I don't cook. With it as much as other people do because I really I kind of like to drink it and have it that way. But I've had some incredible like creations that people have made with macho had a mantra vegan cheesecake recently that was incredible. You are part of this growing number of young women who are launching these businesses who wanted disrupt. The way things have been done previously in when we were reading up on your story. I was thinking of my friend hush warrior who has bright land, the olive oil company. Okay. I don't know if you know about her, but I feel like there are a lot of parallels to your story because we're reading about how some brands are not great. You know, just because it says macho like things have been added to it. It's not organic, it's, you know, not definitely not single origin. I mean, you're, you know, you're specializing in that. But not everyone does. And you you really wanted to product that you could vouch for and get behind and same with sharia, she'd read all this about how olive oil is is adulterated with other things and she just wanted a pure product from California that was beautiful, but I feel like we're meeting more and more people who are trying to do that and their individual categories. What is it about today that you've got people like you who care so much about the product. I want to do things differently than how it had been done. Yeah. I think it's different for for every entrepreneur. A why they do it for me? It was like I saw kind of the the other side of it of working for a huge company and not thinking about the ingredients or whether it was organic as a consumer. I I want to change things and just selfishly make it better for for not only myself, but for everyone because I've I've been on the other side, and I've seen what crappy shitty ingredients can do to your body. I think. I love that. We're kind of in this wave, and when I started in the CPG World Food industry ten years ago. It was all I mean, you would walk into a grocery store every Dame brand. And was so cool now is when you walk into a grocery store, it's all of these like niche brands, and that's just like that gives me still gives me goosebumps because we keep reversing we keep kind of going in this direction of wanting to do things, right and more offensively and more transparently. And so I love that. We're sort of headed I think we're we continue to be headed in that direction. And I think in the future, it's, you know, every consumer should have the right to know where their food is coming from and people like you are disrupting the big CPG companies because they're really responding now and looking at the Browns, they're acquiring. Yeah. What's in their products? I mean, the change has been slow, but I think they are getting beaten up. I mean, you read. This in the papers everyday. They're getting beaten up in terms of sales. And what customers want today, I know? And that's why they keep acquiring these like they just have to keep acquiring companies to kind of stay relevant because the brands that they originally had aren't aren't doing as well anymore. You're a disruptor. Thank you. All right. So Hannah we're going to do the speed round. And we used to ask people coffee or tea, but we know the answer with Hannah off your t t all the way what song makes you smile. My girl came to mind, Donna, why treasured cookbook, I love my best friend is a cookbook writer and simply real health out of Washington. So all that's kind of what got me into clean eating. So most used kitchen implement, a lemon squeezer. Oh, okay. Oh, that's a good one should get one of those. Yeah. Purse snack of choice. I still can't say personnel. It doesn't flow. But anyway, personnel. Oh little bags of popcorn. I'll eat those the little bags of popcorn. See? Yeah. Grabbing go about corn like the healthy kind. Yeah. Though, candy bars your bag, no, candy bars. Although I do. You love the like the dark chocolate like keen wa- crunch. But the the, oh, I know dream vacation destination. Croatia if you had to be trapped on a desert island with any food celebrity who would it be? Let's go with Martha Stewart. Okay. Gotta say why. Well, I just heard her speak, and she's like, she's a hope. So I feel like should be kind of fun and learn just everything from our so, yeah, I wonder if she would do everything or delegate, yes. She'd probably delegate I'd probably be like working for her. But that's okay that that's why I'm learning. I'm learning under Martha Stewart, so I'm okay with that. Good. All right. We'll hannah. Thank you so much. It's been wonderful getting to know you. It's also been really nice working with you. And thank you for putting a beautiful product out into the world because I pointing our product personally love it in our guest to thanks so much. That's it for today show, a huge, thank you to Katrina van wick for talking adapted with us if you want to know more be sure to pick up her new book, titled superpowers and thank you to Hannah Habes of macho full for sharing her journey with us. Visit macho full dot com, or if you're a New York City had to Hannah's macho shops in Dumbo or so Hannah will be making a special guest appearance at Smith canteen in the weeks ahead. So stay tuned for that you can come hang out with us and try some macho macho thank you to our sponsor handsome, brick farm for supporting this season of radio cherry bomb special. Thanks to our associate producer, and our very own riot girl, just Seidman and thank you to the ban Challah for our theme song. Don't forget to sign up for our newsletter the bomb squad buzz radio cherry bomb is joint production of cherry bomb magazine and the heritage radio network. Thanks for listening. Everybody your the bomb. I'll have when he having. Hi, I'm Rebecca the author of the cookie book in creator of displaced housewife, and I live in California. Do you know who I think is the barn? Zoe francois. The amazing Baker and pastry chef behind the blog, so he bakes and the co author of the awesome bread and five cookbook series. So e is not only extremely talented her work is so inspiring. And she always makes me wanna get in the kitchen and make something beautiful. Radio cherry bomb is powered by simple. Cast simple cast is a popular hosting and analytics platform that allows podcasters to easily host in publish to apps like apple podcasts, if you have a podcast or looking to create your very first check it out. Try it for free in save half. Off your first three months at simple casts dot com forward slash heritage. Thanks for listening. The heritage radio network food radio supported by you for a freshest content and to hear about exclusive events subscribe to our newsletter. Enter your Email at the bottom of our website, heritage radio network dot org. Connect with us on Facebook Instagram and Twitter at heritage underscore radio. 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Hannah Habes Japan Katrina van wick New York City founder California Brooklyn Jen EMMY Maka Jin government Brooke farms apple Kerry Publix Kroger bomb magazine Martha Stewart
It Ain't Easy Being A Small Buisness Owner

Radio Cherry Bombe

49:22 min | 2 years ago

It Ain't Easy Being A Small Buisness Owner

"Uh-huh. This episode is brought to you by taste Washington with more than two hundred thirty five wineries, sixty five restaurants, and some of the nation's most talented, chefs taste Washington is the ultimate taste test. Learn more at taste, Washington dot org. I'm HR in communications director cat Johnson. With a preview of this week's episode of meat and three our weekly food. News roundup this week. We're celebrating Valentine's Day, whether it's your favorite day of the season. Or you have would it like the plague there's no debating it's a big day for the world of food and hospitality valentines days what we refer to in the industry a blackout day. I don't feel that my menu is threatened. When I've ordered glass of reserve or Gotha bits of aim. It's an old make injuring from way back and we just decided to bring it back in existence during that the men believe with really does wonders tune into this week's meeting three on heritage radio network. That's MEAT plus signed T H R E available wherever you listen to podcasts. Hi bomb squad. You're listening to radio cherry bomb. And I'm your host Kerry diamond radio cherry bomb is the number one female focused food podcast in the country. Each week, we talked to the most inspiring women in and around the world of food. I let's thank our sponsor handsome brook farm, pasteurized, organic eggs, handsome brook farm secret to making rich, flavorful eggs is simple. The most possible space the best possible feed and lots of love. It's a healthy and humane recipe that makes your almost cakes custard 's and everything in between taste better to learn more and to find their eggs. Visit handsome brook farm dot com. Today's episode is for all the small business owners and future. Entrepreneurs out there era guest is Michelle Mannix, the creator of cooks base a culinary studio in Brooklyn that features classes, private events and more and the first half of our show, Michelle talks about her two previous businesses, a bustling cafe called Ted and Honey and catering company called Parker read. She walks us through something. We don't get to hear about very often the entire life cycle of business from birth to death a lot of you know, that I own a small coffee shop in Brooklyn called Smith canteen. So hearing Michelle's story was very emotional. The second half of our show is part interview part therapy session. Suffice to say, this, isn't are typical episode. And I hope you enjoy it before we get started. We're going to take a little break for word from handsome brook farm, pasteurized, organic eggs, handsome brook farm believes that organic end pastured is the way to go. Comes to eggs pasture. Raised means better lives for hens better lives for small farmers and better eggs for you. It's also better for chefs who depend on rich, flavorful, eggs, handsome, Brooke farms, own flock of amazing shafts, their mother hens count on it and not Adne is mother hen. She's also the celebrated chef behind team Bala booster and kiss cash in Manhattan. Wanna learn how Sheffi not whips up a mini? Herb omelet with salon tro, parsley and turmeric at home or maybe you'd like to make her read shock Shuka an aromatic spicy tomato sauce into a teen. Nestles eggs and lets them poach to perfection you can find Sheffi knots. Middle Eastern eggs Centric, recipes N, videos on handsome brook, farm dot com. You can find handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized eggs at Publix, Kroger sprouts, farmers market freshdirect and many natural foods stores across the country. Here's my conversation with Michelle Mannix. Let's start with what you're doing now because you are doing a very cool thing right now, you have a business called cook. Space hook space yet. Tell us about cook space cook space is a con airy studio, and we called it a studio on purpose because I wanted it to be similar to a yoga studio in the fact that you create a practice of cooking, and it's a recreational cooking school for lack of a better word private event space, and we teach people how to cook from confidence. And that's our primary mission to build confidence in the kitchen. So you can eventually let go of recipes. Oh, I love that. Why did you think that was needed that kind of cooking school? What happened was when I closed hadn't Honey and Parker red which were cafe that. I had an event space and catering company in the navy yard. In the process of sort of unraveling my life and figuring out what I was going to do with. Ten thirteen years on remember now of real experience and skill and this field that was completely new to me at that point. I wasn't the chef even though I'd gone to culinary school. And I didn't want to open another restaurant. So I really kind of said to myself, what do I have to say that's of any value. And usually when people have been around me, and my home, they always say like you make it look so easy. You just throw things together. And I think I realized that oh, it's not easy for other people. Why was that such an interest? It wasn't really about the end result. It was about the process of throwing it together. So that was like a little bit of an moment for me. And then in the what do I have to say kinda trajectory? I think like, oh, well, I'm really good at the visual aspect. You know, I used to have a catering company and put such detail into even the muffins and the milk, and how everything was set up in that grew and took off and I went to the bookstore and got some entertainment books and some cookbooks. And there was nothing wrong with those books, but I realized what they were missing was sort of the back. Story the goal like really how to pull it together. And to me, I didn't think that that was out there. And I also felt that the way people cook in restaurants and also grandma's and people that really cook. Well, it's different than the way we're taught and I feel like it's disturbance. I feel like we're kind of stuck in this hamster wheel of following instruction painting by numbers or just like outsourcing it, and I feel like the culture of food which I love, you know, I love food magazines recipes. I don't love taking pictures of my food. But. The culture of food has sort of hijacked everyone's confidence, and it kind of made people feel like they need to have restaurant quality meals in there, and I feel like nobody knew what to make for dinner anymore. And so it was like counter to what was needed. Yeah. I do think there's something in the air though, between what you're doing semi NAS rats facet, heat, which is really teaching people to cook more instinctually. Yes. And ask themselves wisest ish. Not working, right? Missing one of these four elements, even I haven't tried a lot of the meal kit. So that was my second. I did blue apron I think for like a year because I convince myself that I wanted more variety, and I convinced myself because I realized that's not what I wanted. And I don't think that's what people really want, and I had another aha moment. Because every time I did a blue apron meal. I was like what's wrong. There's something off. My kitchen was always a mess when I cook. It's never MS. And it never tasted is good. As I wanted it to because I wasn't in charge. And I was stressed, and I'm usually in such a calm meditative flow -i enjoyed state when I cook that I'm like, that's what I said to myself. No wonder why people don't cook. This is stressful this because when to me, it's the whole thing for me with cooking is that the reason why we promote cooking from confidence is not because though, and then you could be out of Sheffi, and you can have great that is great you can develop your own culinary expression. When you cook from confidence. But honestly for me, the whole motivation was because of the joy that you get you know, because we all make excuses as to why we can't cook. I don't have the right kitchen. I don't have the right stuff. I don't you know. I think times a biggie. Yeah. You're not probably like that. I hate that. And I'm not saying yours, but every I feel like in the culture, there's no other area of our lives where we say that everybody uses it like I say for working out for everything I blame like we have time. It's like what you prioritize. And when I get it because if you don't food, and you're not gonna cook. If you don't know really how to cook. In a way that's going to work for your lifestyle. You're not gonna have the right foods. So it's just a vicious cycle of frustration. And I get it. But once you get into that place. I feel like you can cook a great meal in thirty minutes or less not to sound like Rachel Ray. Right. I mean, that's why I think meal prep is such a genius trend. And I'm so happy to see at takeoff because if you really can just find that. Chunk of time you plan everything in advance. You know, you make things that are going to last you all week. You can eat really. Well, you know, you can save money. You can eat healthy you can save time. And all that. But it's just committing to at Sunday making it a priority. And to me, it's the most vital and basic form of self care. And how you show someone else and yourself love. So to me, I just feel like it's it's important. So that was the the reason for doing it. And I wanted to show another way to access cooking. And I wanted to take the pretension out of it. I wanted to take the fear out of it and put back into it. And make it feel like I wanna do that. I wanna cook. You know, not just the end result the plate the finished product because I feel like we're just we can't let we can't let the culture of convenience hijack our relationship to the food because it's not just about what you eat it impacts. The food systems that you support the environment. I mean and taking care of oneself in in doing research for this book proposal, which turned into a physical space instead of a book, and it still could turn into book. Hopefully for anybody listening. Kidding? No, don't take kidding. Out in town. Who can take classes cook space? Anybody? We've had we've had a four year old come to a pie making class that was not intended for kids last week, a mom dropped her nine year old off for her fish jury class and we have grandma's. We have a variety, and it's been really interesting as a business owner to look at the demographic because I thought it wouldn't be a lot of millennials. And we have a lot of millennials coming. And you've a lot of cool guest instructors. Yeah. Some of our favorite we share a lot of people that I notice you had Katrina, but at Jap Dejan Trina van wick she did a workshop that I attended at loved and I've started incorporating them in my every other daily life. Yeah. We had shame Mullen to a class last week. We did a conversation cooking and conversation class around mental health, and we had an instructor from the class by Taryn to me help lead the conversation. So we've done workshops, we have kitchen colliding workshop this artists that does these really interesting collages, and she's just going to lead. We use. I like to use the space is just a form of creativity. You know, we had a watercolor class because a lot of people like to pay still alive. And it was just there's a lot of light there. It's a beautiful studio. So it's a variety of classes, we do about ten to twelve a month right now. So cool. Thank you. All right. I'm gonna I need to take a class. I love classes. If I had the again, see if I have time, I blame everything I do wanna talk about Ted and Honey. Okay. The business that used to have because you're very honest about what did work, and what didn't work and nor so now more so. Time to reflect. So tell us what what was Ted and Honey Honey was a made from scratch cafe and cobble hill, we opened in two thousand eight and the we was myself, and my brother, and as you can probably relate it's very challenging to work with a business partner. But let alone someone you're related to or sleepy with. But it was a lot of fun. And we kinda didn't really know what we're doing when we got into it and it took off, but we made everything from scratch, and it was primarily focused around breakfast. And it was on cobble Hill Park, and I loved almost every minute of it. It was it space. I I didn't really live walking distance. But when we would go on road trips, we would always stop there. Whether it's just like a trip on the way out, and because you just so many great things there, and you couldn't get things like that in the neighborhood at that time. Yeah. My brother was really smart about creating it's funny because we had these scones that people loved and he would only make certain amount every day, and I'd get. So frustrated, and like people want them, and he's like that's why you know, you create this and even called our cookie like our signature cookie things like that. It's like it wasn't a signature. I mean, it was I guess, but then it it does create these things we had like insider things on the menu that we'd are tomato soup and grilled cheese. That we like purposely wouldn't run on the menu after the first year because the regulars loved it. And like, I think it was because we forgot to put it on. And somebody's like what about that? And we had it. And then someone else pass it on like this secret thing will you had no food service experience. Non right? Oh, well, I not a lot. I didn't work. I was like a hostess at cheese Mexican, Mike cheese. Ball restaurant already teaches in the eighties in high school and then at a funky restaurant in Richmond for like a tiny stint after Virginia. I'm from Virginia. Kind of my dad was in the military will. Places, but I had been laid off from my corporate job and went to culinary school at the new school that doesn't exist anymore, and it was like an amateur twelve week program. And then I did it again as the chef instructor assistant. And then I got a job at Danny Meyer's restaurant in the museum of modern art as the line cook with no experience whatsoever. And I remember going to work the first day, and I think it was like president's day weekend and. I had done my trail in the prep kitchen, which wasn't stressful. You know, make a gallon of integrate something else with recipes, you know, and the first day on the line. I just assumed that I was like really big avid Danny Meyer fan and read the book and all this stuff and the guys training me next to me. And I think he's going to be with me the whole day. And then he's like, okay, you're good. Right. And we had four hundred covers that day, and I'd never worked in a restaurant, and they didn't even have tickets. So you had to call it back. You know, her ticket is like literally piece of paper that'll print out with the yes. You had somebody Boeing saying I need to chicken, I need to fish. I need this fire this fire that never having worked in an and of couse bumptious thing about you in that kitchen, and it was great. But what I realize is that I would just learn speed and accuracy, which I loved, but I wanted to cook. So I then went to the kitchen and work. They are for few months, and it was good training for ten Honey in a way in terms of like feeding mass amounts of people and organizing and working with other people and. Getting experience working in a kitchen. But yeah, I had none. And my brother had been a chef. But he'd never owned a restaurant before. And yeah, we learned like most people do the real hard way how much money did you have to invest in getting it open. We got seventy five thousand dollars in like one day notice from my husband's company that he owned, but he had to come basically and unindo until his partners that he's going to open a cafe with his wife, and I convinced my brother to come and we didn't even plan for any more money and like scrape together Nichols spray painted things on our own use yard salesman, really kind of just pull that place together. Assuming when I spent the seventy five thousand and key money that everything was going to work. Explain what chemo key many in New York. And now there's sophisticated term for it. I think it's called lease asset or something like that back in the day. It was called key money, and you. Basically pay these kind of I should say ridiculous. Because when you're on the other side, you do put a lot of value in a place. So there's brokers that will arrange for people to go to pre existing restaurants. And if you pay a flat fee, then you take advantage of all the equipment. They're all the furnace f f ini which means furniture fixtures and equipment, and I just I didn't compare it. And the equipment was terrible. Nothing worked and we had to replace half of it. So I would say maybe all in. I started with a hundred thousand Ted and Honey. And then and then we started a company called Parker red which was a full service catering division, simply from I think in the early days. People would call and say, do you do catering, and my brother I'd be like the we do catering. Sure. Yeah. Recent. We always say, no, we don't do catering because it's so complicated. It is. But we actually turned it into almost a million dollar business in about four years. And then we ended up going into the navy yard that was too early in my opinion for us. It just didn't work out you into the navy because you needed a commercial kitchen sort of what it was opportunistic we had done. We'd started doing catering at Ted and Honey people would call us, and they went to out of that space. My God that wasn't a big we'd a wedding one time and we'd had to close on a Saturday prep kitchen with small and the kitchen upstairs was teeny tiny. So what were you doing all this time from from the point where you opened to what you just told us what was your role kind of jack-of-all-trades being in the beginning. I waited on every customer. I opened the front door woods, you know. Hire everybody. And then it took us about three years to get a real legitimate manager. And I think that was the time when we were developing Parker ad and so that was a. I worked on the branding and hiring a catering manager because we had. Catering that just fell in our laps order taking, but I realized in order to mind this to realize this value, I you know, we had to put resources against it. So I became more of a and that was good from our relationship with my brother because he went to that building. And I stayed over it to six four and all of our goods were made there and brought back and forth. So my role was staff happiness operations paying the bills running to the banks get quarters clan. The toilet sounds like what I plunging. At the canteen. Yeah. You have to learn how to fix everything. Yeah. You don't know. What's going on in your business? It's really difficult to I think a good manager an operator and connect with your customers. And I think people can feel that because people are looking to feel a certain way when they walk into spaces like they're known or it's comfortable or it reminds them of something and. That's not you're not able to do that. Just what the aesthetics or just with the food. It's a combination of so much and the people are a big part of that. It's a it's a formula. Yeah. Yeah. So why did you pull the plug on the whole thing? Well, our year prior to my brother decided to move. Oh, that's yeah. Okay. And it was a real shock. We ran everything together. He was our chef catering business. We done Saturday lives party. We'd done Sports Illustrated model party. I mean like a thousand person cocktail parties, weddings. It was of. It was a. Legitimate full business, and he came to me one day and said he was going to move to Charleston, South Carolina, and he gave me three weeks notice and see just so burned out. I think like a lot of people who were from the south originally he realized that he had two small daughters. He just wanted to different lifestyle and. I literally was like what the fuck am. I gonna deal, and you know, like a lot of people I serve eight a few people and a couple of people were like close it. And I just said to myself that's not how I go down. I'm gonna like, and I got reenergized, you know, and I'm like, I'm going to do this. This is going to be great. And I brought in an outside chef and that was challenging because as you can probably relate, the I the the money going to someone that wasn't a partner, you know, you want that to even work even more, and I just realized that it had grown bigger to at this point. We probably had thirty people between the two buildings. Close to two million dollars in nyc cash flow. I just say flow because it just weren't making kaneohe right back. Van equipment twenty four hour events. It. I just felt like a fireman constantly waiting the alarm to go off and as much as I loved it. I just wanted to do something different. And I didn't know what that was. But I was willing to take risk and I still miss Ted. And Honey, it's very visceral. You know, I didn't I couldn't even walk down. The alley for two years. I went there every single day for eight years, and I you know, you watch families grow you watch them fall apart. You you witnessed life and your part? But no, it's true. Like, Hugh people come in, and you know, they're single and then they're together. And then they vein. And then they have a dog in another baby. And you see your part of this whole. Yeah. And you see people's like dying you talk. So. Kuban now. Old people come in that, you know. One day. They don't come in anymore. And you're like, oh, they died. I mean, it's terrible like, but you really have a different relationship with people. And I lived here. It's my neighborhood. So you feel which is so special. You don't get that in New York. I feel like I live in an Abraham and for a while. I thought that it was like high school that everybody knew each other. And they just came to ten hunting every morning like it felt like that. And even the New York Times, which was so great. They wrote about us. And it's the headline was like the place where everybody feels like they are. I can't remember now that that's how I can't. But it did feel like that to me. And I realized now everybody know each other, but it's had a good energy. How did you even decide like, okay? I just have to close this. I pro I don't remember the exact moment. But I'm sure it had to do something breaking or the health department or just some moment. Some sort of reminder of like the frustration and just. I don't know the exact moment. But I remember seeing some Email, and it was like a cheesy name like restaurant loot? And I called the guy like what's the deal with this? And he said I helped people sell restaurants. I help people saw leases. I helped put the value. And I said let me let's just talk there any commitment to this. And I said there's no commitment. I take I take pictures of it. I try to hide any of the regional markings. So even if I got you a buyer, and you don't want to do it you could. So I felt like I really had nothing to lose him. Why not and at this point, I did have debt, and I felt like it wasn't a sustainable thing. For me. I felt like I was making everybody else. Happy the neighborhood. My husband even he went there every day my staff and I loved everybody. But at that point I wanted to be a little bit more selfish. And I wanted to do something different. And it took about six months because I also had to sell the other business simultaneously. Because if I close. Parker read that means I would literally have to add whole nother human being two two six four which I finally gotten it cash flow positive with such discipline around the labor costs in the food cost. And it was just such an integrated thing, you know, we we each unit fed each other and use the quote, unquote left. You know, it was engineered in such a way. So I was able to sell both leases to two different people within three weeks of each other. But it took about six months and the good news is I was able to sell them and bring down most of the debt and then. Have a blank canvas. But in terms of crying, I always used to say, you know, I'll mop the first floor here all mop the last sort of just saying it, and I remember the last day, and I'm not a cry or mopping the floor sobbing. Start crying again. And then two days later, I walked by and somebody had put a piece of paper on the front door, and the entire cry signed it saying how much they were gonna miss out. And I was. Bad, and I still see people. And and now, we smile, and I can tell they're looking at like, I'll get the double take. I think I know her usually it's the glasses. And I, you know, I'm like it's going lady low tape person, you know, you have nicknames for people or you know, what they ordered. And it's. Sitting here ball. That so hard. I think it's just hard to hear because everybody told me just a close Smith canteen. They're like, you're crazy. Even my account was like just close it. You're not making any money. What are you doing? But you're impacting a neighbourhood is what you're dealing. Yeah. And I felt sad to say goodbye to it. I really did. Because I'm miss it to you know, it is hard in our neighborhood to watch Smith street sort of just a little bit dying divine, and we talked about it. But when you care about a neighborhood, you have to support its local businesses, and you have to put your money where your value systems are. New York is so special and. It's special when you find places that you love, and you get attached to the people there, and I had to ask that stay with me, my executive sous-chef at Parker read started as my dishwasher the day opened. We had people at stay was his longtime and so viscerally. It's it's also you're breaking up a family. I I took people's jobs away from them, and I took so it was very difficult. You know, it was sad. And it was also PTSD that I didn't realize, you know, now, I see it. But like, the weather will change, and I instantly go to like do we kept it? I have enough prep dollar Palmer's are like an it's like a year later, and I still have a very physical. Relationship to like, I can still see every corner I can still remember the grid on the ice machine. Like, you just have a relationship with a building. That is pretty powerful. This episode is brought to you by taste, Washington, food and wine lovers wonderland taste. Washington offers the most wine and food from one single place in one's Ingle place, including samples for more than thirty five wineries, sixty five restaurants, sixty exhibitors, and some of the nation's most talented chefs each spring attendees can drink and eat their heart out over four days brimming with specially curated events that highlight the best of Washington state. The result of continued partnership between visit Seattle and Washington state wine taste Washington is taking place March twenty eight to thirty first two thousand nineteen Mark your calendar for this year's lineup featuring the red and white party taste Washington on the farm. The new vintage seminars the grand tasting and Sunday brunch. Learn more at taste, Washington dot org. Do you? Love this podcast. Heritage ray. Jio network has plenty more. We have over thirty five thousand shows in our online library. My name's Jennifer lay you'd see and I'm the host of tech bites where we talk to innovators and influencers in the food tech space. You can find tech bites wherever you listen to podcasts and on heritage radio network dot org. Thanks for listening. Hi, everybody. It's just I been the associate producer of radio cherry bomb. Thanks for listening today show, while Kerry takes a quick coffee break, I'm going to do a little housekeeping. Don't forget our jubilee conference is taking place on Sunday, April seventh. We've got an amazing day plan for everyone. So be sure to get your ticket. They're on sale right now at cherry bomb dot com. Also, be sure to check out our new miniseries. The future of food. The series features talks and panels with dozens of women across the country. I've loved at an in these episodes and getting to know these members of the pom squad you can find the future of food on cherry bomb dot com or wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks to carry gold for supporting our tour. Now, let's go back to carry 'em. Michelle. Thanks Jess for the second part of the show. We turn the tables a bit and Michelle asks the questions. I don't know how good I wasn't answering. But Michelle gave me a lot to think about here we go. So she. She has written. It's a book of sorts. It's a workbook. And it's called seize your days. Prioritize and organize your next twelve weeks with deeper intention, purpose and action. And for those of you who came the cherry bomb university. Michelle was one of our professors. Thank you very much. I hadn't blah you. Did that good? I'm so happy to hear that you're gonna tell us a little bit about this book. It is for sale on cook space, Brooklyn dot com. And you can also take an may cherry mom one day. We're talking about maybe doing something because I'm so I'm so intrigued by this workbook, and you do classes based around the work. I do we have one next on March fourth and I've done them at other people's offices. I've done immensely dog. I did a little thing at the for small group at goop in New York. And I love talking about this stuff as you can tell. So why did you decide to do this workbook for a number of reasons, but primarily because I literally had to pull myself back together and put my life back. Together. And I wanted to tools and some support. And what I mean by pull my life together. I close my business at the age of forty two businesses at the age of forty six and literally had no idea what I was going to do next and wanted to work and wanted these skills and wanted to be on this industry. But I wanted it to work for me and. Through this low process of other groups, I realized that to me what was missing was the combination of our emotional life with the typical stuff you see in a planner and pulling bring people back to life, in whatever way that looks like, you know, there's it's either like very self help, and very spiritual or it's very business or it's very about wellness. And so in the process of all the things I was doing I kind of created this dorky print out. I would literally print out what I want to tackle this week. And how do I wanna feel and what's my priorities because I had nobody I almost wanted. I was like creating my own boss. My own. 'co- like people around me because I had gone from managing thirty people hundreds of thousands of dollars and activity to nothing. So it was like and in the process of using it regularly. I don't I didn't think about it. But a year later I had done a book proposal. Realize that nothing was going to happen from it. Because I didn't know that unless you're an Instagram star. If a really hard time convincing publishers that they should. Go with your idea. And luckily and mcnicoll who we both know like the idea and still was willing to pitch it without with me having at that point like twenty seven. Or whatever, it's just not my big medium. But I so anyway, I I had done this talk at my husband's company lead dog about reinventing myself, and as I said, I never even thought about that way reinventing myself, but in the process of putting together this talk and looking back at through so many things I realized that so many unintentional and intentional things really happened. And I really did manifest for lack of a better word very specific things. And I don't believe it would have happened unless I put things out there not just in the universe, but on paper, and I broke it down, and I really dug deep and. So I had always wanted to create a planner. I'm a big list junkie. I've always created last. I mean, right stupid things on my list, like take our I love crossing things off list and also being a restaurant person prep list, and pack out lists. And you know, I love that kind of order, and I created a prototype of the planner, and then just kept tweaking it and using it and. Was able to launch a second version through Kickstarter and. Here. We are. Yeah. It's kind of like a lot of things. I mean, it's at a neat. It's what I thought was missing. You know, people say why did you do certain things that hadn't hunting and everything? I did there was because I just wanted it. I wanted a good exam ledge and good macho before it was really like at one point somebody came in and said you used to do baby food, and I was like, oh, yeah. Our kids are grown now. That's funny. All right. So you're going to walk me through a short exercise from this. I do I did not see any of these questions in advance. So I have no idea where this is going to go so Kerry as for the ride. Yeah. You meant you pointed out the title is called Caesar days and the whole meaning behind that. I think is that in order to seize your days, you have to size them up and sizing it up is just to create awareness because I don't know how you should live your life. But I know you do and sometimes I feel like we're all kind of aware of what we need to do. But we're for what we're holding ourselves back. So this thing is just for twelve weeks intentionally because I feel like when? For example, the beginning of the year all the pressure to like new new me knew everything it's so much. It's it's not sustainable to have put that much kind of pressure on big changes over a big time. So you're going to think about right now, it's February fifteenth so for the next twelve weeks between now and the next right before summer starts, so kind of a good time. It's not that great a weather. You know, you're still hibernating what we're going to talk about as maybe some ways that you wanna feel your intention behind that. How you want to operate as a human being as a boss as a friend? Maybe as a sister like dogmas and five now, I'm having a prime the pump gut it and some of the goals. So we might not do all this because I'm gonna leave you with this book. But what you're going to think about? Is let me just do one exercise just as okay, we could do rapid-fire rapid fire machoism, but just for a second just like abandoned thoughts of like should would if you were to really ask yourself, how you wanted to feel not a narrative story, but just like feel in general in your mind, and your heart like what kind of words, you is in my mind up more organized, and what about in your heart, my heart or soul or have you want to think about that? The first thing comes to mind is I want to have more time for the people. Who mean a lot to me? That's a narrative. Okay. Okay. Okay. That's not a feeling. It's kind of narrative about feeling what you're really feeling you want to feel connected. I feel can I just say are you wanna have time for just one have time for for the people? So maybe you want to present. Yes. Is that a better word for it? What about your body your physical body? Oh, I always feel like I need to be in better shape. Say when I felt strong. Yeah. Yeah. I don't know strong as the word I would use how vital just shape. Okay. Just. Like just even working out a little bit like I walk, but I just have never had a workout routine, and you and I are the same age as you get older. You're like, oh, I really should at this point have some kind of. Yeah routine. So maybe a little healthier a little stronger little more in shape. What about work? What about your role, and how do you feel your how do I want to feel and your role as a boss? We wanna feel. By the way, this is a new way to do this. I've never done this where it's like asko you. All right. All right. All right. And I guess this goes back to more organized. So that I will have more time. They'll see all these themes just. Keep the company going so. Armaments are so surveilling a leader. I wouldn't feel like leader embodied lead. I don't not feel like a leader. I think the problem was about not feeling that way. It's very minder. Because sometimes it's things you're already feeling, but it's just like a reminder because the whole purpose of these much is kind of like when you think about these things it's a good reminder, just like going through your life. If you say like, I want these things because it goes back to the time right because we all have it. But how do you prioritize the little that we have because you know, what it is a new probably felt this way. I mean, maybe you still do when you're companies are so small, and you do so many things every employee of your company does so many things when you're a small company, you know, everybody's a generalist. Nobody's really a specialist. But because I'm the head of both of the companies, and I do so many things it causes too many bottlenecks. And that's what I want to solve in twenty. So you went to be more efficient. Yes. Yeah. I think that's totally good at home. How do you want to feel? Like for me. I was used. I wanna feel like beauty. I wanna feel comfort. I wanna feel relaxed like like refuge. I love my apartment. So I feel pretty good. Reminder that you're not feeling that way. It's just awareness. How come? I want to couch. That's more comfortable. That's that's what I wanted them. With your family lower part. I love my I love my home. So friends all those people how do you feel with them? And by the way, the reason why we're talking about feeling so much. I should have prefaced this is because we talked about Danielle the port right earlier. Danielle LaPorte is this woman that wrote a book called the desire map, and it's about making resolutions in what she realizes that. Most people are looking for a feeling not thing. And so when you say to yourself, I want a new job I want a new man, I wanna work out. It's because you really probably don't necessarily want the shiny new object. You probably want the feeling associated with it. If somebody wants a new job it's because something's lacking in that when they have. And it's usually not just a job not just the money. It's that they wanna feel valued or smarter or making a contribution. So that's the purpose of all these feeling questions because when you get around and underneath it it helps like aluminum more. So you can have a different relationship. I think with things, and it's like becomes a little bit more of a grounding, tools, just like uncovering all these things because they'll kind of. Hopefully, create a little bit of a narrative for you. So I'll just do those last few. But like your lifestyle, your creative expression. How do you feel feel in that area of your life? This same. I mean, I'm satisfied with that in that area of my life. I would say. Is that an answer? Because you have to identify. I want to feel. I mean, I think some people don't even it's one thing. It's not about saying. I'm good. I'm happy. It's not bad. It's not it's not looking for where unhappy looking to get a little deeper and uncover it because that helps you when you say to yourself, I want to be more efficient at work. I want to have more time I wanna feel strong in my body. And my mind, I want clarity and presence at home. I wanna feel comfort and beauty. Even though you already have these days. It's just good reminder. His it also reminds you that you already are good. But if you start to veer off, it's like these are things that I want and this is important to me. So not forgetting that because everything else can then take hold of us Email. It's not I always say to people Email is someone else's to do list. You know that right? So if that's how you start your day, you're not making it a priority. That doesn't mean you avoid him out. So we took a little inventory on some things you want. And it's kind of maybe maybe. It's a limiting and ought to be like, oh, those are some interesting things that I could be mindful up. But then you kind of move to what is my real intention in these next twelve weeks my life. What what am I thinking about? What do I want to be do? I wanna feel better because last year, my bracing this new love, and my like so in this workshop, you kinda take workbook you take yourself through that. So and I often ask people, I'm all about energy and vibes. It's like what do you want to be vibrating to yourself to the world? Because it's a good reminder to say to yourself, am I prioritizing the ability to bring that forward? And so if you were to ask yourself about an intention that you went to bring to your life between now and may fifteenth, you don't have to share it here. But you could jot it down in this planner here. And then what you do in the planner is you put it together. And you're like in twelve weeks, I want to feel and be an operating from this place. This is the type of person I want to be even if you already are that person. It's just like. Reminder. That's that's a great point that you sometimes don't give always like what you're not not what you you. Don't focus a lot on what you already are. And what you are you focused on things that don't matter. You know, when I say don't matter if you've just identified some really, soft beautiful things presence creativity. Grounding stuff they aren't things that you have to get or do. They're all things that you can, cultivate, already so it's like just re making it's like literally make yourself feel better that from just awareness for most people, I think you really just want to sometimes just feel a little bit differently. And that's enough. Like, why is that not enough, you know, because it impacts everything else? It's like the the air thing on the airplane. You're a better mom, if you're happy or a better boss, if you're filled all those things, but sometimes we leave all of that. And just worry about the emails or stuff that just doesn't kind of. I like to say move the needle, you know, sometimes I'm like working on things with cook space, and it's like that's not what's important right now. It's still important, but it can wait. That's it for today show, a huge, thank you to Michelle Mannix, for her honesty, and for helping me sees my days, if you want to know more about her work book and the companion class checkout, cook space, Brooklyn dot com. Thank you to handsome brook farm for supporting this season of radio cherry bomb for more. Visit handsome brook farm dot com. Special thanks to our associate producer, and our very own riot girl, just Zeidman and thank you to the ban Challah for our theme song radio cherry bomb is a joint production of cherry bomb magazine and the heritage radio network. Thanks for listening everyone. You are the bomb. I'll have what she's having. Hey there. I'm Nancy Pappas, and I'm food Oeser living and working in Brooklyn. Do you want to know who I think is the bomb? What's wrong of Rawson treats, she's located off orchestrated Manhattan, and my favorite thing to eat. There is her pipe pallet. Specifically the sesame slice. Her desserts are raw vegan dairy free. Gluten free and soy free in a hundred percent natural go visit her and check out her Instagram at Rawson treats. Radio cherry bomb is powered by simple. Cast simple cast is a popular hosting and analytics platform that allows podcasters to easily host in publish to apps like apple podcasts, if you have a podcast or looking to create your very first check it out. Try it for free in save half. Off your first three months at simple casts dot com Ford slash heritage. Thanks for listening to heritage radio network food radio supported by you for our freshest content and to learn more about our tenure anniversary celebration happening all year, long subscribe to our newsletter. Just enter your Email at the bottom of our website. Heritage radio network dot org. 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Michelle Mannix Ted Washington New York Parker Kerry partner Brooklyn Manhattan Smith Publix producer Danny Meyer Sheffi Valentine Shuka Virginia director Brooke farms
Episode 182: Take A Coffee Break With The Chocolate Barista

