20 Episode results for "Slovenia"

QD 06: Best of Slovenia

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

28:54 min | 6 months ago

QD 06: Best of Slovenia

"Hello Travel Nerd and welcome to the extra pack of peanuts travel. Podcast WE'RE DOING. We're doing also instagram. Live so or excuse me this show that teaches you how to travel even if right now you're stuck at home and you can't travel and joining me today. Is someone who you know. We disagree on this country. A little bitch. I know you love it. I know you love it but maybe you don't love it as much as me or maybe do we'll find out in today's podcast. My wife my constant travel companion and fellow. I Guess Fellow Slovenia Lover. I love Slovenia. Do I love it as much as Croatia? No no I do not just. That's what I'm talking about. We just did a show. Savini verse. Cratia yeah throwdown showdown on our on our regular Tuesday. Podcast which you can go find on the podcast and a lot of you listeners. Out there thought that I won the argument put trump had a couple in his favor. I don't know I haven't live and tallied all the results. I thought I was doing pretty well into the comments. I heard a lot of love for Selena. Yeah Slovenia should get a Lotta love because it is a very beautiful country. It's small but that just means that it's easier to explore because you can see a lot of it in a small amount of time. Yeah I think that for my money. In boxing they always have the best pound for pound fighter. And I know you're not a boxer pound for pound fighter. Means like okay like if if someone was one hundred and fifty pounds fight someone. Who's two hundred and fifty pounds? Two hundred fifty pound is going to win. He's just bigger but pound for pound just means like who's the best you know compared to their size. You're losing me with this and what I'm saying is so menia packs of crazy amount of punch for its size for House. All it is and how much it has to do. I think it has the most to do for. Its size of anywhere that I've ever been in the world. Wow it's true it's true. Think about it. Think about and we're going to get into the Best Louis and I don't know the Geographical Square is the size of Jersey. It's about Georgia. It's smaller than Georgia or is much much bigger thing about it. We drove up. They know how much you love Georgia. So I'm just kinda throwing you hear. No I think I mean again without looking it up Georgia. My guess would be two and a half times. The size of Slovenia would be my guess all right so we want to fact. Check this rain as you speak and I'll check it or vice versa. That would be my guess. So all I'm saying is that it packs such a crazy punch because this country is tiny. It's the size of New Jersey. So if you're from the states we live in Philadelphia. We'RE RIGHT BY NEW JERSEY. We Know Small New Jersey. It's tied small and yet in Slovenia coast a little bit of it. Tiny tiny little. Have it you have the Alps absolutely gorgeous area up in Alps? You have awesome amazing postcard. Perfect little postage stamp sized capital of Luciana. And then you have. We didn't even get into like more of eastern Slovenia like we didn't touch that but we do go down south where it's just awesome so we're going to tell you about it here because we're doing our best of our favorite things that we did in Slovenia. We went there in twenty seventeen. We went there for our baby moon. We did Slovenia for about. I think it was a week. Are you going to check it? In fact we do Slovenia for about a week and we did Croatia for about a week and it was. I think I like Slovenia more than I liked Croatia this trip because we Croatian we did the Istria Peninsula of Croatia which is beautiful but my favorite part of Croatia is the domination coast the more southern part so comparing those two areas Slovenia definitely was a favorite of mine and we stayed in Lubiana for most of our time there and like that it's beautiful. Little City has great restaurants. Great coffee the little. The river runs through it so you have like pedestrian walkways on either side of the river. So it's just a magical little place and it's it's small so it's very easy to navigate and see most of the city in a few days. Are those of you who are watching TV? You see 'em fact checking this. Slovenia is seven thousand five hundred square. Miles Georgia is almost twenty seven thousand. So Georgia is almost four times the size of the Republic of Georgia. I I put in Georgia and it gave me the state state of Georgia nine times. The size of Slovenia they're tiny. It's small tucked right in there between Italy Austria. You know Croatia right in that little hub. A you know you also have. It's so easy I know we're just talking about it as its own little thing in. Its own little vacuum Slovenia. But if you're there it's so easy to get so many other places. You're basically in the center of Europe when you're probably you're probably close to somewhat of the geographic center so you can just all over the place. It's an awesome place. Okay so here we go here. We got the first card is best memory best memory. Oh Gosh I've got mine all right. This is the day so we took a road trip on the last day of our time in Slovenia because as I mentioned we were then going down into Croatia. And so what we wanted to do. We went up another day to all right. I'll give you this one. I we went. We stayed up in the Alps in the very north of Savini touching the Italian border and then we started there and we drove all the way down the versus pass up through in through the mountains down the verdict pass along the cow coast to the tiny little town. That's on the coast called pure on and then we continued all the way down eventually getting to split that we did not for a split. We went to all right right so then we went down in the coaches. So I mean we basically we did the whole western scientists on a roadshow. Probably be my favorite memory but I can have another one but I have another one too because I forgot him but I mean just that road trip is is stunning because you start in in the mountains and that I mean there was nobody else on that whole drive down the past in the name of the versus. Vr Rea- R. S. I think and the water in the rivers that we were going. I was just clear like clear water. It was very reminiscent anything. Because it's the Alps and you know you. You discuss the color of the water to you. Don't see that like greenish. Aqua color in rivers too much but it was really stunning and everything was green. And I would recommend doing Dr Phil like. You're at a hidden not off. Sorry about that. You feel like you're in a hidden gem because when you go to Switzerland or at least people know they're going to see that type of thing but when I was hearing Savini I just figured touches the Alps like the north of Country. Touches it but you know is it that pretty and then you're driving around. There's not many people. Aren't you think this is as beautiful as what I would see in Switzerland but I don't have anyone like I didn't know this unexpected? My favorite memory was obviously going to lake black guy but not just like blood we also. We spent a good amount of time at Lake bled and we sat on the little beach there but then we drove to that other lake to which was very cool and completely different from Lake blood and it was only about an hour drive. Yeah I lake bled. Quick little aside here. I knew nothing about Eastern Europe really when I was in high school and even college wasn't on my radar but my best friend from high school was doing a PhD program in Eastern European Tourism. Which I like. This is very weird. He's been podcast. My Buddy Nikki. You might have heard him. He was the first one to turn me on to Eastern Europe. And I just remember him saying Travis look at this picture and it was of like bled and the church on the island in the middle of like blood and I could never say all this Lavinia and of course. I didn't know what Slovenia was just like. Oh It's Luana Mike. I don't even know what you're what language you're speaking now but I remember that picture like I was probably early early twenties and it stuck with me even though I didn't know where it was I didn't really do much research. I just remember thinking Data Eastern Europe. I need to go there and so when we did. It was as gorgeous as I as the pictures and I swam all the way from beach. All the way out to the church and back amazing water too so mellow. We relaxed on the beach all day. It had a picnic. Because what more do you want? I mean there are restaurants on the one side of the lake. But we're we were at. The little beach will be John. I mean there weren't that many restaurants but there was a grocery store so we just went in got some food and had a picnic on little beach there and it was really relaxing. An obviously some of the most stunning scenery we've ever seen so that was. That was beautiful. Yeah it's one A and one B drive-thru versus pass and lake just lived up to sometimes when you have high expectations like versus anything about this. Might be cool no expectations. It was awesome lake. But I've been dreaming and thinking for Twenty Years and not twenty. I guess I would have been really young but yeah ten years and it just live you. Just like yeah. I've been thinking about this place and now I'm here and it's awesome. Yeah definitely all right. Next card is best activity. Best activity I know mine straightaway. That is just walking the pedestrian street. That's next to the river. It's so move on. Yeah sorry in Ludhiana and the trees that just kind of hanging over into the water. It reminds me of being in Paris a little bit. Kind of like a mini Paris. It's so beautiful and there are so many fun places to just sit and have a drink. Whether it's you know cocktail wine coffee a water. What have you? It's so relaxing. A beautiful and there's lots of restaurants and shops as well so you could just spend a whole afternoon going into the shops stopping to get something to eat continuing to walk and just wander and it's just so stunning so beautiful. Yeah I mean swimming in leg. Blood is my number one because I lived. I WanNa give you an off the beaten path thing hit that button on that other computer there so I can pronounce it right. I WANNA see the activities. There you go so there's two things two places I went. That didn't care about going at all. These are off the beaten remember. I was six or seven months pregnant. Okay and I think you had a bike to them. Yeah by so. There are two squatters villages now. This isn't for everyone. This is for me though. It's called Metal Cova. Is this abandoned army barracks that a squatters have taken over and turned into bars and like a village that is like an artist village and there haven't been kicked out the obviously the government knows they're they're a lot of people there. The the bars operate legally you're somewhat legally and it's just need to walk through. I felt a little uncomfortable so entering the people are looking at me right because it's the only people who live there then during the day but there were nice and just kept themselves so it was just very unique and then there's also another place that used to be a bike factory. That's a little closer Called the Rog factory. And that's another artist. Squatter village with a cool counterculture vibe that I went to as well. I love this kind of stuff. It's safe at night. If you went to mental Kover like the bars are open so you know. Keep your wits about you as you would if you're any kind of air with a bunch of bars but just we don't have that type of thing in the United States. Exactly right. I know it exist in other European places like these kind of places that spring up that don't necessarily legally govern themselves but for all intensive purposes do and so I loved it and I found out about it because there's a really cool APP for a bunch of different cities in Europe at a lot of smart cities called butts go and it's all about locals giving you like inside scoop on stuff that you might not know so download the let's go up on. That's how I found most of the stuff I wanted to play on and I wish they had it for every European city. Because it's just so bang on what it's like. It's exactly what I want to do. Because it's usually younger people writing it up and give me a bit of off the beaten path and they change it. I think every month so yeah and if you are wondering about this we do have a guide on the website for things to do in Slovene and we do have a destination diary recorded as well. I'm pretty sure totally but this is written up rate in there so you can easily access throw that in because I knew yeah. It's just different all right. Let's get moving we do have the compressor if you guys don't understand that joke. We talked about that in our other quarantine diary episodes which we should explain. Corentin diary. Episodes ARE WHAT WE'RE RECORDING. Unedited off the cuff shorter form. Usually that will be doing every putting out every Monday Wednesday Friday. Come OUT ON TV. If you're watching US and WANNA see us were also on the podcast feed as well but yeah thought we ought to keep it to fifteen minutes well. We don't. I mean instagram. We'll let you put up on. Tv video as long as sixty minutes but it does have to be an MP four formats to find a compressor. So how did some software sleuthing now? We can go longer because we're already almost fifteen minutes but we only have four four two media. Yeah packs a punch. This podcast pack a punch except it's not short. Just take it away. Travel could talk about Slovenia. I feel like for much longer than one hour but we will try to keep tight over the most beautiful sight Lake Bled. I Louisiana like downtown Lubiana by the go out at night and walk on both banks and have the bridges spanning over the river. There I mean yeah I I. It was beautiful but we would just go out at night and just walk around. And it's so easy to navigate. Walk around because at that big just one day. We did clock because I checked my phone and I didn't even have an APP open for health or whatever for walking and we had clocked like six miles walking. I mean we stop for Lodge Lotto during that time Yeah but I was very pregnant and so by the end of that night. I was like yeah. I want to go to bed and I went back laundered back out. It was beautiful so I'm going to give three downtown. Move ON OKAY. You can chime in if you have a different one. Definitely downtown. Lake bled goes without saying if. You've never seen a picture. Google you'll see. There's a church on an island in the middle of a beautiful lake gets its stunning and the third was when we went up to. Cronica Gorka and we stay the night right at the foot of the Alps. When I mean the foot of the Alps this is what was shocking to me is we were staying at this. Awesome like Swiss style chalet and we look out and we got there at nitrous dark. Like are those the mounds? It was almost like a sheer cliff. Face right on the other side of the road like the mountains just went straight up right there. So they're usually. You're either away from the mountain looking. I'm from Disney or you're in. We were just right at the bottom of a cliff face. It was cool. Yeah I actually think it was sunset when we were arriving so we saw them and then it got dark and then the next day it was super foggy so it was just shrouded in clouds. We've actually get to see them as much so we only got to see like them for a few minutes while the sun was setting the night before and it was beautiful really beautiful. I also want to say that the city of Peron I mean because it's the only little coastal met even more beautiful country. This is New Jersey but this is why it's awesome. This is awesome in other countries especially Croatia. You can find these men evil looking cities on the coast like all throughout the coast. Short for example. Obviously they want Dubrovnik the most famous one. Yeah but Piranha also has its little walled city on the coast. So it's really really pretty and we had some great food there so it's a miniature version of Dubrovnik and it's there's only three towns on the coast because they have a very small stretch of coastline but twenty kilometers or pure is like nick. It's just not as tourist in it can get it. All and travel engineer throwdown showdown. What we also did was. We ran into an e Pop. Listener appear on. We're there for like three hours. And we're walking along the walls by the water and Someone came up to us and it was like. Are you traveling heather? And then we got pictures of them. We've got to talk with them. And I think she was a native of Savini or Fenian Fransico. We know you're here. This is listening right now on the quarantine diarrhea. Thank you for making every day that that was awesome. All right the next card is best. Drink drink now. I was pregnant when we were in Slovenia. So my is going to be. Coffee did not have any wine or beer. But I think you found like a craft beer shop or something. Yup I did you want to go. I mean the craft beer is nothing to the guy very nice and very knowledgeable. The craft beer itself obviously is lacking a bit if you are a craft beer nerd because that's how it is in Europe especially Eastern Europe. But the guy was very nice I I just think so. It wasn't the beer as much as we got some beers and then we sat on the edge of the river just drinking a beer as the sun was kind of going down in Lubyanka remember. Doing that obviously wasn't drinking SIP. Yeah Yeah but my favorite was a Louisiana has a pretty good coffee scene for the small fair trade artisan coffee shops and my favorite was this place called sto which was kind of hard because it was in a museum. Ya bottom part of a museum. I think that you had to pay to go through the museum but you could just go into the coffee shop without going into the museum so finding it a little unusual but once you got to it it was kind of like in this cool space. That was almost the basement level but it had. It wasn't a basement. It was just like the lowest floor. Then open to the to a courtyard. This beautiful courtyard that you couldn't access unless you went into the museum. I'm pretty sure it was like all self contained so like you. Couldn't you had to get to the coffee shop to be able to see this amazing? Yeah courtyard kind of and have just a wall of windows four to ceiling windows looking out into the courtyard so it was just beautiful. We were there in August so it was very hot and to just go into this little oasis where it was cool because it was like this lower level and then you could see all this greenspace and the coffee. I mean talk about being serious about their coffee. It was like a coffee lab. Where they they do near Mental Coffee. Roaster like that anyway. They had amazing coffee even something that yes they gave me. What is the name of that? They gave me a Cherry Cherry of the fee of the bean and it was a colder drink starts with a C. I can't remember but I was like I hate coffee in the guys. Okay let me give you this. It comes from the Cherry of the coffee. Being I thought I would not understanding or as a translator and I'm like the Cherry and gave it to me and it was palatable like it was it was okay. I wouldn't drink a ton of it but I drank way more of it than I would have like straight up coffee so I looked good thing. We have phone here so we can. I just WanNa tell you. It's in the City Museum of Liana which actually itself is a coup museum. So you have to go into the city museum and then and then go down stairs. They also had really good pastries and baked goods. So I mean definitely will spot here really little spot really one of my favorite spots. I liked it too because it was just it was. Yeah it was like a hidden gem hidden there you go to museum like little coffee shops or the cafeterias there and they're just crap. This is just like the best coffee you're GONNA find in a museum for whatever is very cool. All right awesome spot and did you. Your best drink was the craft beer. Yeah I mean I mean whatever. There was a restaurant that would be the next thing best meal. This is my best meal so I'll talk about this and if I were able to drink wine I am assuming the wine at this restaurant would be amazing. It's called Vino and re bay. Which is why. Revamping is fit whining and whining fish and one of those eggs like the ceramic eggs that you have in the US. It's it's called the green egg on day. One of those there so they cooked the fish and other like we got callum arena and was so so so good and we just ate it. It's right on like that. I like rose was area. I don't think you could see the river from it. Who's one road bag river? It's very easy to find so easy to find. It was so delicious twice. I think and they have a whole wall of wine which made me a little sad. Because I couldn't have any and you like sit in the tables. It shows this pedestrian street. But then you're in the middle of the pedestrian chaser. People are walking by issue just like sitting out out. Beautiful AWESOME AWESOME AWESOME. French fry chips chips. Eyrie Bay was my favorite to what about the place in pure on where we got the Calamari? That was a good place to is called PIRATA pirate. I guess That that would be second or one. B got really good grilled Calamari. Their place called pure art in the seaside town of pure on. Yeah we love. I Love Calamar Grilled Fried I. I actually prefer growth over fried unless the fried is done. Not like all this frozen Calamar. I'm buying it at a bar. No I mean you need to be freshly. What is the word freshly crumb batter trust freshly battered and fried right there? Then it's legit because it's not as heavy batter these countries in the Mediterranean road at that so good all right last thing about Slovenia most surprising thing good. Oh Gosh I have to think I I mean same. Light Mine is kind of what we already talked about. I would say that there was so much to do there so I knew lake bled like we specifically went to Savini because I was like we're going to like I knew that would be awesome Lubiana. I had high hopes for but it was way better than I expected so I was surprised at I could live in Ludhiana like I know you make fun of me because you look at real estate everywhere and I can live anywhere. He always wants to live everywhere. Which is impasse. Alumina was one of the places that I've been that I said I was like I would like this would be high on my list. Loved the size love the walkability so easy to get to anything else so that was surprising but I think the most surprising was again. I didn't really know that they had amazing mountains. I when we got to like buds and was like you should keep going up to cross kgoradio. We're like what just to the top of the country. It's like it's only forty five minutes and you'll be up in the house and we. I think we knew what is there. But Not really. We just assumed they're like no. You gotta go up. It was like why would you go back to Lugano? We've done four or five days here. We went up and we're like WHOA. These are legit. These are the outs like. This is awesome so that is my most surprising thing is that I didn't really have mountains like that and chronic Gorba- which is right at the foot of it cool like I mean. It's not much of a town. It's just how cool little guest houses and great for skiing. Yeah go up there for skiing not Nagas when we were there but the place that we stayed at was hot spot for skiers and it was so cozy. The bedding was so comfortable. Oh I just remember being so pregnant in. That was the best sleep I had in those mountains the whole entire trip but my most surprising thing was just how stunning the city of Louisiana's and we didn't even talk about how we went up to the castle castle. There was really cool as well because high up above the city. So that was a really neat place to walk as well So just being a beautiful beautiful city. I mean it is hard to go wrong going to Slovenia. Because as heather mentioned you. You could go for three days. I mean yeah you'd be rushing around but you could go for three days you could. You could literally do a day in the mountains a day in Lake bled and then a day on. I mean you wouldn't miss kind of the WANNABES airy relaxing I would say five days would be a right but I mean there are a lot of countries you see. There's no way could do it in three days. I mean here feasibly. Three days by Beijing could see everything you wanted or you could spend five days just being in the aisle or just. I don't think it's been five at Lakeway. There's really not a lot to do there. Who's the summer and you just wanted to go to the beach all day. I mean there's not that many restaurants I personally spend five days to put in perspective. League is an hour and a little over an hour from Lubiana and it's like forty five minutes from the APP so I mean you can do it. One day you could hang out like in the morning. Go to the afternoon and drive right on back. Okay Fair Enough. Yeah good argument. Awesome country go. We love it. We love it. We Love Love. I can't wait to go back. I'm dreaming of like beaming with love for Slovak sponge best pound for pound fighter as far as countries. In my in my opinion my opinion I think that about wraps it up pound for pound wraps up guys. These are quarantine. Diaries have listened to this. Thank you obviously. You're listening to but don't forget every Monday Wednesday Friday. You can get our quarantine dyers if you're listening to podcast. Feed those are denoted by a q d and then the title and if you're watching. Tv Awesome. You can get it that way. Well don't forget our regular podcast. The regular podcast is still coming out every Tuesday as well. These are just in addition more travels of you. Yeah so hope you clearly. We love talking as well if you ever have a topic or theme or something you want to Discuss Ping us on instagram at extra packing peanuts. Let us know. And we'll put in the queue and we'll keep recording so is this quarantine last. Yeah sorry this was almost thirty minutes but we love you really love. Thank you for listening to.