Radio Cherry Bombe

43:11 min | 2 years ago

Episode 182: Take A Coffee Break With The Chocolate Barista

"Hi, everybody. You're listening to radio cherry bomb, and I'm your host Kerry diamond each week. We bring the pages of cherry bomb magazine to life through conversations with the most inspiring women in and around the world of food. I let's thank our sponsors Likud on blue if you're daydreaming about culinary school. Maybe it's time to say Bonjour to Lacorte on blue learn more about the legendary culinary school's. Most prestigious professional qualification Legrand diploma by visiting quote on blue dot EDU. And let's thank vital farms, pasteurized eggs, vital farms. Pasteurized eggs are better than Katri. They are both free. Try for yourself to get your coupon for vital farms, pasteurized eggs, had divided farms dot com backslash cherry bomb and Bob's red. Mill. Bob's red mill is an employee owned company that's been offering organic gluten free and stone ground products for decades. You know with Bob's red mill you're not just getting quality. You are getting flavor packed food. That tastes amazing. Go to Bob's red mill dot com and use the code cherry bomb twenty five for twenty five percent off your order. All right. We have some housekeeping radio cherry bomb is on tour. So far, we've been to Chicago, Detroit and Dallas it's been amazing to meet so many members of the bomb squad and hear from so many incredible women, but the fun is not over yet. Tonight. We are in Birmingham that is November fifteenth at the essential. Title, and we'll be talking to different women to find out. What the food scene is like in the magic city and then on Sunday we head down to New Orleans to talk to Kristen essay of coquette joy, the Baker and others at the ace hotel. If you live in no cities and want to hear episode of radio cherry bomb recorded live. Now is your chance. Tickets are still available on cherry bomb dot com. So don't forget Birmingham tonight. And then New Orleans on Sunday. I'm very excited. If you can't meet us on the road. Don't worry. We'll be releasing each stop as part of a very special radio cherry bomb mini series later this year, a huge. Thank you to our sponsor carry gold for making all of this happen. The very final stop. Nobody knows this yet. I think but it Seattle on December. First we will be going to book Larter, one of our favorite places. It's one of the places we kicked off the cherry bomb cookbook tour. So I'm really thrilled to be going back to Seattle, and we will have some very special guests, and if you go to the. Larter website, you can snag a ticket right now. Today's guest is Michelle Johnson. Some of you might know Michelle as the chocolate barista on Instagram Michelle's been working to shed light on the lack of diversity in the coffee scene. She started a special live event called black coffee where she and baristas and coffee. Shop owners discuss the specialty coffee scene, and what needs to change. She's held them in Portland, New York City and Washington DC. I was really excited to have Michelle on the show because she and I have kind of been Email pen pals for the last year. So it was really wonderful to chat with her in person and hear how she got started on the coffee scene and how she came to be doing what she's doing. I hope you enjoy our conversation as much as I did. And we will be right back after this word from Likud on blue. Are you daydreaming about culinary school again make this the year your dreams become reality? With Likud on blue the legendary culinary school study classic French culinary techniques in cuisine and patisserie as part of their exclusive nine month. Legrand diploma and graduate into a world of opportunity, you also can extend your course of studies to include culinary management and dedicated internships. Likud on blue has locations in more than twenty countries around the world and located within some of the best food cities out their London Ottawa Madrid Bangkok Tokyo, and of course, the spiritual home of cuisine and Likud on blue Paris, turning your daydreams into reality is closer than ever. Visit court on blue dot EDU for more and let your culinary adventure begin. I am so excited to be here with you Michelle because we have in pen pals for so many months now, I really forgot that we had never met. Yeah. I haven't been to New York and over a year. Wow. And what do you think has it changed j just as busy as soon as I land here? Always immediately. Get stressed out like a good type of stressed. I'm stressed out. All the time. Yeah. Why? So you spend time in Portland, I feel like Portland's as caffeinated if not more caffeinated, but but their way more chill way more is because of the recreational marijuana. I was going to say that I didn't wanna make assumptions, but I was going to say it's definitely up in the trees. Okay. Yeah. The trees I mean, the Air's beautiful in I don't wanna lump Portland and Seattle. I know that's like an obnoxious New York thing to do. But the air in Portland and the air and Seattle it's not the same. We do not breathe the same air. I I like to call Portland my side piece. I would never marry the side piece. So I will never move to Portland permanently. But I will go there for like three months at a time and hang out just on the low very quietly, and then leave it's it's gotta be good for everything alongs, the sole your brain. So you had said we were having lunch. And you're like, how did you find me? And I was like I have no idea. I think it might have been we were going to Portland on the radio cherry bomb tour earlier this year. And I realized we did not have a single coffee person on the panel or speaking. And I was like all right. You can't roll into Portland and not have somebody representing the coffee scene. So I started looking up like women in the coffee scene and fell down that Google rabbit hole and found you, and then I think I'd missed you buy like, I wasn't a wee Bayo league or something. Yeah. Real bummer. But you had just been there was at the first of the black hoffy programs. So we've so much to unpack here. Let's start with. Let's start with you, Michelle. Let's start with the chocolate barista. How did the chocolate barista become a thing who've well? I started the chocolate breached in January twenty sixteen. I was still working as a barista in Phoenix Arizona at the time and Phoenix has a it's it's a big city. But it also is kind of has a small town feel to it. So a lot of its communities are like very intertwined and and close to each other. So one of the communities that overlapped with the coffee scene was the creative community. So I had a lot of friends who were for Taga Fers bloggers influencers and things like that. And I was like I want to do that. But I'm Brita. So I wanna make this like blog that's about my barista lifestyle. And I was like, well, I'm the only black person here. We're going to be the chocolate barista, and I the name just popped in your head. Yeah. I think it was someone else had said it sort of as a joke. But I was like that kind of has a ring to it. So I'm gonna keep it. And at first I tried to start it like a year before. And I was in college. I was like, oh, this'll be about community and coffee in college. Then I dropped out of college. So I was like this will just be about coffee and community. I grew up in DC the DC area. Okay. Yeah. I was born in northern Virginia. And then how did you wind up in Phoenix is sort of like a dart at the map type of situation, I've visited when I was like eighteen or nineteen years old one of my friends. I grew up with used to go to Arizona state. So randomly went to visit her and had a great time back. Then there was nothing in Phoenix. So I have no idea how I latched on. And was like, yeah. This is the place for me. But I did. And it took a couple years for me to move there. But in that time, I was I'd gotten. A coffee become a barista started to get really into that. And I was like, you know, no matter where I moved because I didn't want to stay in DC. I was like I at least I can be a barista anywhere. Like, this is a skill set that can take anywhere when I was just researching what was going on in Phoenix. There wasn't that much going on. So I was like not only can I just go there and be a good barista. But I can probably, you know, help build the community there do something. So when I got there. That's exactly what I did. So how did you become a Brita because that's a big part of? Yeah. The coffee world is not really open to people of color. Right. I've always loved coffee my mom during says, she drinks Maxwell house. It's like a little bit of coffee and mostly Milken sugar. But I'd like that's how I grew up drinking. I remember being four years old like stealing sips of her coffee because it just tastes so sweet, and I have four younger siblings. So she would go away to tend to them and the oldest of five. Well, here we go. But she would go tend to them, and I would run in the kitchen and like still a couple and then Reddaway and your mom's like, why is this kid bouncing off the walls? Exactly, why is my coffee gone. But as I got older she used to like make coffee for the both of us, especially when I was in high school so that in high school, I found out that Starbucks thing tried to get a job there. They never hired me. Y'all messed up you should did that to make up for Michelle talk of do need health insurance. After high school. I I was living with my aunt, Maryland me and my cousin were like out in like the part of DC and Maryland that's like the Chevy Chase neighborhood, and we would just job hunting, and I saw coffee shop, and I was like, oh, I kind of went to walk in there. And she was like, why don't you? And I was like, I'm too shy. And I was very shy back then she literally like grabbed my hand and walked me into the coffee shop and was like asset manager for a job. So he did ahead. An interview the next week. And I was just like, look, I don't know how to make coffee, but I love this, and I'm just super fast, and like ready to, you know, get dirty and like figure out how to make this thing that I've been drinking my entire life. And they're like, all right. So they heard me on the spot, and I became obsessed. I like made flash cards for all of the terminology all of the recipes. Like, I used to dream about it we you could sell that. I feel like. Yeah. I feel like so many people either want to be baristas or just be better like know how to order at a coffee shop a lot of stress that people hold as like walking to a coffee shop, and like I don't know how to order and most of the time the baristas going to have an attitude about you being up at the register not knowing what it is that you want. That's not the customers fall. I should make flash. Because also it's just such a great training tool because a lot of the people who apply at my coffee shop teen, they aren't trained baristas, but they just love coffee. And so you're in this tough spot is an owner. You're like, okay, I need to find some actual baristas. But I read this kid and their energy, and I would love to bring them on board. Give me a year. Okay. Okay. Okay. But definitely, but yeah, I just became obsessed with it. And I left that job actually got fired after a couple of months, that's fine. Because then a year later, I got another barista job. And it was my first specialty coffee job, and it was through a counter culture account and from then on it was just like the rabbit hole opened up into a chasm. And I went falling. In a good way in a good way in the shutout to counter show. They are the Smith canteen coffee provider, and they have been very patient newbie coffee shop owner as I get my footing and they're getting used to the emergency tax. Like, do you have any BRUCE'S, this is the second thing you can start there needs to be like a task grab it for baristas? Do they not have like apps for that here? I don't think they do in Australia where you can just like pull up an apple like, I need a breeze to cover this shift this day, and they'll send okay? Could you please start that? Yeah. Just start writing down chest right down. All these bring us in New York. Coffee flash cards one of the yet. No, we need that badly because it's just the nature of the beast like bartending Brita like does attract a lot of creative people. Right. And they you know, they're going on dishes. They're doing all these things, and they don't really have control over their schedule. You know? And you don't wanna stand in the way of a part or a cool gig or something. So we need that definite there. It has to know it exists in the US. But we'll we'll we'll figure something out for New York. Okay. I would love that. Definitely. Okay. So coffee. You fall down that chasm. Yep. After that, I found out that barista competitions existed. My boss told me that. And I was like, so you're telling me this thing that I know I'm already good at I can go to a competition and get extra validation that I am good. At it. Good. I'm on my way. And at that point. I was like one day, I'm gonna do Brita competitions. And I started out with lots throw downs, and those were really fun and. That's when I learned that there was like a community around Coffey a night never like hung out with other baristas from other coffee shops in the DC coffee community is very tight knit. So I started going to lot to throw downs and like seeing people and meeting them LA, art Throwdown. Yes. That is that is baristas going head to head pouring their best law, and it's just like a knockout round like bracket system all the way to the top. And they do the all the time love it. It is such a waste that sounds like fun. Like, it's fine. Why such a waste of mill? It's a huge about sports like guys are bashing each other's heads. That's a waste of brain cells. Right. Exactly. But they are fun. So from there after about a year, I decided I was going to finally move to heirs ONA. So I moved air, and I start working at this coffee shop that was like the coffee shop in the city, and they took coffee a lot more seriously than my last job. I was like, okay. This will be where I can finally do competitions and the community in Phoenix at the time was very cliquish in separated. It was like, oh, you work at you know, you work at cartel. Like, oh, we don't really talk to people at cartel or like, oh, you work at echo like it's like, oh, I think this is kinda weird. 'cause it's not what I was used to in DC like everyone was super close. And the other thing I wasn't used to. I thought DC's community is very diverse. I grew up in the community having like black baristas as my co workers managers like, you know, people have just like all different shapes, colors, whatever and then. I moved to Arizona, and it was so white, and you did not know until you and I. Until I got there. And I was like. Okay. But this is fine. So that was when I first started to realize that there may be a diversity problem that at first, you know, at the time, I just thought it was Zona. But as I started to do more, you know events that require the whole national community. I was like okay is not just air Zona. But that was the second thing, but I started with just trying to get the community together. And I would go to all of the, you know, lots of events and different community events. And I just started hanging out with people at all the other coffee shops. I was like, you know, I don't need to just hang out with the people at mine. I wanna find out what everyone's doing because we can help each other, and we can build each other up and encourage each other. And I don't understand why you wouldn't want to do that. So then after a while I just became like, I don't know a beacon of the community. It's weird talking about it. And like talking about myself in this way. But it it's true. It's just I just became like the. Unity advocate for Phoenix. Especially when I finally did my first breeze to competition actually this weekend for years ago. My routine was about community about how like Phoenix is just such a great place for it in that people need to stop overlooking Phoenix. And I was like just you wait in a few years. This is going to be the spot. We're still waiting for it. But I know Phoenix is on its way. Yeah. It's just I started to hope put together events, and there's this guy named braid in that I worked with putting together like a huge coffee. Swap where we just had everyone. Come and it's like bring whatever bags of coffee you want and just swap with people. We were brewing. Together, we did cupping 's I was always visiting coffee shop, what's the cupping coffee cupping is just a big tasting. And you have a very special soup spoon. And you do a very obnoxious slurp. When you taste the coffee. So that it like air rates and covers all of your mouth. So you can get all of the tasting notes. And I feel away about tasting notes in coffee. I think people take it too seriously. And they sound like Winker is when they are just like, oh, this tastes like, I get hints of elder flower and Lichi or is it light? She I don't know. I don't even know what that tastes like wine. Right. Yeah. Yeah. But like, what are the parallels? There are a lot of parallels in that and like Weinstein because at least get you drunk, but. With. With coffee. I'm just like I understand. And I get it, obviously. Like, I am a coffee professional. So I like I understand that language, and I'm about it. But when it comes to trying to meet people where they are like the general consumer they're just going to kind of look at you like girl, what are you saying? So I'm like, you know, what this coffee tastes like if you were just waking up on Saturday morning and the sun's out, and it's like seventy degrees and your children on your brownie. And you're just like chilling with your cat. And it's like really nice like this is the coffee you're going to want for that. I can relate to that minus the balcony. Yeah. Totally or it's just like, oh this coffee is like wintertime, and it's cold a little bit radio. And you want something a little bit heavier little bit chocolate ear something that you can snuggle up with like this coffee tasting that like that's how I like to talk about coffee because like there are a lot of right for the emotion. Yeah. Exactly straight for the emotion things because there are a lot of tasting notes that I don't know what they taste like like, I, you know, grew up in a specific socio economic class where just like, I don't know what other forward taste like or like, I didn't know what passion fruit tasted like until I moved all Shelia. And it's just like you can get a bag of passion fruits for two dollars. And I was like, and I didn't even know they looked weird on the inside. But they're delicious. I love passion. There's so I didn't have passion free till I was like, I don't know thirty something. And like this year. I think passion is the tasting note of the year in coffee because I see it on every coffee bag, and I'm like, I don't know if it was Drake or. That is my favorite. Such a good. Yeah. I want to go back because when you started the chocolate barista, you did not have a social mission. And I did not you were not about social Justice, racial equality or just like me doing my thing. Which I so I always had the plan of eventually talking about Mike experience being black in the coffee industry because that is a part of my lifestyle like that something that I can't separate myself from, but it wasn't going to be my entire thing. So when it came around time for me to when I did post that blog it's called the black Cup of excellence being black and specialty coffee. I'd spent I was on a business trip in Dallas. And by at this point, I had stopped being a Brita, and I was working for creative agencies. So we run a business trip in Dallas. And I stayed up for three nights from like ten to six AM just writing this drank so much coffee. I didn't. I was drinking wine drinking a lot of wine in writing all night for three nights straight writing this blog posts, I wanted it to be good. And I wanted it to be thorough. And I was like I didn't just talk about my experience. But I like, you know, pulled opinions in in stats about like why there weren't a lot of black people in coffee, or why people thought black people injuring coffee, and I wanna do a part to now. I think about it. It's been a couple years. But what I finally wrote it, my friend was editing it, and he was like well now, you know, that you're going to have to just like talk about this all the time. And I was like, no. It's like, what are you talking about us? Like if you're going to do this. You're going to cross you know, when to threshold that this is something you you need to talk about. And like you are the best person to do it. Now. I was like I don't know kind of scared, and I was very scared. I was even scared to post it. But I did and it blew up it just completely just within a day. Like, so many people were sharing a lot of people were talking about it a lot of people reaching out to me. That's how I met a lot of the friends that I have today. And I was just like oh my God. This is not what I was expecting. And I was like I guess I do to talk about this now. But over time, you know, it offered a lot of opportunities for me to talk about it more into get more comfortable with it. And to you know, be reading more in in learning about what like what activists are doing and other industries and just in general. And then I was like, well, I guess I can be an activist and coffee. That's fine. And since then it's just kind of all into this whole like I've done talks all over the world. I just got back from Norway doing a talk about this. I went to this event called Nordic roasters form, and it is a roasters competition for a row street in the in the Nordic countries in they, you know, usually, the talks are very technical in talking a lot about roasting and green coffee buying and things like that. But this year, the theme was sustainability, and it wasn't just like producer sustainability like sustainability with roasting and things like that. But also workplace sustainability so me, and my really good friend to Mita. We both were the workplace sustainability talks and ours played very well off of each other where I just kind of gave an intro into. Why? What like how do we change thinking about assessable to coffee -cation in sharing information and not just the typical like? Like, this is how you make a cappuccino information, or this is how you rose coffee, but how can we a quipped in a empower our coffee staff to learn about marketing or to learn about operations because those are positions that a lot of coffee companies are starting to hire for, but you can't necessarily afford to hire like like marketing professionals from other industries, but coffee is so unique in a way where it's like, you kinda need to know what's going on within the industry to be able to market it because it's client base is. So so specific and just the way the industry works is so different than everything else. So I gave a talk on that. And then she gave a talk on just like why diversity just going to be so important for people to really make a priority in your business. Not just for the bottom line in your, you know, making money, but you want to keep people, and you know, she made a very valid point where it's like a lot of, you know, women women of color and other ethnic minorities. Will leave companies mostly because then virement just wasn't empowering to them and was not good for them. And they're not going to tell you that. But nine times out of ten like, that's the reason that's been the reason why I've left every one of my jobs except for the one when I moved to Phoenix. So you have the chocolate Brita. That's evolving. Yeah. Then you decide you're going to do black coffee. Yes. Tell us what black coffee is. So black coffee is a live podcast, and I gather several black coffee professionals, and we just get together on a stage and talk about our experiences working in the industry, and the first one was in Portland in April and produced by spreads who have been very supportive of me in the chocolate breeze for years now. And yeah, we just gathered and like had it was such a fun time. It felt like having a conversation just like with my friends, which is the point. It was less about, you know, teaching the audience anything it was more. Just let's just have this. Arctic conversation about our experiences. Very uncensored very just like candid. And if people, you know, people will learn something from it. But that's not necessarily the point. It's really for us. The conversation is for us and bias, and now I have two more black coffees coming up one in New York and one in DC, and they both have a themes with them. So the New York one will be about longevity in the industry, and why we don't see a lot of coffee professionals stay long or for the ones that do. Stay awhile. Like, what is it that you've had to go through or like, what has kept you in it for this long? So everyone in it has been in the industry for like eight or more years in the C show is about specifically about the DC coffee community. And like I said before it's very diverse. It's very tight knit. And I didn't realize there was a diversity problem until I loved so it's like what is it about DC has set it apart. Why is it that you know, it the? The coffee community actually reflects the population. That's there. What something that other cities can take from it? But also what more can DC be doing to hope continue to, cultivate, this. How are you planning and organizing these events it's not someone who's like a professional event planner now, I know how hard it is. And I saw a lot of the footage from the Portland one. I watched the video if anyone's like truly interested in what Michelle is talking about. And I hope you all are there's a great YouTube video of the whole conversation that I really think you should listen to. But then I saw some other footage from in. Just great go you almost having good time. But it was so it was not a small thing that you put together. And it was like, the added difficulty was living in Australia in trying to plan an event that's going to be in the US. Everyone who I'm talking to is in the US like getting up at six AM to have video calls and doing phone calls every every few weeks, and you know, spreads his like the. They did a lot of the leg work on the production side of things and like getting sponsors and making sure we had all the equipment we needed and me as a creative director just focused mostly on like building, the panel building the content. What are we talking about? And then just like other fun things. Like, this is the photographer. I want to have to come. You know, take pictures of the event or like this DJ and stuff like that. But it worked really well together. But doing two of them at the same time and spreads. Just also dropped a book called the new rules of coffee. I can't wait to get. It is so good Rudge for people who don't know with that is it's sort of if you know eater speeches like the eater of coffee. Yeah. Yeah. I also right for them. You should. I several pieces. I miss that. I'm gonna cut catching up to do. We're going to take a short break, and we'll be right back with Michelle after a word from our sponsors. Does this happen to you? You need a dozen eggs, you go to the supermarket you head to the exception. And you are so confused by what you find. There you freeze you want. Nice eggs on hand because maybe wanna cheese and herb omelet for dinner. We want to poach an egg to slip on your ova, KADO toast, and you know, quality eggs, make a big difference. And you're a decent person. So it's important that chickens have a good life. But as you stand there, you think to yourself I have no idea. What all these words on the edge cartons mean? So you shrug pick one and continue shopping stop right there. You are a busy lady. You don't need this both in your life. You need bulls free eggs, which is where vital farms pasteurized eggs, come in their pasteurize. Hens Rome outside in one hundred eight square feet of space per hen, those cage free hens, they never go outside. I tasted the difference. Once I tried vital farms eggs, try for yourself. To get your coupon for vital farms, pasteurized eggs, head divide farms dot com. Backslash cherry bomb. It's time for our Bob's red mill minute, we're here with just Seidman our intern and associate radio producer. Hi, jess. Hi Carey tell everybody what we are talking about today today. We are talking about corn bread because Gabby it. Smith canteen, made some maple walnut corn bread, recently and just could not stop talking about it. I am obsessed with this corn bread. It is the best. I have ever had in my life. And I ate a lot of corn bread growing up. You did did you make it from scratch. Yeah. We made it from scratch. We would make big sheets of in have it with chili and soup, yum. Yeah. It's great cormorants. Liz's will Gabby made. Our corn bread with Bob spread millstone ground organic corn meal. If you don't wanna make totally from scratch. Bob's red. Mill also has a wonderful corn bread Muffin mix. It's made with a blend of stone. Ground whole wheat pastry. Flour stone ground corn meal, cane sugar sweet cream butter milk, powder, seesaw and baking powder. Just if you need to get some. Organic stone. Ground corn meal or the corn bread Muffin. Mix from Bob's red. Mill. What do you do? Oh, I would log on to Bob's red mill dot com and at checkout use the code cherry bomb twenty five for twenty five percent off my order. It's a great deal. So make sure you do that. Like just said go to Bob's red mill cherry bomb twenty-five for twenty five percent off your order because you know, with Bob's red. Mill you're not just getting quality. You're getting flavor packed food the taste amazing. So of so many things that we're talk about why is coffee so white what happened colonization? Alike. Honestly, you know, it's it's funny. It's one of those things one of the many things in food and beverage where it's the origins of it may be in black and Brown communities, and then just overtime like, you know, white people just take it are just like, oh, we're going to gentrify basically, whether it's on purpose or not and now it's sort of seen as just this like status thing, it's like oh to go get coffee, everyday, go, get your daily law taste, just become this. I think it in some ways it's stemmed from or maybe this stereotype has stemmed from it of like the white girl in the yoga pants going to Starbucks like that sort of like the whole thing. And that's just like a stereotype that's blown up. So when you think of specialty coffee, you think of the white guy in the beard, and the plaid shirt and the suspenders, and I was just like that's not me. And that was why it started the chocolate barista because that's not me. And I wanted to show people. Uil of you into that world from my perspective. So this is you know, these are the alpha I like to wear to work. It's like I used to wear used to dress nice to work, and it's just like, look, you all the time and people be like, you are just way too nice for this coffee shop. I don't care like I'm wearing brand new sneakers like I'm just going to wear them. And it's like, I still like, you know, the music that I like, I don't I Coffey did help bring me to the talking heads. Thank you, love them. But I also like riana and migos. All these other. You know, hip hop and rap and like to wrap that into all of it. But like my route of what I do in coffee is very different than a lot of other people. So I just wanted to show that off, but it still, you know, something that isn't mainstream like a lot of people still outside of the coffee industry. Don't know that people like me exist in it. So it's like how can I be a bridge. How can I, you know show that it's it doesn't have to be so white. It doesn't have to look the specific way you can come in and do your own thing. Like, I've still don't know how but I've managed to carve out my own space within the coffee industry. You are unique. I mixed. But, you know, whether it's if someone wants to come in and do the same thing where they carve out their own space, or if someone just wants to come in and be a barista roaster like I wanna make sure that they can come in and have the same fraternities as everyone else be able to, you know, have the same learning resources. Have that information shared with them opera -tunities to go to origin? If they want to go to these other industry events like network, like they're all so important to someone's career development within it. Or if you just want to be consumer in just not have to feel bad about going to coffee shop in and not know what's on the menu. Like, that's fine. It should be those flash cards, and that's why we're getting the flash cards because even you know, there is so much confusion in the few times. I have worked the register. When someone's like, I wanna cappuccino. But no, I want in that cub, you know, because like the cappuccino paper cups kind of small ones big. Yeah. People think it's like a sigh like, no, I wanna large cappuccino. Right. You know? So and you don't wanna be the jerk. Who's like, that's like that doesn't exist. That's a big lots. Hey, man. Exactly. Yeah. Backlash because you are in the customer service business you want to educate gently, right? So I watched you know, when you and I start talking few months ago, and I'd watch the the video one of my big takeaways was I forget, which which of the people on your panel said this, but it was about sharing information. Oh, that was Di Di and just how you know information is not passed down, and you and I were talking at lunch about how it's not just information. Like when you look at so many reasons people have been held back. It has to do with inherited wealth. You know, you look at the statistics about home ownership, and if your parents onto home what that means for you and just start thinking about inherited wealth and inherited knowledge the same way like what is being passed down, right and inherited. And if we're not sharing information on how to do things if we are guarding that information, right? That's just. Just as bad exactly something that the industry, in my opinion, is sort of having an issue with right now is I feel like we're going to find ourselves stagnating sooner than later, and like we have a lot of very pressing issues to deal with like climate change and how that's affecting coffee production, coffee, producers and farmers themselves and their livelihood. And like the price has gone below a dollar. So it's like we have the privacy prices like the baseline price for coffee that isn't specialty prides itself in paying more than that, usually double or more and even like fair trade organizations pay at least that try to also pay more than that. But it's not dropped below a dollar which is under the cost of production. So it's like we have all these issues that we're trying to figure out in and solve the problems for and I feel like we have had at least we've deaf. Had the same type of people in the positions of trying to solve these problems for really long time. And I'm like, you know, we've just been running around like everyone's asking the same questions, and we're getting the same answers that we now need to start opening up so floodgates to let other people come in to offer their experiences their their knowledge to the situation different types of people to help us all these problems. But to before we can even get there, we need to get just like some of the most basic information to them. I we need to teach them like what's going on and help build their pass. So that they can get to that point to help us off problems. And we haven't been doing that as an industry for a long time. And like in the last few years now that these problems are being brought up people are more aware of it. So we still like I feel like we'll get going and it'll start to come. But I'm like we need to do this. Now, do you? You have a a specialty drink. I can make one up every time it came time for competition. And it was like, oh, I have to create a signature drink. I always did it last minute. And it always tasted. Great. But it was like the first time it competed. I hadn't tasted my signature drink until after competition was over. And I was like, oh, this is pretty good. I just put these ingredients together in hope to work like I knew what the Espresso tasted like and like built everything else off of that. But I can come up with something. What is your signature drink in terms of what you order when you go into a shop well in Australia order, flat whites all the time. You do I love whites. But flat whites there are quivalent to like going to like Toby's estate and getting a cappuccino like it's like the American like eight ounce, cappuccino or six ounce cappuccinos the same thing, otherwise, I'm just like a black coffee person like whatever's on the pour over bar or something special or drip coffee. You're true to your brand. Yeah. I like to be low maintenance. Are you going to go back to Austrailia? So yeah, I'll be back in Australia and six weeks the middle November. And then I'll only be there for maybe two months tops before. I move back. We get you back. And I don't know where to move to you. Oh, wow. Still up in the air. Okay. We'll see very exciting. The last thing. I have to ask about is. Because you are the third guest in a row who has tattoos, and I would love to know what those two tattoos are all about this is to have three I have a big one on my shin. But this one is a matching one with my best friend. I got it right before I left Phoenix. It's just a cactus in a little sunset going into the mountains. And then this one is a decker going into a heart with my last name Johnson. It's my maternal family name, and it's sort of like a memorial to my aunt and my grandfather who both died of heart attacks. So yeah. And then the tattoo on my shin is a cardinal on a prickly pear cactus because I'm born and raised in Virginia, sir state bird. And then I didn't realize that cardinals are also huge in Arizona because that's their football team. So some of like, oh, you must really live Phoenix. I was like, oh, I didn't think this through. I should've got a Dogwood flower something else to represent Virginia because the cardinals. Oh my God. I mean, that's an intense tattoo on your inner arm favorite one. Were you close with your aunt and your grandpa? I was very close with my grandfather. Even though he died when I was young. But I still have very fond memories of him. And like my aunt was she was the youngest in the family, and she just fun. She was fun. She was cool. She when I first moved a few. Knicks started doing all the coffee stuff, she used to just write on my Facebook when super urging and yeah, I miss her. But yeah, I need more tattoos though. Well, I don't have a coffee tattoo yet. Not yet. Not yet. Well, that that one is a beautiful memorial. So Michelle, you are busy gal. So thanks for taking the time to see us. I'm thrilled. We finally got to me. And you've been a great pen pal. Glad we got to connect and kick ass with all your black students. I'll be back soon. Awesome. That's it for our show. Huge. Thank you to Michelle Johnson. It was amazing to chat with her about all things coffee. And I can't wait to see what she does next. Make sure to follow her on Instagram at. The chocolate barista and keep an eye out for future black coffee events. Don't forget radio cherry bomb is on the road. As part of our future of food tour. Brought to you by Carey gold. We will be in New Orleans on Sunday at the hotel with some very special guests, and then on December first we will be a book Larter and Seattle tickets were both are on sale right now. You can go to cherry bomb dot com or good book, Larter dot com. Thank you to our sponsors vital farms. Pasteurized eggs. Bob's red mill and Likud on blue culinary school. Thank you to our socio producer, just Seidman and to the band trial, Allah for our theme song. This episode was recorded at the wing in Dumbo. For more information, go to the hyphen wing dot com. Radio cherry bomb is a joint production of cherry bomb magazine and the heritage radio network. Thanks for listening everyone. You're the bomb. Radio cherry bomb is powered by simple. Cast simple cast is a popular hosting and analytics platform that allows podcasters to easily host and publish to apps like apple podcasts, if you have a podcast or looking to create your very first check it out. Try it for free in save half. Off your first three months at simple casts dot com forward slash heritage. Thanks for listening. The heritage radio network food radio supported by you for freshest content and to hear about exclusive events subscribe to our newsletter. Enter your Email at the bottom of our website, heritage radio network dot org. Connect with us on Facebook Instagram and Twitter at heritage underscore radio. Heritage radio network is a nonprofit organization driving conversations to make the world. 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Phoenix Michelle Bob Portland DC New York Brita Seattle Likud cherry bomb magazine coffee world Michelle Johnson Austrailia Arizona New Orleans Larter Virginia producer US Starbucks
Episode 176: Elle Macpherson Makes Her Own Nut Milk