Slovenia Lake Bled Croatia Lubiana Alps Europe Georgia Eastern Europe New Jersey Louisiana Ludhiana United States Selena Little City Savini trump Philadelphia Switzerland Louis
Croatia vs. Slovenia

Extra Pack of Peanuts Travel Podcast

33:13 min | 7 months ago

Croatia vs. Slovenia

"There's a lot to see and do in this country so there's no need to leave especially when you are applied with good food and good wine. So are we ready to go there? Are we ready to time out Vigo already you brought up in the world? Enchilada was all finding good. But it's not going to sustain you for a whole entire trip. I'll run on July auto all day every day. Well I happen to like a little more sustenance in my life in liquid for actual physical food form is the extra pack of peanuts travel podcast episode four hundred and Seventeen in Slovenia. There's a vineyard for every seventy people in the country that's small. That's a lot of wine. I'm super excited to have chased the sponsor of today's show because if you've been following for any length of time you know that chases been my favorite credit card company. Ever since I started learning how to use travel rewards points way back in twenty eleven the chase card that I've recommended for beginners. Just getting started has been the Chase Sapphire preferred card. It's been that way for years and still my favorite card for beginners. The best part about the Chase Sapphire preferred card is that it earns you chase ultimate rewards points which you can transfer to a host of great partners like United Southwest and high it or you can use directly through chase ultimate rewards and book any Flight Hotel or car rental with no blackout dates. It's an absolute no brainer. If you're looking to get started in earning travel rewards points the Chase Sapphire preferred is the card. You need to get to check out more information. All the great perks of the Sapphire preferred card plus the other great offerings from chase. You can go to credit cards dot com slash pop and see all of my favorites to be totally transparent. We do receive compensation from chase as a sponsor but all these opinions are my opinions only and you know I'd only ever recommend something that I absolutely love and use myself like chase so head on over to credit cards dot com slash e pop and see all of my favorites so a lot of people ask us. Is it really true? Can you actually take an extended trip to multiple countries in multiple different climate with just a care on backpack and the trip that we took to Savina and Croatia? Which we're gonNA talk about in. Today's episode is proof that yes it is true so this was about a month trip and we went to Selena and Croatia and then we flew to the UK and went to a very posh wedding out in the cotton swabs in one of the nicest areas of England and during that trip. I took just my Tortuga outbreak her backpack so we packed stuff for a trip to Craciun. Savina beach gear and kind of casual travel gear. And then we're also packed all the stuff that I would need in order to go to this wedding so a suit and a jacket and all that kind of stuff so yes it is possible if you get great carry on one that is big enough to fit all your stuff so Tortuga has both a thirty five liter and a forty five liter size. I prefer the forty five liter size. And if you get a forty five leader to backpack it is possible for you to be able to take a trip and extended trip. Maybe over multiple countries multiple climate with just to carry on backpack. So check it out or two backpacks dot com slash e pop. That'll get you ten percent off. But you have to use that special linked to a two backpacks dot com slash e pop to get ten percent off anything you order Hello Travel nerds and welcome to the extra packing peanuts. Travel podcast the show that teaches you how to travel more while spending less. I'm your host Chevette Sherry and joining me. Today is someone who says I don't even care about that and still kicking my butt in our survivor fantasy poor survivor the TV show my love and I'm still getting crushed by someone who says she doesn't even care about it. My wife concentrated companion. How they're that just shows you. How competitive I mean I like to win. I have put in a little more. This is the second time we've done that survivor pool The first time I didn't even finish doing it. Because that's what care about an but this season survivor is more interesting. I'm a little more into it so I'm giving it a little bit more thought than next to nothing survivor. Winners at forty something. I've been waiting for for twenty years right. You're such a nerd. And then I look at the sheet of Mike. How am I losing? Heather's killing me so hopefully get some revenge in today's show because we're doing it throwdown showdown our third party she? She don't think you're going to be vindicated here because this is my country others already said she's going to. She's said to me multiple times in the last couple of days as we been getting ready record this I'm going to crush. You is what she said. I feel very confident. I baby on the underdog guys. Maybe you're rooting for the underdog. Here today I would say my country is definitely an underdog because today during our throwdown showdown we are doing Croatia vs Slovenia. So obviously. If you've listened to the podcast you know which one I'm choosing heavens Croatia. I am Slovenia and during our throwdown showdown what we do is we take opposite sides and we debate which one is better so if you guys like this format we've just put out the last two weeks we we did. Nashville Verse Austin Than. We just also put out Ireland versus Scotland. So you can go listen those and then if you throw it back. Talk Tober twenty eighteen I quote unquote season of our third showdown. We did Portland Verstraeten coober. We did Thailand verse Bali and we did Eastern versus Western Europe. So there are some goodies in there as well so check those out and then of course let us know on social at extra pack of peanuts on Instagram. Who won this battle so half were Croatia Verse Lavinia? Today we save this to last of the part series because this like this is the day new mall the Climax Actually Dana Ma I think goes up to the climbers either way. This is the climax of it we are. We both love these countries but you know Croatia has a very special place in your heart so he has a very special place in my art. So I'm ready to go to war. I'm ready I'm ready for you. I mean when people ask me what my favourite countries I stay Croatia and it hasn't changed in years. We've been there three times. I love it so much. Sure tell us why started off you again? I'm not holding back here at all. I have is actually legitimately stretching out right now as she. I'm radio I'm not holding back here not hold back. I know you all because you say you want to crush Croatia. Well I don't even know where to begin because there's nothing really bad to say about Croatia. It's a gorgeous country. It has so much coastline. I mean it's okay so geographically. It's across the Adriatic Sea from Italy. Italy gets a lot of love for its coast cities all of that. It also is heavily touristed so Croatia. We'll becoming very popular and mortar should still has less tourists. I think than some of the bigger countries bigger most populated or not most populated most touristic countries in Europe. But it just has this vibe where people are friendly. It's just as beautiful if not more beautiful in some of these other countries. I mean we're talking a thousand miles of coastline if you like if you like the beat if you like being near the water this is the country for you. So it is beautiful. Of course I love creches. Well I think Slovene is even more beautiful. Why because it has more going for it as at least as far as for its size so this country punches above its weight more than any country I've ever been to. It is the size of New Jersey New Jersey so means this is New Jersey and yet it has a little bit of coastline very minimal. One town one mile coastline. And it's gorgeous so you can. You can get it you can go to the town of Piron. Cute Little Town Great Food. So you've got coastline there but what makes Lavinia so gorgeous to me is the fact that it's got everything else as well. It doesn't just have the coast. It has lake bled to this day. One of the most beautiful place. If you've ever been in the world and when I saw the picture of lake bled when I was like fourteen or fifteen years old I remember seeing it having no idea how to pronounce Lubiana. No idea where Slovenia was but saying I will go there one day. There is a lake with a church on an island in the middle of it. I will go there. We went their lives up to the hype in person cool so people know about that lake bled. They might have heard about you. Know they might not have known so. Many had a little bit of coastline. Same coast basically as Croatia. Just a lot less of it but what a lot of people don't realize is has the Alps in it as well so you go up to cranks Gorga. You got to some of these errors. You're in the Alps. We stayed at a hotel or this little awesome guest at the foot of the Alps. So you can say in a country. This is New Jersey. You have the Alps. You have stunningly gorgeous on you have one of the best lakes in the world and we haven't even gotten to the picture perfect little posted stand capital of Lube Lithuania. So to me. That feels like a rehearsed arguing. Were you practicing map before we did this? Podcast I thought this was be no preparation. No rehearsal it's been in my head for a long time. I told you on common with the big guns. Come with the beginning. Well for your lake bled. We have in Croatia about you know. I don't know a thousand islands. Yes that's right. Well over one thousand islands one of which has its very own little monastery on an island in the middle of the sea kirk monastery. We didn't actually go there. But I knew you were going to bring up like blood and when we were in Croatia this time we tried to go to put. Bj LAKES SO Croatia while it may not have the elps has so much natural beauty and it does have mountains are much smaller and if you drive quite a ways off the coast you can get to put bj leaks. We went however because it's so popular now we weren't able to get in because it's better to get a reservation. The next time we were able to go in the park was going to be like five hours from when we were there so we just decided to skip it however when we left there somebody said well. You should go to kirk waterfalls because there are actually bigger than put. Vj they're just not as touristed so you can see some of the most dramatic national parks in Croatia with these waterfalls in these pools of just like beautiful greenish blue water. I mean it's just stunning stuff. Just Google at people. I mean Lake Bled. D You have waterfalls. Yeah you'd be able to see put. Vca Lakes if it wasn't so touristy in Croatia and that brings me to the point of Slovenia being way even though it's right next to cratia being much further off the tourist path. I mean all you gotTa do is head to Dubrovnik a beautiful place in Croatia in the summer. And you'll know what I mean. Cruise ships coming in dumping loads of tourists between nine and the PM so much so that you can barely walk around. Listen I love Cratia I would love Cratia lot more five to seven years ago when we first went and it was way. Less tourist. In. Then game of thrones came king's landing Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah drives. Them drives up the tourist stuff in CRATIA. Meanwhile right next door its neighbor to the north. You've got Slovenia undiscovered little gem very few tours when even when you're at like one of the tourist hot spots in Slovenia it's mostly it's mostly lenient. It's mostly locals or people coming from the surrounding countries because it's so small so you're saying what you're saying it's true about debris gets rammed however you have to go there because it is literally one of the most beautiful walled medieval cities that you will ever see in your lifetime. It's stunning it's gorgeous. Oh my gosh. Don't even stay in the city. Stay above the city like we did. We had a panoramic windows in our AIRBNB reaches look down onto the city and see its beauty and then when you get sick of all of those tourists you just go to one of the thousand islands whereas wave last. Valle's number way less now because you know you can live like a local there. There are so many islands Var branche we went to we went to. Slatni rat wood rot which is like the most famous beach in Croatia with. It's like very unique peninsulas shaped like jutting out into the sea. It's just absolutely stunning. You've also got Kortua. Oh my gosh talk about a gem of a place this island rate off the peninsula. I loved it there. I love it so much. It's pretty remote. I mean you can drive to it. You can take a will. Actually you can't drive. You have to take a ferry so if you go in from split you take three hour ferry which I have to say it was not that Nice or you can go in from Obama. I think and that was like a fifteen minute. Very this island was so beautiful. We were there in. May which is like a little early but there were hardly any people. There are no real tourists. It was gorgeous. There's plenty of spots on there. That are remote. I mean the Old City of Kortua is inevitably self a gorgeous Waldman Evil City. I mean there's so many beautiful medieval cities on the coast. Okay so maybe you have the Alps but you have many will cities on the coast. You have one. I mean it's cute. But it's like so tiny interracial you have so many I don't know how many many will cities but you have a number. That's an island so I just. I'm sorry I know one if you've seen one you've seen them off to keep him out and end coast verse just more and more coast. I'm going to say to. We're talking cities here. We've been now to the capital of Croatia and we have been to the capital of Slovenia which is Louisiana and for my money. Lubiana all day over Zagreb. Zagreb cool like I did enjoy it but it was a big city right or bigger city needs spot. Lubiana if I was GONNA pick a European capital living. That would be right at the top of my list again. The perfect size in terms of the fact that you can have everything that you want there including bit of a trump card here. The world's Best Gelato true special auto find itself in Ludhiana Slovenian. Not In Italy folks but you have everything you could need coming in and out of airports you know stuff like that airport real easy to get into a real easy to get to and all that but it super walkable. You've got the river running right through the middle and you're talking about like to use words stunningly gorgeous and and in this part of the world that is apt. I have not seen a prettier city. Then Lubiana I mean you go out at night and they have you know on both sides of the banks of the river. Everything's all lit up. You feel like you're walking through a Disney representation of what a European capital should look like and because it's so small you can walk anywhere that you want and not get lost like we could. We didn't get lost so I love the fact that it's gorgeous any European capital. I've been to but it's so small that it super accessible I other than you know. We're comparing somewhere like Vienna or or places like that. That are also jaw dropping beautiful. It's just a miniature version of that. I'll take it because I'm a generous person. I will concede to the fact. That Lubiana is more beautiful and quaint than Zagreb Zagreb. It is a cool city. We were there for one or two nights. It's Nice. It has some beautiful architecture but having that river and the pedestrian walkway on either side of it in. Liliana is something absolutely gorgeous. As I like to say or stunningly beautiful. Whatever it is it is however I mean. There are so many more cities in Croatia. That are sending in my opinion. Because you've got. We've got nick which we already mentioned. And even while it is a little bit overrun with cruise ships. Coming in and out. It is in my opinion the most beautiful city I have ever seen. And it's it's also small. Then you also have these other medieval cities where every and it just feels like. You're living in a different century while also just being on the coast so you have split which is Gorgeous Diocletian palace which is one of the oldest Roman ruin. That's preserved you can walk through it all. There's lots of fun restaurants shops and it's really gorgeous and it's right there on on the coast where you can have the biggest ports in. I think the biggest port in Croatia isn't split. You can take the ferry to all of those gorgeous islands that I have mentioned so many times. You've also got Makarska which we did a road trip. I mean talk about road. Tripping is one of my points as well. Croatia is one of the coolest road tripping countries. Because there's so much coast you can. We drove from Zagreb down to split. We stopped a way off the way apple. Vj Lakes but we drove from Zagreb to split. I mean that drive was not so epic however split down to Dubrovnik is gorgeous. We stopped Makarska. The very first time that we did that. Talk about a beautiful Queen Little City. Oh my goodness I have the picture hanging up in our house. I loved it so much. Then you also have the drive on the Pelvic Peninsula did Korcula and then we drove from Kortua down. Yeah you rolling your eyes because you know. I'm winning this one. I mean it's all coastal drives by the C. You Know No. We drove through the mountains as well again not the Alps but the rockiness of them juxtaposed up against the does see. I mean seeing mountains. That's everybody's dream. That's why like Slovenia. Could you got the Alps? You got real else or not next to see. I mean we have the mountains right there. I'll be there a little bit smaller than the Alps. A lot of bit smaller. They're still striking next to the Ocean. Like the city's just. Kinda go up and that is just stunning to me. So you've got Makarska Dubrovnik Split Korcula. We've got revenge in in history and the northern part of of Croatia. There's just so many gorgeous places to see now. My heart lies in the domination coast. That's where it's at for me but history is also you know it's it's it's a cool place to be issues okay. Dalmatian coasts is my faith one of the things that I love about Savina and Lubiana specifically is the fact that you are so centrally located so people don't know where SELENA's I don't blame you it again size of New Jersey here punches. Well above its weight creches cool but it gets pretty remote like when you get down in Dubrovnik and you get down split like you are starting to get very far from anything else. Obviously you have the water on one side your Bazi on the other side so you can get the Sarajevo. But you're certainly a long way away from anywhere else in Europe and then you sit in Slovenia and you say wow right to the West is Italy. I could pop on over to Venice. Milan right there. I could hit up Switzerland. Variously only co OP in Austria boom. Vm Sows Berg. I'm in Bratislav. I'm up in Budapest. Let me go up to Prague