Radio Cherry Bombe

42:29 min | 2 years ago

Episode 176: Elle Macpherson Makes Her Own Nut Milk

"You're listening to heritage radio network. We're a member supported food radio network broadcasting over thirty five weekly shows live from Bushwick Brooklyn. Join our hosts as they lead you through the world of craft brewing behind the scenes of the restaurant industry inside the battle over school food and beyond. Find us at heritage radio network, dot org. Meat and three is heritage. Radio network's weekly food news roundup this week on meat and three. We're bringing you highlights from feast Portland, like our chat with the one and only Andrew Zimmerman. I'm super excited to be here for people who do what I do for a living. We do tons of, you know, decide chats and podcasts and interviews and stuff like that. And you circle the handful of ones on a year where you get to talk with people that you're really excited about talking with. So this is this is awesome. We picked up on some recurring themes while talking to our impressive roster of guests, including the current state of Portland's food scene, personal identity, and believe it or not. The influence of great chefs grandmothers may mom never touched a drop of is in her life and now has a distillery named after her, but I grew up in her garden and just really, she taught me all good things come from scratch, and women can be anyone they want to be. So tune in for this week's extra special. Episode subscribed to meet in three wherever you get your podcasts. Hi, everybody. You're listening to radio cherry bomb, and I'm your host, carry diamond. Each week. We bring the pages of cherry bomb magazine to life through conversations with the most inspiring women in and around the world of boot first. Let's thank our sponsors Likud on blue. If you're daydreaming about culinary school, maybe it's time to say Bonjour to Likud on blue, learn more about the legendary culinary school's. Most prestigious professional qualification Legrand diploma by visiting court on blue dot EDU and Bob's red mill. Bob's red mill is an employee owned company that's been offering organic gluten free and stone ground products for decades visit. Bob's red mill dot com today and use their code cherry twenty five, four, twenty five percent off your order and vital farms. Pasture-raised eggs, vital farms. Pasteurized eggs are better than cage free. They are both free try for yourself to get your. Coupon for vital farms. Pasteurized eggs had divided farms dot com. Backslash cherry bomb, some housekeeping, this October. We have some very fun events taking place in New York City, October twenty. Sixth through twenty eighth. The very first cherry bomb university will take place at the food and finance high school. We have a great weekend of classes with some professors, you know, in love and were kicking everything off Friday night with Christina Tosi. Yes, the one and only Tosi who will be getting an honorary doctorate from cherry bomb university. Then we're kicking off the cherry Bombay club with to events at Smith canteen in Brooklyn on October. Fourth will be celebrating Lindsey sung of cocoa cake land and her new cookbook come by for cake, of course, and get a signed copy of Lindsay's book. Then on October twenty. Fifth were welcoming. Lisa Lewinsky of Detroit's sister pi, I'm sure you've heard of them. We will have pie of course, and you can get leases. Book two tickets for all of those events are on sale right now at cherry bomb dot com. It is time for today's guests. They are Andrea Horwood and l. McPherson the founders of the wellness brand. Welco. Welcome. Makes wonderful. Nutrient rich plant based elixirs including the super greens superfoods powder, which I'm a big fan of and had this very morning. Andrea was in her late teens when she launched the magazine called Australian style, she then went onto launch Becca, cosmetics, and founded the sunscreen brand and visible zinc. You might be more familiar with l. story a, she's one of the world's most major supermodels when she was in her late teens living in Australia, she decided to move to New York City to model. So she could make some money for law school. Her career took off and she wound up on countless covers in huge ad campaigns and she even earned the nickname the body from time magazine, we talk about everything from the changing definition of beauty to the women's mentors to ELS advice on making your own nut milk. You know, I love Australians. So I was so excited to talk with Andrea and l. and I also love how welco is a story about their personal wellness journeys as well as their friendship. One thing to note, we recorded this interview at the wing in Dumbo. We're very excited to start this partnership with a wing, and we'll be spending a lot of time. They're working out of their podcast studio. So thank you to the team at the wing are talk will begin right after this message from our sponsor Likud on blue. Are you daydreaming about culinary school? Again, make this the year, your dreams become reality with Likud on blue, the legendary culinary school study classic French culinary techniques in cuisine, and patisserie as part of their exclusive nine month Legrand diplomas and graduate into a world of opportunity. You also can extend your course of studies to include culinary management and dedicated internships. Likud on blue has locations in more than twenty countries around the world and located within some of the best food cities out their London, Ottawa, Madrid, Bangkok, Tokyo. And of course, the spiritual home of cuisine and Likud on blue Paris, turning your daydreams into reality is closer than ever visit court on blue dot EDU for more and let your culinary adventure begin. So you've both been entrepreneurs literally since you were teenagers and the word entrepreneur wasn't used back then the way it is today, which you know, did you look at yourself as young business people back then, or were you just young women doing your thing? I think that you don't concede so business person at that age. I think it said consequence, you at business ended up being built around what I loved to do rather than me considering myself business person at that age. How did you wind up launching a magazine at nineteen? I'm from very remote part of a stray Leah on the west coast Perth, I think may the second most isolated city in the world. So you really have to learn to amuse yourself. And we were obsessed with myself and all my friends are obsessed with fashion to music popular culture, and we didn't have many outlets so we created our own. And was this pre internet was it was a print magazine. Yes. Was a print magazine. Yeah, and we was printed on beautiful paper. Nice to is to go to the print and stand by the print presses for every form that came off. And I remember when I was competing against newspapers for advertising dollars, and I used to tell them allow magazine says he'll mind not your fingers. That's so impressive. How are you getting information in Perth? You didn't have the internet will we used to write about the things that meant a lot to us. So music was is to collect vinyl from an imports and order them. And most of the people that we knew from fashion designers to photographers, a load of photographers started working for the magazine when we are an independent and now they populate some of the leading roles in the fashion and publishing businesses now. So I think we all grew up with it and we created our own worlds, but you can be interested in art and literature and architecture and photography, and fashion and music wherever you are. So we all come together. It was like a like minded group to produce something that meant mental to us, so. Cool. So Al your turn. So you up and left and came to America and you were you were a teenager to, right? I was trying to do the math I was eighteen and I wanted to go to law school and I needed to fund. Education. So I had a couple of jokes had Jovan pharmacy where I worked Thursday night since day mornings, and I ended thirteen dollars a week that was not going to get me through law school, and I just said, I gotta figure out something else, and a friend of mine suggested I stopped modeling and I didn't even know modeling meant I mean country to Andrea story. I never even seen a magazine. I wasn't interested in auto musical literature was a kid sort of grew up in the beaches, and I went to school and had my friends. And so I mean, the concept of even working in fashion was not in my, you know, in my mindset at all, but I I didn't want to go to school and I did want to pay for it. I I wanted financial independence and freedom, and so I started working and one thing led to the another and I- deferred my place in college for the following year and that I moved to America nineteen eighty two. And here I am thirty five years later. So it's not that unusual for Australians to up and relocate to to an American. It sounds like, oh my God, you moved half a world away. Yeah, I think it's part of my personality as being straight. And so I'm sort of like give it a go, go and I'll try things and that's actually being really useful, sort of quality to have because it's allowed me to really explore what I love to do and what interests me. And you know do lots of different things within my scope of of work. But in the beginning in a stray, Liam people sort of traveled once when they got out of school, you'd generally go for six weeks away. And I want saw a tour guide in in Greece and he told me how, gosh, I love those tried in tourists because they're so hungry for knowledge about where they are because I think they think they're never going to get back and I do the, I do feel like when we go, we're. So we're so we'll expunge. We wanna learn so much because we don't know when we're going to be able to get overseas and when you know. And so I, I laughed. And it didn't seem like anything even like a right of passage. It just felt like I was go and remember I was only going for six weeks, but ended up spending thirty five years. So it wasn't like I said, okay, I'm leaving strata that is I gotta go physics weeks and then it was three months and then it was six months and then it was a year. And then it was actually, I'm, I'm exploring and evolving and learning laude, and this is what I'm going to keep doing for now. So did you ever want to go back to law school? Yeah, people often ask me, do I wish I'd gone back to law school? And the answer is I'm so grateful that I was encouraged to continue getting to know myself and try lots of new things because it kept me on a path. That was a really interesting journey of the last few years. I don't believe in regretting anything. I think we all we all because of the decisions that we've made and was just, you know, a decision I made and you could still go to law school. Why. Feel so much with lawyers. Become an expert anyway, reading contracts. I was going say, I can't even imagine the number of contracts you've had to deal with over the years between all your agents and all your modeling were. So tell me how you two met. I was publishing straightened style magazine, and we would doing a special issue on a straight and icons and naturally I wanted to be on the cover of that issue. So that was really off I, that was officed interaction that would have been Ninety-six. I think that why bathing sue, the caveat that was after that it was the one. It was the one way you were naked actually with feast hair and your legs crossed. That's why I was thinking because I remember thinking at the time, hey, who's this woman who so cool is to put, you know, it's kind of bulls. -i cover and I wasn't actually a goal that had ad. I wasn't really a Cup ago per se. You know, I was sort of an athletic Amazonian, strongest trailing girl. Yes, I did. A lot of bathing suit shops is always very comfortable on the beaches. I, I realized when I was very young that I could not be what the girls of my time were, which were androgynous very thin. Very fashionable girls. I, I wasn't that, and and my career really started to evolve once I kind of said, okay, who am I? What do I represent? And I, and I realized that no-one strong in athletic and that's what I need to be in my pitches. So I started to adopting poses and started to really create that image to some extent. But I remember being fascinated by this woman that would put me naked on the cover of the magazine and what she didn't tell you. This magazine was like it was. It was triple the size of a normal magazine. You know, it's like a coffee table magazine and it was on the most incredible paper and she had the coolest people in the the best upcoming actor. The most well-known rockstar wonderful autists instead of being -cluded with this, these people in this beautiful spread. I just immediately loved a big. Thank you. Would he be able to cover of your magazine? Then? She did again. Well, we were, yeah, we were thinking, do you think l. would a for us because we are an independent, very cheeky. We used to do things I runway and a lot of trouble intentionally. And so I think in that issue we had a prime minister we had it was it was a very interesting collection of people, and we thought, well, I wonder if I would do it and she did, and it was incredibly supportive for us because as it really did hope us jump up level as a little independent magazine to one that's that sold out that issue. And if I told you that, but it did. So the new sold your magazine and got into the beauty business. How did that transition happen? I published a magazine for nearly ten years and it was about youth culture, and I believe strongly that you should that that particular title and that particular genre should be written by and produced by the people who are living it. And I just felt that you know heading into my thirties, I didn't really think that he was for me and Morton on to be talking about what the kids like that. Just cringe full. So there was those a time, and it was also an opportune time because publishes would try to acquire cool titles like us. So there was a natural exit point for me, and then I back in my hometown after I returned, I spoke to these scientists from the paddock engineering department at our local university, and they said that they told me about the way that they discovered a reduction technique to reduce the particle sizes, downing, zinc, for example, and it would make it clear and then they told me why this was a superior sunscreen and that the heading trysts from cosmetic companies all over the world, and it was going to change the industry. Only problem was it's about ten times more expensive than the cheap chemical book. Say, I said to them, well, why don't we created brow create brands and then that'll make the ingredient. Well, nine. And then people start getting traction. So created a brand called invisible zinc to stop you for one second. So you have no experience in packaged goods? No, no beauty industry experience. You just decide once again, you're going to go for it. And do this. Yeah, I think it would so compelling to me when they told me and I didn't know most distractions will completely unaware. Sunscreen is a product that is part of everyday life when they told me that the dangers of these chemical UVA absorb is and what they do. I thought the world should know about this disgrace. And so then when we started to produce the Protestant was rookie road in the beginning, but very difficult to formulate very thick creams that sort of so that would difficult to they went cosmetically appealing. So it probably took us a year, oh, to to work with formulas and to get that right. And then when we did and we started to get and show space where we in all the pharmacies department store. And then when we broke through into grocery, that was the point when we sitting on alongside on the shelves alongside in your base dose in Jay Jay's. We will very vulnerable, this independent and that's when I went to l. enough to she would be if she would do a TV commercials, and when we can talk about the. The benefits of physical, Hugh reflector bite, if l. talks about the benefits of a superior sunscreen, and it's healthier and beta full you. A lot more people are going to hear that message. So ill really did help us establish that education pace around the brand that we think really contributed substantially to what we did. I love that you to keep dipping in and out of of your lives. So well co now represents your third partnership in a sense? Yes. How did how did welcome come about. Andrew is actually being somebody who's really educated me as far as wellness concerned. So we st- I started this understanding about just even like going what's in our products with invisible ink. Because when she explained to me, you know, when you go in the sun and you, you know, put these products on your skin. This is what it's actually doing, and this is what this new product. Because before I could do the TV commercials, I have to understand what I'm saying and I have to really truly believe in it. And that's always been something that's been important to me. And my modeling career that have aligned myself with brands that there is an authentic, say, parallel with my own beliefs and wilko's a very different situation because I'm not a spokesperson for well co, actually, we co co founded it together through personal experience. You know, I had a problem research. The solution had a vision to share with other people spoke to Andrea about it. We wanted to do business together and she said, come on that spill. A company to shed this message for other people because it's so important because you seen profound effects on your life. And I truly believe in this as well. And we just we want to share it with other people. And so that's what we did, and she would end the best nutritional experts and doctors to help formulate the product that is now hero product. The super Alexa. It was based on a product that I had been taking from a nutritionist in London who was helping me with some ailments that I had when I was in about four or five years ago, turning forty forty, nine fifty. And I just noticed that I couldn't really rely on genetic might didactic disposition anymore for for my well being, I had to give it some support. So I worked personally with the with a nutritionist to tailor the things that I needed in it, and then a team kind of refined that, and that's what we have now as products. So we had a fantastic product and we had the desire to share this message with other people. Because we'd seen profound changes in our lives since taking it. And also we'd come to understand that there's a real correlation between beauty and wellness. Whereas before the correlation has always been beauty and youth, and we just said, no, actually, it's that the tide is change. Things are changing. It is shocking. When you think about the beauty industry and how everything was about the external, what you can put on your face, what you can put on your skin, and so little conversation about what you're eating and how that was affecting your mental state, how you looked how you felt. It's been a huge shift and and a, we feel quite strongly this. This is driven by what what people want and how we fail and how inform we are. And it's not a trend. This is really a profound shift in people's attitudes in the way we want to leave. And I think there's a generation that won't to care about their health and not wait until they see to care about the health. And sometimes it's a crisis, Lawrence. Something that will happen in your life pissed. Nate. It will treat you that. And sometimes it's just like a light goes on and you. You can't on no things so l. towns like for you, a light went on, but were you living what you would have considered a a wellness based life? I think lived a fit lie. You know, worked out and I drank water and I and I, you know, I looked after my body, but I looked often my body in a very sort eighties way. And actually I didn't really change my program much. And if in fact, when I went to the nutritionist, I said, I'm doing what always done in. It's not working anymore. And it's like even at that, I, what I think about that, I think, well, the. A really profound statement. You just said that you can apply to so many different things in your life, and I'm not involving. Oh, okay. So what I realized was that I was taking a lot of synthetic vitamins. They were not doing what I was hoping they would do because isn't that my body doesn't recognize them. So I was just picking them out or inspecting lots of money being my own pharmacists, making my own cocktails. Goodness knows what I was doing and my intentions were good, which would look after myself if sometimes it was just damage control. Like I haven't slept enough, I haven't eaten right foods. I'm working too hard, and I'll stuff a bunch of vitamins down my throat and hope that it's going to make it all better. It's been a lot of time in front of the mirror checking to see that. You know the looking after the body, the asset in many ways and I, it's not much fun. So my nutritionist said to me, listen, I think that you just missing the point a little bit here. You know what's really important view at this stage is that you're leading. You have a really. Acidic lifestyle. And when you have an acidic lifestyle, it causes inflammation in your body cells tend to regenerate less quickly. You put on weight, you've become fatigued. And particularly if you've been doing that for a long period of time, obviously, it's going to start to show. So we need to change that lifestyle choices that you'll making in order to be out to see the results that you would like, which is just a feel better. So the first thing she asked me to do is sleep more and I was like, what do you mean sleep more? No, I, I'm superwoman. I sleep four hours a night, and I've got fantastic energy, and she's like, you call that energy. She says, I call that adrenal depletion. So I learned a lot about my body and I realized that sleep is very important and would is very important and nutrients from whole foods and and that is one of the things that are so important with well co, you know how nutrients are plant-based Potanin Kohl's, derived from whole foods a learned a, you know. She just opened up my eyes to a lot of things that I thought I thought it was doing well and realized actually know, and it's quite a simple program. It's just eat more plants, get more sleep. Get some sunshine, drink lots of water and get outside and take you super Alexa. It's really simple. So Andrew, how about you when you were about to start this journey? What was your life? Like at that point where you taking care of yourself? I don't think I really knew what taking care of myself meant. I think I was a bit, like I said, you women sometimes feel like to be superwoman. You need to be doing everything and it's it's a sign. It's something you proud of only sleep this many hours a night, and I get up and not do that. And I don't think I was even away of many of the issues. Hopefully most of the things we do not twenties wouldn't PICO to be doing at, say, the thing that I do love about. Well, welco is when we say, we've got twenty-somethings now who into health and wellness and. The taking plant based proteins and the posting on Instagram about the the meals and the healthy meals. It's become something that twenty-somethings a proud of. I mean, we went doing that at that age, should we you a proud of destroying you help in a way? And that was you'll sign of bravery and it's just terrible. So I think it's great. It is a whole generation coming up that have a completely different viewpoint. And I think if you can adopt those principles quite early, I think that it's going to set you up for different different type of life. Are you very excited by this movement? I have to say for me, I just feel like this revolution. We're only like at the beginning of this revolution of health and wellness and mindfulness, and you really represent sort of the this wave of what I think is just about to become something huge in major really has the potential to just change so many people's lives. Yeah, I agree. I think this isn't a trend. This is a profound shift, and I think it's shift for good. And if you. Look at a lot of laughs style related conditions and illnesses. And I think that maybe there's a more positive future ahead if this becomes something that is widely adopted and if we're part of that process, that would be something we're really proud of. We'll be right back with Andrea Horwood and Elle macphearson right after this message from our sponsors. Does this happen to you? You need a dozen eggs. You go to the supermarket. You had to the section and you are so confused by what you find there. You freeze. You want nice eggs on hand because maybe wanna cheese and herb omelet for dinner for you. Want to poach an egg to slip on your ova KADO toast, and you know quality eggs, make a big difference and you're a decent person. So it's important that chickens have a good life. But as you stand there, you think to yourself, I have no idea what all these words on the Ed cartons mean. So you shrug pick one and continue shopping, stop right there. You are a busy lady. You don't need this book in your life. You need bull free eggs, which is where vital farms. Pasteurized eggs come in there. Pasteurize hens Rome outside in one hundred and eight square feet of space per hen. Those cage free hens. They never go outside. I tasted the difference once I tried vital farms x. try for your. Self to get your coupon for vital farms. Pasteurized eggs, head to vital farms dot com. Backslash cherry bomb. It's time for our Bob's red mill minute. Today we're talking about Bob's red mill whole grain keen walk. Everybody loves keen wa as a salad or as a side, but did you know you can bake with keen wa? Gabby Figaro. The brilliant Baker at my coffee shop Smith canteen in Brooklyn makes these incredible muffins with keen wa and seasonal fruit. The ingredients include cinnamon yogurt, olive oil, lots of yummy stuff. They also contain Honey, so there's no refined sugar. The Keene wa gives a nice crunch and some texture. These muffins are also great way to use up some fruit that is maybe a little bashed up. It doesn't have to look perfect to taste delicious in this Muffin berries and stone fruit or really great in this recipe. We'll be sure to include the recipe with the show description. So you can bake some for yourself these keen while muffins or something you're really going to want to try. Don't forget with Bob's red mill, you're not just getting quality. You're getting flavor packed. Food that tastes amazing visit Bob's red mill dot com today, and remember to use the code cherry twenty five for twenty five percent off at checkout. So tell me why you're in New York right now. You've big stuff going on. Oh, you start go idea. We just opened up flagship store in the US in SoHo in the corner of Bremen Crosby. And this is something that is very exciting for us because it gives us a chance to have a direct relationship with our customers and for them to come in and have a direct contact with us, look and feel of the brand taste products to talk to tame and to learn a little more about Wilco. And I, I feel strongly that we wanted to create an environment that was very lined with l. and my, you know, personal aesthetic as well. It's this, there's not a lot of millennial pink in stole, but it's it's a sophisticated creative environment and product that is so good for you. We wanted to create environment that was beautiful, and it reflected the way that we live as well. So hopefully it'll be a different experience when people come in to see us, it's not a purely transactional experience to come in, try products to see what we do and to have an understanding of the DNA of Wilco and where we come from industry. So it's really bold what you're doing to open a store. I mean, you only cheer credit. You only have a few products. You haven't like blown out the line and done like eight million skews. So it's clear you really believe in in your products to open a whole store based around this? Yeah, I believe that wellness is the true luxury and anybody who suffered any health ailments or lost somebody or is had people around them that have suffered from not being well will understand. Only perhaps at that point, how valuable our illnesses, you know, feeling good, feeling vibrant, feeling excited to get up in the day, feeling strong being run around off to your kids, get your work done, feel inspired. And so we decided that we were going to really create a luxury space and sell out products as a luxury item because we believe wellness is luxury as far as at being Bolshie as opening up the space. I think that it's a great hall. Bob, the like minded people and not only to learn about whoa co, but to learn about themselves, they can get in an Oscar nutritionist there and say, hey, this, and this is what I'm feeling, you know, what do you recommend? Basically what we found is that ninety nine percent of the ailments that we have men and women and children get distilled into similar thing, which is you need more truly rich nutrients in your body. Good plant per teen. Could multi vitamin and mineral good prebiotics per -biotics. And so we keep it very simple and we're hit a hopefully, make a change in people's lives. And I think you know to do that, we've got to keep it simple and clear message. You know, it has its has a wave standing out from the crowd. When it's simple. We have a store in a strata that's attached to head office and it's very valuable for us because we have a dialogue with our customers. We're direct to customer business. So we talk to our customers. We hear what they want the, they tell us what they expect from us, and we can be completely transparent. We. We want to talk about the origin of all of our ingredients, known, soul, supplies, sustainability of ingredients as we grow. And we found that just by having what is a tiny little hole in the wall in Australia, the percentage is so high. It's nine thousand nine hundred ninety eight percent of customers that will through dole where we have a chance to talk to them and they experience the product. They end up buying the product and so that we could see the value of that direct communication. We also learned from our customers when they come in. So for example, they'll say to, I go through three teams of those of the protein powder every two weeks. And could you could you do a logic size for us? So I don't like traveling with the teen. Could you do this? And can you mix this with that? And I wish I can. I give this to my children so it helped us develop a children's product as well. A healthy chocolate drink for children. So the the communication is a two way street for us, and we learn from our customers as well. So I wanna ask you some food questions for we let you go. So I know you both make smooth. These using the powder's. So I'm kinda lazy. I just put it in my water. What's what's a smoothie recipe that you do with one of your powders? Like just to be clear, we do have full products. We have the super greens, right? We have the chocolate protein powder for adults, the vanilla protein powder for adults. We have the chocolate protein powder for kids, and we have our t. so my favorite smoothie is I will do half another KADO, a huge scoop will maybe two scoops of chocolate chocolate protein. So I do basically two one, two scoops of chocolate protein one scoop of greens and avocado and water in a neutral, et and I mix it up and that's it. And that's how and it becomes like a moose. I started off doing it with sort of milk and things like that. And then I just started looking at different ways of making smoothies not using milk then instead of making my own milk. So not Milken and undecided. Actually, what an ado hemp milk. So often I'll just. Due chocolate protein quarter of a Cup of hemp seeds and water delicious attend not to put fruit in with my protein, but a lot of people do what I love the McPherson is making her own nut milks. Yeah, my day I absolutely I'm like three times a week nut milk. Go. His fantastic. You have to tell me how do you make because I have a nut milk bag, which I think is like the funniest thing to say, but how are you? How do you make your nutmeg was I soaked my always my nuts for for twelve hours and because that releases the enzymes. And so it's much easier for us to digest, and then I wash and drain them two or three times during that period, I put a Cup of almond two cups of water in the blender, and then I pour it into my not bag, and I squeeze it like another. I milk my nutmeg bag like a cow, and I get this wonderful Robin. Robin crying about it. Right. So had to wash your hands first. The other way to do it is if you have a French sieve, you can do that. You can balance the French sieve on a big solo spin and just let it drain if you not into like having the massive and not milk, but the foster one is the hempseed. So quarter Cup of hemp seeds in a Cup of water makes a really great protein tried that one. I need it so easy and you don't have to soak anything. No, you don't have to. So I like that. Okay. Andras laughing, Andrew, you don't own them nut milk bag. I do. But and actually l. told me about the note because I was making almond milk couple of times a week, and I found it just he's quite heavy after a while as well. And I just wanted to vary it. And when I came to stay with you in the US couple of years ago now and l. taught me how to make hip milk. So I started off that way. Now I don't even strain it. I just put a scoop of hemp seeds into filtered water, frozen, banana, and chocolate protein and greens together. And I make the same for the kids in the morning for breakfast, so I didn't care what else they have is almost that as well tip that up just learned which is frozen cauliflower with water and make sort of like smoothie out of that with your protein powder and super greens and whatever you wanna put in. I just throw whatever you can find, but you use your base as cauliflower ha. Isn't that interesting? And it tastes. It's amazing. It's just it's neutral it, but it gives it a thick and especially if it's frozen Mexico. A lot of people like this. Moody's cold. So that's an interesting one. Check that out. Okay, absolutely. I got some good tips from you. Both. What is next for welco? We've been working with formulas and we've had a scientific board it well codes comprised of members that help us take the process right through from nine source supply to formulations to nutritional doctors, and we've been working on a series of super boosters that enable you to customize you'll requirements. So we have seven variants and we don't see them at the end of October things. Like if if you have an additional requirement or if he needed immunity boost. And so these are very high dose high efficiency products. They're actually made under the TJ relations in a strategy. So this that's standard Felicidad medicines I've wit within before when I had the sunscreen company because we were made under TGI license there as well. So some of the highest standards in the world and these products just enable you to if you have specific needs you add those. Is to boost your super Alexa and with seven vari- you can choose what what you may need at the time. Oh, exciting. I love that. I didn't ask you about mentors. Like we said earlier, the word entrepreneur wasn't a word that was thrown around that much back when we were all teenagers, you really have been entrepreneurs for your whole working lives. Essentially. I mean, it's only recently that models are called entrepreneurs, but obviously like all models for entrepreneurs, but who are some of your role models along the way from a business perspective, and you is definitely being role model for me. And you know, as we mentioned he, we have a long relationship and I've learned a lot with her in time has been my greatest mental and experience. I just try things out and they, you know, they work with that don't work. We think they don't work. But in the end, you realize, actually, gosh, you know, that was a stepping stone to something else. And so I feel that you know our own personal experience and digging deep inside ourselves and having the courage to. To make changes will make those steps. So when we reached crossroads and we have to slow down and check in with ourselves and see what really resonates, and then we have the courage to make step down a road that we don't even know you know where it's going, where we can't see the future, but we feel something we decide to do it. I feel that that is the truest mentor watching other people's journeys. You don't know what they went through. You see the exterior indication of it, but you don't know what they went through to get there. So it's very hard to be really, truly mentor by others. I believe my father having said that has been somebody who is an entrepreneur, all his life. I just by watching him reinvent himself. And you know, he, he told me to work smart, not hard, and you know there's no right or wrong way to do business you you, you do what works for you at the time that it does, and you adapt and involve according to your circumstances how 'bout you very similar. Actually, I think I watched my father do very interesting things. Is that part of his life and they became part of his career. So very varied career. It's made me very aware that much will be watching what I'm doing because you tend to absorb those influences. My father was evolved in primary industry in a strategy, so he's the head of the Royal or cultural society and defense counsel on whether they be buying submarines ships, that ear and the chairman of the port authority. These a really varied unusual career career moves, and I've watched him do things that just genuinely interested him and he did them very well and he's hot was in it, and I think he never, he was old school so he probably wanted to try and his sons to today. Those two things he'd probably didn't imagine that his small, the youngest of full and go would go and do those things. But I, I was definitely influenced by watching him and it was, I think, when I was around twenty two, I didn't. I wasn't really sure that that was watching what I was doing. And when I was about twenty two, there was. I participated in the documentary full the and they said they were going to ask my father question about my career and that filled me with terror of what on earth will he say? I don't really think he knows what I do anyway, and the only thing my father was a man of few words, and he said, I always thought much wilder would be known as g Mojo would children. I think I may actually be known as and Rehoboth father and I shouldn't try and piss Nash's voice, but. That's that. I remember watching that and just failing incredibly proud. Oh, it's amazing. Well, thank you both. I mean, I just think it's incredible that you're empowering women in the way that you are through their health and helping them take care of themselves. So thank you for doing that. Thanks so much for having us and supporting us. We really appreciate it. Thank you to l. and Andrea of welco for stopping by their very first welcome shop in America just opened in Manhattan. So go check it out if you're in town and to learn more about welco visit welco dot com. Thank you to our sponsors. Bob's red mill vital farms, pasteurized eggs, and Likud on blue culinary school. Thank you to our associate producer Jess Zeidman and to the ban Challah for our theme song don't forget. Tickets are on sale for cherry bomb university happening, October twenty. Sixth twenty, seventh and twenty eighth in New York City. See cherry bomb dot com for more and for tickets. Radio cherry bomb is a joint production of cherry bomb magazine and the heritage radio network. Thank you again to our pals at the wing. We recorded this interview with Ellen Andrea at the wing in Dumbo visit the hyphen wing dot com to learn more about the wing. Thanks for listening. Everyone. You're the bomb. I'll have what she's having. Hi, I'm Jeff Zeidman. The associate producer radio cherry bomb and the newest member of the bomb squad. Do you know who I think is the bomb Deb Perelman of smitten kitchen? Why? Because her cookbooks website and Instagram or my favorite ways to procrastinate. That's what I got. Thanks for listening to heritage radio network food radio supported by you for our freshest content and to hear about exclusive events. Subscribe to our newsletter. Enter your Email at the bottom of our website heritage radio network, dot org, connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at heritage. Underscore radio heritage. 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Follow The Leader: Company Culture with Dianna Daouheung

Radio Cherry Bombe

37:57 min | 1 year ago

Follow The Leader: Company Culture with Dianna Daouheung

"Hi Bomb Squad. This is Keri diamond. Host of Radio Radio Cherry bomb and editor in chief of Cherry bomb magazine. Welcome to our new series. Follow the leader these days Everyone is hungry for more advice especially about being an entrepreneur or finding smarter ways to run a business for this series. We're talking to four women at different stages of careers about how they handle key aspects of their business. Today we'll be talking about culture and no we don't mean the yogurt kind when it comes to building your for business. It's important to consider how to create a community and an ethos that speaks to both your employees and your customers. That's why I'm talking with Diana Dow of Black Flaxseed bagels about how she's worked to create a culture from day one when she had just a few employees and one location to today with more than one hundred employees employees across seven locations. Let's thank Uber. Eats for supporting this series and now my interview with Diana Dow. Yeah so we're here to talk about culture not the yogurt kind or You know all that but what it means to have a company culture so black seeds been open now for five years right. Yep Yep five years going on six very shortly really five going on six. It feels like blackeyed has been around longer because you opened and you just start crushing it. Immediately I mean you change the Bagel scene and in New York which is not an easy thing to do because the places that have been around our institutions and now black seat institution. How does that feel? It's insane into the that we have seven locations now in five years like you said to you. It seems like we've been to me. I feel like I've been doing it for a lifetime. It's Oh I feel it's been around and yeah I mean I think that the mark of a good brand and a good product absolutely when it sort of seamlessly fits into yeah. Yeah for sure especially hearing the younger generations taught. I'll be randomly on the L. Train and I'll over here. Some you know college kid be like oh I take my mom all the time. I'm to black seat on like all the time we've only been open for mazing so tell us how you got your start. Yeah Baking for awhile you more than it was in advertising when I moved to New York and you know I did the typical life. Crisis Transitional Change Drastic In salary paying all types but you know I. I started off in savory seen. Okay wait I need to take you back. Yeah we glossed over that very quickly. I try so where did you grow up. I grew up in Florida. My parents originally from Thailand first generation. And you know went to school for marketing and business and then I moved to New York thinking you know. I'm going to be a madman and be an advertising and that was gonna be my career life choice. I was advertising interesting to you. Obviously the creative aspect the money because when you're young you think money's the answer to everything and you know at that time to you know. Two thousand doesn't four and it seemed like that was the right move especially you know growing in Florida when you think about New York jobs. You know advertising fashion those those are probably the two biggest things that you I are drawn to the Glamour job. Yeah the glamour jobs. Then you realize it ain't so glamorous is it you know it's like especially when you're in the the bottom rung and and I moved up pretty quickly in that world and I learned a lot of business practices that I still apply to my current job but at the end of the day was stuck in luxury brands and You know every client that worked on was just these unattainable a little brands. That aren't for everyday people and I just didn't feel good about it. The end of the day. Well Yeah So. How old were you when you decided I need to make a change? Probably probably out twenty six twenty five hundred sixty realize pretty quickly wasn't for you. Yeah I mean my dad's a Buddhist monk. My mom was a housekeeper is keep her never really you know grew up in that kind of world and consulted with my dad and he was just like you know you have to follow your heart. You really you. Don't chase the money. I know how important it is in New York. But that's not going to be. What makes you happy and I really dug into? What makes me happy in the the in the day you know? Food is a big part of my family of Thai culture. Answer just like you know what I'm just GonNa go to culinary school and give it a shot in the mirrors. Why chose IOS culinary schools? I had served bartended all through college but I really super nervous going into a situation where I really didn't know much about it except except from the front on the House side so you know I don't want to say I regret it now. 'cause color school gave me my basics. But you know I'm still paying for tuition based yeah well like every college student. Yeah exactly one lucky ones graduate with debt but when you got to culinary school did you gravitate toured anyone side sweet savory yeah I mainly actually went specifically for pastry because not even another sounds crazy not because I had a specific interest for it because they knew that was my weakest thing growing up. Thai food isn't really known for its sweet to my mom is a big Kyrie Cook. She really didn't like Baker Cake for press or anything so I naturally knew how to do a lot of safety things already and I also wanted to really go into kitchen be like you know I know how to do everything thing. I'm I don't ever want to be in there like I don't know how to butcher a pig. I don't know how to bake a cake. And since that was my weakest and I knew it was gonNA pay a lot of money for for school is like I'm GonNa do something that's going to benefit me. Where when I go into a kitchen asking me like who knows how to make and I can raise my hands? You know. So that was really why I chose Pastries I still love making it but overall I like just being a well rounded chef. Think it's really important in today's kitchen economics because you can no longer afford justice. Avery JESSOP pay. She really need to know everything at this point. So you gravitate toward baking you. You wind up meeting the Mile End folks which is a sort of Modern Deli in Brooklyn and tell us how you got involved with them in how you got involved in their baking program. Yes so it actually goes back advertising. Ed really great friend that lived above mylan and at that time it was. You know just the one in Brooklyn which now. It's just the one in Brooklyn but he was like. Hey I know you're really nervous about going into a kitchen asking for a job. I know a place opening up and they really are needing some a good time to people and literally just went up and I was like hey and at this time to Noah had no clue what he was doing either like I could just tell he he was still green. So he's like I could use any help possible so that I doing half kitchen half front of the house just shifts because you need to help them both and slowly but surely he's like windmill. Wait a minute amid teach you how to slice meat. And he saw Amelia's like murdering all the guys in the slice way faster way thinner than any of the guys even on the line so he's like all right. Let's do this so no being the CO founder. Right yes of mile end so fast forward so they come up with the idea for black seed right. You wind up involved in that. Yes so is actually Noah the Matt clean men who owns the smile in new operates. Jane they both were just sitting sitting around. This was after sandy basically and they were just Hurricane Sandy Hurricane Sandy in new matt offered a hand to Noah just like hey I heard your commissary went down how can help you and they were just having beers and just chit chatting about you know. Why are there no good bagels? And they're they're like we're restaurant tours. We can make this happen. And now we have to note before the New Yorkers are like what do you mean. They're no good bagels right. Noah's from Montreal different kind of Bagel. Diana will explain to us. What a Montreal? The but that's why they were saying they're no good bagels right in the Matt is actually a New Yorker. So that's kind of how he came up with a hybrid but you know and how will they came about with me as like you know. We don't know what black seeds going to be. We can't afford necessarily a general manager chef. We need somebody that can really encompass everything in this is obviously before they made me a partner of any sort and that time. I think I've worked with Noah for about five years at that time and he just like. Hey Hey in two. At that time I think it was just managing and doing catering and events from from Ireland. And he's like. Hey I know you really speaking. Do you WanNa do this again. And I was like sure sure I'll give it a shot not knowing that was going to be the craziness it is now so and there's one of those rare brands. It became a success right out of the gate. Yeah Yeah it was insane to me. We couldn't keep up with literally first day. Think we had a close down at like one. Remember the GRUB street stories. Yeah kept running out you. Yeah so your partner today You know it's interesting hearing you talk about the the mile end days. I don't even think we use the word culture that often back then bribe definitely not what your company was like and your mind. What does culture mean in that respect? Oh man there. There's so so much that goes into culture. I think when it's it can be just a feeling it could just be literally walking into space and feeling something but also what is your staff appreciating in the place you know. That's part of it but I think honestly I think the best description is just a feeling thing right culture I think is. I'm still trying to figure out to this day. You know constantly. How do we develop black culture? How do we really keep Are Employees retain them but also have them be excited to go to work and not only excited to go to work. Be Really Proud of the work that we do. So so. So how would you define the blackeyed culture. It's probably it's obviously a good culture. I think is is sort of like a living thing. It's always evolving. But if you got to describe it right now but would it be. Yeah I like to say. We're extremely diverse. I think that's the thing I'm most proud of to be honest with you. We literally have people from all walks of life all ages. I always like to tell people that I am so proud that when you go into a Black Sea nobody looks the same. You know I hate going to those bars in Brooklyn where everybody has tattoos and nose piercing. And you know there's there's a time and place for it I get it and it's not like that's how they hire but it to me. I just think it's really cool that we attract everybody from all countries from all walks of life and that's not necessarily easy to do like what are you putting out into the universe or in those craiglist I out wherever you're putting job postings. What are you doing to attract? Yes kinds of potential employees so a couple of things you know one really really make an the effort you know right now. We're at seven shops. Have One hundred fifty employees. It's very intense. But it really literally give every single employee my fa- my personal phone number and a almost tried to make an effort to speak to each and every one of you know and I I really try to use my maternal instinct talking to really have understand where a place that is growing and we want them to be a part of the growth and also you know a more your personal approach. It's it's really easy with how large we are now to fuel corporate. You know and that's the last thing we're trying to do is make people feel alienated alienated make people feel like you know I'm just punching in and punching out kind of thing so really make it a point to talk to each and every employee I mean obviously in place. It's hard to do every single day or every week so at least trimming appoint every month to to just sit down with them. Just ask them how they're doing or what their liking or you now as easy as like. Hey what's your favorite sandwich. Something as small as that makes people feel really like wow she. She actually knows my name she. She's interesting you're seeing. What kind of sandwich I'm meeting you know so? It's just a small things that can help build culture and your partner today. Yes that's exciting. When did they make you partner? It was like literally I probably a year and a half after we open they immediately. Yeah they immediately like. We can't do this without you. A Diana yeah so in terms of the Black Sea culture turn. How much of it are you writing down as you get bigger and bigger and you have one hundred fifty employees like yes? A lot of it is stuff that comes from the gut and how like the business to be we run. That's funny. They are asking that right now because literally now that we're kind of add an assay stopping point but we're a little election point. Don't do call it because literally we I think we opened up three locations within three months. I'm exhausted let's just say literally. This is the time that I am. I'm starting to kind of rate training. Manuals out right. You know how I can really create this culture knuckle. I as I keep on having having more stores that is my biggest fear is how do I incorporate more myself in there. How do I keep my values alive in every single one of those stores and I think doc the most important thing is really training my managers and to be not not necessarily into being me and I want them to be many me's but I do want them to have similar values values not necessarily in their personal life police in their business life? You know because again. I'm not the type of chef yells. I'm very patient and very read encouraging so I want to make sure that my my managers at the same so how much is written down right. Probably none I'M NOT GONNA lie. It's okay it's hard to write something like that. We're all figuring this out. Yeah absolutely I think it's also hard to figure out how to really write I culture down inwards. 'cause I again I feel like it. It's such a feeling such a it's a spirit and yeah absolutely one hundred percent but once you start to get past one hundred fifty fifty people. Yeah that's that's exactly the point that I'm trying to literally give myself computer time because as a chef it's like you know people are like. Oh I can't believe you actually actually emailed me back and I'm like I really try to have some computer time as cheesy as it sounds because that's I need to figure out how to write this culture down in words and it's probably the toughest tasks that I've had to do a really long time and you haven't worked in a lot of professional kitchens not not that many think the most professionals the boulevard in San in Francisco but even they didn't even have anything written down. It was very you know and I grew up in a kitchen culture that it was just like all right. Good luck in the kitchen. No manual the annual no. I don't think I've ever gotten a handbook. You know we didn't have sexual harassment training. We didn't have any of this written down guidelines just the old school kitchen way so I think working with the next generation the thing I am understanding is they need that really written down word because they are very. I don't don't want a liberal. But they they're just way more educated in social things than I ever was as a line. Cook does black seat have human resources department and yet you looking at her house that going. It's good it's good. I think it's good because it's extremely important and to me as a female a sexual harasser any kind of Rosman not even just sexual harassment is one of the most important things that I let any any new employees know that I don't care how my new how little it is. I need to know right away. If they feel any kind of threat they need to come to me right away. So so again It's kind of tough playing all roles but I think if I was avenue department and if I was separated from it I would feel not in control. You know. That's interesting yeah. Do you have a sexual harassment training. It yes we do. Yeah tell us what that involves. Yeah so Harry. Actually the they do employment to they actually have a great online program because there are so many nuances where you know as every play comes in. I can't just literally sit down so it's just a online program. That's pretty forty five minute course. Then at the end of it they take a test just to show that they were actually listening. Because again I think incoming. I'm learning as one person's harassment isn't necessarily the others but they just need to have the basic understanding of what is Ross. Meant so you said a Terry's just for other restauranteurs tors looking for I mean there's there's a lot out there but I think the the good thing about Harry so h. a. r.. I give you a little certificate to each employee that completes it so it shows that they've been through it so and then you take it seriously. Yeah exactly. It also sounds like you're really describing a a kitchen culture based on respect absolutely. Yeah you know. One hundred percent is as a female you know worked at ISA. I worked at again boulevard. which you worked in a lot of kitchens little law and for some reason? I thought you went right from culinary to mile end. I had a little break from island for a minute. 'cause I you know. Wanted to broaden my experience so it was tough being a female now trying to really move up move up quickly so having that experience myself I I made it my goal that blacks. He wasn't going to be that type of environment. You know is really really important to me and still is. Let's thank Uber eats for supporting. Follow the leader. Hey bomb squad savvy savvy. Food entrepreneurs are a selective about their ingredients as they are about food delivery which is one of many reasons why they partner with Uber eats in addition to the reliable. All delivery Uber eats as a delivery platform that allows users to discover new restaurants so a smaller business gets reach end awareness benefits if you are ready ready to learn more and get started. Visit Uber Eats Dot Com backslash bomb squad for more information. That's Uber eats. Dot Com backslash bomb-squad. Let's return to my conversation with Diana Dow one of black seed bagels. So let's talk about hiring that is the hardest regardless of what industry St. Yeah you're yeah. How do you hire man? It's I've actually stepped away from using craigslist. The biggest thing when craigslist is you. Just get everything everything and You know you you put specific things and you just don't get what you need to actually work with hot bread kitchen for our listeners out there who don't know what hot bread kitchen business yes. Give us the brief description. Yeah so obviously. There are bakery as well but hot bread kitchen also has this amazing training program for women that are either refugees or just you know lower income and just trying to get their foot in the door in the kitchen and might not have the skill sets but I think the amazing thing about the In the program for for each person they go through a whole series of interviews. And because I am not quite sure how big each classes but you know they kind of have a limited seating in how many people and I believe it's a three month program they go through and I think the best thing about them is they. Don't just teach them. This is how you use a Robo coup. This is how oh you die something. Teach them the soft skills so by soft skills. I mean Lake showing up on work on time. How do you take criticism? What is really? Do you know team team playing. 'cause I think that the one thing that I have learned is that what's actually missing a lot of people. It's unbelievable people how you know I tell people I'm like okay. It's really important to me to show up on time in to them on. Time is five minutes past the time they were coming in I. I Love Hot bread kitchen for taking the time to teach really interview skills skills that I definitely wasn't taught as a line cook so I think you know that's I love him. And at the end of every semester they have a little recruitment program and they really have you know also love obviously the fact that they work with women lament. I think it's amazing. So so hot. Bird kitchen is resource and not using craigslist anymore. Nowhere else are you going. Indeed indeed is actually the second person to mention that they today they are a really good source they really have figured out how to supply each employer with not just one or two who like literally hundreds of resumes. You can sort through so I really have enjoyed using Again they'll give you one hundred employees but out of that hundred you might get hand hand reading the frustrating part. Is You'd be surprised you get ten replacing. Yeah I'll come in for an interview and really only like two or three show up. I know isn't that maddening. When I was hired for my coffee shop I would always be like they know showed me yep hosted the time they they love ghosting they do those I think but I I learned over time? I was still using craigslist because I'd used a few other sort of niche hiring sites and they just didn't really perform for me as well as S. craigslist. But I was hiring Baristas. Yeah and I learned that if I didn't write a really corporate sounding job description and you add that I I got a better quality candidate and that sounds like it makes total sense but if you go on craigslist and you look at the ads. They're awful they're like. Yeah thousand awesome words in so boring and instead I just put like who we were and what we were all about and at the time we were looking for Baristas who were very much into environmentally sustainable practices right and got a lot of great people. Yeah I mean I think her kinda mix obviously we we kind of you know tout the James Berry thing and you know we've been in this but we also try. What's the James Beard thing you know just being nominated? I think we try to AH keep it a little bit corporate but also really put our our soul into it. You know kind of just keep it fun and not so serious I ah I think also the hardest part is the fact that the economy is doing somewhat good. So it's kind of tough to hire somebody fifteen dollars an hour. Yes that's minimum wage but it's it's a lot for restaurant especially going from thirteen to fifteen it. It really is tough. If you think about now. High School Kid comes out of High School of makes fifteen when I was lying in cook think it was like seven fifty an hour so it I mean. I think it's definitely necessary. We had that jump. But it's tough from a business standpoint right and you're not you're selling one Bagel at a time. You're not exactly we're not like a wholesale. Even wholesale is tough because I just mean even somebody who comes listen to a restaurant. Oh right in average ticket is like I don't know seventy dollars exactly. Yeah which tickets. Yeah we're fat fast casual or fast casual and it's they absolutely tough to compete with you. Know The gramercy taverns of the world that again every person that walks in their spending at least seventy dollars. Here's have not more aware ranges from three dollars to twelve dollars in one BAGEL. Just that's why we kind of need to continue. Can you expand so. So when you hire someone what sort of orientation program do you have when they start yes so luckily now with seven stores as we have kind of a hired I guess you can call them like an orientation manager so we are very compliant with all the paperwork so literally the stack of Paperwork Burke them to go there was like a hundred pages long salvage the thigh than the hand. I'm like Menu Guide and go through our basic guidelines of what it means to be a Black Sea which obviously is the boring in basic part. Then and then we kind of just throw them in the trenches side by side with the trainer. But you know I think the hardest part heart is really taking it back to when we just had one black seed when we had one black seat. I literally the whole entire staffer like my friends. Hey do you wanna work with me. which was kind of probably not the best thing now they look at it? I definitely didn't hurt any friendships. But it definitely didn't gain any friendships. I think that so. It's it's definitely interesting on how to try to keep a little piece of me into every Black Sea we open. You know that's been my biggest heartache. I think you know as we grow. And then how bad for your customers. I mean we've talked what we're talking basil out of sort of the behind the scenes although obviously some of the people you're hiring are consumer facing how do you create a culture for your clients and your consumers. I mean I think one obviously the status of your restaurant play a big role on and luckily may two partners have amazing design aesthetic and they really focus on the build out to that. I think one even though each location Asian is a different floor plan really things that are key to us. Obviously you know the types of wood we use what tiles we use just really making sure sure that even though it might look a little different you can walk in. You're like this is black seat. One hundred percent the music we use a program called gravy. It's a little bit better than spotify. Just in terms of your employees aren't allowed to pick anyone. It's literally black seat specific you'd be some we're using spotify walk in and in a literally would hear death metal at like a seven. Am have one Baker Co wanting to put on this Norwegian death metal. And I'm like yeah I know you're at you're ending your shift but these people are just waking up. We can't this is not black seed and so funny. We worked when I had Smith canteen the coffee shop. We we worked with this great kid from The Food and Finance High School I won't say him by name. Might be listening if you're listening. You know I'm talking to you but I would walk in. And all all of a sudden they would hear like a lady Gaga Song. I knew is not on the playlist and then all of a sudden it would stop after one song and I'll be like where is he. I know he messed with. Yes so I think any kind of visual in audio cues can absolutely make the culture of a restaurant the minute you walk in you can feel the difference and they think as cheesy as much as my hate uniforms. I think uniforms actually really help. Play a part in creating this feeling where okay these guys are professional. Were back in the day when we just had two or three hundred. Okay Yeah you guys can wear whatever I want forgetting that. Some people's for professional clothes aren't like every other the people's professional close so so tell us what they wear now they re now they just have basic black ct shirts they just have our logo on them and black hats. Like I said they're basic but again we're a Bagel Nagel shop. I'm not expecting him to wear like chef uniforms and things like that. Yeah one of the things I I talked to my staff about a little bit with how they interact with the guests because people use different pronouns today absolutely you don't know what they're pronoun of choices you can't tell from looking being at someone absolutely. Yeah talking a little bit to them. Badges how you interact with guests and don't make assumptions about gender cells or things like that. A couple of things things that we do is so nowadays. A lot of credit cards can automatically read the name. So how you know one of the things we do once. We're finished with the sandwich in order. We call it the person's name so we no longer just go from straight from the credit card. Ray We always always ask. Hey can I get your name because is again. Maybe I don't Wanna be called Diana. Maybe I wanna be called Matt or Noah you know so in that respect we absolutely just ask for their names and it really tried to a lot of people still love to say hey honey or hey deer and personally myself. I hate when people do that to me. You know even my friends and like he can. You just is not call me that I don't necessarily want them to be without personality my staff but I just let them know to really you know be neutral about things. I don't necessarily assume somebody wants to be called one thing or another. I had to talk to them about that. Yeah it's tough to kick that habit out of people you know especially when when you when that's tied into how you feel you're being welcoming to someone absolutely and I think that's one great thing about the sexual harassment training. It does touch on that where you know we can no longer assume and we. Shouldn't you know I think it's perfectly fair to be called what you want to be called. You know. It is hard to break that I find. I still say you guys do much ruin trying my best to break that. Yeah I'm the same year especially I think just coming from a different kitchen status to that a really tried to respect people's gender identities in that respect so I mean you've been doing in this long enough now I mean. I know you're not an old timer in the industry but you've really seen kitchens change. Yeah Oh oh my yeah. Even within the past five years at blacks he's been open. It's so different it's insane. Yeah must be exciting to be part of that change. Yeah I mean I hope again the minute I open blacks. He'd from day day one. I made sure that you know we're not a yelling kitchen. We're not the type to make anybody feel excluded. I don't care who you are care where you come from. It's it's not the place for that so I I hope that when people leave blacks after working in go do something bigger and better that they can always look at blacks and be like. Wow they were and in a in a absolutely have people integrating message me and be like. Hey I'm actually a professor now on in Philly I just wanted to say still think about how you never never. You know. It never bothered you that I was transgender. You actually were the first boss at made me feel like I was what I wanted to be and I was like yeah. Why would I treat you any different? Dan I understand why you're thinking me but cool thanks. Yeah so you've got five years of wisdom under your belt now if you're opening black seed today and you were thinking about company culture. What would you do differently? I probably write it down now seriously. I probably would because as has. We're looking to expand outside which I can't necessarily talk about now as we're thinking about going to other taught countries and other countries Yup Yup perhaps It's I won't start guessing. It's making making me nervous again. The how is black seed can be translated to even other cities forget countries. But how would we look in. La How would we look in DC. See 'cause I'm not going to be able to be there everyday like I am here so yeah like you said I think even starting to write down what it is and again. Maybe I'm not hiring so many of my friends with but again hiring my friends I guess. Help me to find that culture. 'cause my friends are so much of me. You know all right. Let's talk about food food for a few minutes before we let you go so explain to us what a Montreal Bagel is. Yes so the one thing I wanNA say is that we're definitely a hybrid that you're I I don't want montrealers coming to my door. I what the Montreal Bagel is and then tell us what the Black Sea. Yeah so the Montreal. diggle is kind of a smaller denser. You're friendlier cousin of the New York Bagel sweeter because of the honey. It's wood fired in help. People on the spectrum of like a Kaiser Roll to a Pretzel is probably closer to Pretzel kind of thing. It's thinner bigger hole often. Misshapen you know people in New York are very spoiled with like perfectly weekly shaped bagels. That look like pillowy big. Yeah I'm a native New Yorker so to me Montreal bagels really big. Yeah there's a lot of people that Dinka Michael from food baby. He actually went to Montreal and he was like posting this. Bill Sucks in Montreal. Friends were like nope. No offense Montreal. Yeah so you know again. I think we took the aspects that we liked Auto Montreal woodfire the honey and not so much of a huge Bagel title and mix it with a New York Bagel. It's it's literally like my two partners. You know again ones Montreal and from Long Island so we just kinda mix those two and came up with a What I like to think is a perfect Bagel? Not Not too big not not as dances Montreal but again not as fluffy as New York Bagel some New York bagels. You could actually sleep on one of them. Big and fluffy takes me like days to get through New York Bagel. When I was a kid it was growing up here it was a big deal? My Dad Edward. Go Get bagels on like Saturday morning. And if when he came back they were warm. Just felt like you won the lottery. Yeah yeah totally totally now. Oh I don't even touch called big also. I'm like yeah. I'll just take one right out of the oven. No human hands have touched it and you are in our new issue. We're very excited. Yes yes you kindly welcomed one of our contributors Jane Lark Worthy. WHO's a beauty editor? An who works at the Cut New York magazine she is an amateur bagel maker. And what do you call Bagel maker Bagel maker Bagel maker think of a official term bagel Baker like bagels Eh anyway. She's an amateur Bagel maker and she wanted to learn a little bit more about how someone who's a professional makes bagels. But now that I said that I'm like actually. We made her go. Go do that story. Forster's go learn how to make bagels from someone who actually knows what they're doing and she was game. Have you had her Bagel. Since she she left there are they any better her. She's not you know what I had her Bagel prior to her class with us. Yeah Yeah how did she do. She did great actually I think Keno after a couple hand rolls you could immediately tell which bagels hers in which remind but no she. She really impressed me actually is like Oh maybe you should quit the beauty. Editing being insert waking up at four. Am with me. And I love the description of the of the rolled. Big like a bangle. was that something you describe it as well terminals. There's a bunch of different written history about the history of bagels. And there's one that we're saying that they they mimic it off of a bangle. So that's where in the end fell off or however you want to describe it there's that theory and there's also theory of that was part of of the king's horses stir up so there was this famous Polish king that one this awesome war so this Jewish Baker made this. You know pastry for this this king that was mimicking his stirrup. That's one thing. And the ones it was actually for the Queen when she was giving birth and represented her Bangel that she would always where. Where is this? Life represents the circle of life exactly so if folks want to to support you or just see what you're up to. Where can they find? Lexi bagels man now that we have seven locations. It's hard for me to think so. I am typically at the either the east villager. The Chelsea location renowned Chelsea markets are newest one. It's more of an appetizing shop. So that's like our newest. What's an enticing show? That's so funny so it's not full of Jalapeno genial poppers and and potato poppers or whatever. It's you know an old school Jewish. I don't want to call it a fishery but it's full smoked fishes basically anything that you could put on a Bagel. So that's at the Chelsea. Markets are our newest one that opened maybe two months ago at this point and then there's the East village and Nolita Alito. which is our original location? There's Brookfield place which is down by the financial district there's down Brooklyn and then there's Gosh I can't even keep track one by the town near the new milk bar and then there is. You're all over a rock center. I can't believe I forgot rock center. Do you all of them yes I I tried to make it a point obviously not every day. That'd be exhausting. But every week I at least try to see them or meet up with all manslaughter. It's intense. Yeah that's amazing yeah again. That's part of building that culture of you don't have face time you know they're they're you're gonNA end up kind of disappearing if you don't make that face time so and and tell me what your classic order is at Black May always go for the super classic smoked salmon cream teas tomatoes capers onions on a sesame Bagel. Why just the bounce of it that saltiness from the capers and the Sam in the mellowness of the plane cream cheese and I just love sesame Bagel? Because it's a as much as I do appreciate the everything Bagel just think. Sometimes garlic and onion can overpower all the ingredient. So and they just you know the tomato and it just gives that acidity just to me. It's the perfect sandwich. So that sounds like heaven. Yeah that's it for this episode of follow followed the leader. Thank you Diana Dow long for talking with me about the culture. She and her crew have built at black seed bagels and thank you to uber. Eats for supporting this radio. Radio Cherry bomb miniseries follow. The leader was produced and edited by Jesse Richman of Cherry bomb and recorded at CDM sound studios and Argo studios in New York City. Thanks for listening everybody. You're the bomb.

New York City Black Sea Diana Dow Noah Montreal Brooklyn craigslist harassment partner New York Montreal Bagel Kyrie Cook Florida Jane Lark Matt Bagel Nagel editor in chief Keri diamond Cherry bomb magazine
Rookie of the Year: Chef Kia Damon

Radio Cherry Bombe

39:32 min | 2 years ago

Rookie of the Year: Chef Kia Damon

"Hi. This is Padma Lakshmi and Joffrey. You're listening to radio. Jerry bomb your the bomb. Hi bomb squad. You're listening to radio cherry bomb into I'm your host carry diamond each week. We talked to the most inspiring women in and around the world of food. Let's thank our sponsor handsome, brook farm, pasteurized organic eggs, handsome brook farm secret to making rich flavorful eggs is simple, the most possible space, the best possible feed and lots of love. It's a healthy and humane recipe that makes her omelets, cakes Custer's and everything in between taste better. Get cracking handsome brook farm dot com before we get to today's guest. I want to remind you about our summer sustainability project. It's called cone only. If you go to an ice cream shop stand or truck this summer skip the Cup and skip the spoon. Get a cone. So it's zero waste treat. If you're out there saying, ugh, Kerry, I'm a Cup girl. I hear you. I used to be strictly Cup mostly because a lot of cones tastes like cardboard, but there's so many good coach. These days like the big chocolate ones at my fav- rococo ice cream in Kennebunkport, Maine milkmaid right here in Brooklyn has awesome cones. You can find Taki inspired cones in New York City's Chinatown. You have so many options, make sure to use the hashtag cone only. So we can see what you and the bomb squad are up to is cream wise. Thanks to our cone only partners, the New York City and Long Island chapters of surfrider if the restaurant world was a baseball league. And I had to pick the rookie of the year. My money would be on Kia damone, this young chef is mindful stylish end laris, and she cooks like a dream at her restaurant, LA Lido, in Chinatown in Manhattan, if any of you are old school, New Yorkers, you'll know the location because it used to house Winnie's the famous karaoke bar. I had lunch at LA leader recently and was so blown away by the food. I had the chick pea guac the rainbow rice bowl, the crispy sweet potatoes, and more. If I lived closer, I would eat there, every day key is food. As fresh and bright, just like she is, if you are do believe, hopefully, you got to meet Kia and try her food. She was one of the featured chefs during our breakfast before we get to Kia. Let's hear a word from our sponsor. Handsome brook. Farm believes that organic and pastured is the way to go when it comes to eggs, pasture-raised means better lives. For Hinz better lives for small farmers and better eggs for you. It's also better for the chefs who depend on rich flavorful, eggs, handsome, Brooke farms owned flock of amazing shafts. Their mother hens count on it. Janine booth is a mother hen. She's the Australian chef behind the southern inspired and bone restaurants in New York City and Miami want to learn how chef Janine makes her sweetcorn spoon bread. The ingredients include handsome, brook, farm eggs, some scallions sharp cheddar cheese, and a touch of heavy cream. You can find chef Janin's, delicious, egg Centric, recipes videos on handsome brook, farm dot com. Where can you find handsome brook farm organic pasteurized eggs at Publix, Kroger sprouts. Farmers market freshdirect and many natural foods stores across the country. Enjoy my chat with Kia demon of LA Lido. So Kia, we're going to start at the very beginning. Okay. Where did you grow up? I grew up in Orlando, Florida. The kingdom of hospitality that Mickey Mouse, is it weird to grow up somewhere? That is. So specifically known for one thing. Yeah. Definitely a lot of people when you say you're from the oh, you into Disney were all the time, all you went this all the time, say, Khon. Ho actually, a lot of a stay away from those areas, molest. We work there, which dots redo like your first job like your first what's the word initiation? I guess when you get a certain age out, there is you go work at the theme. Parks, everyone knows like when that period is, and you apply, but outside of that, like, most of us stay away from there, because it's, it's a lot, let's too much. We're going to go back to the magic kingdom in a few minutes. But what was food like in your house who cooked the earliest memories of cookie in my house was when we lived with my grandma? Other at some point, and she was always cooking grits. I know. That's not. We always eat. But I always specifically remember grits, like on the back, and then we like live near some water, as willik little reading pawn situation with, like little raggedy fish. But my grandma was catching these raggedy fish and frying them and there's always like some fried fish and some grits on, like a piece of white bread with mustard. Maybe sausage. That's what I kind of member until it was like holiday time. This holiday was pulling out the turkeys, pull it out the hams all of that. Did you cook? Yes and no, like little kid cooking little. Oh, no. They would not allow me to do any of that, which is interesting. I know a lot of people have opposite, like overnight was this many years old, like I was in there with apron. No, they will. Like we're handling it little kids like get outta here. So I was eating all the time, I was underneath my grandma, when she would make pound cake her pound cake. Correct. Velvet cake and her carry cake. And I was always there for the bowl and the bowl is always mine like with me like no shade like being the favourite most beloved grandchild. I love drama, but me bowl is a big deal. I yeah, I got the jaded for the bowl and the beaters. Yes. And the beaters I wanted it all my other cousins were like a bit to older. And they were like leave it alone that's for Kia. But then my little brother younger brother came along, and let younger cousins, and then there was competition for the bowl in the beater, and I was pressed I will so give the beater to your brother this two of them. I was so mad. But I was eating I was just getting the scraps and just enjoying being around everyone. You know, think it was maybe like years later, once, you know, me, and my mom, and my brothers and my, my stepdad and all of that, where Karna started having to cook, because, you know, they go to work, and you're stuck there for the summer, you know, neither we weren't always going to like after care, like summer situation. So it's like you have to do something I tried to mimic, what I saw them doing a lot, which led to a lot of disasters a lot of KEA that's not an actual piece of meat that's like a piece of ham hawk for beans. And that's not slake seasoning. That's meat tenderizer that you just put on the like you can't eat this. You know. But I, I was just like this is what I remember. I see. So this is, you know what I'm gonna do those, definitely a lot of trial and error, a lot of burnt rice, a lot of mistrust of my abilities in the kitchen, which is crazy. Because now I'm doing this, you know that you didn't. Burn the house down. I didn't didn't injure yourself too badly. No, not too badly. I'm here able bodied. Unless. So did you work at the aforementioned theme parks? Yes, I worked at universal. Yeah. What did you do? I started as this program, they call food rescue. And that's just because it was like so many people coming in that they didn't really wanna hire people like for specific places that has hired a crew of us who literally be at a new restaurant every day. So curious that they called it food rescue, because they needed help, because it was it was a situation today. Like, if you said somebody who's part of like a food rescue crew, I would think that you're going in and getting like excess food from events and different things to that wearing a shelters and all that, that that's because you're kind. That's because you have a good heart, but you would think fat absolutely not. We were sent just to help people with this influx, so you were like an eighteen. Yeah. It'd be like, we're where we going to say the thing where was, I going was it going to dress park or am I going to the tune Ville Popeye anger actually bounced around a lot until I stuck at Harry Potter, which makes sense. Because it that was the biggest thing going on there. So whether you're going to say because you love Terry Potter that tube. I didn't wanna tawny. One that because I don't know. It was like a hit or miss, like if you loved it so much. You would get stuck at like certain places like you know, to interact with guests and stuff like that, like being costumes. But then sometimes if you loved her like too much they like water. I don't know. It was weird. So I was like, I'm just going to be, I'm just going to omit that. And see what happens and I got put there and they were like, let's keep these people as keep her in these other people. And that was that was so fun. And what was the restaurant the three? Broomsticks shutouts, y'all. Me like I should know that does know the three the three broomsticks and they had shepherd's pie fish and chips. There was ribs. There was soda bread. Which I grew to really actually enjoy. There was half chickens on there. It was a situation theme. Did they have funny like Harry Potter related names? Nope. The whole not, not in the three like the food was just very like this, this, this, this, this. And then is appointing I know it's okay. But first of all, the inside of it was phenomenal. The interactive nece just the way it looked. Honestly, it was really dope. And like I would just hear the music on loops. I couldn't watch the movies because I all I can hear just the soundtrack going, and going and going, but eventually, I moved out of three boom sticks. And I was at about it required. So it's a bit girl for my last letter, beer, something like a cream soda, but not quite okay. Then it has frozen or soda, apparently, there have been major developments in, but a bit technologies since I left. Which was like it was been over five years since I've been there, but it's really developed in grown. And, and I think about it sometimes I find old pitchers like it was very great times. But also very bad times just because, you know, first job and working with different personalities and people then you know, you may or may not get fired. I was fired. But it's fine. But it's fine. Did you gravitate toward a food job there? They just assigned you to that I definitely gravitated towards you did. So that was all I wanted took it was food. When did that kind of I manifest itself, the love for being your food? Could you weren't really cooking at home until you had to fend for yourself? Yeah. Honestly, it was probably around that time because I gather up there and then also got a job like hosting at a restaurant, and it just felt like the natural occurrence of things. You know what I mean? At first, but since I was already late coming from such a food censored home in all of that. It was like, well. Yeah, let's get a food service job because like they're always going to hire like whatever you know, that's what it seemed like. It was at first until the more I got involved in working out a place I was hosting God and just being in the kitchen, and then, eventually cooking, you know, more for myself because of dietary things think is definitely around that time that I was like, oh, wait a second, actually. Like this. It wasn't like going to do this. But I like, oh I like this. I can do this. And it gives me a sense of independence. You know what I mean? Yeah. Definitely around. That's when the spark they Harry Potter. Spark went off inside of me. I don't know before we talked too much about New York. Tell me about your Tallahassee supper club. Yes. So I started a supper club with my good friend Jonah shuttled to eighty on a sheet is gonna gag but a I started the supper club with her called the supper club from nowhere. And I knew I wanted to do some sort of dinner series pop up situation, which made the most sense, because I didn't have a particular space, I was working out of, you know. I was listening to gravy. I love listening gravy, and he started talking about George Gilmore and heard about her, but let not in great grape depth now, listen to this episode did may research about her club from nowhere and everything. And I was like, yeah. Hopefully I call sign I stay in. This is definitely, like everything that I'm feeling like I want to do with food, you know, so I started the supper club from nowhere. And it was really scary. So do that is really scared put myself out because, you know, people always say, is like, when you, you know, you're in school, and you have all these friends or whatever community and then your leg while I really wanna throw a party. I don't know if these people actually gonna come to my party in have to put the party out there. And if I put it out there also have to be prepared for people to not care to support it. You know. So I was like I am going to do this thing. But I'm gonna really feel strongly insecure. With myself about it, so that I don't feel disappointed when people don't show up in don't take personally, you know. So I went for it start at the supper club from nowhere literal around the same time, I went ahead and launched myself as Kia cooks. I went through multiple names names that I am embarrassed stuff until I made it to key cooks. And I watched it all at the same time, the help of my friends, it is my greatest joy. Yeah. It has brought me so much joy so much confidence in myself, so much just direction, you know, with food, because it's like I'm cooking food, and I started, you know, cooking food, and I started beyond Instagram, but I felt like I was just literally falling in line with what typical Instagram food bloggers, say, in the typical food blogger hashtags, and it just felt so inauthentic, you know. And I was like, what am I talking about why am I saying, hashtag yummies hashtag? Food porn. Why did I make this French toast ice cream? I was like, what the hell I was like what? What am I doing? So it feels so good to finally bring that out of me, and I did dinners pop-ups some ad for the first one I did him out of my home that I was staying in with my roommates for like, ten dollars like red beans and rice vegan cornbread lake think greens. Like, really, that's the way I like to cook. Anyways, so does really southern food, you know, and people loved it. So I did more and did a breakfast version did one that was in Oman to salons in the table and try to do for Valentine's Day, just, you know, and people enjoyed I think the last one I did was on my friend's farm Kadian Aaron fuller farm, then that was the biggest one that in the most expensive one leg as far as, like tickets, people bought at that price range in, and I got the duck from white oh, passers on Georgia. Just. Was such like an elaborate labor of love from everyone that I could not have imagined that I would have done that when I was literally in my room, like with my little two hundred whatever rat, you know, whatever just. Just dreaming. You know what I mean? Literally light night, even breaking even because I'm pulling all that money out of my pocket. You know what I mean just to do it, and then having dishes every for three days, I could not have imagined reaching that. You know what I mean from that, that definitely did not. Imagine reaching this from that from that all in the span of like a year. It's pretty well. But you decide you're going to New York. Yeah. And you can act with Gerardo Gonzales who at the time was he out Lido. No. Yeah. G was he was L Alito. He was okay. He's one of only two men who I've ever seen carrying a cherry bomb, tote bag. I have a lot of affection for him all in general, but that made me love him even more. So you come up there. Do start working for him immediately. No. So I went up there with a friend when I was in Tallahassee. Another thing that happened was that he wanted one of my shirts, make you cook shirts because I wanted to allow Lido shirt, you know, I was like, oh, this year, so called definitely support. So we exchanged. Shirts. He didn't send me my shirt. Yeah. I know he didn't send me my shirt, I sent his and I my Instagram was blown up in Salta. He worked for grub street, and I was like, oh, what? So I just went I was up there. Anyway, someone to visit, that's an all these people, etc. Etc. Went back home, and before I went to go do some work in Detroit with some other folks for the allied media conference. My friends saw post that they were looking for a sushi chef. And she sent me that post, and I was like, okay. We looked at and also array like a wis the listens Cassivi struck. My shirt, I'm like I don't care. And she was like you should totally apply. The guy should totally not. And she said, well, why not and I was also reading shonda rhimes zero. Yes. Around the scenes. And I, I was saying yes to everything until that. And I was like, no. Like, why would I do that? She'll go, why should you have everything? That's why I was like, I don't feel like I do you know, like I have a lot of confidence being self taught. But I didn't realize that I had internalized some ideas about my capabilities because of that in wasn't even going to give myself the chance deepen try. And if it didn't work at least I'm the you know, like I was looking back. I'm kinda shocked that I did that because I'm the first one to like jump into something make a rash decision. Like buy shoes. When I have like two hundred dollars in my account like I am wild in that manner. But she was like, well, if you don't send it than all send your resume yard 'cause she'd edit it my resume. She's gonna be don't do it. I will those like, wow. Okay. So it got that. And they reach out to me it wasn't g at the time. So it had reached out to me, and we kind of try to, to link it up in after I did the work in Detroit. With all these amazing people, and that's why I finally really, really met Carlo, who's the GM, and we all spend a lot of really great beautiful time together. That was also really rough time in my life. That that was all happening, you know, and they will just come out like just do it. And I did it. And I did it and I was went to work under someone else at the time, but I was just happy to be in a space to even physically be. There was this really mind blowing to me. I touchdown the twelfth and I started working of August, and I said, at work in the fourteenth of August a half my stuff, it's a big move. I mean New York is not the easiest place to just roll into it's so. Gee had left when you were talking. He was gone already. Yeah. Okay. And he moved down to the Caribbean to do. He's in the Caymans right now. We're all waiting for invitation down to the Cayman. They're doing these, these doing this thing out there. Okay. So for those who haven't gone to LA Lido, explain what the restaurant is, and what the cuisine is so let lido's founded as a Kelly Mexican restaurant, which makes sense you know with, with g Kelly Mexican, but now that I'm there, but you have to add that it is plopped in the middle of Chinatown. It is, and what people need to know about New York Chinatown is other restaurants. Really, don't open in Chinatown. Yes. Very much. I mean, that's their community in their space and all of that. You know, let's why I think about the fact that we're in Chinatown and how it taking up space in that community and that if we're going to be there, then I want things on the menu to reflect that I want us to be buying things, like there's like a few place like me. Sawfish from around the corner. There's you know, Bayard meat so be go to get specialty things last minute things, so many markets around. Yeah. As if we're gonna be here. Do we need to respect that? And we need to put the money you know, out back into their community. Yeah, for sure I don't play that, but yeah, no we're right in the middle Chinatown. So I definitely want to like continuously reiterate. Yeah. But that is a neighborhood in transition. I was around. There are a few weeks ago. I couldn't believe all the for rent signs, yellow businesses, Lhasa Ference, so many of my favorite places. The oldest Haagen-Dazs has gone thousands that was one of that had been there forever and everyone loves the Haagen-Dazs now. She's gone with definitely is an I mean now that speaks a lot to just. Gentrification and people will get in hip to, like, what neighborhood. They Sean to. Now, I've been learning a lot so far from I'm just being in the neighborhood, and then just Popeye who works at the restaurant who's been there for longer. He's always putting me on two specific cuisines and things like that. And I'm like, yes, teach me like I don't wanna be walking around here ignorant, you know, like I like I refuse, I refuse and, you know, the location was a was a famous. Yes, winning bar. When he's a lot of people. Allow a lot of people come in, and they're like, what is this? Whereas Wendy's bay hasn't I mean hasn't been she has been for two years. And I don't know how many years before that when he was let my I don't want, no smoke. I just got here. I'm like I don't even I was like, I don't know was an institution but la- Lido has the potential to be a new institution because the food is fabulous. Thank you so much. Tell us about the menu. Yes. So, honestly. If I tried it's really difficult to describe the food that he was making I'm gonna be. Change the menu little difficult. I want to say thirty five percent okay? Thirty five percent right now, should be fifty should be sixty five but you know what? I'm not going to be myself up about it. It's thirty five. I'm working on it every day, very hard to describe the food that he was making. There's like the pasta loan that everyone loves that's, like a veggie version, the pendulum would sweep plantations on there. There's the vegan teacher owns that everyone is like screaming about, she's she does things like that. How do you make a vegan Chitra Rhone while it's this little lake pasta sheet? It's the pasta. She etching get from a Mexican specialty store. You just fry it. And it just poofs. It really is pretty, like I'm not gonna when I first saw one other. This is the cool. I can't eat them. It's just too much for my stomach to handle, and then making them all the time watching, you know, fried pasta. I'm I don't wanna see no more. But yeah, no really cute right now. I have the duck on there that everyone laws that I love that one took a few months for it to look, as simple as it does it took months for me to figure out how to do because I was go away. I wanted to fee and I want to do this, and I want to do that. And it's like okay killer's. Think about logistics hem pick up time and you can make a duck breasts in an instant but dot com. Fi you're looking at like, three days of prep, and then six hours, you know what I mean? I was like, oh, whatever the duck breast in tiger salad is my favorite right now. Tell me what's in the duck. So it's a duck breast with this maple marinate on top. And then there's the tiger solid. The Tigers fell it has pickled carrots their scali in those red onion cucumber, celery. They used to have pickle Lotus root, which was really pretty. But a lot of people just weren't enjoying that pickled starch situation. Which I respect, you know, I was like, it's pretty but, you know, if the people don't like it, I don't wanna waste my time making nor do I wanna see come back on the plea. That is insulting. But yeah, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Pickle carrots, etc. Cucumbers, odd tiger the tiger solid dressy that I'm making house. That's like orange based with all kinds of other cute secret things in there. And I think I've got it to a science now where you have this really bright fiber, like crunchy salad. Then you have this like, really lake rich duck breast Pugh been ordering a lot lately. I think. I think I'm I think I found a formula what else is super popular and the males is super popular definitely the, the right curry, snapper. I enjoy. I think it's the prettiest thing, and it's so it's so basic at least to me, but I feel like it. Let's just steaming the, the Florida snappers shuttled to Florida, with the banana leaf a lot of aromatics like it's I feel like it allows the fish to shine the way that it should end just simple food that people enjoy this, what I'm trying to get to, and not trying to crowd it too much complexity or, or with doing the most, you know what I mean. I feel like I'm starting to filter out once I started filtering out all like the voices and things in my life. I realized that I can start filtering through my food. Now, your big thinker. Yes. And you're really thinking beyond the. Plays sagittarius. Are you such develops badges found out? And when we were going through everyone's bios for jubilee, and, and I know you mentioned jubilee earlier Kia was at her first jubilee and it worked, I won the team at Smith. Canteen and hung out with us for the day. Yes. Was great. Seeing you there. We loved your bio. We were like Kia has the best bio and you talked about wanting to uplift, the marginalized voices in all areas of the food industry. Yes. I first of all, will not take credit for writing that has Iowa so stuck because it's very difficult to figure out what to say about myself, but someone close to me wrote it. Yeah. No, they wrote that. I was really like. Oh, wow. Link but it was true a home of. Absolutely. It was interesting to see that. And I was like, oh, no, that's everything that anyone really needs to know about me, you know, rare sneakers and all, but yeah, I want to lift these marginalized voices when did that become? Something that you are aware of as being a goal when I started the supper club for sure. When I started the supper club and really started to delve into 'cause I always knew growing up black. You just know that things are different or that things will set up, you never really cried have words for it, and see, like a hit point in your life, and you're like, oh, that's what this is. And that's what this is. And then when you have the language for it, it's so exhausting, because you just see it, you know what I mean before it's like what is this, like ominously being? I feel like I don't know. Something's kinda holding me back here and then you find out what's holding you back and everyone else back and all these things. Just you just filled with so much rage. But once I really started getting heavier into food, and seeing that I really didn't have a whole lot of people to look to, to figure it out is, and I was like, okay, well, what the hell what the hell is this about? Like, I feel like I can't connect to any of this, because none of this me or my own race. Story, and then it was, I felt even stronger about that with the supper club when I was like, wow. All of these wonderful, wonderful women, wonderful black women have like been contributing to food from. The beginning, you know, and then either on a lot of people talk about like will, you know, after slave your during slavery. But it's like priestly free from like way, over yonder. You know what I mean? Like it's been happening since then, it didn't feel like it doesn't have to start when we talk about slavery. You know, it's like noble even before that, like, what were we doing with, with food? But yeah, once I started to get the language for that, and understand that and see that I was like I need to put on for the rest of my community, you know, because it's like I a woman, and I'm a black woman, and I'm very openly queer, as well. You know all my garlic all of these intersections of exhaust. And then all of these, these paths of discrimination is like Jesus Christ. So like, well, I'm going to do everything in my power, and in my career in my existence to fight against that. And I spent a lot of years fighting against that a lot of years crying, a lot of years being so frustrated and feeling like I just really could not do anything because of the powers that be, you know, in the ways that people just do stuff, you know, person to person, just everyday interactions, everyday people who had access the things that I did it, you know what I mean? So I was fighting a lot and now that I'm here where I am now I have power, which is kind of odd or not, odd, just like surprising. Now I have power and now I have access, and now I have very intense visibility so it's like what can I do with all of that will now I'm on the other side in some way that I? Can open up behind me or purposefully seek out folks like me and put the work in and in book people for things, or, or send resources their ways and things like that, or even just with press and interviews and all that, like, continuously being open about it, and pushing back against it 'cause it's like there isn't always some like grand. Huge gesture you can do or like some massive amount of money, because I don't have money or energy like that. But I do have my voice, and I can talk really loud for a long time for like you're getting a lot of tension. You're doing lot of things the media loves that's crazy. It makes me so. Do you like like what? Like I literally wake up with, like Krista is in like lock John, like, and then I go onto the world I was like Kia. We love you like me. But yeah, it's like now that I have it. I'm like done being scared of it or nervous by, and I'm like, I'm just going to be my absolute authentic self so that people can see me so the right people. It was like I know a lot of people can see me right now. But it's like so the right people can see me. It's also an interesting time in New York. I think had you gotten here a few years earlier, you might have been very frustrated by what you found. There were not a lot of women of color getting attention for cooking. Yeah. There was not a queer community. That was as solid, as I think it is. Now, you know, thanks to things like queer soup made and yes, shout outs of them the night, people like aura Cam. And also Angela Demi Yuga. I don't think agile. Oh, yeah. I love her. Yeah. I think I don't know if she gets enough credit for the seeds she planted. I don't think so for helping the queer community in New York in food, because they don't think it was really I'm sure it was a conversation. It just wasn't as open conversation. I think she used her mission Chinese platform alley. Well, it wasn't always that way. And I think about it a lot and why. Yeah. 'cause, you know starting cherry bomb. There is still a lot of female chefs who don't wanna talk about being a female chef. Yeah. And they don't wanna talk about being a female chef. They don't want to talk about being a black stuff, they don't want to talk about being queer. Chef that's not even a word. They're comfortable using. Yeah. Yeah. I think it's because people weren't talking because women weren't in touch with each other to know that they had this, you know, community and they could they just they just wanted to be respected. Chefs and I. Yeah. And I do think all show first and foremost want to just be respected. Thefts. No, I totally I absolutely respect there. Some people's. They listen is not about this. It's not about this is about this is about my food, and I totally rock with that because I, I have my times, I'm just saying, all right. We can talk about all these things. But Kenya not forget that I also cook, you know, care, not forget that also am busting my butt like to make sure like that this food is, is on point. But I am also. Feel privilege in that I can't take up space with these other things and be like, all right. So we all understand that. I can cook right in, you can cook it. We can cook. Now, let's talk about these other things that are going on that are stopping me and people like me from getting proper recognition or support or funding, you know, let's talk about the ways that these identities that we hold are leaving us vulnerable to abuse every jacked up things in the kitchen. And in the world having a token is when we go do thing, it's like I wanna talk about it. And then I also have times where I'm like, I don't wanna talk about it. Met how to Sierra duck breath. Yeah. Blake DR wanna know how was on a panel for my good friend devan with Giardi. He's when eaters young guns like phenomenal. Love, love, devante, Nisha. But on the panels, like sometimes I just want to talk about my food, like I'm tired. Well, we appreciate everything you do, and speaking up and the beautiful food you make, I mean, I had the best time that afternoon at all. And I all the feedback and just our associate producer, Haifa's lost it over the food as she. Yeah. We all did. I was like, don't you wish this was next door, and we can eat here every day. Oh my gosh. Goes the rice dishes. The salads. I mean a real I'm hoping to do more. Are you doing breakfast and no you during lunch and dinner right now? Yet luncheon dinner, and then Saturday and Sunday. I run the brunch show fun yet. Just me. Oh, okay. And honestly, I've gotten used to like working. So I'm just like, yeah, get outta my way. Quickly supper club. Is it still alive? She's alive. I have been secretly plotting on the how to bring that back force without compromising the integrity of it or just doing anything. With that. I don't wanna do you know so she's, she's there, Kia cooks. I'm Dustin her off with some people. Looking for a rebrand revamp? All of that, just I this time to, to change things up shaky 'cause I'm doing all kinds of stuff now. You know what I mean? But cool we'll keep us in the loop. Absolutely. I could ask you, eight million more questions. But we're gonna do the speed round. What ready? No. What are the rules? There are none. Just speedy. What's okay. Favourite kitchen tool, paring knife song. That makes you smile box of Wheaties by Chris quell. Yes. Favorite ingredient to cook with coconut milk. Oh, why? She's so good. Also being a non dairy hunts. He like it gives me that richness that I need without like, you know, the diarrhea I loved it everything. So she yeah. Your supper club. Okay. He'll occasionally a non binary. Hunting. But. Okay. What's a cookbook you love? Princess pamelas cookbook by Princess. Pamela, give us a little blurb about it. So Princess Pamela. She just made this cookbook with these initiatives appeared, and I purchased the cookbook once they put it out there again and it's. Literally, I was just crying reading the recipes because they're just so everything that I've grown up on, like very like old scrapings on my grandma who's like born in, like the forties. You know, it was making in that she learned to make from like her mother. You know what I mean? Like it's very in every aspect of the word it is very, very black and very, very amazing. And it's one of my greatest treasures have what is the oldest thing in your fridge? Oldest thing in my fridge. I think is this little weird bottle of sardines? Dream vacation travel destination. Tokyo. If you were trapped on a desert island with one food celebrity who would it be? On a garden. I'm pretty sure she'll find a way to make Earl two chicken like show turn us being stranded into a dinner party perfect will Kia. Thank you, for stopping by know how busy you are a ho- literally going back toward, we've loved getting to know you, you're the bomb, they. That's it for today show. Thank you, to Kia damone of LA Lido for joining us. If you are an NYC the summer be sure to plan a visit for lunch dinner cocktails, brunch or heck, all of the above. Thank you to our sponsor handsome, brook farm, pasteurized organic eggs for supporting this season of radio cherry bomb. You folks are excellent radio. Cherry bomb is a production of cherry bomb media, our show is edited engineered and produced by just Seidman. And our theme song is all fired up by the ban. Cha LA LA, if you're a longtime listener, and you've never left a rating or review for our show. Well, today's the day thanks for listening, everybody, you're the bomb. I'll have what he's having. Hi. My name is Natalie pot cave and I own be in the Baker in Seattle. Do you want to know who I think, is the bomb jasmine bell? Bells pastries here in Seattle. Jasmine creates custom cakes gorgeous sugar cookies, and impeccable MEF runes. She even teaches first time bakers to flawlessly, recreate these intricate confections jasmine shows me, what Dr and dedication looks like.