any of these areas. You're you're sitting at such a central point of Europe especially of that region of Europe which is considered. You're basically right. It's funny because they call themselves Central Europe right. You're basically right in between Western and Eastern Europe. And it's such a hub to get anywhere that you want to go so that you could sit there. You could take the motorways very very European saying the motorists there or you can just hop on a train and you can get to any of those big cities and they right at your doorstep. Where if you're going from Croatia you're definitely going to have to go and get on a flight or you're gonNA take a really really long train ride to get to any of them so for me. The accessibility to the rest of Europe. When you're sitting there in Lubiana like if you look at a map it just pin it. It's right there next everything else. You can just go anywhere. Your little heart desires including amazing places that we talked about Buddha Paschke sovereign. Even we're not talking about those countries we're talking about Savini. I'm just talking about the fact that you're you get to any of that and you know you want Slovenia's small so you might want to go somewhere else because it's not that big whereas when you're in Croatia you don't need to go anywhere else because you have over a thousand islands over twelve hundred miles of coastline. You've got hiking if you really now. Twelve hundred miles. I thought it was a thousand much. You got stat. Oh sorry no. It's a thousand miles of coastline and over twelve hundred islands. I you know I mean. There's there's so big there's a lot to see and do in this country so there's no need to leave especially when you are applied with good food and and good wine. Are we ready to go? There are we. Are we ready to out? I brought out Vigo already. He brought out in. The world. Enchilada was all finding good. But it's not gonNA sustain you for a whole entire trip. I'll run on July auto all day every day. Well I happen to like a little more sustenance in my life in liquid for actual physical food for Him Croatia. Some of the best wine in the entire world. There's so many amazing wineries both white wine and red wine. I think that people talk about wind. They talk about Spanish wine and talk about Italian wine even French. You Know Champagne what have you? Croatia has so many amazing wineries. And again you can drink wine in these medieval cities. They have wind bars. They also have incredible food. Go ahead saying yes The best meal I've ever eaten was in a very UN touristed remote part of Croatia culture stack and we went to the seafood restaurant there as we drove down the pell Jezek peninsula. It was the best if we ever have. We got the seafood platter for two. It was enough to feed three adults in Mensa. I'm really just amazing. Grilled fresh seafood caught that day. You know by the owner of the restaurant. Who's the fishermen WHO's the chef? It was so delicious like we still dreaming about in talk about it. And that's just one meal I mean. They also have amazing local cheeses Croatian cheeses they have amazing cured meats the same as you can find in Italy but you know Kareishe should does it to it. Has that whole vibe of the local cheeses and the meats and the winds and they do a lot of like the cantaloupe and per Shudo. We've had they're just so good so fresh I love it. It's my favorite thing to eat and that paired with the wine of Croatia I mean I could just I could live there in fact hopefully someday maybe I do live there. Well you know that. I don't have much of a leg to stand on when it comes to fighting against Vittachi. Which is the best meal that we had on record on this podcast of saying? Both of US agreed. That was the best meal that we had in two thousand nine hundred nine so fine. Amazing seafood in In Croatia the Food Lubiana and the food in Slovenia itself. I think has a bit more variety. So they do have incredible seafood. There Vino relay which is right in Savannah we love but they also have a lot of I would say maybe more eastern European influence food as well. So you've got your Barack. You've got your Your meats your shave appease things like that so while there is not a restaurant that stands out at quite as much as Petacci in Croatia. Which is our favorite meal two thousand nineteen. I think that they're that Savini as a whole it's gastronomic influence and its gastronomic Kind of identity is up there with Croatia and I think that there's a little more variety in Slovenia and Croatia. What else am I going to say? I throw on top of that as you've already mentioned the beautiful delicious creamy incredible Gelato at Vigo and Yeah I'm going to say that you know there's some good eating and some good drinking and Slovenia as well may not their own wines not much of wind guy but there is some cool stuff there the last point for me for Slovenia as why it's better than Croatia and this goes along hand in hand with the touristy thing is that Savina is also now cheaper. I'm not going to say much cheaper than Cratia. There are some things that are much cheaper right independent where you are with. The tourist crowds to Creche has come a a rise in price especially for like accommodations and stuff. So if you're going in the peak season not always going to be really crowd. It's GonNa be pretty expensive. I mean we're talking Western Europe prices at this point. It's true we I went there in like two thousand fourteen. I think and it was much cheaper than it was last year when we went. I mean so for me. I'm sitting there saying. Listen it's cheaper get to Safina while still a bit more undiscovered be like the people who went to Cratia fifteen years ago. You feel like you have a hidden jam at your fingertips that people have not discovered yet. I just to me that holds a lot of sway. This idea that there's less people s people who know about it it's a it's a bit under the radar it's a bit of a hidden gem it's cheaper and I just love the fact that Slovenia for being so tiny has everything. I could want a great little city. A little bit of coastline super accessible to the rest of Europe. And some really cool stuff right around. It Lake bled and the Alps right there in a country. The size of New Jersey. So for me is Slovenia. I mean Slovenia is a beautiful country. But for me I love being near the water and twenty miles of coastline. Just is not enough for me and while Piranha is a cute. It'll teeny tiny city. I much rather have my pick of ten plus coastal cities that are like Perran. I mean even more because when you come at the islands in like we were on court. Shula incorporate self has its own little medieval city. When we went to the island of we went to bowl and that was its own little city. I mean there's just so many you could we haven't even seen all of CRATIA. We've been there three times and I just want to keep going back because there's so much more to see and you know as far as affordability goes it is a little bit more expensive than Slovenia but it's still cheaper than the coastline in Italy. The coastline in France. I'm I don't know I mean about speen in in Portugal but it's still pretty fantastic as as for as for affordability. Well you guys have it. I we didn't hold back. We went at it. Savini averse Croatia. Let us know a which you prefer if you've been to them or which you prefer even if you haven't which. Where do you want to go but important? Maybe even more importantly let us know who want. Who is the winner was it the underdog Trav- stumping for Sylvania or was it the big bad Croatia? Let us know which you think instagram at extra pack peanuts and we should say as we wrap up this throwdown showdown series. If you have more that you want us to debate. This is how we got some of these ideas with people giving us we said we've done these throwdown showdown in two thousand eighteen October. Two thousand eighteen. What do you want to hear and people gave us some incredible recommendations? That's how we formed these. So if you're listening to this throwdown showdown the last two that we put out the last two weeks. You can go listen to those other ones where we did Austin verse Nashville and then listener. Recommendation was Ireland versus Scotland. So that was great And then in two thousand eighteen. We did Portland verse. Vancouver Thailand Verse Bali which I think the gloves came off much in that one is in this one and then eastern versus Western Europe so we really went at it for Eastern Western Europe. So you can go listen to this. Throwdown showdowns obviously anywhere. However you're listening to this you can go into those as well thank you. We truly appreciate the support. Please reach out to us now. During the throwdown showdown let us know who you think was the winner here will probably be able to put up an instagram store south. I don't I don't know how to do those. That we can put up holes right sure of who on that and then if you would leave us rating review that's super helpful have religiousness You guys heard our call to do that a couple of months ago and we got a bunch more ratings and reviews. That's always super helpful. If you can do that for us truly appreciate that and as always which really appreciate the support that you've given us that makes us one rated travel podcast out. There pat it sad that we're not going to either US places right now because now. I'm just dreaming of awesome seafood checking out the Alps. Delicious Gelato Yeah. We go back. We love it so much. So thank you guys for listening and until next time. Travel our own know