Kia Manhattan New York City lido Chinatown LA Lido Kia damone Instagram Harry Potter LA Lido Florida LA Publix Orlando Disney Kennebunkport Janine booth Padma Lakshmi baseball
How To Be A Better Boss

Radio Cherry Bombe

35:16 min | 1 year ago

How To Be A Better Boss

"Hi i'm so fierro chef and wellness enthusiast. Did you know that nearly three hundred and forty thousand or one in five new york city children rely on soup kitchens and food pantries to eat especially during the summer months when school is out the folks over at food bank for new york city want you to know that unlike school hunger doesn't take a break help them. I'm an child hunger by providing meals to families and children in need during this challenging summer months visit foodbank n._y._c. dot org to learn how you can volunteer spread the word and and more hi bomb squad. You're listening to radio cherry bomb and i'm your host carry diamond each week. We talked to the most inspiring women in and around the world food. Let's thank today's sponsors likud on bleu culinary schools and traeger wood fired grills for supporting radio cherry bomb some housekeeping early bird tickets are available elbow for seattle jubilee. I'm so excited to bring the bomb squad together and the pacific northwest to discuss foods new wave on saturday november second will be announcing announcing the lineup soon so stay tuned. I'm actually in seattle right now doing some research and checking out the scene and eating a lot of food and i could not love this city more more for early bird tickets visit cherry bomb dot com. Today's interview is a poignant one for me. I just closed my beloved coffee. Shop smith canteen eighteen last week and thank you to everybody who sent me emails and d._m.'s. I really appreciate all your kind words and well wishes. I was the co owner for a long time and then and for the past year and a half i ran it with the help of some great people i learned a ton and made a lot of mistakes along the way which is why i was very excited to talk to today's today's guest valerie ruben of u._s. foods u._s. Foods is company that helps chefs bakers and restaurateurs run better and more profitable businesses valerie is a u._s. Foods culinary innovations consultant based in los angeles and she works with mom and pop eateries throughout the city. Stay tuned to hear some great. Advice is from val about creating a company culture helping your employees succeed and basically being a better boss and colleague. It's all advice. I could've could've used years ago. Vows advice is applicable to everybody no matter what industry you're in. We'll be right back after this word from the cordon bleu. Are you daydreaming about culinary school again. Make this the year your dreams become reality with the court on blue the legendary culinary school study classic french culinary techniques in cuisine an patisserie as part of their exclusive nine months lebron diploma and graduate into a world of opportunity. You also can extend your course of studies to include culinary management and dedicated internships likud on blue has locations in more than twenty countries around the world and located within some of the best food cities out their london ottawa madrid bangkok tokyo and of course the spiritual home of cuisine and likud on blue harris turning your d- dreams into reality is closer than ever visit cordon bleu due dot e._d._u. For more and let your culinary adventure begin doc vowel. Welcome to radio cherry bomb. Thank you i'm. I'm happy to be here. We wanted to talk to you today. Because you're one of the people who actually helps mom and pops do what they do right. Yeah i do. I <hes> i mean that's what's the main staple of what i do every day in fact later today i'm hoping <hes> a woman open her her new pizza shop. She's got a little vegan pizza shop. She's opening and it's like vietnamese american fusion. Oh my god wait. A vietnamese american fusion vegan the pizza shop. That's for some sense or she's <hes>. She's getting she. She really wanted to have that. We're in in some of the dishes and you know plant based eating which is when our focus on here in southern california. Ah is increased six hundred percent in the past two years so nobody is asking for and plant based gluten free a kiddo. That's what i do here. I give workshop on the scene ability and plant based eating gluten free and i find products for our customers and i do recipe development so i can you tell her audience what you mean by plant based eating. How did you define that so plant based even actual sin synonymous with vegan when people started eating more vegan and when when companies started <hes> marketing that vegan became kind of a four letter word because we we had four or five sixties and p._r. And and the mainstream really looks at veganism wag something very very fringe and berry not attractive so when larger companies like impossible border and beyond and any of those newer newer company d._c. and whole foods for example so did marketing their products. They started marketing it as a plant based which became the new sexy term for regionalism. You know that's so funny because i was at a food conference in silicon valley a few years ago and the founder of just mayo what's company called now hampton creek. I think he has a week yeah. He said he would rather cut off his arm than call his products vegan. I thought that was that was aggressive. But i got the point well well to be quite honest. You know do this every day and i don't just work with restaurant tours and chefs but i work with the customers that come in to those restaurants and the difference between trying to egan although and here we have a new plant british is night and day. It's one hundred percent different so it just goes to show you know what marketing can do exactly so about. How did you get into this line of work. Do you come from a restaurant family the food family now <hes> i just happen to be sensitive food on fat cared <hes> so you and i was an only child and i had really nothing to do growing up so i spent a lotta time at home. Come from an immigrant family so oh. My family is very over protective. You know i'm a girl. I'm an only child at malone so they didn't want me to go outside. I stayed inside and and the only thing to do is cook so and parents both work though you know at three years old on the weekends when they were sleeping in. I taught taught myself downstairs and get on a chair and cook myself eggs off. No vowel scrambled eggs on the where's your family from bell quote from the philippines this. She moves her and she was in her twenties and <hes> the rest of her family. Most of them also migrated here. You're around that same time in the seventies. I believe those she's my. Dad's family are actually from here. They're from pittsburgh but but i spent most of my younger years with my mom's side of the family i grew up in my my grandparents house and you know filipino families are all very integrated with each other so i i spent a lot of time with cousins and aunts and uncle my grandmother and i like i said i had nothing to do. So when i was when i wasn't cooking follow my grandmother around the house and kind of watch her cook and and make these amazing dishes that took hours and hours she had guarded and and watch her garden and at this point i believe on the only one that knows any of arrested. You've now because of that well what what were some of the things she would make. When you were growing up. She made a lot of students. Filipino cooking is a lot of fuse and a lot of there wasn't a lot of refrigeration so a lot of vinegar preservation type methods so she would make <hes> something called genoa. Which is it's like. A chicken soup has bitter melon in it. Some people put noodles my burma good it and she just put <hes> vegetables and chicken made with ginger and garlic and then it's imos for a long time and you get that real nice gelatinous texture from from chicken skin and cartilage and then the same thing there's something called doboy think which is very ubique now people make it with cork my made made it with chicken but it's it's with vinegar and garlic and she can shoot for a really long time so i saw us and it gets could be this nice. Thick sauce the chicken dish and you eat it over rice and kind of filipino comfort food adobo the bomb. We we have a recipe for that in the terry cookbook so jump forward. How did that translate into a career. How did you figure out that you know you could work in food in a certain capacity or a long time. I've actually been degree so he gave a musical theater degree. I can you sing. I can't human i'm not going to you. Can my dream is to do a cherry bomb talent show because there are so many people in the in the bomb squad who have really interesting musical talents talents. I would love to yeah that'd be great. I actually went through performing arts high school similar to like fame and it was a boarding school in california so i i did that and and when i was in high school actually all right we lived in dorms two hundred and fifty people and we will have kitchen the dining hall but i- snuka doc hot plate in to <hes> to my dorm room of course every friday night of course everything i would make my friend dinner so i would in the bathroom in my dorm room rolling out pasta with clothes bottles and i do some crazy things that you know stuff. The chicken cooked hop figured out how to do a lot of really interesting stuff with no equipment and no just like no space essentially not kind of pretty well going through college and into my life but you know i i wonder for our school. I just followed that path and got a degree in musical. I gotta join with some theater company toured for a year. I moved back to l._a. Job the new channel of it getting standard work in addition to hunting and i woke up one day and i thought i hate my life and everybody i know th request who twenty two twenty three and i was living because at the time and i looked at him and said what do you think of going to in school. He's i don't know why i like ben actually catering in working caring since i was a teenager off prime i would cook for for big parties and and events so i've been doing that and i do. I would do dinners for the family oddly complicated dinners for people well who would have been happy with whatever so i went to culinary school and something i'm not exactly sure i'm sure people sign nine. That's you know there's a there's a feeling you get when you are in the place. You're supposed to be and everything clicks in and comes into focus and and i had never been focused before i went to school all of a sudden everything just was clear from moment i just kind of move forward and you know i. I worked back in the house. Obviously started no feisty shin guard mosaic law kind of move my way a small kitchen abbot kinney venice and then took production baking job and and then decided i needed to make more money so we took a front house job and i worked for and and i worked as a server and learned to be a bartender somehow got a job as a staff mixologist hollywood palladium when they reopened and then and spent my time catering and cooking in kitchens and working front of house renting a little barb bank and accidentally somehow got a job with u._s. Foods ooh wow so you've seen all aspects of how the business works from from commercial baking to catering front of house back of house. Yeah it serves me very well in this job helping smaller establishments open and and kind of retool their menus and their their culture because i've gotten to see what really works and what really doesn't which gives them more valuable thing. That's that's what we're going to talk about today because there's been such tabun in restaurants in new restaurants and new bakeries and so many women in our community are opening their own places for the first time you because finally women are getting a little more access to capital and investor money and just or crowdfunding and venturing out on their own so we wanted to talk did you about what some of those common mistakes are and how to avoid making them absolutely yeah. I'm happy to do that when you work with a new client ryan. Where do you begin. I started asking them. You know what do you do what is it. What is it that you want to do. I typically you know people will focus on the food which is great but i think one of the biggest mistakes you know business owners will make in the beginning is they focus is on what they do and not who they are so you kind of miss your own culture and you know the people don't realize is you a culture whether you you realize it or not so you have an opportunity from the beginning to really set that tone and tell people who you are and not just what you do and if you do that properly you'll really hook into something emotional in your clientele baths what keeps them coming back and if you want to go to school because it's about cupcake ever it goes sprinkled because it hook something from their childhood and makes them feel good to a culture that those their workers get off. How nice everybody is how the cupcakes look you know all of that is part of their culture culture and if you can hook into someone emotional button you'll have one for life right because you can get you pretty much know. It's l. at it places like l._a. And new york or different but you can get a lot of great food and a lot of different places today so what is that that gets people to come back and a lot of times. It's the people not the food exactly yeah absolutely all right. So what's the next step. Organization is a really big one so so when you're starting everybody needs. You know if you're if you're needing access to capital. Obviously you have a business plan without business. Plan doesn't necessarily lay out how oh you're gonna go about executing everything so you just because you know you wanna do doesn't mean you know how you're gonna do it so taking time end of the year sorry continue no. It's <hes> you you know. I mean with old like here. We're gonna do and i think we're gonna. Have you gonna do that. We'll go yeah. It's it's except you hard so you know. Having a plan to execute is really is really key and the thing about it. Is i work with your work with a lot of people that i worked with a lot of female business owners that came from other backgrounds the the woman i'm working today. She came camila state. I open recently cafe in marino. I'm the owner she came from the banking industry and you know these people they love food. They want to open a restaurant and the amazing and they have really great recipes and really good ideas but never having worked in a restaurant before. It's hard to see that second. Stop the execution. Step that organization that so that's kind of what i work with and and i'm fortunate because you know i get to work with a lot of women and the women that i work with are so hardworking and so- organize and and understand that when they're given a plan an instruction following that instruction is going to make them successful and that's not always the case with everyone so i feel fortunate and i i get to work with these women and they follow the instruction auction and then they're successful and i get to look at your thick month later see they're busy and that people are loving food and loving their culture and they you are not pulling their hair out anymore. We'll be right back with valerie after this quick break. Let me introduce you to traeger woodfired grills. It's a company that has revolutionized cooking outdoors. I had the opportunity to see traegergrills up-close and inaction at a special event. We did the summer in the hamptons john's and let me tell you. They are beautiful pieces of equipment. Some of our favorite chefs proved just how versatile and easy traegergrills are to us. We had grilled grapes. Yes you can grill grapes and they are so tasty. They are beautifully with barada and grilled bread. We also had delicious grilled vegetables beef tenderloin that was as soft as butter and even a stone fruit gallant. I had no idea you can make baked goods on a traitor but you can traegergrills infuse. Does your food with woodfired flavor. You can't say that about a charcoal or gas grill cook alfresco and do it hot and fast or low and slow however wherever you like try it on a traitor visit traegergrills dot com to learn more. Let's talk about hiring. 'cause that's that when i had my own coffee off. He's out by found. That was one of the biggest challenges because you know when you're a small place when you're a single unit and you have a small team. Losing one person just upsets everything so a lot of times you just have to hire very quickly and you can't necessarily do this long luxurious search for the world's best employees employees. How do you coach people in terms of hiring when you have to hire very quickly so i kind of focus on three things focus on attitudes who you were intuitive. People people are intuitive so and you know some people are just good at interviewing so so you you know it's not a hundred percent accurate but when you sit down with this person you feel comfortable with them. Do they feel like they're trying to intimidate you. Give feel like you could give them an instruction and they would be obedient for lack of better word a is are they going to fit with the rest of your team couldn't vibe you got from them so they're not for army's always the first step. It's like if i get a bad vibe from someone. I'm really gonna trust my intuition and because that has served me very well step to who i try to advise the people i work chris like give them a task to do whether that hey can you. Can i just have you mcnair coffee or you know. Can you grab me a grammy these two things from the kitchen and see how well they execute that task because sometimes you you can tell very quickly you know if you ask somebody. This is and this is my test in my kitchen. I'll ask somebody hey can you go to the dry storage and garmin these two cans and tell them vaguely where it is and see how long it takes them to go if they find it and typically. It's not not something very difficult but if they get me the correct or the wrong thing and then i test patients just a little bit by having them. Go back and get me something else immediately sometimes and again. Sometimes you know it's the hardest people to work with on your staff offer people that are impatient people that are kind of over it when people that are trying to take charge over essentially you the owner so those are the things i i try to really avoid when hiring someone <hes> look for things like a good attitude someone who's really full new problem. I'm pretty laid back but still task oriented. They really your. I try to look for that. I also always advise people when they're opening and this is a really hard thing to do. It kind of goes to the financial piece. I always tell people hire twice as many people as you need in the beginning whoa don't because every time you open and i know a lot of run where it's it's a really hard thing to do but inevitably what happens and i'm i'm you know eighty percent trying this happened to you is you will hire five people because you need five people and by the time you have a week to train them. By the time you open open three of those people have dropped out and now you're trying to run a business with people so i know it's a little bit of extra runway but i always whereas advise higher prices. Many people as you need at a time you open you will lose half of those people well but if you don't then you have to fire them. That's painful never heard that housing you. You've never had that happen. That's funny but you do need to be able to hire and fire and that's the part heart that nobody ever wants to think about absolutely yeah but you're so right about the intuition one hundred percent. I feel like every job i've ever had when i didn't trust my gut. That's when things went south. Absolutely what else fell. What are some other tips in your and your toolbox so i i'm a big advocate of the prop list goes. I sit organization thing. Having clear direction for for yourself every day and having clear direction for your staff is key. I think the more specific you can be the better is my motto so if you give everybody on your staff a list of things to do every single day and how much of that they need to do so if it's your back of house staff give them a prep list of monday. Here's either tuesday. Here's what you do and here's how much was so those are really important and then offended house as well if you give them a list of monday. We're gonna clean the filters on all of the water dogs. We're gonna you know make these three things. We're gonna clean the counter. You know every day and give them those tasks to do. It really prevents people from standing around number one but also gives them a sense of purpose or every time. I walk in this restaurant. I know exactly what it needs to and were any to go. Take you mentioned pars. Tell what apar- is it's the amount of something you have to have on here. So you're part of the level of which of the item you need to have so if i say i need my partners to can to four court containers of cut tomatoes and i have one four container. I mean unbothered. Four containers will have to on par at at all times or when i have. That'll make popular got it. I mean you're so right about writing everything down. When i took over the coffee shop i had like a year and a half ago they had they had sort of the the i guess the opening and the closing chore lists somewhere but it was never printed out it was never followed precisely and i wish shift. There is one thing i had done. It would have been to have exactly what you said instructions for everybody front of house back of house opening closing what you're just occasional occasional chores are when you're standing around and laminated those damn things and put them where people could reference them really easily absolutely absolutely yes and that's one of the things that people owners especially a lot of the time ona are you responsible eligible and they're organized and they chef as well. You know you'll expect everybody to just be understand what needs to be done at the level you did you but i think part of the big miscommunication in this business is when people come in you know the owner of the boss. The manager has to understand understand that they're a teacher. You know you're not a manager. You're an instructor going not everybody's gonna come in and understand what needs we done and why so it's your responsibility to teach them how to do that and having written down and really spending time to teach <hes> how did you re not getting frustrated. Don't know how to do it. Our big key components to being successful. I need to do in my life a lot earlier than today. Yeah i mean i coach pro start which is <hes> an organization that helps high school kids that wanna take professional track as opposed to educational. They'll tracking so i teach press start for for cooking essentially so high school juniors and seniors compete for scholarship shipped to go to culinary education so i work with them and and you know there there's anywhere between fifteen and eighteen and you they're talented alan ted but they don't know so i got the opportunity to work with these kids and really teach them how to elevate their dishes and elevate their cooking file on their their skill and on top of that because they work with dummy new business owners you know these these people hire kids higher again fish anywhere between fifteen and twenty year old go in and the first thing they say you know who's who twelve names before who was who clean to counter and nine hundred hundred ten they have never done max so you meaning you kind of parse out the people that want to learn what they want to learn and kind of fear them put them you know the kids that wanna learn you put them in the kitchen and become a teacher teacher and you learn very quickly that you can't get frustrated because someone doesn't know something. That's not their fault so i i've been fortunate in that. I've gotten so much practice over the past ten years in doing that and it's also gotten to see the reward award when someone learn something new and really like gets the joy that little spark of joy and it's really fun to watch especially when i do my training you know i try to keep somebody new every single day because even though it little sparkle joy. It's just like oh. That's so cool like like how to cut an onion. You know here's what you don't cut it this way. Here's why you cut it this way and when you explain the why even clean a counter are wipe down fingerprints from adore you explain the why you see this little light go on and it's you know stupidly very rewarding. I love the way you put that the explain the why because i think for you know like the way i describe it. It's like when you're a little kid and you're fighting with your parents and you don't want to do something in your parents says because i said so you know that that's probably what i was doing. Instead of explaining the y you know it was doing a because i said so and your away obviously is so much better. Well and it's hard to do that. You know because you have to take the time. It takes three times as much time to explain the why i does. She just say we'll just go you know but then when you think about it later if you take <hes> <hes> those five minutes and explain. Here's what i wanted us. Here's why you should do this. Then i have relieved myself of exclaiming or telling telling you down the road a hundred more times. You have to do with this web because you already you understand why you do it that way so i spent five minutes but i probably saved myself sufferers and a lot of frustration. You know it's interesting so many of the tips that you mentioned the explain. The why be you know a teacher not a boss. Trust mr gut you know what they do. Versus who they are so much of that goes back to culture essentially and even just the explaining leaning to the staff the y you know then when you've got a new person the people who are already there can also explain the why it doesn't always fall on you but you've established that there's this culture of of teaching and explaining rather than just this is how we do it because just because you know exactly well and that's it. I mean that would be my third tip is really sometime training and and people owners in particular owners and managers and i say to train yourself they see what are the tiny you at but i think what what doesn't understood often is. You don't have to take two hours and get everybody in a room to train them. You know you can done ten minutes every single day with one or two of your employees and train them to do some things properly and if you you are patient and your x y and you really celebrate the learning part of it and the winning part of it when they do it correctly then you are creating not culture of good habits so instead of saying. We have to have a shift meeting dan every weber you've got to come in. You know i know when i was when i was around in the bar. You have shifting here if if that but they would pull over to eight o'clock in the morning the unit you cohort o'clock two hundred eight. Nobody wants to be their owners on you. You just get through it but if you know and if you have if you have shift meeting do something enjoy fall in that shift meaning you know like if the the best cultures of the cultures of joy you know they feel like people are just like getting thing by their feels like they're. They're happy to be doing me. I mean i go to disney. I'm from california disney family. We we go to disney. I'm actually going on that day. When you go there. They have fostered a culture of joy so you wanna be there so that and that's true for the employees while at the customers and not the kind of you know that's the kind of culture you wanna want us or whether that you you know a culture of joy because you're disneyland or culture jewelry because you are a very professional bar after work or they serve a great martini not me you know not so different type of joy but it is still culture of july oval. That is a perfect place to end. You are treasure and i really hope we have you back doc. I really hope we have you back on the show. Honestly if i had known you ten years ago <hes> i might have very different life today your advice so great and whether it's if you're somebody in the bomb squad who has a restaurant or a bakery or a cafe or coffee shop or whatever or you're thinking of having one or i think all your advice is applicable to multiple multiple industries. I don't think it matters if you're in food or f._n._b. Or not so so thank you so much. I would love to have you back on and talk talk about i mean we probably could have talked for two hours about all these subjects or thank you so much for having me. I sincerely mean when i say i will come back anytime. Thank you so much. That's it for today. Show thank you so much valerie ruben for sharing her amazing advice with all of us. If your wondering how you you can work with u._s. Foods you can d._m. Them on instagram. Their handle is u._s. Underscore foods also thank you to today's sponsors trigger woodfired fired grills and likud on bleu culinary schools. Don't forget we'd love if you could support. The hunger doesn't take a break initiative from the food bank for new york city visit visit foodbank n._y._c. dot org for more radio. Cherry bomb is a production of cherry bomb media. Our show is edited engineered and produced by vijay seidman. Our special projects director is lauren page goldstein. Our publisher is kate. Miller spencer and our intern is julia fabrication our theme song long is all fired up by the band challah. Thanks for listening. Everybody your the bomb all cheese having hey guys my name name is camille more otherwise known as can cooks on instagram. I'm a chef event stylist youtuber and guest expert on t._v.'s social here in canada who i think is the the bomb without a doubt that would have to be the one and only julia child watching her on tv as a kid really showed me what i wanted to do when i grow up and when it came time to choose culinary school likud on blue in paris was the only way to go because obviously that's where she went without a doubt. Julia is v. bomb in my books mm-hmm.

new york valerie ruben likud california seattle Foods traegergrills cordon bleu los angeles d._m. bangkok consultant l._a genoa burma cordon bleu philippines tabun
Episode 180: Crunch Time with the Granola Girls

Radio Cherry Bombe

48:05 min | 2 years ago

Episode 180: Crunch Time with the Granola Girls

"I may Teheran's communications director cat Johnson. With a preview of this week's episode of meat and three I think we should realize that we more or less have broken foot system when eight hundred million dollars go to bed hungry. Six hundred million are obese we waste thirty percent over then something is under mentally wrong. We'll introduce you to one food waste solution happening in Asia introduced the system where residents were issued laconic card that would open automated been able them to Wade food waste being dropped off. And then they would be charged in a certain amount of money. You're the weight of that food, and we'll take a look at some of the real struggles happening closer to home. How the possible that a meal that was perfectly fine to consume at ten fifty nine PM, then becomes waste at eleven PM. So tune into this week's meeting three on heritage radio network available wherever you listen to podcasts. Hi, everybody. You're listening to radio cherry bomb, and I'm your host carry diamond each week. We bring the pages of Terry Baum magazine to life through conversations with the most inspiring women in and around the World Food. I let's thank our sponsors Likud on blue if your daydreaming about culinary school. Maybe it's time to say bone jure to Likud on blue. Learn more about the legendary culinary school's. Most prestigious professional qualification Legrand diploma by visiting cordon bleu dot EDU, and let's thank vital farms, pasteurized eggs, vital farms, pasteurized eggs are better than cage free. They are bull free. Try for yourself to get your coupon for vital farms, pasteurized eggs, had divided farms dot com backslash cherry bomb and Bob's red. Mill. Bob's red mill is an employee owned company that's been offering organic gluten free and stone ground products for decades. You know with Bob's red. Mill you're not just getting quality. You are getting. Packed food that tastes amazing. Good. Bob's red mill dot com and use the code cherry bomb twenty five four twenty five percent off your order so cherry bomb university starts tomorrow. We're kinda losing our minds. Your turn them H Q is at the food and finance high school in Manhattan. That's the city's only culinary high school ticket prices start at fifty dollars and they're only couple left. So be sure to get yours now at cherry bomb dot com. We have so many Mazen classes on Saturday and Sunday, and so many incredible professors a lot of whom you've heard on the show. Jody Burg the CEO Vitamix is actually teaching a class. I'm sure some of you remember her show that was actually one of my favorites. She actually went back to school and got a special degree in how to help people like pursue their passion, which is so incredible. So she'll be teaching about that we've got bone apps. Emily Schultz will be teaching everybody some social media secrets Bonab crushes it on the Instagram game so excited to learn. From Emily on my gosh. So many others Clancy. Miller you've heard Clancy co hosts she is teaching how to write and test recipes the right way, a lot of people don't realize there is a right way to write and test recipe. I learned that the hard way when we did the cherry bomb cookbook. I wish I had taken Clancy's class at advance. And then we also have Jen Pelata, and that was one of our most popular shows of the year. Jen came on and talked about how she raised six hundred and fifty thousand dollars from thirty three different women to open her champagne bar, the Ridler in San Francisco. And I know a lot of you listened because a lot of you emailed about that show. So Jen will be teaching all about that on Sunday. So just go to cherry bomb dot com. Check out the different classes and tracks and prices we've got lots of options for everybody hope to see you this weekend. Today's guests are Julie mountain and Dana norrowly, Julian Dana, call themselves, the film and Louise of granola op. Obviously that's without driving off the cliff part. They are the co founders and CEO's of the granola bar a local chain of modern diners throughout Connecticut and Westchester where you can get anything from avocados toast to a frozen hot chocolate to they're fantastic. Homemade granola Dana and Julie drove all the way from their home base in Westport, Connecticut to the wing in Dumbo to record this episode. And I couldn't be happier. They came. They are an absolute riot. And they are such amazing business people whose unconventional paths left me feeling inspired about flipping the script when it comes to running and growing a company. I hope you enjoy my conversation with them as much as I did. We will be right back after this word from Likud on blue. Are you daydreaming about culinary school again make this the year your dreams become reality? With the court on blue the legendary culinary school study classic French culinary techniques in cuisine and patisserie as part of their exclusive nine month. Legrand diploma and graduate into a world of opportunity, you also can extend your course of studies to include culinary management and dedicated internships. Likud on blue has locations in more than twenty countries around the world and located within some of the best food cities out their London Ottawa Madrid. Thank talk Tokyo. And of course, the spiritual home of cuisine and Likud on blue Paris, turning your daydreams into reality is closer than ever. Visit court on blue dot EDU for more and let your culinary adventure begin. So we are here with Julie and Dana, and I literally could not be more excited. And I know I say that about every guests. And I do mean it, but you to I met you, and I liked you instantly. It was like love at for. It was love it was. And I couldn't believe I did. No, you before I couldn't believe you hadn't been part of the bomb squad since cherry bomb had been born. But we're making up for lost time really quickly. And I'm just thrilled to welcome. You both to radio cherry. This is the great great to be at the wing. Great to be in Brooklyn. Very exciting. You drove all the way from Connecticut. We did which sounds like a very far journey because it is it was like two and a half hours in rush hour. Yeah. It was our for four miles. But if so, and do, you know, how many times I've wanted to stop to see you both? But by the time, you're on the Connecticut turnpike. Yeah. Whoever you're in the car with their like, we're we're we're not stopping once you open fifty or sixty stores will send a helicopter for you. And I think that's the only way to go. Let's be honest sometimes you'll stop Newhaven the get pizza. Right. But even that you have to be. Dedicated exactly sort of we do have two locations in Westchester, which makes it a little more palatable. That's only what thirty minutes to our rival actually take the train directly to are. There you go. There's a pitch education. Okay. Excellent. So let's start at the beginning. Like, we usually do how did you to meet? Oh, nineteen seventy nine. Oh, we have to jump into our suburban existence 'cause we had we both had really robust lives in the city. Both of us individually. I sixteen years meaning we didn't live together at the time. We both moved out when did knew that day in two thousand in eight. Yeah, we moved out moved out to Westport. Yeah. Of your parents house. No funny. We did that journey to the burbs saying we had careers. We got married. We had kids we left the city because it became challenging. And I don't want to speak for Julie by you can of I think she would agree with me. We both really kind of pine to be back in the city. Oh, you're meaning now especially being at the wing. Yes. But when you go back to two thousand eight you have to women who had never met kind of experiencing the same thing. So we had both like to Dina's point had careers in the city. What were your I was in? The music business for a while. I didn't know that. Yeah. And Dana was in. I was in finance and what did they do? What did they do music kind of everything I started at a place called urban plaza? I was sure eighteen years old, and I was working there and going to NYU, and I don't know which one feels more part time. I think it was NYU, and then I moved onto Atlantic records and some personal management in kind of did a three sixty of the of the music business. So cool drop a few of the ax. You worked on. Zaharije act drop, you it actually cry because it would age me immediately. Fighting a older than Nope. I was like Edmund Edwin McCain should worry, ammos. We'd I love tour. I show in the city. Maybe it wasn't even plaza. She was on the piano. It was little earthquakes tour stage myself going back to early nineties. I lead music street cred. The I was at Atlantic records at a time when a fax if anyone out there needs to Google that go for it. But a fax came in and said, we really need to have a meeting to corporate. You know, we need to have a meeting about this thing called Napster and my boss at the time was like euchre up that up. I'm not interested. So there's that I'm going to run out just for a second. But when we were in the office the other day, just our associate producer and radio in turn said, hey, did you get anything done back like in the days a fair question? And I was like that is a great question. And I had to explain to the team what remember periodical research that book you would go to the library and take that out X card and look up and you'd get microfiche. I have explained to them. What I sounded. Like, I was one hundred. But I think we had more hours in the day because we were not attached to our mobile devices. I think there were just more hours. No way that we were doing things. So maybe we got more done. I don't know, Dan. What did you do in the in your old life and my old life? I was I was in finance. I worked on a trading desk. And I traded international equities was a very exciting time with their from nineteen ninety six until two thousand and eight when I left the city and I worked with a group a team for the same team for about ten years straight. So it was really it was a great time in my life. I look back on it. Very Finally, I remember when I was doing it felt very high pressured and all that good stuff. But I feel like now is definitely more high. Pressured owning a business winning my own business, and there are days when I kind of crave the lifestyle of working for someone else, and you know, getting that guaranteed paycheck and the routine of it same every now. And then I'm like, what was I thinking when leave those job. But ultimately in we'll get to this. It's more rewarding. Yes. Yeah. How many kids do each have funny? So I let you go first. Overachievers? So I have two children and I married a man with four children. So we together have six three girls and three boys, but I gave birth to two girls there now nine and eleven and I four steps so it's Brady bunch. Yeah. They're seven to sixteen years old, no pressure at all. And I have thirteen year old son and eleven year old boy, girl twins, and that actually can bring us right to how Julie and I met which was at a birthday party that our daughters were seated next to one another we didn't know each other. They didn't know each other. And we kind of struck up a conversation. You know, the way it worked is the kids are sitting at a table. They've had an activity and now they're having some pizza and the moms are sort of corralled around on the outside, and it's kind of like a bar scene. Right. You're you're looking for someone to talk to. Awkward actually, when you think about the kids are eating piece in the moms or just standing there, didn't you? Yeah. I don't know what I'm doing. So he struck up accommodation, and it was very natural. Yeah. We we were I was actually asking her how to get my child to eat the pizza. I'm like, look how delicious that looks. Why won't she eat it? So we started talking about food, and my gut immediately was I like this person. We're not friends she seems to be so kind and so present. Wow. Maybe she'll work with me. It was my immediate thought was we could work together. Because like I said at the time when you look back we had had careers, which I didn't I didn't know anything about her yet. But we'd both had careers. We had both given them up to raise our children, and then were in the suburbs. Kind of we didn't know that we were both looking around and seeking but we were both seeking. And so I asked her to have lunch to talk about an idea that I had had for hobby. That that terrible word hobby. So when you left your jobs in the city and moved out to the suburbs was was it hard. I mean, did you that was a big piece of your identity that you were leaving behind? It was terrifying. Also, exciting I don't know that I understood the support that I was going to need to do that. And what kind of kind of emotional trauma? It was going to have on me. Because now all of a sudden I was looking to my children into my husband to kind of give me more than they really should. I don't know if that sounds kind of appropriate, but I really didn't understand the value of exercising. My brain in that way. But in the time, I thought what a joy I've been working since I'm seventeen what a what a wonderful blessing to be able to stop working. And I saw it as an opportunity and something honestly to try on. Right. Like, I I can always shift, and ultimately it will get to how I shifted. But the yeah, I had I had a difficult time with it. I did not anticipate those feelings I was very excited about my new venture might, you know, leaving the city and moving into a home and being part of a new community. I really felt like I was not part of a community when I was in New York, which is one of the benefits of being in New York, but especially with young children because I was a working parent. I really had very little connection and very little community sense. So I was looking for to the opportunity to be part of a community and to make some real friends, and I had felt like since college. I really, you know, outside of my colleagues, I didn't have a big social existence. I think it also changed for me when I had my second daughter, not that it would have been different because it isn't for Dana. She has two sons and a daughter but for me as a stay at home mom with two daughters. I felt oh my gosh. What am I gonna do? Now. What do I show them? How do I show them? How? How to be everything right? There was this real weight to that job. The job of parenting. I wasn't prepared for either. You know, there's this paradigm of you're in the city, and you have a decent job, and you get married, and then you have children, and there's this real domino effect that very few of us. Really stop. And think is that what I want right like. And so by the time I had had both of my daughters and thank goodness. I really was very reflective and very it was a really personal moment of now. What now that was all going on inside of my head when I met Dana. And I think it was just kind of our people say the shared, but like very meant to be that I met someone, you know, in a similar state nam just kind of looking around and at the time when I met teen is said, do you do you work, do you? And she's like, well, I'm I'm gonna say I'm thinking about selling new skin, and I looked at her. And I was like, oh, well, okay. Well, I know. About that. And that's extraordinarily successful. In. Actually our joke. Is you might have made a lot more. I'm back interrupt that path. But I thought why don't we create something instead of join something that already exists? How would you feel about creating something? Sorry to jump ahead of an your first business was born. Yes, tell us about the first business oats granola. It was born in two thousand and ten pretty shortly after we met. We Julie came to me and said Julie had done them traveling and she came back from her trip. And she said, oh, I had the most delicious granola when I was on vacation sounded like it was. So I can't tell you. That's top secret. No. Because you know, I I was on the west coast, which I'm very attached to just the beauty of the northern west coast. Look like California girl to do gold. Goldline whole met. No, I'm like Jewish from Long Island. Nobody's ever said that. That's the funny where where are you from? And then the people next me go really you had to ask. Well, thanks. So no I had. I was like, oh, look there's this. I thought there was this white space in giftable high end beautiful granola like the Bergdorf of granola. So I pitched that to Dana. Well, I I I I care. I I said I need to try it. Right. I'm not going to endorse something or get behind something that I don't enjoy. So the first batch was made, and it was really delicious, really really religious. In fact, it's still exist. So the granola was great. It was really really good good. And I was so happy to not only endorse it, but you know, be a part of it. So we and Dana was a we more weed Bish more popular than I was. And I don't mean that in any kind of I think it's because I had an older child. I had I was we were in school age by that time with him. And Julia was just you know. Nicer than me. But but I think. I think Dana is just a beautiful person. And she had a network of people. So the first call of business was like, hey deny, you know, a lot more people than I do all jokes aside. I was like can you can you see if people like this? And so media, we had this great reaction from Dina's bribes. Just about how delicious it was. We thought okay, maybe we had something. So I went to the local far market in Westport, we should Florida. We're gonna be hotel twenty twenty but we went to the local market and the gentleman. There are said great. I'll take a few cases. What's the name of the company, and how much is it and I called in? And I was like what's a case. What does he mean? By a case. What is that? We had to use the Google. We had to use the Google, and what's next crazy? What are we going to have like one of those cottage industry licenses something? Yeah. No. We had nothing. We were making it entertaining about. No. It was just doing doing. Okay. We are buying the ingredients gloves retail it. Right. We were we're making everything in her kitchen. Yeah. Exactly. We are buying the most expensive Honey they had. And we wanted it to be delicious. That was what we were seeing. But we've really really fell into it. And then all of a sudden, I mean, we'll fast forward a bit. But we just realized that we had this great working relationship. Like who? I mean we cared about granola. But in a way, like in a way, it was this dynamic friendship that was being born and people would say to us. Oh, you don't. I do this voice. It's terrible. I didn't do it for the people. But it's like, you know, you work with your friend. He can't work for their friend. And I'm like, she's not my friend. We just met. And I think there is this real birth of just two women that had this crazy appetite for work. So here we were with like, no idea. What the case was. I mean, we we have to enter crazy passion for food that I think neither one of us had really tapped into you know, like we were both in different industries, and we like to go out to eat. But we had like a real passion for food and culturally, we realized that we both lived in home. Uh-huh. Growing up that used food to sue comfort used food to comfort and we had similar grandma's. We came to understand that like had seven proteins on Friday night dinner who needs seven proteins into. Where did you grow up? I've up in Connecticut at Klay, so okay. I'm going the fast forward you. So don't politics. This may holidays about everything. We're working on that. Now, I just say I'm sorry. A million workshop. Over apologizing. There could be we should probably do that at cherry bomb university. Yes. Yeah. This this is just just tell us what you learned the big thing that I learned is that never say sorry. We'll say sorry. If you need to say sorry, obviously, don't say sorry, say thank you. Thank you for letting me collect my I say both. That's good. Thank you. It's too late for me. Just going to have to reprogram there's hope for you, just but there's no hope for me. Yeah. There's definitely hope for you. It's good to because I think saying thank you keeps things positive. So it's like this is a problem. Thank you. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. Jess. All right. And you I'm sorry. Thank you for saying, you're sorry. And I'm sorry. So. We're going gonna leap forward. So there's a huge difference between your cottage granola illegal cottage granola and stop it. Harasses opening your first retail as us to get there. Yeah. We have to go to nothing. I want you to get there. But it's just such a leap. How did you make that lease leap? It's a huge leap. So and it deals with you know, a lot right? So during this time, we were kind of making ends meet with this criminal company. It was wholesale. It was very difficult. We didn't know what we were doing. And even apparently if you do it's very difficult to the it's it's a tough tough business. And it's a very our particular item granola with, you know, a crowded a crowded space, you go to whole foods and there's thirty two different local granola. So it wasn't like we had this unique product that you know, we could get into every whole foods in the country. And even if we could we weren't sure we wanted to because if you multiply a million bag. Eggs by zero profit you have zero. And man, I was not like people the people people said, oh, it's a volume business. And I was like not if you keep multiplying it by zero. It's not interesting. And so we we had a mentor at actually Dan in. And they had opened a concept store in the city that we found very interesting. We're making bulk or Nola for them and someone at that store said to us they worked for Dan and corporate what if you turned your manufacturing around? What if you at your home town of Westport, Connecticut that you basically, you know, opened up kind of a manufacturing facilities. So that you took back all of that contract manufacturing. You know profit that you were giving giving away we went to look at space in Westport our hometown, we found a space, and that made sense to you as a concept, you set a light bulb L know what? Well, not not not initially. I think it was more that we could do the manufacturing. And he, you know, he also suggested well, you could have like. A little cafe out front. And when we were being reflective of how we ate in our lifestyle. And we were we were entrepreneurs we didn't have an office. We didn't have a headquarters so we are kind of bouncing around, and we would often work out of one of our homes, and we would make ourselves keen wa bowls or avocado toast or egg bowls. And we really were being reflective. We thought well, you know, there's not really a place in our town where we can eat like this. We struggle. We struggle to eat out the way that we want to eat and on the human side of it, which obviously the food is. But on the hospitality side, both Dana. And I were looking for a joyous connected place to be which you know, being in the wing actually, kind of feels like that when you're in the suburbs. There is a real kind of availability to create something like that as suburban women at the time. There was no place. We could go and kind. Feel happier leaving than when we came in. And for Dana night. We we knew that people like us would want to feel connected. We were going to the same places every day for years and eating lunch and breaking twenty to eat lunch. And we still didn't get I contact or. Hey, julie. How are you? Or there was really nothing there. And we missed that about the city like my local, my Louis energy and having kind of come out of the music business. I I was so passionate about brand. So all of these things kind of converged being also in a tough place. Personally. I was looking for a place to kind of an outlet an outlet and a place to call home that was beautiful and surrounding myself with joyous happy people. And so when this gentleman it, Dan and said to us, hey, you can have a front of house. We looked each other. We're like what's a front of house? Very reminiscent of what's a case. You know, what's a front of house? We don't we don't know what that is. We've only ever. Ordered in. And here we were attempting to kind of make granola in the back and have a front of house, whatever that meant in the front. So we sat down at my kitchen with all of these ideas, both about brand and connectedness and joy and food being the vessel right for the joy. And we wrote a menu absolutely without clue how that would translate to a restaurant, and we we were in denial that it was actually a restaurant for quite some time. Even open say, oh, we have a little cafe someone would say, you know, that's the restaurant. Yeah. Yeah. At any point. Did you hire consultants? No sorry. Thank you know, we hired a chef to help with our menu. Just because we were we didn't know what we were doing. We had an idea that you shouldn't have one item with like roasted peppers on it. Right. We had an idea that that sounded like a bad idea. And we knew we wanted to make money, right? That was the differences. We had gone. Into this. Hobby of granola kind of as stay at home. Moms all of a sudden, we were turning into business women, and we were like, you know, what nothing's going to be multiplied by zero anymore because that just doesn't work and as apologetic in a way as we wanted to be about Mayhew any. Yes, we, you know, we we decided we'll wait. We need to ask somebody had a write a menu where this can be profitable menu. But a business plan. Yeah. We got some help we got a pro forma to look at and thank goodness. And then that's it though. We what does that mean? A pro forma. It's. The assumptions you're making about your business that was like a budget and or PNL so you're just making a sumptuous. He's a difference between that and the business plan. You would have a performance tonight. You know side if someone wants to Email or comment and tell me that I'm wrong. That's totally her scene. Still has not written business plan. But I'm going to right? So so a pro forma would look like your year, you'd say, okay. One hundred people are gonna walk in between these hours they're going to spend this many dollars. Then we have all of these expenses below. What is our EBA the end of the day our net income, right? So it's it was very it was over our heads. But at the same time, not really we were businesswomen before, you know. And here we here we went. And so we we signed a lease. But, but we should we should you know, injured you contribute to the story here that right before we signed the lease. We had a I don't I don't know if you want to call it a say that we haven't omen. No. We had. No, we had actually I don't know. What it? Yes. Had a complete film in Louise's panic attack. It would be like at the end of a movie if fell Thelma and Louise stopped before they went off the cliff and looked at each other. And then looked at the camera and said, we we're not going to do they want to do. Now. I don't know. Actually, I'm good you good. I'm good. So we called everyone. We're like, we're just kidding. We call it the architects, we're bigger we called everybody. We're heading at least we're we're not happened, actually. Sorry. Sorry. We thought that would know. And then we drove to the beach. We have a lovely little water Fronton in Westport, it's beautiful, and we sat there, and we had cried both of us individually for days and were not ashamed to say, it, we grieved the idea that we had just dissolved Dana looked at me. And she said, I'm going to be you know, I'm going to be more sad that we didn't do it. And we've then got back in the car, and you know, when like you get back in the car and the cliff Thelma Louise, and like you don't have that. Runway to fly the car, and you're just push the gas in it falls. Yeah. That was as we just got back in the car and hit the gas. And it was like. Okay. So here we went and was almost five years ago. Are we have our fifth anniversary coming up December seven it's no longer, you know, a wing and a prayer when you really dive into math. This is an algorithm. Right. Not to take the romance out of it. But you know, how to get to those numbers is all about the hospitality on the warmth. And the the happiness that we serve, and that's really what we're serving is is happiness. But once we realized that we could figure out this algorithm than we knew we could open more stores than they would they would work. We're going to take a short break, and we'll be right back with Julian Dana after this word from our sponsors. Does this happen to you? You need a dozen eggs, you go to the supermarket you head to the section, and you are so confused by what you find. There you freeze you want. Nice eggs on hand because maybe wanna cheese and herb omelet for dinner or you want to poach an egg to slip on your ova, KADO toast, and you know, quality eggs, make a big difference. And you're a decent person. So it's important that chickens have a good life. But as you stand there, you think to yourself I have no idea what all these words on the Ed cartons. So you shrug pick one and continue shopping stop right there. You are a busy lady. You don't need this book in your life. You need bull free eggs, which is where vital farms pasteurized eggs. Come in there. Pessaries hens Rome outside in one hundred eight square feet of space per hen, those cage free hens, they never go outside. I tasted the difference. Once I tried vital farms X try for. For yourself to get your coupon for vital farms, pasteurized eggs, head to vital farms dot com. Backslash cherry bomb. It's time for our Bob's red mill minute with all this granola talk my associate producer Jusin. I got to talking about the different types of Bob's red. Mill granola is out there, isn't that? Right. Just we sure did carry did. You know, the Bob's red. Mill has nine different types of delicious granola nine types. That's a lot of granola. I don't think there's such a thing as too much granola of the nine which one would you be just I think I would be the Honey almond granola. Not only do. I love having nuts in my granola. But I love anything with Honey food lotion, drink, whatever you name it. Plus the Bob's red mill Honey almond granola has a hint of vanilla in it which adds a little something extra. And I often feel a little extra myself. How about you carry which Bob's red mill granola? Would you be you know, the answer? Just I would be the classic granola. Come on Cary. That's boring. You gotta choose again. Well, come on just you know, I'm boring. All right, fine. I'll be the apple blueberry granola because it has dried up. In it, which I love and it's fall, I'm because it's lightly sweetened, which is very important to me when it comes to breakfast. I don't really like super sweet breakfasts when I was a kid. I literally eight like sugar smacks breakfast every day, and these days, my tastes are really different. You know what I do love for breakfast? Just what Kerry I love making granola Parfait with some yogurt some fresh berries. And some Bob's red mill granola. Ooh. That sounds really good. Maybe I'll get some. So we can make that a cherry bomb HQ this week. That's not a bad idea. And if you order Bob's red mill dot com, be sure to use the code cherry bomb twenty-five at checkout for twenty five percent off your order. What a deal. I've so many questions for you. So what are some things you've learned as business owners over the past few years that you just didn't know I think that at the beginning Dana, and I were focused on top line top line top line. And then we realized hotline meaning I'm sorry revenue revenue coming in the door. Right. And then we realized know, thank you. Sure. Sorry. Then we realized you know, it's it's bottom line game. Right. It's if if you make the just using round numbers a million dollars a year, and you spend nine hundred ninety nine thousand it just didn't matter. So I think becoming really focused on the bottom line has been a big dynamic change for us as business owners. And I would say another lesson that we learned is to grow your business doesn't mean you have to open another ten stores, necessarily, you can grow your business from within you have a platform, and you have the arena where you can have new products. You can have we started selling our salad dressings, and you know, all of these things increase, our our top line as Julie mentioned, which is also very good, and very helpful. But also bringing new people in and you know, we when we first opened a location, we tend to be very busy at lunch and breakfast is kind of the afterthought or we have to it's hard to change people's routines in the morning. Oh, a matter of like capturing a breakfast crowd to fill our left busy hours. So all of these things are expansion of the business without actually opening more stores. Yeah. And then I think the human element of everyone says isn't hiring the hardest. He know isn't the turnover we have over ninety employees or so now, and you know, I think for us really structuring things has been very important. Would we expect out of a GM, and we're still working on it every time we think we have it? We're not afraid to say, you know, what it isn't. Right. It isn't right yet. We definitely run our business as women that has been a very challenging thing for Danai to embrace. Tell me what that means. It means it took us five years to take CEO titles to accompany that we founded and own think that I don't know what it took us a while to find our voices and then. To find the at least for me. I don't want to speak for you. Although I love doing it. But you know, I think ninety percent of the time. It's okay. Okay. This could be the ten, but I think for us I had to come to terms with what I wasn't good at and then hire appropriately around me to support that to hire people that were more powerful than I was in so many different ways and understanding that I'm not graded XYZ. I'm not going to tell you what that is obviously. But really understanding that and harnessing that you know, we run our business really caring about the people now, whether that's female or I can't sit here in define that. But we are moms we are female, and we do right. We nurture people. They have to do things. Horribly horribly wrong for us to really get to that level of like, okay, we're we're done, and we don't necessarily always do that. Brilliantly. But this is our first time running a business. So we'll just have to write the book about it in reflect. Then are you big enough to have someone doing HR? We outsource our HR. Could I was just going to add to Julie sentiment that you know, we it's very hard. I think when you're in the thick of things to be reflective, and it's very challenging to admit when something isn't working and saying, you know, what we need to change here we need to do something. And so it's not really different from what Julie saying, but it's more adding onto it that that has been a challenge, you kind of say, okay. This is the plan this we're going to execute it. This is how it's gonna work. And then it doesn't go as planned, and you have to kind of change course. And sometimes that can be very challenging if you work with us with you just know that this is us learning as we go, and we're very transparent about I haven't done this before. So we're very authentic. We believe in. If we run our business that way then. When you come into the granola VAR, you're going to feel that kind of genuine. There's almost like a naive attache around. It of like, we're just here to make you happy and outside of that we want to run our business in a very I don't wanna say vulnerable. But it it's almost vulnerable that we look like we don't know does can someone help. So how have you educated yourselves over the past few years? Have you had other mentors? Have you bought business books domination of those things? But a lot of it is we we've just learned as as you know, I our trial and error. And I know that for me there are times when I'm feeling very aggravated. And and kind of disenchanted from the whole process said, then I'll spend an afternoon in one of our stores, and I'll say, I get it. I know why we're doing this. It's so the day today is so challenging you know, yesterday we had our one year anniversary and ri- and. We were in the store and a woman pulled us aside. And she said are you one of the owners, and I said, yes. And she said, I just have to tell you. And I thought oh boy. Here we go. You never know never know the owner, your heart. Yeah. I heart heart. He totally. She said did he know as? She said this place is so wonderful and was so needed. And I didn't know that we needed it. Now that it's here. I don't know what I would do without it, and I used to drive to your Greenwich location, and then what's your Armonk location? I couldn't wait for you to open in ri-. And I just want to tell you that you guys are doing such a wonderful job. And I just love it here. And you just need to hear that a couple times a week. And you feel better about what you're doing because it can get lost. Yeah. I think in terms of educating ourselves we've in the last two years met some great people like yourself, and we went to that restaurant conference. We've we've really been in a bunker of work from two thousand thirteen to really two thousand seventeen and we did not come out to say Hello. There has been a really pretty sizeable shift. Just kind of having that great corporate crew that can hold things down a bit. We we say it's the difference between working in our business and on our business. So we've. I tried to take that elevation to maybe a thousand feet and come out and meet wonderful people. We've met Alice Elliott and we've met sandy bell. And we've met people that have really sat with us and helped us even a meeting investors in people that can tell us where we are on this happy because. While we you know, we think of ourselves now as a restaurant like we have committed to that. But we do things not traditionally and we're aware of that. And I think we'll continue to but Dina Meyer, just realizing that, you know, coming out of the the work is likely very important for our business, but we have not had really a single mentor. We really have learned this through work and making mistakes and looking around and saying, I'm I'm sorry. We we didn't know we haven't done this perfectly for shar. We've we've probably offended some people. We've probably heard some people we've probably, you know, made a bad bacon egg and cheese every now and again, but that's how we learn. And again, hiring people that have been in the business. I wanna talk about money. That's a very important thing to the bone. Yeah. And investment did you put all your own money into this? Or did you take loans out you have investors? We started off by putting our own money in. So our first two locations was Julian I and then we took on some outside money at the beginning of two thousand seventeen in that helped with our rapid expansion over. So what has she our investors versus a Bank loan? That's correct. Okay. It's an interesting subplot that we have not been able to get any loans from anyone who tried multiple times. Yeah. Yeah. It's been interesting. You know, good for the ego. Not good for the heat and go not good for the feels. But we understand restaurants are very high risk. So, you know, we appreciated what we got when we got it because it was very high risk still, you know there. There are still even restaurant investors that are scared of investing in restaurants. So it's also it's also been kind of a tumultuous time in the space. So I think that doesn't help our case. Yeah. But but we've done very well with what we've been been given. And we're very appreciative. Because you know, when we first set out to open the granola bar Westport. We did go go in our town and try to raise some capital. But it really looked quite scary. Especially when you know, we are still present in our families lives. We are not, you know, putting hard hard lines down. And so it's been difficult. So how did you wind up at the finance? Inference that we did with Tremaine Alice. Elliot L got to see him by we those. There's we're going a conference next week in the city. And I mean, we always learn so much where we walk away. So inspired. And there's nothing like hearing from other founders, and you know, the the camaraderie of the highs and the lows and everything in between. It's so good. It's really good for the soul. Yeah. And we're still we're still a very small company, and where able to hit it, and that's really exciting. Once you have twenty thirty stores. It's very hard to make little moves or big ones. But I think for us, you know, staying here for awhile feels really comfortable kind of just like Dana said growing, our brand and growing our company just from within this footprint feels much more authentic than, you know, building more stores right now not feels that feels really good. So you have salad dressing granola. We have we have some really delicious granola bars as our that Renault, lavar, we have a paleo line of baked goods as well. Which is quite popular. We have muffins and paleo cookies we're going to be working on kind of our interior consumer goods line that we can sell inside of our stores were always expanding. We've a wonderful executive chef Neal. He's always thinking about awesome, delicious items, and it's really working with him. That also takes the, you know, the seed of ideas that Dana, and I have that we feel the market loves, and he kind of expands on that. So yeah, we had last week. We said oh, be great. If we had some ice cream and the next day, there's an avocado lemon zest ice cream coming out of our our was like a lights out to us crying over it. Yeah. So it's really nice. But yeah, we've got this. We've got a commissary in our in our Westport store that has all this licenses and does no longer. Out of our home. Does make thousands of granola bars a month and packaged granola after bring the truck to the wing. I know we should bring the tuck to do you have a truck we do like a food truck. Yeah. Oh, I've wouldn't Harry. Why wouldn't we do that? Right. So sue kind of have seven located. Yeah. Exactly, exactly. We threw that in during the crazy year. God. Well, you to are mazing we could keep talking. We're. Jason. Jason I wouldn't know how you take care of yourselves because I'm doing such a shit job right now taking care of myself to slowing your way your windows allow because I ran here from canteen hopped on the subway, and it was like partially raining and the way he's do do. We might be literally doing she actually we take care smell so good. Let's melting often to the wing, and I hugged junior smelled so good. But I don't tell you which one. Okay. Okay. I do like that brand. Yeah. And I use Malan and gets the the the role lied because I love those. We actually smell it from the fear and the angst of our world. So we have to cover that up on the cover up, wouldn't you citing? Yeah. Yeah. We do many feeler or there's all kinds of cover their under. I conceal her. There's fragrance those highlights highlights single process. Good highlights. Thank you a little boats. I'm going tomorrow. So you don't have to. Say anything you two are amazing. You to really are the bomb. Thank you. Thank you for having us, a huge. Thank you to Jillian Dana. I had an absolute blast recording this episode with them at the wing and Dumbo, and I can't wait to see what they do next. If you're ever in Connecticut or the West Chester area, be sure to visit the granola bar and tell them you're part of the bomb squad. Thank you to our sponsors vital farms. Pasteurized eggs. Bob's red mill and Likud on blue culinary school. Thank you to our associate producer and resident riot girl. Just Zeidman and to the ban Challah for our theme song as I mentioned at the beginning of the episode cherry bomb university starts tomorrow, we're kicking off this weekend long event with a talk by Martha Stewart, and Christina Tosi who will both be receiving honorary doctorates we're giving our first ever humanitarian award to Justin Rodriguez of hot bread kitchen. Tickets can be found at cherry bomb dot com. I can't wait to see all of you smart, cookies and class and compare notes after radio cherry bomb is a joint production of cherry. Magazine and the heritage radio network. Thanks for listening everyone. You're the bomb. I'll have what she's having my name is Emily Abramson. And I'm the administrative assistant at Smith canteen. And do you know who I think is the bone Hannah Spiegelman of sweet history because she makes ice creams inspired by history. Thanks for listening to heritage radio network food radio supported by you for a freshest content and to hear about exclusive events subscribe to our newsletter. Enter your Email at the bottom of our website, heritage radio network dot org. Connect with us on Facebook Instagram and Twitter at heritage underscore radio. Heritage radio network is a nonprofit organization driving conversations to make the world. A better fairer more delicious place, and we couldn't do it without support from listeners like you wanna be a part of the food world's most innovative community rate. The shows you like tell your friends and please join our community by becoming a member. Just click on the beating heart at the top right of our homepage. Thanks for listening.

Julian Dana Westport Julie Bob Connecticut Likud Dina Meyer Dan cherry bomb university producer Google Westchester Thelma Louise Dana CEO Jen Pelata Dumbo Instagram Teheran Legrand
Episode 178: Put It in Your Bag and Pipe It!

Radio Cherry Bombe

46:09 min | 2 years ago

Episode 178: Put It in Your Bag and Pipe It!

"You're listening to heritage radio network. Were member supported food radio network broadcasting over thirty five weekly shows live from Bushwick Brooklyn. Join our hosts as a lead you through the world of craft brewing behind the scenes of the restaurant industry inside the battle over school food and beyond. Find us at heritage radio network, dot org. Hi, everybody. You're listening to radio cherry bomb, and I'm your host, carry diamond each week. We bring the pages of cherry bomb magazine to life through conversations with the most inspiring women in and around the world of food. I, let's thank our sponsors Likud on blue. If your daydreaming about culinary school, maybe it's time to say, bomb jour to Likud on blue, learn more about the legendary culinary school's. Most prestigious professional qualification Legrand diploma by visiting court on blue dot EDU. And let's thank vital farms. Pasteurized eggs, vital farms. Pasteurized eggs are better than cage free. They are. You know it both free try for yourself to get your coupon for vital farms. Pasteurized eggs, head to vital farms dot com. Backslash cherry bomb and Bob's red mill. Bob's red mill is an employee owned company that's been offering organic gluten free and stone ground products for decades. You know, with Bob's red mill, you're not just getting quality. You're getting flavor, packed food that tastes amazing. Go to Bob's red mill dot com and use the code cherry bomb twenty five for twenty five percent off at checkout. That's cherry bomb. Twenty five cherry bomb university is two weeks away. The special weekend is taking place Friday, October twenty. Sixth through Sunday, October twenty. Seventh at the food and finance high school in Manhattan. Ticket prices started fifty dollars. So be sure to check it out at cherry bomb dot com. We have so many amazing professors teaching classes and giving lectures, including so many of your favorites Athena Calderon Alison, Roman, Jenny Britain. Bauer of ice cream, fame, salty Seattle of that amazing pasta the vegetable butcher on and on. We've even got a class on how to get a cookbook deal with author. Kalou Henry w m e agent Andy macnichol, and Doris Cooper of Clarkson Potter and remember when gen Pella of the Ridler champagne bar did that great episode with us about raising money? Well, she's teaching class on ready raising money. You don't want to miss that again, check out Terry bomb dot com for tickets, class schedule and more enroll now in cherry bomb university. Today's guest is someone very special to the bomb squad. It's Lindsey sung who is better known to her tens of thousands of fans as cocoa cake land. She's a cake artist who makes so many people smile with her door. -able animal cakes and gorgeous Lee piped Buttercream, flowers and borders all done in her signature bright pastels. But Lindsay sometimes uses her cakes and subversive ways, whether it's to promote feminism, fight sexism or in a series that was incredibly personal, connect with our audience during her treatment for breast cancer. Lindsay is based in Vancouver, but she was visiting New York recently to promote her very first cookbook. Cocoa cake land. Cute and pretty party cakes to bake and decorate. We recorded this interview with Lindsay at the wing in Dumbo, Brooklyn. I hope you enjoy our conversation as much as I did. We'll be right back with Lindsay after this word from Likud on blue. Are you daydreaming about culinary school? Again, make this the year, your dreams become reality with the court on blue, the legendary culinary school study classic French culinary techniques in cuisine, and patisserie as part of their exclusive nine month, Legrand diploma and graduate into a world of opportunity. You also can extend your course of studies to include culinary management and dedicated internships. Likud on blue has locations in more than twenty countries around the world and located within some of the best food cities out their London, Ottawa, Madrid, Bangkok, Tokyo. And of course, the spiritual home of cuisine and Likud on blue Harris, turning your daydreams into reality is closer than ever visit court on blue dot EDU for more and let your culinary adventure begin. Lindsay song. I can't believe me diamond. I can't believe I'm in the same room with you. This is surreal for me too. So this is awesome. Thanks for having me. You are more than welcome. I forget how we I fell in love with you. Probably Instagram like so much today. You know, I think it might have been Yahoo Danes. Oh, k. hey, the day the day shoutout to Donnie yen and the Yahoo food team, y'all food forever. Rest in peace. But yet cake of the day actually cake the day, Michael down as my best idea ever. It was a good one. It wasn't really an original idea of mine, but I just love cake. And I was always so blown away by all the creativity in the cake world. I discovered lots of cool people through the day. So I think I think we all did. So I decided that every single day we would post a different cake and write about the maker and we quickly had our favorites. So every day, poor, Donna had to find a different cake from a different person. But we started to repeat people because we just loved like Linda low Malino. What does she bake under? Forget her name, but she just let me cupcake. We're okay calm. Which is funny because her cakes don't look like someone who calls themselves call me cupcake. They're like little darker. I think she's evolved now just like I have. Ten years of blogging your your work tends to change and shift. That's good. If you have all after ten years, I had a chance to interview her actually for my blog, and she has a very sort of dark and moody aesthetic, but she's actually really funny a really like her favorite movie is elf. I hope I didn't think my family watches elf every Christmas. She always had this like this almost gothi. It was almost like a gothi cake thing. So we fell in love with you because explain what cocoa cake land is cake land. It's my blog, and it sort of encompasses bright colors and fun, but also a lot of jokey nece and feminism and just personal expression. I guess it's a real sort of mix of my personality and the stuff that I like, I guess. And the this that that I that I sort of moved towards is very optimistic if I had to pick one word Ozzy. Pasi core. Yeah. Where'd you just say Pasi core is just like Ozzy court. What does Passi core. Positively. Oh, Pasi core. I didn't even know that we're years. Did you make that up? I'm not sure. Okay. Possible that. So like norm core and. Yeah. All that's okay. Got it. Senate God came out of mcneese days or you know. Oh, okay. Okay. That's super clear on that. Yeah, so, but I realized I really know absolutely nothing about you accept what like we've hung out a few times and you're really, you are on Malaya was just here two days ago? Yes. You on that dynamite panel. So actually I should start just asking questions and stop talking, but I'm so excited. I haven't seen Lindsey sung in like over a year, asked me whenever you started to fire off questions. Okay. Where were you born? I was born in Vancouver. BC Canada? Yep. And I grew up in a little suburb called bear to be and then moved back to Vancouver after college. So I've been in Vancouver since well born many years ago, and since two thousand I've been back there. So are you friends with Justin Trudeau where we're not acquainted? No. Have you met him. No. Now you're like one of the most famous Canadians to us like us. So that's a very, yeah, not nobody else knows about me. Seriously. When did you start baking? Not till I was like thirty years old. Yeah, I, I got a kitchen aid for a wedding present for my my, my grandma who rest in peace. And then after that, I sort of got obsessed with baking. Yeah, before that not not much, not much else. So what was your sort of like I dunno approach to food and cooking before that? Well, you know, growing up, I actually didn't really do much cooking or baking, or really experimenting as as a kid in the kitchen. But my my dad was in the fruit and vegetable business wholesale business. So we always had fresh fruit around didn't have tons of sweets. You know, like my mom would buy like seaweed gummy bears and like you know sesame? Yeah, seaweed gummy. Wow. Yeah. So you know, low sugar staff like a treat for us was like one Oreo wrapped up in plastic wrap, like once a week. In our lunch or something. So maybe I sorta just like ping pong off off of that and just kind of got obsessed with sugar. I don't know. I was like a wild little sugar animal child. I would have sugar snaps for breakfast like that should be. I think that's been outlawed in all fifty states. Now serving that to your child for breakfast out just has just wants to weigh in. Kids do not drink juice anymore. My mom had this picnic this weekend for her department. My mom's OBGYN OBGYN's have a lot of kids and there's all these kids at this picnic in my mom gets choosed boxes every year. This year, no juice juice boxes aren't real juice, but kids don't drink like any Jews. Kids only drink water, but we sell orange juice, fresh grease daily orange juice at the canteen. And I keep saying, let's just get rid of this, but people ordered all the time. For their kids for themselves guy doesn't drink juice. He's like, he's a water dude, and and milk. But times are changing. I think it's more about teeth erosion. May I have all my, it's a miracle. I have all my teeth. So the sugar smacks. I mean, honestly, the sugary the more sugary and we would like walk up to the street up to the street. We'd like walk up to this little storm when we were kids and spend all our allowance on candy bars and stuff like that. We were. I feel like we're wild animals compared to you and your household, Canadians, sugarless family. No, I definitely was into interested in sugar, but it just wasn't something that was a lot around a lot in our place who cooked in the family, my mom. And what what would you make? My mom loved this cookbook. It was like called the best of bridge, and it was this group of like, you know, white wealthy ladies who were, I guess, played bridge and they put out all these these cookbooks. Maybe I guess they got the idea went around a bridge table and yeah, so there's like recipes like Christmas morning, lifesaver and which is delicious. Wife saver. Yeah. Now. Varieties and but it actually has the best one. I mobile recipe the best year. The hell is over an Emo bar is like a Canadian desert hot. It's a, it's a bar. Tell us what's in the bar. It's like a custard with like sort of a coconut chocolate cocoa base and dark chocolate on top. I would add like a little bit of sea salt on there too. But yeah, if you like no bars best of breed, how'd you slow that an a. n. a. m. oh, okay. Oh, that's fun. I wish we would have made them for the events. Okay. Maybe there's time if anybody wants to make. Yeah, one of those bars, but those cookbooks sound amazing. I mean, they sound like relics actually looked up a a a photo of Australian. Okay. Yeah, just tweeted out ninety share it later. So so you really your mom cooked and that was it. And then I speak lettuce salads with Catalina dressing. And you know she, she did an awesome job though. Like she was a fulltime mom, twenty four, seven job with like three daughters by, you know, I was zero to enforce or my sisters and I were all two years apart. So yeah, she's cool eighty. Okay. So you went to college? I did. What did you study a call? I did a degree in women's studies and studies. Yeah, before it now got changed gender studies. Yeah. So I was in the nineties, and then I did a subsequent degree in integrated media at an art school as well doing like experimental film and video art and music, and that kind of stuff installation. So how would rightful degrees. With lots of job prospects. So how did you gravitate toward women's studies? What was were you in early feminist? I was going on. I was always a feminist, but I didn't have the the words or the critical thinking behind. Why felt that way? You know. And then a good friend of mine in university. She was taking a women's studies class, whereas like, oh, sounds cool. You know. So I jumped in the class and then I was like, yes, you know, just I did the did my whole degree in it. I was gonna do English, but then switched on over. So then what came next you graduated? Where did you? What were your first few jobs? Oh, I've had such a range of jobs. I like developed photos and like a photo lab. I, my first job was like bagging, groceries at grocery store, making fruit baskets. Yeah, I worked at the movie that your dad get you that job. He totally did. He. Yeah. Yeah. So I cranked my little turquoise, you know, ghetto blaster and and just being like this dingy basement making like fruit fruit baskets and with shiny ribbons and stuff. Yeah. So, and then what came next well in when I was in doing my art degree, I did a lot of tour and playing music, so I was playing in bands and stuff. You were any years? Yeah. What did you play? I played keyboards synthesizer and bass guitar and backup vocals. And yeah. Wow. I have no idea how I've seen a lot of America was I've, I've been to a lot of states because I've seen a lot of gas stations across America and and crappy clubs from touring would we know any of the band's probably not throw a few names out just for your fans? Radio. Berlin was the first band that I sort of did a lot of touring and it sort of like a post punk since new wave can a lot like Susie and banshee is the cure wire gang afford, kinda my God. I would have loved your band. I would've liked you my. Where are you kidding? My? I would've let you sleep on my floor. Yeah, so very cool. Throughout a few more names, pink mountaintops was another bound toured with came here a couple times, loved the names. And so you didn't continue down that path now still play today? I do yet, and I was like, okay, when I turned forty, I want to start a new band. So he Lindsay is going to be in the talent show. So one of the my another crazy dream is so many of the women in the bomb squad. Have these hidden musical talents and Jane lark worthy who've she filled in for me earlier this year. I guess when I was on the radio tour, she interviewed Kalou Henry who has that great cookbook back pocket pasta. And it turns out that they both love cabaret and there I listened to their show and I was just like dying laughing, and I was like, oh, we're going to do something called cabaret and cabernet. And then that just expanded because I just kept finding out about all these secret talents like. The two butchers from white gold or trained opera singers. Everybody's got all these things. I need to start writing them down though, because I'm going to forget, but we'll make sure the date works with your schedule. Okay. Before we plan. Jerry, I'm telling him also learning the drums so I could. I could. I can play like four beans. Good for you. So is that I had said to you before we started the show that I noticed you had tattoos, and I had never noticed that on you before. Are those from your music days? I guess so, yeah. And just being like a stupid kid. Yeah. Your wild days. Wild. Yeah, while days of youth. Okay. So fast forward, you get that kitchenaid. How does that translate into our? I'm going to start making like the cutest cakes the world has ever seen. Well, it actually started off with I'm gonna make the grossest cakes that the world is at Racine and they taste disgusting, but I'm gonna keep trying. So I'm guessing your partner was like, these are great. Honey, I can't remember. Maybe, I think, yeah, he would probably taste it and be like, oh, okay. But yeah. No, I just I actually the Martha Stewart baking handbook. I also I got that as a bridal shower gift, and I just baked my way through it and that's kind of how I taught myself to bake. Yeah. And then through that I started, it was tweak and recipes and like making cupcakes back in the cupcake craze for for people. I made it for my friend's wedding. And then from that it was like word of mouth. And then I also I love photography, but back then my by blog was had crappy like point and shoot Cameron, not the sweetest photos, but yeah, slamming photos up on my blog spot blog, which was I'd like the longest name ever. Yeah, then that just sort of slowly shifted and yeah, so mazing for people who are intimidated by baking, and there are a lot of people who say that they can't bake. But yeah, I think the nice thing about baking versus cooking if you separate them that way is if you can follow a recipe, you can come out with something. Good. Yeah. You just have to be committed to following the recipe and then I think like you baking through that whole book. I found this when we worked on the cherry bomb cookbook that I started to learn other cues that were beyond the recipe like literally like, you could hear when something was done, you could smell when something was done. Yeah. See when something I can smell when my cookies are ready to go ready to just chomp down on, you know, it just becomes like intuitive as you cook through that cookbook and we're becoming more comfortable like, what? What were you doing? What were you noticing that you just felt like more at ease you knew you kind of had this? Yeah, I think it's just practice. You know, like I do. I say this in the intro of my book like no baby is born knowing how to make a perfect pie crust. You know, like you, you just kind of practice and keep trying and tweaking it and tweaking recipes or or certifying out what you did wrong and trying again. And then you know if you keep trying, it's eventually I think you can make something pretty good. So how did the decorating aspect come in because they're. You could make cookies. You can make some brownies, but then you start to take it to the next level. Then I was like, okay, how do they? How do they make that look? So cool. You know, so clean like wires or no. Why aren't there like four hundred crumbs stuck to this outside? And why? Why is it not like two different heights of your? You know, how does it look level? How how do you? How do you do that? How do you make those pretty things that look like roses, you know, but piping tips? Yes. Playing with piping tips is a lot of fun. So I encourage people to do that. Just even piping like a simple border on a cake and like adding some sprinkles can just give it more more finished, look, you know, so. So then in terms of your aesthetic and how did that start to develop? How did you gravitate toward all these really wonderful. Yeah, pastel and bright colors. And these playful characters. Yeah. Well, as a kid, I loved drawing, so I was drawing all the time cartoons and like I loved Archie comics, and I loved like cute stuff like Hello kitty in San Rio and all those little Japanese kind of characters. And somehow my work has now sort of all these interest from the past of just like converged into this weird land called cocoa glance. You know. So cute animals from my past and and Buttercream piping feminism, like all this other stuff, able to like a weird little career doing. So, yeah, there was no sort of direct path to as you can have. You can tell from my meandering stories, how did the name cocoa cake lens come about cocoa cocoa keg? It was named after my old cat. Yes, Makoko loved her so much. Can be brought to tears. Just thinking about it right now to the past passed away in two thousand seven. But yeah, yeah, fresh, my cat Minka had her for sixteen years. I've dreams about her. Yeah, you don't realize how connected you are and how much they're they're through all of these formative things and breakup or deaths in the family. Or you know, they're, they're just there and and not not hearing them this sad, but pets now I don't own my son teddy just a child's keen key. Freddie wants a pet. Yeah, my pet child. What is what is teddy lobbying for either cat or dog. Yeah, leaning more towards dog at the moment. So how is teddy? How old is he? No, he is sexy just turned six years old. All these first grade? Yes. We call it grade one in Canada, but yeah, I grade great one. Has that going? It's going good. Yeah, he's a hilarious charming little guy, you know? And yeah, it's it's tough being a parent though. You know, I had no idea how I feel like I'm raising like, can I hope I'm raising you right? You know, I just want you to turn out to be like a kind good person, you know, and he's got like a good sense of humor and I have so much admiration for moms. I mean I to the point where I'm so angry when I'm on the subway. Now all the time. If I see pregnant women and people don't get up, if I see a mom struggling with a stroller, I like lose it. And I just think I can't speak for Canada, but I think America needs to be nicer to moms having moms have it easy. And I think everything is set to not make things success. Full for moms. It's like so many places don't have maternity leave. You basically carry the kid till it falls out of you, and then you have to go back to work when the in America is still so tiny. I mean, that's just I know that so hard. I can't imagine. Yeah, leaving having, you know to leave my my son, so young, you know, but but acute hoping it's all it's all going to change. I mean, I hope so just your generation, it's up to your generation to make a better. I'm sorry, my generation didn't do it for you. Anyway, tells about Canada and maternal carrots better up there. So I, I got like a year's maternity leave or pay, but then I. So I worked during my pregnancy mostly because I wanted to also get maternity leave, and then I, I'm a freelancer, so then I didn't go back to any, you know, place of work, but except for my home or my kitchen. But yeah. How long have you been self employed? Quite a few years. I guess I when I first started my my cake. Business. I was also teaching art to kids at the same time. So you know, doing both part time, and then I switched to just doing cakes, but then that got to depressing just working solitary on my own all the time. So I kind of went back to doing both. Yeah. We're going to take a little break for a word from our sponsors. Does this happen to you? You need a dozen eggs. You go to the supermarket. You had to the section and you are so confused by what you find there. You freeze. You want nice eggs on hand because maybe wanna cheese and herb omelet for dinner where you want to poach an egg to slip on your ova KADO toast, and you know quality eggs, make a big difference and you're a decent person. So it's important that chickens have a good life. But as you stand there, you think to yourself, I have no idea what all these words on the egg cartons mean. So you shrug pick one and continue shopping, stop right there. You are a busy lady. You don't need this book in your life. You need bull free eggs, which is where vital farms. Pasteurized eggs come in there. Pasteurize hens Rome outside in one hundred and eight square feet of space per hen. Those cage free hens. They never go outside. I tasted the difference once I tried vital farms x. try for your. Herself to get your coupon for vital farms. Pasteurized eggs, head to vital farms dot com. Backslash cherry bomb. Now it's time for our Bob's red mill minute. I'm here with Jess our assistant producer at radio cherry bomb. Just wants to say hi, hi everyone. And what are we talking about today? Make goods. Absolutely. We have a new baked good at Smith canteen my coffee shop and Carroll gardens Brooklyn. Now that the seasons have finally changed and fall is here. Gabby Figaro are Baker who many of you know in love debuted a buckwheat pair cake recessed with it at cherry bomb HQ. So obsessed first off, it's naturally gluten free because of the buckwheat flour. It's lightly sweetened with dates and coconut and the hint of pair ads. This beautiful, taste and texture. Bob's organic buckwheat flour is made from one hundred percent whole grain buckwheat growth. I'll confess I thought a growth was that guy from guardians of the galaxy, but just set me straight. Terry was talking about Groot not Grote anyway. Growths are the hold kernels of various cereal grains. Thank you win Kapadia despite the name buckwheat isn't related to weed and it is gluten free. If you've only ever baked with white flour, maybe now is the time to switch it up and try alternative flower. Bob's red mill has so many options. We should swing by Bob's red mill dot com and take a look. And if you purchase anything, be sure to use the cherry bomb twenty-five code at checkout four, twenty, five percents off your order. Bob's red mill. They're the best friend of every Baker. We know. So people always want to know how bloggers make a living. I know you get asked that question a lot. How do you do it? I don't make as much as other some other blogger pounds, but I think that might be because being in Canada, but yeah, you I just sort of wait for people to approach me actually. And I was talking to a blogger friend recently and she's like, no, you got to start reaching out and I'm like, well, I don't know how to. I don't know how to get these people's numbers or whatever. She's like, just Google. I was like, okay, well, I'll try it later, but I did work with an agency for a little bit, but it wasn't really for me. So I'm back just on my own, you know? Yeah, but getting some good work, who are sort of the folks who supported you, here's a chance, give Michelle. I'm I'm working with miss Jones Bates coming, which I guess we'll probably be out by the time this airs. But yeah, they're, they're really awesome. You loved them and I met them at jubilee actually a couple years ago. So miss Jones, they have these wonderful organic cake mixes and frostings, and they also have the sweat shirts that everyone. Is obsessed with yet. The Baker is going to bake yet sweatshirt that March is Stuart. Got got one when I when I was at jubilee a couple of years. Yeah, and the big mixes are awesome teddy, and I actually just made them like two weeks ago and my nephew loves them, Luke, Luke. If you're listening on Luke was actually on the show that miss Jones was on acute. So now he says that they're the only cakes hill bake. Yeah, so it's Mark kid, and then I just did a when I was in Seattle. I did a little Photoshop with Amazon home actually, which I met through jubilee as well. So anyone out there you should definitely come to you because you just meet cool people. You know, like meeting people in like face to face is so much better and more fun because you actually build relationships, you know, and they can see, you know that you're like a normal person and that was not a paid plug for jubilee just goes just my own on solicited. Actually, that reminds me we did that Amazon home dinner and that was the first time you and I ever met. Yeah. All memory. All right. So that's how you make a living as logger. Byu? Just kind of our chill about it and things like book deals help. Yes. Yeah. So you got, how did you get your book deal? So this is back in two twenty fourteen. I was wanting to do a book and I wanted to do a book a few times over the years and a few things you know came up, but it didn't quite work out. And then one of my good friends staff from food blog, I was talking to her. We hang out a lot. She's from Vancouver to and and she was like, oh, if you wanna do a book. Like do you have an agent? And I was like new. Real, go getter here. And then we're going to class at cherry university, what could we call it. Yes. So she introduced me to her agent and then the agent like me and stuff, then she wanted to work together. So yeah, I worked with what it is. You're so nice and so much fun that I think people just want to help you and like good energy is attracted to you. When Molly was here, we were talking about you. I was like, remember that that year you were all there. And I said it was Lindsay's first year at you believe. And I said she was just like the bell of the ball. Like when you look at Instagram after behind the scenes, I was like almost crappy my pants, but yeah, it was a lot of fun. It was so much fun. Honestly, it was like you were the start. There was a picture of you with everyone at jubilee. Like Instagram was was like the Lindsay sunk show. That's funny. Yeah, it was awesome. So your book is very specific in terms of how to actually bake and decorate cakes. It's like bright, colorful, fun book. It's about there's like thirty cake tutorials. So it's all designed based. And then you know you, right? The little head notes and stuff, and I had fun doing that and the intro, and and then there's base recipes in the back. Yeah, so all my favorite recipes. So tell us a few tricks and tips. I know it's a random question. We know if somebody was like, totally just your first time, decorating cake level, your cake layers. Like if it comes up with a little party dome, you just like either slice it off or if it's, you know, you can gently sort of press it down even with a piece of parchment paper and in Evan meant, don't burn yourself softly gently. You're petting this just pet it down and you can even level kick that way. I know what you use a serrated knife. Yeah. Tell us about the chrome coat the clubs, Kate, right. I actually just came up with Derm when I was in Seattle because I was doing the that thing with with Antonia. Amazon home, but so I was I was doing Crump coat, and I was I was talking about, you're trapping the crumbs in a crime prison. So chrome code is cuter. Okay. You're in. You're just kidding. Maybe something like something about, like I dunno, chrome sweater of a chrome. Yeah. So and then chill that. So you do your first layer each for like ten fifteen minute chrome sweaters a weezer song. Right? Never made it to the. Ellen, you bring it out and and then I, it's, it's all hard in like the the crumbs are trapped. So then you you, you do the next layer and you got a nice, frosted finish. Yeah. What's the basic way to start to learn how to do all those type piping and all? I mean, piping tips and piping banks, not really that expensive. You can buy them online or at your local kick decorating store. So just try with like an open star tip like a one m, for example, it's like an a multi-pronged tip. Put that on a piping bag and put it in your bag and pipe it as I say. And yeah, just try. You can try it on parchment paper. I to just test and squeeze and yeah, after practice, then you can move on to the cake and see how that goes. So when I was in my twenties, I loved decorating cakes and I don't know why stopped, but I did and I haven't done it since I'm dying to do it again, but I still have my original Martha by mail Caitlyn Meghan rates kid. And if anyone out there members Martha by mail, it was so mazing. We interviewed her for the cover story. She said that she actually regretted stopping Martha because the products are so nice. Oh, people now sell the Martha by mail catalogs on Oetzi and EBay, really like, yeah, fair amount of money. But yeah, I had a carrot cake recipe that I loved that was from the original Tate's Bake Shop in the Hamptons. I think it was called the Kathleen's back in the day. Do you have Tate's those chocolate chip cookies and Canada? They're kind of their semi famous here, but yeah, I had my little cake decorating kit in the head, my carrot cake recipe, and I would make like a Buttercream cream cheese frosting. 'cause it wasn't. I love butter. I like live for Buttercream. So this was like Buttercream, but not quite as aggressively. Sweet and I would decorate and I would use a little food coloring and I loved it so much. Nice one day. Carrot cake is actually one of my favorites too. I get it from my birthday even. Yeah, randomly cakes for people's birthdays and like that's that's one of the nicest things in the world to make cake Rizzoli birthday. Yes. Like getting to make Teddy's cake. Every year is like, you know, I'm thinking about that like six months in advance. Although he just recently told me he doesn't like cake anymore. Yeah, but I found out he'd actually doesn't like frosting. He actually likes cakes without too much frosting on it. So we moved to ice cream cakes this past birthday, was that a dagger to your heart or did you the? Yeah, it was a decker actually. But I'm going to, I'm going to try doing more sort of cute. Animal ice cream cakes. I'll try doing that for his birthday next year, but I think that's interesting because it moves you into a whole new territory. Yeah. Yeah. I'm actually I'm actually interested in doing more plant-based cakes and stuff. So that's sort of what I'm sort of moving towards personally to. I love that. Yeah. Yeah, that's I feel like so many of us in this community are are feeling that the the plant based people, you know, they want the cute cakes to, you know, but just developing recipes where it actually tastes good. Just really wanted to develop a really delicious vegan Buttercream. So I want you to develop a really speaking Buttercream that would be life changing. Excellent. All right. Let's talk about a few serious things. I know we've been like super joking. So I remember reading your blog, you know, always like funny and upbeat and the pictures, like just even some days I was just like, look at the pictures because it would make you so happy looking at them. And if you're having a crappy day and then one day I, it's a happy cake there, and I read the post and I'm like, oh my God, and you had been diagnosed with breast cancer and made the decision that you would share this with your community. So I still marvel at that whole period of your life and how you shared everything and not only did you share it, but you actually also did a whole project involving cake that I still think is really one of the most. I'm gonna make myself cry, but I feel like it was one of the most moving and important things I've ever seen like in the food world and. Just the way you used cake to convey a message about breast cancer. I just thought was astounding. So I think what you did was very important for the community and I just wanna. Thank you if no one's ever thank you for putting that out there, but can you walk us through how you decided to share that with everybody? You know, I didn't. I didn't really share initially and things. I was just processing at myself. So it took a while. I think it was just before I started treatment or just before I was about to get my surgery that I was like, I just decided to post one day and then the support really was helpful. You know, through all my treatment, like I was just getting letters and packages, and you know, just letters and packages of support in like brownies or like, you know, apothecary, creams, and stuff just from all over the world, you know, like people I'd never met so it was pretty bunkers, you know? And a lot of those people have become like good friends to, you know. And I think. I realized the value of the Instagram community, you know, like everybody, you know, can shit on Instagram and it can be a tough place for sure. Like trying to keep up or whatever. But I try to approach it now way more casually. You know, I'll post things that only when I have something I want. I want to say talk about her or just a picture I wanna post. But yeah, the community really made me feel supported and like they were actually my friends out there, you know. And I would just be like lying in bed like feeling really shitty and. You know posting something and then getting comments in just support. So it helped me because, you know, even though we consider you like one of our superstars, you're, you know, you're a private person like you chose to do a blog. You didn't put yourself out there and want to be like a TV personality or something like that. So was it a hard decision? I don't know. I mean, once I started it, I I, it became sort of almost therapeutic, so I just kept sharing. And then and then that the breast cancer cakes post that you're talking about that totally was like one of those wake up in the middle of the night ideas. And I was like, oh, I wanna. I wanna make something I don't know how I'm a Baker. You know, I want to do some sort of cake, but I did not sure how. And then that was an idea that woke me up, you know, and I, I wrote it down quickly and then had to make the next day, you know. So yeah. So we'll put a link to that on the show page, but that's still on your website yet. And then I think we excerpted part of it. I forget what issue that was. One of. Trayvon, thank you for letting us do that. That's still just, I've thought, like I said, just an incredible, incredible thing you did. How are you doing today? I think I'm healthy. I get checked up every six months and it's always super scary. But. I don't know. I I have moments of fear for sure, but it also I just it's sort of also taught me just to, you know, be with the people you wanna be with enjoy your time here and you know, do the do the best you can and you're so young to go through that and and a still a fairly new mom at the time was my son was two and a half. So he was a little guy, but I have an awesome family and tons of great friends. So yeah, they helped me. Then another series topping the whole metoo movement and what has been going on. You are a partner with us in the eighty six. This project when all that went down, I guess December in the food world, you know, little earlier for for media in Hollywood and those things, and we decided to do that special issue online about harassment eighty six. This, if any of our Eighty-six, this contributors were listening. I love that community of people. I mean, they just were so incredible. And just so quickly turned around essays an artwork and cakes and all these things. It was such a powerful package for anybody who just was kind of reeling at that time as so many of us were. But so most people did essays if you people did art work, and then we reached out to you and ask you to came because that's your medium. Yeah, you know, that's how you speak to people. I know I feel like people will come to my Instagram for the the colorful cute. And then they'll be a little bit. Fries. We'll be like, oh. So, yeah, I reeled them in with like the Kuei colorful faces and then and then gently just wash them over with when I'm really what I'm really like. But yeah, normalizing feminism, you know, that's just that's sort of what what I'd like to do normalizing gay rights, like everything. It's part of a my normal everyday life. And even in my book like I'll talk about it, not casually, but like insert a little something like I've got a rainbow kick in there and it's like, oh, great, first birthday party or a coming out or like a wedding, you know. So yeah, that's great. I mean, cake is a medium everyone loves. Yeah. So to be able to to be occasionally subversive, I think is amazing. Look at it that way. So tell us, where else are you going on? This tour you hit Seattle? Yep, you're in Brooklyn. Why? I hope to make it to l. a. I haven't made plans to do that yet, but that's, that's where I'd I'd love to go. So if anyone wants to sponsor me there, I would be very stoked and yeah, and then I'm doing a like a cake decorating class in Becan Vancouver as well. Oh, fun in November. Good, good. So you're heading back to Vancouver. Your your book tour is going to be over soon. What is next for you? Well, I'm actually want to work on a couple new proposals for books. So one of them is was inspired by. I saw this YouTube video a couple of weeks ago of this Australian women's weekly, the woman who sort of put together the birthday cake books for kids spoke. I don't know if you're familiar with that book. I'll send you the link. The documentary was all about how that book came to be and how all these children remember as adults that book, you know. So I was like, oh, I would love to make a book like that. But like with just animal cakes for kids. So. It's like one of my ideas. And then another idea is more sort of a conceptual cakes kind of book with sort of essays, which I describe as like orange, it light talking about just just life, but also like feminism and women's women's bodies, and my experiences through aging and like infertility and motherhood, and a real sort of more conceptual Boca. I guess like not necessarily something with straight up recipes, but more like a cake with some sort of like little weird essay. So that's something I'm keen on writing a proposal for. I love that. Have you already started writing the essays? I have a few things through my whole treatment. I wrote a blog, a private blog, and then I'm always writing too. So well, anyone out there is listening in the in the audience Jaap a big fat book deal, Lindsey, sons, lap. We can make it happen. We've made a few things happen for Lindsay. So let's do this to thank you so much for your support over the years. Real. Thanks for being a friend wanna give any shoutout to some Instagram bakers. You've been following lately there. So I just wash it. Instagram, Kate community? Yeah, it's I love wandering with down in down in Florida. Does the shag cakes? Oh, Lana Jones, man, all my God, Alana Jones, man. I, I've got a big birthday coming up next year. I want one of those skits for my day off for sure. Bombed. Yvonne. Cakes is awesome woman. I think she's from Chicago. I really love her. She's got a artful bright style. Yeah, they look kind of sculptural, you know, ooh, check it out with monger somebody that also works a lot with like dried fruit, but they really do look like sculpture stew. That's another person I can too. I don't know. Yeah, MandA favor out in LA. She just moved, I think, from the south to LA she's amazing. Just so many such a wonderful community. Honestly. Like I love. I love it. I love the the woman on there. Like we're always exchanging the EMS and stuff, and you know, people responding to stories and it's, yeah, it's it's a really sweet community and I feel like I have buddies in every town, you know, because of it which just great. You do? Yeah. All right. Well, Lindsey, it's so much fun seeing you. We might have date for jubilee. I'm gonna. I'll tell you the date when we get just in case it's not the actual date, but we would love to see you again. It's always fun to see you. I let on that day, sorta life pilot. Congratulations on your book. Thank you. Congratulations on your health and all the good things, and we love you. You're the bomb. Thank you. That's it for today show. Thank you very much to Lindsey sung for her friendship and for sharing so much during this interview for all of you aspiring cake artists out there. And I know there are a lot of you be sure to check out her brand new book. Cocoa cake land. Thank you to our sponsors for keeping radio cherry bomb on the air vital farms, pasteurized eggs, Likud on blue culinary school and Bob's red mill. Thank you to our associate producer and our very owned riot girl just Seidman and to the ban Challah for our theme song. If you are interested in cherry bomb university and who isn't it's taking place at the end of October in New York City. Visit cherry bomb dot com for more Martha Stewart and Christina Tosi will be there. And I'd love to see you there to radio chair bomb is a joint production of cherry bomb magazine and the heritage radio network. Thanks for listening. Everyone. You're the bomb all have what she's having. I Mattie Ross, and you know who I think is the bomb Salva faira and here's why after ten years of working in restaurants as a teenager Salva opened up her first restaurant at age, twenty three in downtown in Arbor, a humble spot with only twenty three seats today. The restaurant has grown involve from a mere twenty three spot to a grand restaurant that can seat three hundred guests salvages one of the most popular and well known restaurants in Ann Arbor. I admire Savas mission to hustle and provide the utmost hospitality to all of her diners shoes, an overall goddess human who inspires me beyond words. Radio, cherry bomb is powered by simple. Cast simple cast is a popular hosting and analytics platform that allows podcasters to easily host in publish to apps like apple podcasts. If you have a podcast or looking to create your very first, check it out, try it for free in save half off your first three months at simple casts dot com. Forward slash heritage. 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The Ice Cream CEO