Croatia Slovenia Alps Italy Lubiana Lake Bled Europe Dubrovnik New Jersey Croatia Verse Lavinia CRATIA Vigo Zagreb Chase Sapphire Nashville Selena Sapphire Enchilada US Western Europe
561 Green Oslo; English Cathedrals; Slovenian Cuisine

Travel with Rick Steves

51:19 min | 1 year ago

561 Green Oslo; English Cathedrals; Slovenian Cuisine

"Imagine how the medieval cathedral, your visiting would have looked to the people who lived there when it was built the people in those days would have lived in little one story wooden shacks and they'd arrive in sight like that. And it was like a preview to heaven. We're exploring the gothic churches of England in the hour ahead. What's for lunch? Try the cuisine of Slovenia to find out how the crossroads at the Slavic Latin Turkish in Germanic worlds can produce some tasty results. There's quite a bit of pasta fish salad like Mediterranean dishes. They're also known for the medicinal qualities of their herbal brands, and we like to say with everything that grows all the flour sold. The herbs just dip them into schnaps. And learn how every day is Earth Day in the capital of Norway. Also, actually has become like the electrical vehicle capital of the world's come with us from the green capital of Europe to the sacred space seven English cathedral on today's travel with Rick steves. You don't need a car to get around. And also, in fact, there are a number of reasons you don't even want to car to get around and Oslo we'll hear how the city earned its reputation as the down to earth green capital of Europe. In just a moment. We'll also get you ready to visit some of England's impressive cathedrals in here. How variety is the spice of Slovenia S. We learn about it's multifaceted food traditions. That's all in the our head on today's travel with Rick steves. Oslo? It's a small capital just about six hundred thousand people of a big, but sparsely populated country. As a matter of fact, it has far from Oslo to the north end of Norway as it is from Oslo to Rome, but only five million people live in the country Norwegians are famously close to nature and their leaders in caring for the environment. And we're joined now by a proud Norwegian to learn more. Paul Johansson was born and raised in Oslo. He's a computer engineer made his own startup company and decided, you know, he just likes to show people around his beautiful country. And he's been a guide for many years and Paul joins us now to tell us what's going on in Oslo Paul thanks for being here. Thanks, rick. So tell us about where you live and just personally how environmental concerns would be part of the life of young or region. Yeah. So I live in in Oslo, and I live in not downtown but pretty close to downtown. I can easily walk to downtown. If I like, and I said walk. Emphasized underlined bold. That's basically how I get around. I don't have a car. I never owned the car. Most of my friends don't have cars, you have a public transit pass. Yes. I do you know when the trams going and you hop on. You don't really have to look at any schedule you go. I go with my closest tram stop or bus stop. And I know there will be a bus or a tram coming in about seven, eight minutes maximum. So in Oslo, of course, you may have environmental concerns and celebrate not having a car. But it's also a practical thing it's expensive to have a car. It's cheaper is the government. Subsidized public transit. You have a special pass that encourages people to use it for young. It's also expensive to have cars because the local government has made it very expensive to have a car. Well, this is what we're going to talk about. Here's this green approach and in a green friendly society doesn't just happen to takes a I guess a populous to elect to government that then wants to take leadership in this in Oslo was recently, awarded the European green capital. Yes, we are. And. We are super excited about that. This for twenty nineteen Oslo is the green capital year of Europe. Yeah. So what were the problems, and why would the people who made this word be so impressed by Oslo? So I I just wanted to point out how important this award s it started back in two thousand and ten and it's a war that has become increasingly more important because today more than half off the bird population. They live in cities, which means that if we can have our cities to be environmentally friendly. It will make a big effort for the planet's very slight. Yeah. So traffic has always been the big problem in all slow, especially in the winter when it's cold, and and you don't have a lot of air circulation the standstill so on certain days during the winter if you have asthma or beating problems, and so on you, basically can't go on Oslo in hostile you wouldn't think that, but that's how bad it is. So it's been changed. Now that is changing for example last year on certain days during the winter when the will. Too much pollution in the area. Right. The local government said that if you have a diesel car, you're not allowed to drive today. Okay. So that's one straight dramatic other measures that we have taken as to build new tunnels twenty years ago. All the traffic went through the city. Now, we have tunnel that goes under the city and under the fjord. Now that's interesting because I've been going to Oslo since I was a kid in the harbor front. It used to be a noisy, traffic mess. Now. It feels like a pedestrian friendly park, and you kind of wonder where all the traffic. I mean, this is a big city six hundred thousand people people got to get to work. It underground. Yeah. Silent. Is there a fee in London? They have a congestion fee when a car comes into the centers or anything like that in Norway. We have rotates. So whenever you go drive into Oslo. And now also when you're out the fall slow you have to pay a road tall. There is an exception though, that is if you own an electrical car, right this rotel. This is. A tough love from government at once a green future it is. So you can you can potentially save a lot of money during a year. And also have actually has become like, the electrical vehicle capital of the world. I've heard that tesla. Green car that's quite expensive. Yeah. It's one of the best selling cars, Norway. It is is actually the most selling place in the world is in Norway after California. What would be an incentive for a Norwegian divide tesla? So there are two reasons here, of course, Norwegians have good economy. So they can afford to buy tesla. But at tesla is actually considered an affordable car in Norway. And that's because there are no taxes on electrical cars, no taxes on electrical car taxes. You don't payroll tells you can drive in the in the public transit lanes, you can sort of skip the line on way to work, and there's a lot of places where you can charge it, and it's just very convenient to own. Yeah. I'll never forget. I was standing in Bergen. And it was like this tesla drill fine. There's no cars here. What's this? Tesla. Do it in my own Tesla's owned the road. If you have Tesli you can go anywhere you can park anywhere subsidies on this and with the high taxes in Orleans so on when all the descendants at tesla is no more expensive than a Honda maybe a little bit. But still still isn't affordable carnival car and affordable. Well, that's leadership from your society's view. What is Norway doing from a technology point of view to combat climate change? So there's one big technology, which actually, unfortunately, it still quite unknown to the world in general. But it's something that we invented about ten years ago, and it's about cleaning carbon dioxide out off emissions from cars, for example. So we had on prime minister ten years ago. And he said that is famous quotes that this is our moon landing. This big initiatives is how big this been prestige project has spent billions of kroner on it. And I can give you. An example, how this works. So we have a tunnel in oscillates called opera tunnel. If you go to Oslo, you will see him just by the other two big chimneys coming up so old emissions car. Emissions coming from the tunnel. They go through the chimney. But before they go through the chimney they pass through liquid and some chemical that captures all the CO two. So all the bad stuff. And then they take that liquid and they boil it. So it comes guess, and they take the guests and put it on big tanks ships, and they transport that gas of into the North Sea and puppets down into empty oil wealth. And then the sea were excess sort of normal lives, and then after a certain amount of years, this gas turns into rock, this is a radical new technology could be hopeful for helping mitigate a lot of problems caused by fossil fuel. Yeah. And you can also use it on on waste-burning plants. For example, you put this technology in the chimney, and you remove the sea of two so Norway's a tiny. Entry. You know, if Oslo designating perfectly it hardly registers on a global scale. But yeah, I'm Ken inspire other countries that are bigger contributors to climate change is is there a sense of that in Norway that your leaders in that regard. There is certain as that's also big part of this award