Radio Cherry Bombe

42:51 min | 2 years ago

The Ice Cream CEO

"Hi, this is Michele Russo and San rosel, and you're listening to radio cherry bomb. You're the bomb. Hey bomb squad. Your listening to radio cherry bomb, and I'm your host carry diamond each week. We talked to the most inspiring women in and around the world of food. Let's thank our sponsor handsome brook farm, pasteurized, organic eggs, handsome brook farms secret to making rich, flavorful eggs is simple. The most possible space the best possible feed and lots of love. It's a healthy and humane recipe that makes your almonds cakes custard and everything in between taste better. Get cracking at handsome brook, farm dot com. Some housekeeping we are finishing the next issue of cherry bomb magazine, if you are not a subscriber head over to Terry bomb dot com and subscribe, you get two issues per year and help support projects like radio cherry bomb. Speaking of radio cherry bomb next week. We are kicking off our food for thought tour presented by carry gold will be visiting Nanto kit. Baltimore portland. Maine, savannah, Phoenix and San Diego, we are covering a lot of ground. You can check out cherry bomb dot com for dates tickets and more details we'd love to see you on our tour. What else do we have to tell you the food waste fair? Twenty nineteen is taking place in Brooklyn on Thursday may twenty third. It's coming up soon joined the cherry bomb team and other mindful folks to learn more about composting, zero waste kitchens and sustainable restaurants. Visit food waste fair dot NYC for tickets and more information, I. Can't wait for you to listen to today's interview because it covers my favorite subject ice cream. Today's guest isn't a tasha case, the founder and CEO of cool house, the brand that's changing the ice cream world. One scoop at a time the tasha not only stop by cherry bomb HQ, but she brought some ice cream sandwiches and her new dairy free flavors, which are excellent. We love Natasha for putting great ice cream into the world and for being fearless business leader before I speak with Natasha. Let's hear a word from our sponsor. Handsome brook farm believes that organic and pastured is the way to go. When it comes to eggs pasture-raised means better lives for hens better lives for small farmers and better eggs for you. It's also better for chefs who depend on rich, flavorful, eggs, handsome, Brooke farms owned flock of amazing chefs their mother hens count on. It Suzanne veteran is a mother hen she's the chef and owner of buttermilk kitchen in Atlanta curious, how chef Suzanne makes her French toast with caramelized bananas, the ingredients include whole milk. She about a bread and some handsome brook farm eggs to make each slice as fluffy as can be. You can find chef Suzanne's, delicious, egg Centric, recipes and videos on handsome brook, farm dot com. If you're looking for handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized eggs, you can find them at Publix Kroger sprouts, farmers market freshdirect and many natural foods stores across the country. Here's my conversation with Natasha case of cool house. All right. So I want you to drop some stats for us because you have built cool house into such an impressive business. So tell us the state of the state today. Yeah. Is growing so much? It's really exciting. So this year, we're in about seventy five hundred doors, and that's everything from, you know, the whole foods where we just launched our dairy free sandwiches, which I'm super excited about to a wagmans freshdirect, your local Bodega often here in New York to like the Krogers public. Safeway, we are international to Cayman Islands Caribbean Asia Middle East, the footprint has grown a lot. We're going to do about seventeen eighteen million in sales this year. So we're super excited about that. With about thirty five skews pint, sandwiches and bars expecting to sell multiple millions of of the sandwiches. What is your goal? I would say I really. Leave that cool house could be the ice cream brand of the millennial generation like that household brand that is acceptable that you can get in a lot of places, but is of phenomenal polity and has a really authentic and unique story behind it. And is women founded on lead is is representing a huge change in. How brands are built and the kind of people behind them. Let's talk about that. Because you now have your all your products are stamped with. Yes. A w when people see that what is that all about? So it's amazing. We we started to incorporate that into the branding because we were seeing that we're really becoming the biggest women founded and led ice cream ran at grocery. And we said we really need to share this more. And in a way, that's that's clearer with our with our fans because you may think it's the obvious thing about your brand the most obvious thing. But then it takes a law for people to really get the information. So you need to make this clear we went, and we got the certification, which is kinda funny process. Like they like come like audit. You like your office? You're gonna follow me to the bathroom. You know, it's an organization that does there several there's several and so we went through one of them, and we kind of with front of the packaging, and then that's been there for a couple years. And that is the thing that more than anything else as far as the call outs. Like really is the biggest touch point for people on social they're coming to say. Like, I didn't know callsas unknown. I want to support this or they're they kind of like showcase that like when they post about us recently. We went through around of like our first ever like focus groups, which is like a fascinating experience. Let's like I've done those before. Yeah. Other people have worked for okay? Yeah. Never what you think be ever ever. There's so many surprises in all directions. And it's like such a fascinating so hard on building this company and shaping it. And you know, what it stands for? And then when you talk to people outside the company are like we talking about the same brand. Yeah. No, there's so many surprises and sometimes people taking so much farther than you even deadly. We were asking them about the women founded and led seal, and I just kind of like, oh, that's cool for them to know. They're going to see that. That's something different. Well, the specifics at their mind goes to like they were like, well, if it's women founded and led she probably has a family, and I'm not only supporting her, but I'm supporting her family. I mean in this case happens to be true. But like total assumption or she's gonna make flavors that I like better because she understands me she's more thoughtful about the creation of the flavors in the Brandon what it stands for or the sustainability element. Like all these things that come into people's heads. That are like it's like you have there's work to do in terms of making it resonate more in like kind of tapping into that. But the fact that people are already going there is like amazing, actually. So so for you, why is that important that people know this company's women founded, well, what I think that it's it's the exception off the rule, and so people need to see that change is happening, and they need to see that. It's possible for them to you know, if someone it's so much easier to like become the change. You can see so making sure that it's known for our generation for the next generation for an older generation may be that feels like inspired by the fact that the dial is moving I definitely think it is a different perspective in terms of flavor development. The thoughtfulness is I think there's some meaning behind I do find booth female entrepreneurs. There's just a very deep level of consideration and carefulness and the details, and I think like, you know, you do want to make that known. So that people can be aware kind of a different level that might be going into this product. It's so interesting, you you said about being the change. I was watching a I'm going to get back to cool house surprised how I do love it. But I was watching Beyonce as homecoming this weekend like the rest of the planet. She had quotes in between some of the footage and she had a quote from Marian Wright Edelman who is the founder of the Children's Defense Fund. But she had given I think she might have been valedictorian of her college. And there was a quote. From her valedictorian speech. And she said if you can't see it you can't be at. And I was like a ha that's where it's from. And guess what year? It was from nineteen fifty nine. Isn't that? Amazing. Yeah. I mean, we're still talking about represents. I mean, we'll know, you know, talking about representation for a very long time. But beyond say. Yeah. Concert film was filmed at Coachella. Yes. Well, played cool house kind of took off. Yeah. At coachella. Like, I know that's a big part of your early story. Totally basically almost exactly ten years ago. So now we're gonna go back to the beginning. Yeah. So tell us I'm God. Where do we even start? So tell us about the Coachella story. So you roll up a Coachella. Yeah. Well, even getting there quite a challenge. So basically, we we had the idea for elevating ice cream in particular ice cream sandwiches to do something more that represented Arjun rations point of view, and especially I think women's point of view, we wanna Tel Aviv ice cream, especially ice cream sandwiches, though. They had been particularly bastardized, and I think novelties is a whole other game, and we can get into like some of the thoughts on that. But and so we want to do this. We had bought a beat up postal van that kind of was masquerading as an ice cream truck. It was twenty five hundred bucks. And we were really just paying for the chrome rims because there was no engine the doors and windows didn't operate, but that's what we could afford. We didn't have money for. Scoop shop we didn't understand grocery. So that was going to be at and then we needed a big place to launch at. So we had both been to Coachella for a few years, and we begged and begged them to let us sell there. We were the first food truck to go to Coachella. So they had no like protocol for it. Great. Okay. You can go in the camp ground like just stay away from us. Like, you know, don't want to hear anything from your great. We'll we'll accept it. So the morning of Coachella comes around. And remember the truck has no engine. We had figured out that if we join AAA platinum we got one free two hundred mile Thome. And we pretend the truck broke down even though it never drove. Yeah. It's funny. Like thinking of it like it seemed like such a normal like the way we solve the problem. This is how we're getting there. It didn't even seem like a crazy thing to do. How did you know how much quantity to bring all of that? Well, we didn't we way overestimated. So better that way around like, I don't think we understood like one hundred thousand people at Coachella. Well, how many people are in the camp ground? And then how many people actually are gonna buy dessert? It's usually ten percent of a captive audience aren't gonna buy dessert if there is no other competition. So we had way more than we needed but worked out because we actually went back for stagecoach one or two weeks after there was no Coachella weekend to back then. So that gave you enough. So so tell me what. So so yes, the sales was some proof of concept. But really the thing that I think made it like we have to do this. And this is going to go to the next level is actually a friend of mine was writing for curbed at the time. And he said, you know, if it goes, well, send me a logo a description and all too little piece on cool houses and. Like, it seemed like it what will enough like I'm gonna you know, send him the information. And he wrote this article it was like, not even very nice. It was like if you really bored and like you wanna do something weird. And check out this weird truck like maybe think about it's called cool houses. Thanks, Dan is things that but it went viral. It went from there to -partment therapy to dwell to LA times Angelino, I had all these editors calling me on the way home. And and meanwhile, Freya her phone had died the last day of Coachella. She charges it on the way home. We had like, you know, basically like booked like the Twitter handle and she had set like an Email alert for each new follower. Because when you have ten doesn't matter, but she was getting emails every every couple of seconds, literally. And she called me. She was like, I think we've been hacked, and we need to shut this down. It was like no that's real like something happened. Cool fray, a being your co founder and your exactly started. Yes. The other founder of cool house my life partner. My my wife. My the first lady of cool house. Now's I'd like to call her. So that was really. I think that beyond like, okay. The basic infrastructure was in place. It shows you how valuable having a story to town a connection with media and journalism and journalists who wanna share it is is so huge free around especially early on basically by the time. We got back. It was like this is happening. This is taking off we had people calling in to try to book the truck. And that was really like we're doing this. So win cool has. I mean, I remember when cool house launched because there was just nothing like it. Yeah. You were you were inspired by architecture. And it was like such a kooky store. You're like, wait a second. It's like architecture inspired ice cream like you couldn't help but pay attention. So let let's go back because you studied architecture. Yes. Not ice cream. That's true. Architect ice cream, lady, totally normal. So you're in school studying architecture. You get your first job. What was your first big gig? So my first real job out of grad school is Disney Imagineering, which was it's I think like on like the dream job scale like it's up there. Like, it's an incredible place to work. I've read a lot about imagine ears. But for the VX who haven't that means? So does he imagine airing their most famous for like ride design at at the theme parks, but it's also the hotels, the hospitality. It's really why it was such a great place to start out is like Disney, they're masters of storytelling. They create these characters in these stories that stay with people for their entire lives. And then specifically Imagineering about bringing that like into space and into the design world. So you know, was definitely like crazy timing with starting there because I was there for maybe two or three months before the recession hit. So it was clear that like the, you know, the path was not going to be as predictable as I had originally thought what wound up happening? It started getting a little, you know, stressful dismal at the office a lot of like layoffs and just hiring freeze, and I had been since college playing around with the intersection of food and design food and architecture. I felt there was so much there to talk about so much unexplored. And also, just you know, we with our is like a huge part of how we kind of like take in food has to do with the presentation and the packaging, so I had thought, you know, I want to kind of play around the idea, and this is a wave to make architecture. Also, more fun and accessible for people because I felt like it was very intimidating, and I'd hate things that are intimidating. I think things that are cool should be more accessible not less accessible. And so that had taken the form of like different like pie concept, dinner parties and different products. But it was really like an art project. And so when the recession hit at Imagineering, I started baking cookies making ice cream naming the combinations after architects, and it was really just a passionate hobby and something I was doing to lighten the mood, and I met Freya. Really just I've been doing this for like two weeks. And she was like, so, you know, architecture inspired ice cream sandwiches. Okay. She called them the elitist ice cream sandwiches. Ironically, my whole point was to be naughtily dozens again, it's kind of elitist. I guess she was like what's your cost per unit? And I was like, oh, I don't know. I went to whole foods. I spent eighty bucks she was like, okay, we're going to go to whole foods, and we're going to write down what everything costs, and then we're going to make like a little performance. Like, oh, you know. Yeah. I was like, but now love that kind of stuff like, but it was it's shows. How lucky it is like one like have a co founder and someone who could really have a complimentary skill set who could think about the things I wasn't thinking about and frankly who even thought of it as a business in the first place like I didn't really that's when it became. I think a business potential. What was he doing at the time that she understood things like she was in real estate development? She was actually project managing architects. So is perfect. And she was also she had been interested in getting into the food world. So she was a moonlighting at a restaurant after work just to kind of learn the ropes. So she had been thinking that way as well. So it was like really just the happenstance of it all tell us some of the first few combos and their names because the names are. Let's see this the regional combos we had always had Meese vanilla round chocolate chip to Houston vanilla bean. And that is now fourteen percent of our sales overall in grocery. So that's over like a couple of million of our wholesale businesses. Just that sandwich, which is the Leroux music Manila row. Yes. After the house is well, he's Vander row not vanilla row. So you know, there's let's see how the check out the legal team on that. Why what's the reference? I don't know. There was Frank berry snicker doodle strawberry. And Frank does know about it has multiple times. Frank gehry. He actually the one of the first events we ever did was going to his office and won. I think I know he's had the sandwich since then. But maybe the time he was having lactose difficulties. So it was like, oh, lactose and tunnel Akot can have your sandwich. And he's also he's tiny, you know. So you couldn't quite see into the window of the truck. And he was like he said something like, oh, you're there was a huge line is whole office came out. He he's like you're making a lot of money off us. We're like what does that mean? Like does that mean like everyone's lining up, or you know, we we pondered that for like days, we had Tom mango after Tom main, which was our dairy free at the time his booked us many times and then minimalism after minimalist design. I think the last one was which was not really played where we do much anymore oatmeal cinema Neo after Moneo. Yeah. So that was kind of like the original court. They're very classic. They're like reinvented classics. We it's interesting because we become so much more or part of like what people come to know us for like the real unique flavors the out of the box. But like we started with its elevating classics, which I think is also like I'm really glad that that's a big part of it is well, you have to nail it on the classics. What is your most popular flavor today? Is it the mies? Yeah. The move the maze. The maze is number one. We are introducing next year just a double chocolate cookie with teach in Manila being because I think as far as the business model like it's like we'd need you wanna do the interesting stuff. And there's definitely always like cult falling for certain like very innovative flavors. But like you need more than one chocolate. Vanilla you know, you need those top top skews. So I think double Chaka vanilla is going to be interesting. Just because it's like that's the classic like when you think ice cream sandwich like with like the way for cookie, although this will not be away for cookie. But I think that's that's going to be up there as well. And then as far as pints the streetcar tro is quickly rising to number one. I did bring you guys. It's delicious with Brown butter and like a a shattered chocolate as we. We call it swirled throughout there's an and then I'd say close second. Maybe like, the the cookie dough the cookies and cream sandwich are really up there chocolate cake, which is gluten free as a pint really good. You just mentioned gluten-free. Let's talk dairy free because that is such a big thing right now. When did you go into dairy free options, we just launched our Jerry free line? This just hit it's actually vegan. But per the focus groups vegan is scary for some people. And no, it's it's been a really incredible moment for the whole dairy alternative. And I think it's one. That's I think it's so cool like as a brand known for dairy 'cause we really are still very much Jerry I but to be able to embrace dairy free in the same way and to really innovate because with a dairy flavor. There's so much creativity. That's possible. But you have milk cream sugar. You have kind of like a a huge court of the product that's already set in stone dairy free. It was like a complete blank canvas. Like, what's it? Even going to be made of we looked at the market. We saw a lot of coconut. We saw a lot of Cascio which some of them are great. But we definitely saw that. Like that's dominating. I feel that a lot of coconut flavors tastes like coconut after because because the is wrong, and you know, some people might love that cashew. You lose the nut people, and it is sometimes a textual issue. So we found peas, and we thought that are it's a really clean like kind of sourcing a lot of its domestic or Canadian pe- milk that love male ripple. I think is fantastic. That was definitely an inspiration. It delivers kind of more protein. It's like a more effective way to get the plant protein. It's a really interesting versatile product. So we ended up going peas Brown rice. Cocoa butter is the base. Oh interested area. I love the whole dairy free trend knock on wood him, I'm fine with Jerry. But at the end of the day ice cream is all about making people happy, and the fact that there are people excluded from that. It's so nice. Now that it's just opened up to everybody at Smith canteen. I was brought samples and there should be enough for you guys as well took out. I don't have Jerry. I was like it's so nice. You'll be like I have something for you. And I completely stand by it on the quality level of the dairy. And that's something that was a non-negotiable for us when we're doing this. It was like this cannot be a compromise new. And I think today you can just kind of go back and forth. Yeah. It's it's Trevor I call myself, flexible, -tarian out whatever's good, you know, and and that's why I wanted to. I was like this has to be, you know, that's what this has to be for the people who are lactose intolerant. For people who are vegan or from people who just love delicious things. I hope that. I think a lot of dairy consumers are opening themselves up. So it's really it's it's a really exciting time to like, I'm glad and its pioneering still like we're at very it may feel for those of us like in L A and in New York like os has been like, it's we're at the forefront. You know, it's amazing to me how the ice cream category has exploded. Yeah. Oh my God. What is behind the? Okay. I think that definitely awareness of a better quality product being possible has changed a lot of and that's happened cross category. Like, so many you could almost go product by product, and like so many different like things have been elevated in terms of how they're made how they're sourced. What's behind them? Just also being more personal brands with the people behind them. You mean just brands in general? I think everything's. Yeah. Elevate. Yes, the actual ice cream category. If you look at like, the big numbers, it, you know, it goes up a few percentage of goes down. But it's just like what are people buying with them that space? Are they choosing to buy something better? But why is cream like it's such a tough category to get into it's such a perishable product. It is the most powerful product probably you could be I think I would be shocked for someone to find a category that isn't really tough. You know, like, you could be I wanna. I wanna make right, right. Exactly. Like anything's hard. I think like oh like beverages. Like, yeah. Like, there's people consume them a lot more. But then it's way more crowded, and it costs a lot more to get into that space. You know, other kinds of of snacking other kinds of like, you could you could go really to anything, and you would find your difficulties with him. So I would say there's probably maybe less people overall who attempt ice cream, and that's why like it is a small world. Like, you kind of know each other. I think you keep getting to certain thresholds toward smaller and smaller, my friend. Jane were wand who does dramatic or who's the founder and the who created that brand? She's amazing. And she says, and she was like way better accent that so it sounds better with her like British accent. But she says it's very crowded at the bottom, and it's very quiet at the top. And it's true. So like the farther you go along you're like, oh, there's there's actually really only a handful of brands who are nationally distributed who had the capability to keep scaling who have the potential. To be that house will brand or maybe they'll be several. And like, oh my God. Like, we could really do this. We could go all the way. So yeah, it's like really really fucking hard. But show me something that isn't. So that begs the question have you met Ben or Jerry yet? I haven't met them. I've spoken with a good number of Unilever, folks. And I've found many of them to do. So so lovely I actually have not met them. That's a really that. That would be a good one. I would love to I would love to to to get to know them. And I've heard, you know, great things about how they still involved in the brand heavy mid Haagen Dazs. That's the so like, no one. I is there one really I mean. No, I think right now, the New Jersey, but like they're really interesting to me because they represent like there's nobody like people don't really know anyone who's behind that brand. There's no face. There's not really a story besides like, the quality element of the ice cream. And I think that it's interesting like Ben and Jerry's is one of the first like really more personal brands where we're like, it's them in their account or call. Culture, and they they represent something Haagen-Dazs to me is the sleeper giant in the category because they're still like really widely consumed. I think their quality has actually maintained pretty well considering there I'm going to go on record. I think they're vanilla. Yeah. Dynamite? It's really, although I will say we did this as like a tasting of blind like try next to cool how station vanilla pint. And I just got to say I mean, I always thought Haagen-Dazs so good, and I hadn't really done the comparison recently. And I do feel very proud of our vanilla love a blind taste test. Yeah. Oh, yeah. It's I mean, it's so much fun. But I think people don't see going after Haagen-Dazs in the same way. Because I think it's not as like cool. They don't have that like brand element that's interest. But like icy claws kind of in a way as like a lovechild child of Haagen-Dazs, and Ben and Jerry's like we have kind of that like edgy kind of that story the counterculture of our generation. But then the texture we're going more for like a Haagen-Dazs. The simplicity the classic flavors elevated Haagen-Dazs number one skew. Bar and so they're bathing the novelty world, which Ben and Jerry's has really not done nearly as much of going like Haagen-Dazs like that's kind of our strategy in some ways that I think is like different a different take on things is such an interesting brand to look at because there really is no story behind and they've succeeded despite that. Yeah. There are already so big by the time. We would that be effective now they were just starting. I don't think so great question. Yeah. And then I feel like Ben and Jerry's was one of the first brands. I can think of I'm sure there are others. But that was values I total that they weren't afraid to put their values out there hundred percent. Yeah. One thing I really would love to know about you is how you have developed as a business owner as an executive over the years because you did not start out aspiring to be a small business owner. How have you learned what you've learned over the years, you definitely radiate confident competent executive I've gotten to that. Maybe it's the yes, it's eating poser. Well, one you have to be willing to embrace change and grow a ton. If you want to you know. That found a company be SEO. Like, you're always kind of growing always evolving. If that doesn't excite you. I think than maybe you're in the wrong game. I think you have to have a lot of conviction. You do have to have a lot of confidence vision. There are certain things that are, you know, either just inherently you really gotta get in touch with kind of like on that on that like deeper level that that are not necessarily, you know, delone skills in the same way. But something that can really like inspire people to even get behind what you wanna do. And I think that energy is really important, really powerful. And I realize now looking back like you almost kind of want to it's like you want a bottle that because there's such a magic to the beginning. Even though in a way, you know, nothing. And then I think you start to kind of like acquire your skill set. And like, I said, you have to just be willing to evolve all the time, hopefully, you can be around team or around product that like helps with that you're learning from each other and you're bringing different skills to the table like all safe for me. Like in the beginning. I was kind of like. Ona tasha is like the creative and sales and phrase like the business one, which I always like frustrates me. I really don't like getting put in that box. And I also think for creatives like you you can't be like, oh, I'm just gonna find someone to do the numbers like you have to at least understand what's going on. And then maybe hire someone that you don't get taken advantage of. It's funny. Because now if people think of me in fair that are like oh phrase like an ideas person in tasha like she gets the job done. I'm like, oh, it's so awesome. We like kind of absorb these different things from each other. And it shows how much I think you can change and grow. I think over the years, I just came to really no-one understand business and really become passionate about it become passionate about the different elements of what makes it all work because I think that that is what a business is. You know, this isn't a homework assignment. This isn't an art project like it has to work, and that's the beauty of the creativity. Like it almost meat. Sometimes I think it takes more creativity. When it has to be applied, and when it has to function than when it can just kind of exist in a vacuum. Like I've come to. Just really enjoy that. And then now we're ten years and we've grown quite a bit. We are building our team with some phenomenal people. I have a new partner president of the company Denise or vodka who is has a couple of decades of experience in CPG a little little more. She helped grow UD's from five hundred thousand to one hundred million in just a few years. Like, she's amazing. What I'm learning so much from her? She's just like blow my mind every day. And I think with a partner like that like in a way, you kind of come back to the specialization like, okay? Well, now that you have the team, and you feel like really of like all that they can do. Now, I can really dig into the practice element innovation. The branding the marketing, and you want to be spending all your time on what you really feel like you can contribute the most. So it's kind of full circle, let's talk fundraising because that's something that love is of big interest to our listeners. Great I love. So you sell funded at the beginning UPS together. Then twenty five hundred dollars short version. Tell us the steps. So yes, the credit cards. So it was like, no even ice beco-. We started with twenty five hundred five thousand dollars. Let's say no it was actually dead. It was money. We didn't have so no money just at and then started cash on right away. 'cause we spent nothing launching. And then the next round was like a friends and family we needed about forty thousand dollars so tiny because it that's like nothing. Yeah. I don't mean that sounds like nothing because for a lot of you out there listening. You're like, what do you mean forty thousand dollars? It was like make or break, but you need so much more than that. Right. Well, it was just because basically we had the illegal truck that I then I had to go to court. And then it was missing. It was the people vs tasha case. Yeah. Yeah. And and they're like, yeah. Totally. So they were like you need to build a proper truck. And so the forty thousand was for to build a real truck. Okay. That was permanent in a little extra change. But yet tiny amount, but you said you had cash flow. So you did have some other money. Come. Yes. But not enough enough to run the business, but on to build this neutron that was like because I'm thinking salaries ingredients the forty thousand dollars it and like it's going to cut it. Right. Right. Exactly. So because the business was functioning from like, the the major operating costs like it was basically working. Okay. So then we needed more trucks because we weren't keeping up with the demand in L A, and we wanted to launch a New York. So I found this organization called opportunity fund, and they're amazing, and I really excited for your listeners to hear about them. They're now become the nation's biggest microlender, they're the number one lender to food trucks. Because the the truck is the asset that they can help you borrow against. And they can do it pretty quickly, but they lend from people who like are cell. Selling something like goods on like, a a street corner who need a thousand dollars. Let's say to keep their business going now all the way up. I think the biggest loan do is two hundred fifty thousand and that was such an important like cabalists moment. I think if we couldn't keep scaling that would have been a glass ceiling for us, and you just apply with the opportunity fund online. Yeah. You can guess you can apply online or I'm happy to connect. Anyone who's interested to an I'm now on the board o poster child? Yeah. Southern California board. So that was amazing. And then the next round and asking for a friend are the rate loans. They are they're very fair. Basically they're serving the market in between like it's so hard to go and get like a line of credit real small business loans still and they're kind of the anti payday lender. So they're really filling that void of where the bigger banks just can't really help. So it's pretty similar rates depending on the size of the loan. Very very fair. Very good payback rate. And also, they are like amazing people who actually care about the people that they give the loans to it's not just like, here's a check goodbye. Like, they promote so many of the. Companies that they work. Oh, so they're really cool. Okay. So then we're running the trucks now are two years in. And we said, you know, the truck business is it's amazing, and it's very magical. It's very it's cool boutique element, but it didn't really have the scaling potential. We could see and we wanted to revisit the two channels that we really couldn't afford or understand in the beginning, which was grocery and and scoop shops, and then we're like, okay, we're really going to need more money now. And so then we didn't angel round of a million dollars to really do those two things which is angel round mean so an angel is typically like non institutional money. So it could be like a high net worth individual. You know, oftentimes, it can be now there are like angel networks, but it could be like someone kind of injured warm community that you may know of. So it's like there's maybe some personal connection. But they're not like someone that you see in every holiday a very often. And in this case the million dollars came from AVI Margolis who for those children of the ninety s at Cherokee, jeans and. And was just like a titan of business. So he was amazing because it wasn't just money. It was him as a mentor and a coach, and he was very much came out of the counter-culture kind of Jerry's era. So I think he liked kinda saw us as like seeing seeing himself in the business in that way. And his son-in-law became president of our company and his daughters amazing like celebrity PR agency. So it was like a super that is something I can't emphasize enough like it was really smart money. Bobby really wanted us to focus on grocery and saw the scale ability there and saw the potential to exit. So we really started kind of like pivoting more to focusing on that and building that and that million dollars lasted us, basically seven years. Yeah. So because we grew the business maybe not as quickly as it could have for a few years in there, but profitably in very responsibly. And so we didn't need to constantly take in money as we were growing. Then came, you know, twenty seventeen two thousand eighteen and we've now done a pretty substantial strategic private equity round. It was technically twelve million dollars. But really more seven for you know, growing the business. So it's pretty substantial for us. But it was good like because we had kind of waited it out both Fran myself are pretty heavily equity invested. And I think it was just really really good timing. And they have brought so much to the table again going through due-diligence with them, which is the process when they're really checking Alec all your financials and your team and the plan even if the deal hadn't worked out learned so much from going through that with them owes like, I know that this is going to be, you know, meaningful and a lot of them have been operators and have really been there. So I think that that is has been meaningful for us as well. And wish you had raised that money earlier. No, I think I think is actually was just the right time. Honestly, but it had to happen. Then like, we couldn't wait any longer. I only ask because I had heard of venture capitalist speaking in here. She said women bring me fully built up businesses men. Bring me ideas. Now that is true. I think a lot more women think they have to prove it and earn it and men sort of more often think they deserve it or they take. After a stance at like, someone should be so lucky to invest in their business. And I think probably the answer lies somewhere in between. So what's next? So we are mama. Yeah. A mom. I have two year old son Rummy, and that's been phenomenal. It's been actually like I think when you love what you do when you have a kid like it just makes you feel more passionate because you're doing it for them in a mom who does is cream. What's colour than that? He's love science scream. All let me tell you. He knows that. She is the packaging, and he like goes bananas, and we are working on growing our family again. So I'll keep you posted on that. We were building the team. We've added a couple of really great players to the team. Hi, I'm really excited about in in operations in marketing. We've a ton of innovation in the works. We are working on a multi pack. We are working on bites is like a Bon Nolan made the bond Vom reinvent the Choco. Taco was so much cool stuff. I'm super excited. I've been able to tell throughout this interview, you're super psyched about novelty, you've you've mentioned. All time. Yes. But that's what we loved his kids. You know, Italy. It's such a different thing. Yes. Claim or stuff? It's a good humor humor. If you're listening. I dunno hires Itajai to like come redo your brand because you've let your standard slip big time. I mean, have you had one of those grow up loving those chocolate Eclair bars, you get one of those now from like, the local data, whatever their so sad. Now, that's well not trying to, you know, just rag on for example, John no taco, but even that people could still concert yummy. But if you actually taste ice cream, it's just air it just ingredients ice cream, it's not ice cream. And even even if it could have good ingredients the amount of air in it is like, it's not dense. It's not crazy. Because really the that is a huge we'll make ice cream. Good. I mean, they appreciate them trying to have an affordable product, but they have to sacrifice quality that much. Exactly. And there's definitely a market. That's been proved for for. Okay. You could definitely take things a major notch up and make it great. I see. That's the thing. I think cool house. What's interesting too? As I as I mentioned to tell like it as far as like the. Premium ice cream landscape, for example, like some of our competitors. They are two and three dollars more than us. Like, we are part of what we're trying to do is like really have incredible quality. But really keep it like our blended average of pine I think it was like five sixty-nine like we're trying to be as fair as we can about that. Because we also don't want to miss a huge part of the market. That's going to say why I want the greatest room to but I am not going to buy nine dollar pine. So that's definitely a consideration. But we looked at Choco taco, and it's like a multi-million dollar skew over let's say like last few months or something. And and it's like that one flavor. There's been no reinvention in the quality's not there. So I think you kind of see opportunity and novelties like that's such a specialization for cool house. I nobody is really able to play in that space. I think the way we are because it is a whole different set of of development. So started is like super classy novel chance it. Yeah. The elitist. Alright speed round time this favorite kitchen tool. I guess like the teapot because I just love to make my macho. Song that makes you smile, you know, I've been really into Kurt vile, and like I feel like that. It's just like chill. Happy music. Less than you cooked. Let's see a greens from the garden charred yet. Chard kale? We have so many great things going right now pressed, yeah. Okay. Favourite ingredient took with kind of say to make a drink with. That count as cooking. I love it. I love antiga carpano and takeover moose is I think so so good this week vermouth say that again, slowly, it's carpano and tika Renteria carpano. It's like if you love a good Manhattan, if you love negroni, if you love anything with like, the sweet vermouth, it just makes it so so so much better oldest thing in your fridge. We have so many like pickled things I'm sure one of them's like been around for since we moved into the house for years ago. Some of maybe some of that kimchi or? It's better with age. Right. Yeah. Dream vacation destination while dying already to go back to Tokyo and Japan it love to go to Thailand really really curious about Thailand, I'd say I would save Thailand. Or India at this point if you were trapped on a desert island with one food celebrity who would it be? Wow, that's amazing one. These are great questions and love it. Thanks tasha. Am I allowed to say have you seen like the Amy sedaris her cooking show because I know like the show I was like makes fun of it. But I know she's actually like a pretty passionate like at home entertaining. I feel like shoud be great because we could really talk about food, but she would just be so funny, and we could go off on many other topics. So yeah, I think I would I think I would pick her I feel like we should have a bell that goes off when someone gets picked for the first time, you are the first person to pick Amy sedaris, we love her. She's kind of outside the box, you know, as far as the but. Spend the whole time laughing. Yeah. And you might starve to death and not realize it because it'd be laughing so hard, right? We would not any recipes from her show. I probably die. No, we love her. We actually tried to get her for jubilee, Amy. If you're listening. We love you. She's amazing. We want to get her for the show to one day. Thank you for coming. By again. Of course, now that we know your offices in the hood. Hopefully, we'll see more fantastic. I love that. Thanks for having me. Have a great summer you U2.? That's it for today show. Thank you to Natasha for stopping by and bringing us some great treats if you haven't tried cool house ice cream. Well, you got to treat yourself and support a kick ass female fueled business in the process. Thank you to our sponsor handsome brook farm pasteurized organic eggs for supporting this season of radio cherry bomb. You folks are excellent. Our theme song is all fired up by the ban Challah. Our show is edited engineered and produced by just Seidman radio. Cherry bomb is a production of cherry bomb media. If you listen to our show via apple podcasts, be sure to subscribe. If you are a Stitcher kind of gal make sure to add us to your playlists. You don't want to. Miss a single episode. Thanks to everyone for listening. You're the bomb. I'll have what she's having. Hi, my name's Madison truckin, and I'm the founder of girls squash, a women's food culture in art publication based in Boston, Massachusetts. Do you want to know who I think is the bomb all the other women making indie food publications like Emily and Anna Kochman of milky MAG, Jay and Jesse nicely of compound butter. And of course, Syra Keough of put on it because these women inspire me to keep fighting for small print and to keep pushing activism through food and art.