that the Goths dot EU. You're sort of supposed to be like a role model here, you know, your role model for other European cities on for other cities around the now, but that takes taxation, I mean, somebody's gotta pay for all these tunnels and all of this geology, and so on, and you guys are already highly taxed because you include in general citizenship, education and health care and a good solid retirement. And and all that kind of stuff. I mean, you don't even have pledge drive shift public broadcasting, pledge drives. So why do people willingly pay for this? So is there a gun in their back? No, not at all. So Norwegians are by default. We are very environmentally friendly people. You know, we liked the outdoors, and so it's very easy for politicians to implement new policies that has to do with improving them the environment. And also people now are coming, you know, more and more aware about this. And the are whoa. Think for parties. So this is honesty really to to recognize we have an impact on the environment or children are going to pay for this. If we are dishonest. Yeah. And we're doing it now. Yeah. It's not a right wing or left wing thing. Not at all. I mean, we love to go skiing, and we have been witnessing the last ten years that there's less snow in around Austin in the winter, and that's dramatic impact. Is there a discussion in Norway about is climate change real? There's there's like there's one party right-wing party that the over half of the party sort of Dobbs the whole theory, but. It's not a big discussion on now our guest. Paul Johansson is expanding how his city earned the title of green capital of Europe for twenty nineteen through its initiatives to reduce carbon emissions and protect the land. And waterways around the city. It's the greening of Oslo right now on travel with Rick steves. And just that Europe would have green capital is pretty interesting is that you think that is an e you thing, so it's a European Commission who decided on this back in two thousand eight and under first capital sexually Stockholm was elected in two thousand and ten what do you call people who live in Oslo the Oslo agents or what? It's like all slow livers in the way like living. Also, I don't know. Norwegian. We'll slow board whose Labou snowboard. I've never encountered that win. It's like it's like living. Okay. Who's a little blue as use Lebar? Who's a little blue? How are you personally impacted by your environmental sensibilities? Well, I think we're very interview cycling, for example, you know, everything has to go into the right, then and also just the way that you sort of transport yourself around in the city, it's mostly in the very environmentally friendly way. Take the tram or the bus or or you just walk or you buy cycle. There's a bicycle lanes everywhere. So it's is really the best way of getting around is to do public transport oral just bike and walking. Is there an initiative to clean up the fjord tower, the fjords doing from a health point of view because a lotta shipping comes and goes. Yeah, I'm sure that's a concern. So ten years ago, you couldn't really jump out into the yard anywhere. Because there were it wasn't really clean is that right? But now it's been cleaned up, and you can swim pretty much anywhere because there's the big new development of Capri occupation right in downtown Oslo. I mean, it is right in the middle of the city to all this open would and. Wonderful modern condominium living with great restaurants at the ground floor and everybody living upstairs, and you want this prominade. It must be a kilometer long in at the very end. Well, you'll have in the summer bunch of was adults and kids Sunday just jumping into the water. This is Oslo. This is green Oslo. This is a citizenry that knows that it has a stewardship responsibility for the future. Yeah. And even in a small country, like Norway, you're making a difference, Paul Johansson from hustle. Thanks for joining us. And thanks for inspiring us that we all need to wake up when it comes to making sure this world's a good place for coming to nations who's in talks for a green future. How do we see that in Norwegian and talk foot and get in from teed Tucson talk for in grin from Oregon. Pellets planes. How political coalitions were to govern us low and why he takes pride in being built for Norway's public broadcasting services. That's an extra today's show, and you can hear it at Rick steves dot com slash radio. Celebrate Easter in the grand cathedrals of England and enjoy a Slovenian feast that's still to come on today's travel with Rick steves, we're at eight seven seven three three three seven four two five. He told me it was the most glorious sight people had ever seen the deacon at wells cathedral in Somerset in England once explained to me that the towering facade on England's I entirely gothic cathedral would have been the definition of John dropping back when it opened around the year twelve hundred a Sunday morning would have included a brassy call from trumpets playing few openings in the ornate facade. I can just imagine petitioners dressing up in their finest inspired by the brightly painted statues of the saints tour guides ROY Nichols. And Jillian Chadwick. Join us now to take your calls at eight seven seven three three three seven four to five as we explore the impressive historic cathedrals that you can visit today all over England, Jillian ROY thanks for being care cause you to be here. Do you know what I'm talking about in front of wells cathedral? Oh, yes. Thank right, west front, spectacular view, glorious facade, Jillian when you look at if Assad like that how can you explain the splendor of that from? Five or six hundred years ago. I just try make them understand how the people in those days would have lived in little one story didn't shocks and they'd arrive in CSI like that. And it was like a preview to heaven. That's what it was come out of your hovel. And once a week, you can get a little glimpse of what heavens going to be can you step through that door? Roy. What else would you add to the prep before stepping into that cathedral in well, we'll really to echo on Jim was saying to give them a context of what it would must've been lying for the medieval peasant see that for the first time. And because normally they wouldn't be allowed inside ordinary presence would worship in their local churches, and also realizing that the whole facade would have been highly painted highly decorative as most of the church walls, we think of that as gothic as just Stony white. But that's the problem of Victorian times. It really isn't that interesting. They just wanted to whitewash it, but we need to be able to find a way to go back in time. And when you think about the centrality of the church in medieval, Europe and Britain the community was really built. Her out at the belltower told the hours told us when to celebrate we didn't have what chis- did they say it defined the day. Some cities are homes of Athena. In fact, that is the term of a city, right and see to the Bishop or it can be appointed by the MONUC, for example, uneven Brittany at Brighton Hove, and they don't have a federal there, but they are city because the Queen decided in the two thousand capacity increasingly lot of launch towns being giving the status of a city because he loves them, greater autonomy and money within the church or within the government now. So that's it's a political definite. Yes. Yeah. But I understand traditionally or historically a city is not to be the feet of a Bishop in center of a dances sets a political unit for the church, basically. Yes, minutes to the the churches and parishes in because wells cathedral. We were just talking about happens to be the smallest was the smallest city in England, and it has this glorious cathedral because it was an important administrative center of the church, and it's not alone. Because you don't say David's in Wales, and we'll say Lincoln in Lincolnshire. So it's also a very small city as well as you're traveling around in England, you will stumble upon a lot of cathedrals whether you like it or not there the building on the main square, they're free to go in generally, and they're just glorious. What are some tips for appreciating a cathedral as you're traveling? They will have resident guides, and if you really want to appreciate at the federal you just go with one of the resident guides in the cathedral, and they speak English. And they Brooklyn about traveling in England. Speak the queen's English and often generally volunteers who do for the the passion for the interest for the love of the building. And that always comes out. I love that about English churches, you go into a cathedral, and there are people with their sashes or their banners or their little name tags, and they are Dosen or volunteer guides or whatever you wanna call them. And for the tourist a lot of people are shy. They don't want to be a problem. No, you're going to make their day. If you just ask them questions and let them do their work. You'll get a private tour. Your own charming expert, literally taking you by the arm and walking you