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Food & Feelings With Sophia Roe

Radio Cherry Bombe

49:50 min | 2 years ago

Food & Feelings With Sophia Roe

"Today's program is brought to you by Koren, a supplier of Japanese chef knives and restaurant supplies for more information. Visit corn dot com. Hi bomb squad. Your listening to radio cherry bomb. And I'm your host Kerry diamond radio cherry bomb is the number one female focused food podcast in the country. Each week, we talked to the most inspiring women in and around the world of food. Welcome to a brand new year of our show. It's really nice to be back after the holidays. Even though I have a little cold, which you might hear in my voice, the break gave us a chance to reflect on the past year of radio cherry bomb, and everything we accomplished we produced more than forty episodes and talked to so many cool people. I was very happy to learn that the show was downloaded more than one million times in two thousand eighteen can you believe that thanks to all of you who listen to the show week after week and to our new listeners welcome to the bomb squad. We have a lot of great things in store for twenty nineteen. We're working on a second show that will debut later this year. We have some great miniseries that will air in the months ahead. We're working on a special live show to celebrate our two hundred episode later this spring and what? Else? Let's see I will be back on the road the radio cherry bomb roadshow will start up again with some special twists that. I will tell you about in a few weeks. Stay tuned. Let's thank our brand. New sponsor handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized, eggs, handsome, Brooke farms secret to making rich, flavorful eggs is simple. The most possible space the best possible feed and lots of love. It's a healthy and humane recipe that makes your omelettes cakes custard 's and everything in between taste better. Visit handsome brook farm dot com. For more information, and where to find their organic, pasteurized eggs, a little housekeeping early bird tickets for jubilee two thousand nineteen or sold out. But don't worry. We still have plenty of tickets available for general admission, please know that prices will go up on March first so buy your ticket soon. Jubilee two thousand nineteen will take place on Sunday, April seventh at the Brooklyn expo in green point, Brooklyn. This coming Wednesday is the deadline for. Scholarship applications, so don't delay. It's going to be a great jubilee this year. What else is going on starting January eighteenth? We will have a brand new shiny newsletter featuring lots of fun stuff. Our chef of the week are eatery of the week cookbook of the week and lots more. If you don't already subscribe to our newsletter, you can sign up at cherry bomb dot com. So let's talk about today's show did any of you make New Year's resolutions or have things you want to do differently in two thousand nineteen. I certainly do. I'd like to meditate regularly cut down on food waste, work smarter. Not harder. Last year was the opposite of that cook more and finally get an exercise routine that sticks will I succeeded all of them or any of them. I hope so and I've set small doable goals. So I don't get discouraged and give up, but I figured we could all use some encouragement and advice in this area. So I asked Sophia row to come on the show so FIA as many of you know, is on the cover of the new issue of cherry bomb magazine. I hope you've all seen her gorgeous covers she's a wellness advocate, a personal chef an Instagram influence, our end, a serious truth teller, so fee has done a lot of living in her thirty years and has helped so many people through her inspirational Instagram posts, fun fact, we recorded today show at cherry bomb age Q in Brooklyn. So if you hear any noise in the background, it's what's going on outside. And I hope you enjoyed our conversation since it's twenty nineteen OMG. I thought we would start with resolutions. Awesome. Do you believe in resolutions and making resolutions, sure? I don't think they need to be saved for like January. I think I think it's always good to like pull yourself over in like kind of check your engine lie a little bit. I totally I love a resolution. Absolutely. Because some people aren't into the idea. I mean, maybe I mean, maybe that's all they're thinking about the question. You know? I don't think I think that that whole entire thing needs to be reset a little bit the whole that was part of the question to like the new year new me thing. I didn't know that knew me. Maybe it's a maybe instead of new year new meet needs to be like reset reevaluate restart or something, you know, because I feel like we can all it's not about being being better you as if the one that you are it sucks. Like somehow, we feel like every December. Where like this crappy person are like, I don't know what we think. But I think it's. Kind of like January. It is a fresh is a new year, and it's a great. It's a great goal starter. You know, it's kind of like starting something on the first the start of a New Year's a big deal. So I understand the appeal of making that list of resolutions and Italy, I used to do it a lot, and then I would just fail at the list, and then somewhere along the line, I stopped, you know, because you'd have twenty things, and that's so unrealistic twenty eighteen was a tough year. Like, I'm happy that it's a new year. I am excited about starting fresh. Absolutely. And you need to shower. Shower, and I do have a list of resolutions and damaged. I'm going to stick to them. Yeah. I think that if your goal is your new resolution is to like I'm going to be vegan that is like that's really intense, and that's like an entire lifestyle shift. And of course, have you won't stick to that? But if you're gonna eat more vegetables, right, or if you're going to try to cut out me like that's just I think it's just how you repurpose your restart. I wanted to talk to you about that. If you are making resolutions, how do you not set yourself up to fail steps? I think it's also like for me. Okay. So big one is I want to make my house plastic free. So this is something that I know is going to take a lot of research and take a lot of time. But it's also like, it's doable. I just need to know from the jump. I'm not going to do this tomorrow. But I think it's just now I'm kind of investigating the work. And it's it's also made me evaluate what plastic I already do have in my house, and the plastic already have what am I going to do with it? You know, which I think is it just kind of creates. Thought which I feel like is what resolution is four. It's supposed to make you think about yourself and your space, which is good healthy. You know, what I think is a is going to be really helpful to people in terms of keeping their resolutions. A spreadsheet totally mama's Reggie, oh, I make decks I have spent like literally, I'm I'm one of those crazy people. That's definitely like. I if I write it down, then I make it happen. I remember my manager is sit calendar it put in your calendar. Even if it's five minutes, even if it's ten minutes to set aside, something if you write it down, you'll remember so for me, I'm one of those big people it works for me. I love spreadsheet name we work with the young woman from time to time they teasha, and we were talking about KPI's. Do you know what KPI's arm? Tell me. I knew kind of forgot it stands for key performance indicator. And no, I would have guessed this very wonky and kind of like marketing an advertising for sure, but it's a way to measure a project album, and she said all sometimes apply KPI's to my personal projects. And I think that's a great idea. Same it's all about it's really all about pulling yourself over and investigating where you're at. And I think that that if we did that Moore we'd save ourselves. A lot of struggle, and strife, I believe it's for me. It's the same thing as. Degreen juice for your brain. It's preventative action. It's preventative work like for me to assess. All right. This is all the plastic. I have in my house. This is all the plastic currently by. Okay. Each thing. Okay. Turns out most of the I have in my home is beauty products. Now, I'm gonna start emailing all these companies or I'm going to start talking to people in doing some reach out on how I can on. What I can do turns out diva curl is totally okay. With me going into the salon and just filling up the containers. I already have would have never known that had. I not had my little spreadsheet figured out that beauty is what I spend most of my money on which most of my plastic is at so writing everything down is like that's already passed me killing it Emma resolution, so spreadsheets it's the answer to everything in life. I mean, you don't have a traditional career. Oh, no. I don't right now. And I'm sure a lot of people look at your gorgeous Instagram, and you know, like when the cover story came out where like wellness advocate. Private chef influence, you all these things. And I'm sure a lot of people are like how does she make a living? I know. I know it's crazy. I it's it's funny lately, I make money speaking publicly. I do that. I like I said I worked at a company when I was a private chef, obviously, that's all I was making my money. But now it's kind of like a lot of stuff I make money for writing. I make money for speaking publicly and make money to essentially be myself, I realized that privilege there, but I also feel like it's my duty to use that privilege in the appropriate way. And that for me has always been why I continue to tell my story the way that I do if a brain wants to work for me, their understanding that this is what they're signing up for right? But that also comes with a lot of pressure to me, it's a ton of pressure. So I felt that in a way in a different way than I ever had before he's just make food and people just like my food because my food is good. So if is really easy the one thing I trust more than anything is that when I make food for someone. They're going to like it, really simple. Don't worry. Zero stressful. No imposter syndrome in the kitchen. I don't have any at all. I feel like I'm really good at making food for a person for people. You know, got it. But everything else all the other stuff. I do. I still kind of feel like oh, God people are gonna come. And listen to me talk so weird. But they do and I think I do. Okay. So how did Instagram become your thing started out with me in the kitchen houses trapped in the kitchen being this private Jeff person? And I used to just take pictures of food and everybody kind of did that. And and there's always this weird thing who your chef as if like you've to look a certain way to be a chef we've got pushed back that that was really pissed me off. So I was like we'll find I'm just gonna show myself in the kitchen, and then people were like. It's like the stroll actually works in the kitchen. Yeah. Wow. This is crazy. And then I realized that it was a lot easier for me to to do this and be myself. But that's not so easy. You know, where you're such a truth teller, and there's so much honesty, and what you put out there. But that's not it's not if you love yourself and being yourself as the easiest thing you can do. Now, it took me a long time to figure out how to do that. But now here, I am lemme tell you carry there's nobody in New York City that sleeps better than me. I like I have nothing to I'm open book. I am hiding nothing, you know. And I think that that's a really great place to be. I don't have shame. I don't have insecurity. However, the only reason I know that I feel better now because I used to have those things I was like a great day liar. Like amazing liar. Now, I'm a horrible liar. Because I know what it feels like to be a liar. I think that when people say it must be so hard. I'm like just try it. You're saying used to be a liar. We yeah. Yeah. Like, you know, people will be like well, would you do for holiday then like all off my mom did family? Soft like twenty half, my mom my God. Please, you know, like I remember being in. I was in foster care, and I'd tell people that I lived with my family still. Just as save myself just to like like when I look back at unlike these kids wouldn't have cared like who cares? You know? But I cared and I cared so much about what I looked like I think that when people ask me now, how do you do that? How do you? How is it? So easy for you to be yourself on just how people just try it. You know, what was the breakthrough moment or moments might just one moment. My breakthrough moment was when I moved to New York. And I felt like a while. This has this place has nothing to do with anything. I came from. This is totally crazy. And everybody's kinda crazy in New York. You know, and I mean, I mean crazy in like a really beautiful way to it felt like I was like, listen, I you know, what I'm not going home for Christmas and other people would be like, oh me. Neither. And I'm like, oh, okay. Yeah. We'll actually like don't even have a good relationship with my mom like, oh, my mom died a few years ago. And I'm like, oh, it was the first time. I realized that whatever you feel you are absolutely never alone. And that is the really comforting thing. Like, I'm not the only while era. Ghent is that to think that I'm the only girl that has had this experience than I realized that I was kind of addicted to being a victim and a lot of ways, and I needed to really break that cycle and just be honest with myself like all the other people that have been victims. So let's talk about some of the tools that you used you address some of them in the story with Tisch one of those tools is audio journaling. Now, can you explain what that is yet? Well, it started when I was young, and my mom was really young when she had me. So she kinda like she's nineteen. And then I was like a little kid, right? And she kinda wanted to be out of her space. So she gave me like a tape recorder. And like one of those old school into the little tapes. You know, and I was like this is amazing. I can listen back to myself. Like, I had I'd have radio shows with myself. It was. Yeah. It was awesome fast forward to now. I'm this like weird crazy girl who's like walking around the block, it looks like she's like talking on the phone, which is really just talking to herself. But it's really healthy. Not everybody's a letter writer nine everybody connects really great to the pen like that. Or maybe they sit in front of their. Computer all day anyway. So it's not lucrative for them. But you need to get it out and a good cry. That sounds nice in theory. But sometimes you want to have a pretend conversation like, hey, jerky, boss. I'm not down with the way that you just treated me in that meeting. I'm really upset about it. You just have it out with him in secret. And in theory in the middle of the street, and then you feel better, you know, and I've I've been doing that for I have hundreds of hours of audio and some of them. I look I listened back to a really hard to listen to. But then I sort of remember that they solidify me as a server not like a victim. So I kind of I'm like, well, I'm nowhere like that. I'm nothing like that anymore. So that's been really really healthy for me. And we all have that application on our phones, everyone if you have Instagram than you have that ability to talk to yourself and record. I also love sending it to people to friends. It's a really concrete personal thing to send I send it to my manager all the time. She's like, you're crazy. You sent a lot to Tisch for the covered endure ISIS in to tissue. Alec tisch. I just want you to know. I love you. Okay. By like. These weird sort of things, and I I just think they're really sweet they're like a modern day postcard. Let's talk about letter writing you write letters to everybody younger self. Yeah. Your older self your future, sell totally do write letters to people. You send sure I write letters to people. I don't know. I write letters to make believe people. I I write letters all the time. I think that there's something really special about a letter because typically when they when the person receives it they they just have to read it, and they don't they can't immediately rebuttal, and it really kind of soaks in differently than a conversation. Does even than an audio note something like that I write letters to my younger self to just sort of read like, wow, I went through all that stuff. I think sometimes we just hold onto only the yucky part, the painful part, and it's really nice to write a letter to a painful memory when I'm like sitting in a warm, comfortable just made nice. Dinner like, I'm okay. You know, I think that we forget the like your good like, you're good. You know, it was a hard day, but like you're alive. And I think the letter writing solidifies you as on a live person, which is really special, and it's also great to to write letters to people that maybe you don't know in a in a way that kind of that's a manifest property to give me give us an example. So like, I remember even like writing letter to like, a dream partner will let her that. I would write to a man that I loved so much or woman that I love so much because I never was really connected to one of the other. And that was a really great manifest sort of tool for me to kind of like, this is a person I deserve. This is a person and I'm calling to action. This is what I kind of want, you know, instead of just dating people to date people. I would write letters to these people. And when I even find myself in a dating scene, I'm like, this isn't the person that would get this letter. You know, like, I definitely and maybe that's like a little like weird and out there. But for me, really really works. What you do what you spend your time. Doing is call to action. You are what you do what you do with these letters. Sometimes I keep them burn them. Sometimes I send them sometimes I just I save them and put them away. I always date them. That's really really special. There's nothing crazier than like reading like what kind of partner reading a letter D wrote to your partner into eleven and it's like all different. But it really kind of gets you in touch with yourself, and it's a really tangible way to see growth, and I think a lot of times we don't think that we're growing or we don't think we're getting better. And like, wow, I was wearing pants a debt. We're like way too tight back in the day now, I can breathe. Yeah. I do all kinds of things. I sometimes I've me like scrapbooks with my letters. And you know, I send letters to my mom's still too. I don't know if she raised them. I sent him to her. You know, it's not about getting anything back. It's just the release of doing it. It's interesting that you said to see the growth. Yeah. That that you've done Cheever's accomplished because I think there's a tendency to think that there is a destination and once we hit there. It's like mission accomplished a few months ago. I saw Michelle Obama speak in Boston on the book tour was Donnelly a highlight of OD eighteen. Yes, I started crying before she even I trying watching your story. And she talked a lot about that about how there's so much pressure when you're younger, what do you want to be? When you grow up, and you're never one thing. And how ever she put herself out as an example of that did not grow up thinking, she would be first lady of the United States did not grow up thinking, she'd be the first black first lady, you know, all these things that she's done in a -ccomplish writer mother lawyer activists all these things I do think that we lose sight that we are these constantly evolving human beings and that life's the journey. You know, there is no destination. And we're just, you know, it's okay. If there are hundred different versions of us through a lifetime. Well, I almost think that it's like weird. If there isn't I guess that's kind of an and again, I think that for a lot of people that's a that's a bit of a privilege, and I feel like. I feel like my ancestors would be like disappointed in me. If I didn't do something like this with the privilege that I have, you know, and I say privileged like I'm privileged that. I have water to drink like that's how I think every day. I feel like it is my it's not my calling. It's not like it is my duty to let young people, particularly humans who call themselves women to let them know that like the multifaceted them that they feel everyday is like not only is it good is an important, but it's like normal. It's normal. It's all normal. It's normal for you to like want to know how to play the trumpet NBA, supermodel and cook really good and one escape board and like be really good at banking. That's normal. That's okay. Because we're elevated p who were humans. We have we have multiple feelings. Like, this is what I always think of if we have the power to like regenerate after a surgery, if we have the power to like, overcome cancer or disease, then of course, we're allowed to like skateboard. Like be a lawyer. But simple, that's like baby stuff. You know? What I mean? Like we can heal ourselves. Let alone like be anything that we want. And I just I want people to know that. And I feel like the biggest enemy that we all have is ourselves. I don't care if you have an abusive mom, I don't care if you have I had all that stuff. I literally have all of it. Don't don't have a family don't have Christmas traditions. Don't have any of that stuff. And it's none of us an excuse for me. It used to answer survivor which lie. I don't know. Yeah. Let people don't know that lost part of my ovary at twenty three which is. Horrible and scary. And also like like a weird sort of like who am I like people are telling you like you have to get hysterectomy? And you're like, wait what? So I was able to find a great physician that was able to treat it with radiation. And do I had a unilateral sell Pango elected me as a mouthful, but I had part of my over removed, and they were like you'll never have a period again. Happy to report. I have perfectly functioning ovaries they worked just fine. I think that as all the stuff that I've been through still here still exist. I'm still so like, I still do the work. I do every day and hopefully more and there are still things. I wanna learn how to do like the idea that you get older, and you kind of have to stop wanting to learn things is also kind of like gross. No, I love lifetime learning. Right. I wanna learn how to code the sheer hell God and same. I wanna understand code Mike, the person do my website. I'm like in my head. He's like in his house doing like Harry Potter magic. Like what we're saying? Exactly. What is it one other practice? I wanna talk about stress journaling because I had never heard about that. And I thought it was really interesting finding sort of the underlying thing that's really causing all this stress in your life. Yeah. That for me was was a big sort of another lying to myself like I'm just not doing enough after after my surgery. So I did this horrible silent retreat. It was horrible. It was terrible. I don't recommend it. However it change my life. So did the silent retreat, and I go in and out your loud a few contradictions. Oh my God. I go in. And of course, I'm like hi in there. Like looking at me giving me these stern faces like you can't talk. And I'm thinking. I really can't talk. And I have to do this for like a week. What am I doing? So I got this really great relationship with the journal, and I didn't just like right to right? I was writing about how annoyed I was that. I couldn't talk. This effing garbage. I don't like this wide. I think this is a good idea and before I got into it. It started kind of getting into became really negative. I was like writing about a lot of stuff. I don't like. And a lot of things that really is nasty which is still had this journal because it was a nasty one. And then I got out of it. And I was like look at all of these horrible stuff. I gotta handle this stuff. I going to handle how much I don't like myself. I gotta handle how much I don't like my my upbringing and how shamed of it. I am. I got a handle the stuff, and I think all the other stuff. We'll get better when I do and lo and behold when someone says listen so fi I'm doing it. All right. I'm not doing soy. I'm not doing corn. I'm not doing potatoes. I'm doing it. I'm like, listen it, then you're doing something wrong. There's something deeper wrong. And for me, I feel like it's stress and the so the practices for three. Three two three days to seven days. You write down everything that drives you nuts. And remember the journals for you. So you're supposed to be very honest. Aggravated honest, like I hate my roommate don't like my boyfriend hate my job. I don't like my commute. And then after that time, you really sit in assess it, and it's kind of nasty to really like. Wow. Oh my gosh. And what you might come to is like turns out, I only complain about my commute when I'm on the way to work. So maybe it's not my commute. Maybe it's my job. I don't like or what are some things I can do to make my commute better. Can I wake up a little earlier? Can I plan my outfit? Can I you know, and that's sort of for me goes into the apex of my brand of wellness, which is bio- individuality. Bio individuality? Yeah. So bio individuality is that what works for me might not work for Lou. But might work for sue, right? Like, not everything is going to work for you. You've got to find what works best for you. And the best way to do that is right. Your own stress journal your own food journal, you know, and even the way that I suggest food journaling. It's not about just writing down what you ate day threatening about how you slept that day. How you felt after you ate a certain thing. How many times do you get do you have you been asked in your life? What do you think you might feel like for dinner? So when people ask me the question, how our food and feelings connected. I'm like, how aren't they connected like wins last time you thought like you just you just eat to eat. Of course, your feelings are connected and there tied into that. And so it's the same with the food journals to same with the stress, and let's getting down to the bottom of where something's coming to. I'm all about solutions and getting to the bottom of things, and I feel like in a world of comparison eating. Let's talk about what's for you. And I think that when. I work with people. Now, I really try to get to the I'm working with them on them on how to get to the bottom of that. Then I feel like that to me is hopefully the future of wellness not like juice cleanses and like weird fifty dollars, yoga classes, hopefully. We're going to take a little break for a word from handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized eggs, then we'll be back with more wisdom from Sofia. And the return of our speed round. Handsome brook farm believes that organic and pastured is the way to go. When it comes to eggs pasture-raised means better lives for hens better lives for small farmers and better eggs for you. It's also better for chefs who depend on rich, flavorful, eggs, handsome, Brooke farms owned flock of amazing chefs their mother hens count on it and not Admoni is a mother hen. She's also the celebrated chef behind him Bella booster and Kish cash in Manhattan wants to learn how Sheffi not whips up mini. Herb omelet with salon tro, parsley and turmeric at home or maybe you'd like to make her read shock Shuka an aromatic spicy tomato sauce into a chain. Nestles eggs and lets them poach to perfection you can find Sheffi knots. Middle Eastern, egg Centric, recipes and videos on handsome brook, farm dot com. You can find handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized eggs at Publix, Kroger sprouts, farmers market freshdirect and many natural foods stores across the country. Today's program is brought to you by Koren, a supplier of Japanese chef knives in restaurant supplies, coroner's, proud of their Japanese culture and traditions, but they want you to know that their products are not just for Japanese restaurants, their knives and tableware bring out the best qualities of food from every culture and fit into every restaurant from French to pan-asian to American and that is why they are located in New York City where people from every country in the world come to eat Koren's. Tribeca showroom is home to the most extensive collection of Japanese chef knives in the world, including Japan stopped by view, their exquisitely designed tableware and the rarest natural sharpening stones. They have a whole range of knife services from repair and rest removal to reshaping and realigning core in is dedicated to this ideal bringing the highest quality Japanese designed to your table. So you can experience the unparalleled quality of Japanese craftsmanship in your home or restaurant. For more information. Visit Corinth dot com. Let's return to our conversation with Sophia row. So I would like to talk about your kitchen. I've had the privilege of hanging out in your kitchen. It's a wonderful cozy place very modest vary. But you have some tools and pantry items in there that you love a news time and time again. So can we can we walk through a few of those? Of course, my kitchen's real simple, I that's sort of my my brand of food. I don't think I think you can make the super fanciest food in a in a simple little kitchen. I don't think like listen, I have the pasta roller I have immersion blender like we got it. But like it's not like, we don't like you don't need it. I probably use the most disliked my my bench scraper like my micro plane because I don't wanna mess up my knives. And then my pantry Scott's a little weird. I use a lot of like coconut butter, which there's all this confusion on what is coconut butter. And it's kind of like what is almond butter. Right. It's the same thing. So I use that a lot I use it constantly in everything. Would you use? I use a ton of coconut oil. Yeah. What you use coconut butter HOGAN. Butter is a great way to make something creamy without putting cream in it. Like, if you're breezing something or if you're trying to make a little cream like little something a little creamy, white wine coconut butter, boom. I should've asked you this at the start. But are you one hundred percent vegan, not I'm I'm officiator your fish eater. I don't I don't need any land animals got it. So you're Pesca -tarian. Yeah. Yeah. Fishing moderation. Yeah. No laws vegetables. Also, not a gluten free girl. Gluten doesn't bother me. So I I don't like stress myself out about gluten I actually love making it from scratch for thanksgiving this year, I made pizza so from Turkey pizza. You mean only animals no pros. How pizza and like, you know, I just made a very nontraditional but pieces delicious to me year round. So I may piece of thanksgiving. So so you reach for the coconut butter ally. What are some other? I like lower a lot. I think that's one of my favorite flowers that people just don't talk about or don't use. And it's great. It's if you are someone who's grain for you fries up, really nice. If you want to kind of make like Tim poorer situation like a temporary battery it'd be like Salzer and like rice lower, but tell certain tapioca works just as fine. So I love tap yoga. You said a lot. And then I also really love making the an Rahman a lot. I do that a lump heavy like twice a week. So I make my own like broths with Khumbu. I use a lot of seaweed cook with Tennessee. We'd like a lot of seaweed, and you always making broths or do you pre make them, you know, I I always have like a my my my little pot in the back that I just throw all my like my garbage in just like once a week. You know, we do like a like. A like a broth with like pepper corns and lots of fennel, and yeah, all that good all that yummy stuff, and it's just kind of cook back there. And then we keep it in the fridge in the freezer, and it's always nice to have. But I love the way it feels to make broth that's like my favorite. I love making sauce sauce. More sauces are like the dream. They also keep eating better. Because if you if you make five different sauces a week, then you've got up shins what kind of sauce I love making a little like a curry dressing. That's like one of my favorite dressings right now like some tumor, Eric and pistachio oil. That's my favorite. I've always got like a salon tra- lime some kind of situation. Easiest one in the world champagne vinegar, Dijon shallot. You know, I always have that dislike kind of on. Hey like would up around. And then I do like a ginger one the Scott for his no chillis pickled shallots. So these are like salad dressing. They're just salad dressings or or sauces. You can mix with short or some break ins vegetables, you can breeze some fish with or just really nice to have like Simone some vegetables. It's my way of planning ahead. Think people think planning ahead means like steaming, sweet potatoes and doing the Keene wall. Maybe it does do meal. Prep totally on my God, I work from home. So like, you know, I love cooking. I obviously, but it's really so enjoyable to make food for myself because like for my whole life. I wasn't really able to make food for myself. So it's great like, I'm I'm a creature of habit. People are like don't you get bored? I'm like, no eight the same salad every single day. Do you have a sweet tooth? I don't. Well. However, I have the biggest like salty craving like I probably eat ten cups of popcorn every day. I heard you saying earlier that you don't have any vices except for popcorn. I was like, oh, my pretty funny. It's true. Let listen I go to the Nighthawk cedar with Toco bag, and I get to popcorns love that place and same idea two popcorns. And I just and they just already know. And I'm like if could you put this in this paper bag this like big paper bag that I go in there. And then they fill it up a little popcorn. And I'm like, thanks guys. Love you like, I love it. I make it for myself and making friends I always have it in my house at all times. And so I'm I like to snack for sure but not on anything. Sweet. So you said you could eat the same salad every day. Do you have a signature, Sal, I do Lhasa rainbow charts with chard radishes, cucumbers soup potato cauliflower brussel sprouts and right now tahini based dressing. I'm telling you, I got this. I know. What's it? And. Zucchinis? I'm really into those right now, tell us what you do with them the red beans. Yeah. I just cook them like, that's, you know, the great if you have the pressure cooker, but you don't need the pressure cooker. I love to make beans from scratch. The really really great cooking them properly with a little bit of comb boo boils out the Lagos Sakarai. So the all ago soccer aid is white beans. Probably if you if they make you gase, that's probably why your body doesn't have the enzyme necessary to break him down. But if you had a little comb boy in there, it kind of life. He is being played, basically if beings make you fart. Yes. Yeah. No. When they make you super super Ferdie. They don't do that for me because the way that you cook them so a lot of actually organic. I think Edens organics or day are actually if you look in the ingredients komo's in there. So a lot of brands are getting really smart and really hip to that. But it's the Japanese technique of just and it imparts no flavor. It's it really just breaks down it gives the beans the enzyme necessary to break down that that property that humans can't really digest. What like very well and tell us. About your shopping your grocery shopping routine. Are you do you like shopping the order everything? Would you do? I'm addicted to grocery shopping. I never met a grocery store it in love. I love him. Even like, the weird ones that like have a lot of packaged food. I'm like, this is sad. But like, I love it. I love being your I go to the farmer's market twice a week. I have to go at least once a week because I dropped my compass off there, and I'm can't, you know, I'm not gonna leave my girl house yet. Exactly. So which are your favorite of the New York City green markets while I go to union square because that's where the compost drop off. But I actually love coming all the way over here to Carroll gardens on Sunday because my mushroom ladies over there. Oh, she's great. Isn't she? Listen, I drive forty five minutes to come over here. And just hang out. I love this farmer's market over here. It's nice. And it's exactly what a farmer's market. Should be quick simple too many options. You don't get paralysis which happens sometimes in union square. Gosh, it overwhelms me. I yeah. You're like in a good way. You have options are great. And I feel you you're probably you probably do exactly the same thing. I do I feel like I have to spend my money at all the different farm Stanley to support as many of them as I can. So rather than buy everything from one like all by my cucumbers here all by mushrooms here. All by my carrots there, which I don't know. I guess that's not crazy. It's nice right reforms got a different thing. I remember when I used to cook. In the Hamptons every summer, I will go to green thumb, and they knew I was a chef. So they'd be like, listen, these red peppers or garbage. But you gotta get these very tailored plant, you know, like every crop has different level of nitrogen in the soil. So like, some tomatoes are good. Some aren't it depends on the crop rotation and the crop, whatever. But I feel like supporting is. Many people and as much as possible always what kind of game. And after also, you just taste to get a taste everything. I think sometimes some people forget that at the farmer's market gear encouraged to taste things because all right to be like, hey, I've never seen that before. What do I do with it that's super healthy? And I do that a lot too. Even as a chef. I'm like what is that? Crazy air loan thing is a good as it tastes good. What is it tastes? Like, what are they going to pair with? I think people forget to smell. Absolutely, well, nobody, and I feel like I've also always used to kind of drive me crazy because I feel like when I was younger, and I was worked in restaurants is pursuing house in Florida. I'd see so many chefs smoke, and I remember being like, I all I can smell the smoke. So kind of mess up your sense of smell. But I feel like you're smelling your taste are also connected. So for me, the only way to really cook anything is smell it. You know, I'm one of those weird people to like when I go out to eat smell things, and my friends are like what a weirdo. Why are you smelling? Oh, it's so important. I loved playing up some herbs at the farmer's market. Just like same reason that Rosemary that's launch show all of it. So I find I find there's something like really kind of healing saying that it will there is like. Yeah. Or even eat it. Yeah. Roma therapies for real white citrus. Always makes me feel awake. Like why? And it's citrus season. It sure is isn't it fascinating. How the planet gives you. What you need when you need it like how like cucumbers watermelon are like so hydrating and their season in the summer, and then lake sitters is when you really need your vitamin C because it's like sixties and like the planet. Really smart. Like, it's good. Do you? I'm sure you do this. But a roasting lemons, totally cut a lemon and half put it on parchment paper. And just roasted like you roasted vegetable totally I learned that technique from Sarah, Sarah, the two chefs behind Qismat in LA. Oh, I didn't know that. I mean, I think for but take him like further than you think. Yeah. Like lab. Really caramelized babies. I remembered there was a dish. And I couldn't tell you what cookbook was couldn't. It's shallot dish. It's a it's a five hour roasted shallots and in the they're they're like, but it's it's almost like it's like a torch show like a a low temp low Tampa. And I mean, it's a low temp five hours. No bake them at four hundred fifty just your baby burn your house down. I mean if I'm sane. And so all ideas that you take a lemon you you put the limit into. And then you keep adding you keep kind of adding lemon, and it's crazy because you realize the shall have a lot of liquid in them, and like they end up juicy and caramelized, and all it is crazy, but it's almost like the idea of a preserved lemon to like, I love a papal pickle homes, a whole lemon and just keep them in salt. You know, I used to what I used to do to for when for when I cooked I used to preserve a yolks though, take egg yolks and pacman Saul. And they get solid, and then you micro plane them onto things almost like cheese. But you can actually do the same thing with like up. You can do it with anything, you, can you can pack and preserve anything. But I think that citrus is a really actually just got a lemon tattoo. I did is. I sure what I did. Because you can't really. So lemons are everybody thinks a lemon is like the idea of it's fresh, and it's healing and whatever. But for me lemon signify cleanse like a cleansing. And I just I turned thirty. And I this is like I said as a huge big year of I for me, all my I have a lot twos. And they all means something to me. And I I don't know some people feel certain ways about tattoos, but a lot of chefs have tattoos and a lot of young people have tattoos, and there's a million reasons to get them. But for me, they're very milestone driven when something special happens. Then you know, like, I'm writing this book. So a lot of ideas, get the little light bulb. Everything had a mean something, but the cleansing thing is really big because I feel like. I never thought. I'd be. I never thought I feel so clear it and like good, you know. And I just so happened to feel like that at thirty. You know? And so it's also kind of a way messaging wise for me to be like so K for to like take awhile. I think that there's so many like this. Why here all the time? I feel like it's already too late for me. I'm twenty three and I'm literally one hysterically laugh because I am I am a thirty year old woman. And I just now feel okay about who. I am as a person. And I'm thirty years old. You know, and like, I'm I'm thirty years young with the heck I can do anything I want. So I think that for me the lemon really signifies like a freshness and a cleanse nece. And plus every person knows that nothing is finished with without some acid. You gotta like a little bit of vinegar a little bit of salt fat acid. He ought to have it one hundred percent necessary. And I feel like it's also the finishing step. So it's an oath to like to feeling feeling like, I complex something. You know, I love this. Really cool. Yeah. Well, I think that's a good place to stop. We're going to do the speed round. I'm excited. I'm reading we always used to do the speed round. It's kind of sad I stopped doing the speed round right around where we lost Anthony bourdain because one of my favorite questions in the speed round was if you had to be stuck on a desert island with any food celeb- who would you pick and my personal one was Anthony boarding, and I just stopped doing it after. That happy new year. We're going to bring it back. It's new urine. I also start. You know, I don't want the industry to kind of forget boarding. I think he gave us a lot read. Great storyteller. He just because he's not with us physically. I don't want us to forget about him. Of course. Not. So we're gonna fire some rapid fire questions at you ready. I'm ready to sure I don't I don't know anymore. Maybe I'm not ready. I sound. So sure. Okay. Okay. So here we go. Oh, gosh. Personal theme song. Okay. You know? This is very hard. And I was like if it's if it's a song by Freddie Mercury. Donna summer who I feel like our my honorary parents like even like physically I feel like if Freddie Mercury and Donna summer had a child. It would probably look like me. You have far. I is what I'm saying. They're my greatest inflation's, but it's got to be song by either one of them. Maybe like I want to break free. That's a beautiful Queen song. Crazy little thing called love as agreed cream song on the radio. Gotta be my Donna because everything radio like Donna's my besides like studs terkel who I love like in terms of like radio that's a random name to throw out random do not know who studs only leave it up to the girl has been like talking to herself and having a radio show since she was eight years old, and no that's a good one for all of you to look up. Yeah. Alright. Most treasured cookbook. Okay. Okay. Or one cookbook, you'll find it's it's a it's a regular basic old cookbook. But it's it's it's my mom's, and as many people know, my I don't have a relationship with my mother. However, I do have this old joy of cooking. That's tattered. I mean, it's in pieces. It's it's like, it's a seventies copyright. But it's got some of her handwriting in it, which is really cool to me. Yeah. Which I mean, it's got like phone numbers in like weird doodles, and like my mom did not care about cooking. But I don't know where she got the book. I don't know what the story is around it. But I have it, and it's very special to me favorite ingredients to cook. With. That is super hard. Well, I love cooking with cilantro. Which is so funny because we either love it or you hate it. And for me, if I could have it I I mean, I salon true salads for breakfast. Like, you can't have enough of it. Also, probably some kind of squash. You can make sweet stuff with squash. You could make pasta with squash. You can make squash tastes like meat. You can dehydrate you can Braise it. You can do anything with it. I feel like it's just such that or like cauliflowers really big hot one too. I I've I've I feel like I always end up cooking with that. I remember I made a the goal one time at this restaurant. We had to make a nut free Caesar dressing. And I used cauliflower no one could guess it. No one knew that. There was no nuts in the dressing. This vegan dressing who's delicious? Last book you read. This is so boring. It was working from studs terkel. It's my favorite book in the last book. I read a read it once a year, and I had to read it because it's the end of the year. So yeah, that's that's for sure. Yeah. Go to purse snack feel like I need to say that twice purse snack. Doesn't exactly roll off. Go to personnel golden berries. I've got them in my purse right now the dehydrated golden berries. They're my favorite even if I've ever eaten a Seri. I'm about to you're about to learn. Okay. Okay. 'cause they're amazing. I loved them. So as like a cranberry or some. Oh, no. But better, but better writer way, more floral a little bit funkier and very very interesting flavor. They're great to rehydrate and put in something like I did a stuffing recipe with them. And it was a real game changer was really interesting Yoma aside from the land animal thing one food. You just would never eat all that. I just not down. You know, that's really hard for me. Because I love everything textually not down with wha beans. They stress me out down. I don't like it. I don't love him. I really don't like I love beans, but let me tell you. It's never one that I reached for so no succotash. I'm good. But I love okra though, you know. But like now, I'm like, I don't I don't love that food that makes you smile anything spicy. I love Fresno chili like the second. You say Fresno Trillium, like talk to me any kind of jalapeno are charred anything charred. That's got some flame or some fire down Lubbock spicier, the better dream vacation destination Japan easily, Ben no, I haven't which is crazy because my grandmother's Japanese, but no, I I'm dying to go same. I'm going. It's two thousand nineteen. I'm gonna watch it. You guys do those nineteen. So is coming to Tokyo happening. Okay. And as promised bringing back the the question if you had to be trapped on a desert island with anyone food celeb- who would it be Imed y. Okay. So maybe it's a little personal. But I right now I'd say Yotam Otellini, partly because he's just. He's such a sweet beautiful gay, man. He has beautiful taste. I feel like he has such a crazy amazing story. I feel like I have so many questions for him. He's also one of the very few food celebs. That's made me look at food differently and made me. Question flavor, and the way that I taste things that I smell things and also visualize things, and it's really interesting for modern Jeff to do that. I always just really like challenged my taste buds in a really cool way. And I just think it'd be really cool guy to be on out. Maybe just like a really cool insight on something have you met Yotam yet? I haven't all my God. You settle that. You haven't even met him just dying. No, I that's what I can feel it. And I just I just love him. And I you know, all of his restaurants in London. And even the restaurants are like they're like understatement compared to him as a human. And the way he writes, a recipe also is really interesting and most of them are that I've tried are like super kind of full proof if you have everything and he challenges the idea, I don't I don't cook. Like that. I never wanna make a recipe that people feel like they have to go shopping for. However, he makes you kind of feel lucky and excited to be going shopping for these bespoke sort of interesting ingredients, which is which is really cool. I hope you get to meet him this year because I've. Interviewed him times. And I really had to sort of just like rain myself in and not be a complete. Geek, that's how I feel like I would be if I if I met him because I just what an interesting life, and he's so warm, and yeah, I can tell I'm telling you. I just feel like we're going to have an episode where a bunch of us just have a round table. And just talk about how much we love tomato lanky. He'd just call you when we lease. I will. I just love him. I love him so much. He's so great. We'll so if we love you so much you're so much. Thank you. You are we thank you for being on the cover. Doing what you do. That's always baffled me. Thank you for letting me have that. Great great. Great pleasure. That is to like, it's like one of the greatest things in my whole life. So thank you so much. Thank you for that gift. Thank you have a wonderful year. Same you to go. So of course, by what? That's it for today show huge. Thank you to so Fierro. If you don't have the new issue of cherry bomb, featuring Sofia, you can pick it up at places like CASA, magazines and New York City maven shop and San Diego and Raleigh provision in Durham, North Carolina. Thank you to our sponsor handsome brook farm, organic pasteurized eggs for supporting this season of radio cherry bomb special. Thanks to our associate producer, and our very own riot girl. Just Seidman just was our intern last semester. And now, she's a fulltime member of team cherry bomb and thank you to the ban Challah for our theme song radio cherry bomb is a joint production of cherry bomb magazine and the heritage radio network. Thanks for listening everyone. You're the bomb. All have what he's having. Hi, I'm Diana. I'm a Baker at Smith canteen in Carroll gardens. Do you wanna know who I think is the bomb? Julia Tertia n-, I admire her career co authoring an authoring cookbooks. She's the founder of equity at the table. And I love her post on Instagram with her wife, grace, volunteering and cooking food for those who can't. Thanks for listening to heritage radio network food radio supported by you for a freshest content and to hear about exclusive events subscribe to our newsletter. Enter your Email at the bottom of our website, heritage radio network dot org. Connect with us on Facebook Instagram and Twitter at heritage underscore radio. Heritage radio network is a nonprofit organization driving conversations to make the world. A better fairer more delicious place, and we couldn't do it without support from listeners like you wanna be a part of the food world's most innovative community rate. The shows you like tell your friends and please join our community by becoming a member. Just click on the beating heart at the top right of our homepage. Thanks for listening.

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