through the whole cathedral giving you a private tour. And that's the great. I love it. Now in the church. There's so much to enjoy you've got tombs that'll give you an indication of where the money came from a long time ago in the cuts, walls, what kind of terms would you see the bail tombs the in bail shape tombs from the wool much, you'll merchant, dammit. And I suppose in the south coast you'd find captains sea-captain. Tombs and some of the church's places. Like, of course, they had a long connection with the real navy and many of the tombs and memorials there connected to the role navien sea captains now there are some architectural terms that are just helpful to understand if you're going to really appreciate the the cathedral's. What's the basics? Right. You should know from an architectural golfing. Could take trees understand how gothic was used and exploited built in in England because you find it all across Europe. It's has a different sort of process and Eva Lucien in England understand what early English decorated and perpendicular architecture means the periods of they cover the developments of the architecture because it will give you a much greater understanding the way that these enormous buildings were built over quite launch appearance of time. So bone up on the basic architect Jackson that would be the crude simple dark age stuff. There's the Norman which in Europe would be called romanesque. Yeah. And you'll see difference between the two and then within gothic you've got the perpendicular which would be the sort of final. Flowering of gothic before let the renaissance would come on. And you'll see a lot of that perpendicular in in Cambridge. I think you've seen although you do see romanesque Norman elements in some of the churches. The vast majority was swept away. So the vast majority of English medieval cathedrals are event gothic period except Darren. Wanted. Why was it swept away because it was the new exciting sexy architecture? Okay. So they just would purge the churches of the old deck or because there's a new style. This is travel with Rick steves. We're talking with Jillian Chadwick and ROY Nichols about English could Beatles. Our phone number's eight seven seven three three three seven four to five and ID's calling from San Diego. I hide. He thanks for the call. Thanks for taking my call. My husband, and I visited England numerous times, but their children about two years ago visited friends near Winchester visited the wonderful struck teacher there and one thing I've been learning about 'cause in England as we travel is that they aren't just houses of worship, but historic and cultural centers, and so many things Brayton's are buried in the cathedral enough and Winchester, which I didn't know before we went. So that was a fun surprise. And then along with regular worship services. They could teach all concerts and cultural events activists beatings at one teacher, we visited we were looking at the bulletin board in the back, and they're all kinds of taking place like a hand. Oh concert and a meeting to discuss the plight of refugees that whether it's the large famous cathedral or a small village church. We always are lightened by the to the local house of worship, you don't Heidi. I think that is a very good tip. And I as you're thinking about that out loud. I I was just remembering when I'm in a church in England. I love to take advantage of the fact that I understand the language and spend a few minutes in the lobby just reading what's going on with that community. There is refugees through housing. There's the quilters club on Tuesday nights. That says we welcome guest to help out. I mean, that's in stone of all they've got actual quilters club that's Tuesday nights. And if you happen to be there to see you can come in for tea and cookies and help out with a quilting. You've got a list of rectors or pastors that goes back eight hundred years without a stop, and you can kind of trace that there's so much you can read into the material there, and as you mentioned, you've got cultural events activist meetings. And of course, even songs Jillian really to go to church during an even sign is. Chance to see it in action. I think that's the best way to appreciate a church or cathedral begun, sit there in the marvellous architecture listening to the choir, and it just sends shivers up your spine. And it's free. I don't want to pay ten dollars to see Saint Paul's. You can go to even saw they scoot you out after the service. You can't say CF services over but every church in Britain, whether they charge or not for tourist is free for even song. And it really is not that tough to get a spot for even song. And a lot of times you get to sit right there in the choir these beautifully carved stalls in the very center of the church. Right. What's an even sung tip that you'd have verily him because to sit in the quarry self certainly the more popular ones if you're going to your minster. For instance, you're not the only person that's going on to even songs to be this fifteen twenty minutes before everybody else, and you will get a prime seat. So the the core of the church. It's like if it triggers, a huge, vast, windy Stony structure, there's a cozy little beautifully carved central part where they can have the intimacy, and that's where the services would be yes. Between the nave on the high altar, and you feel like you're going into their more. I mean, sometimes it's not even open during the regular pub. Days and not offensive specialness really was created quite liberally because the vast majority of people wouldn't be allowed to be on the screen the separated from the choir, and it would only be the priest that would go into area do the religious heavy lifting back, they're not sort of thing. But everybody's welcome. During the Evenson Heidi, thanks for your call. Dino's calling from woodinville in Washington. Hi, dino. What's your memory of touring churches in Britain? Well, we take a drive around Britain, and we had soft in York, and we're looking in the cathedral. They're looking at the tombs along the is on the inside. And one of the volunteers told me the look way up high towards the ceiling of the church, and there were a row of relief carvings along there volcanoes of figures, but he was pointing when I which I was kind of odd to having a cathedral, which was a couple of monkeys that looked they were happy, but they were rudely posed and he got a big laugh out of it. And it was pretty see if there was fun. But why would that be inside the cathedral zillion? Why would they be rudely posed monkeys carved into the stones of cathedral column? I know that this the monkey window. I don't remember the comings, and it's something's do glazes guild, isn't it then they York minster to him. But anyway. In gothic architecture. You'll find that the stonemasons get to have a little fun here and there by carving goofy. Things into the capitals have is this the famous Lincoln IMP carving venenum ROY tie-up on the roof of the cathedral in the city of Lincoln. You know, it's just human beings that spend their lives carrying stones and carving them for divinities churches for generation upon generation and eight hundred years ago, then like the vent and be characters goofy. And sometimes a little bit believing. You can it said that you can identify some of the clergy from the cathedral carved by the Masons during the wintertime when they couldn't work on the main building itself, so they would spend the wind carving the figures and the bosses and all the other things with what they really think about maybe they really think about from. Yeah. And also in the choir where you're supposed to be sitting. Sometimes you have to be standing in the little area where you lean against the where you put your your. But is that sort of less religious because you're sitting on it? And that means they have the freedom to carve and have a little bit of. Respectful or just comical are a little bit of rude art, and you see that in the house of God. And it's just gives you a little glimpse of the humanity of society eight hundred years ago, not All Saints. All right. Dana. Thanks for your your comment about the route monkeys in York. Well, thank you for the background. Take care. It is fun. When you get to go into a cathedral, and you see these also I think we have to remember that early churches were dealing with pre Christian sort of traditions in the leaves incorporate a little bit of that. So you've got some pagan creatures here and there, then we man. Yeah. That just helps new Christians embraced this new religion. That's been put on these people who for centuries before we're worshiping in a pink. Instead, I mean that veneer of Christianity was Wifa thin for hundreds of years. So we're talking about cathedrals in England and just if you're going to think of the five or six big cathedrals to see the cathedral cities, which one should we keep in mind Cantabria, I think you have stopped. We have to the headquarters of the judge in this confidence a beautiful place done with plenty of go Simpson guide. It's another one soldiery so loud, very copy of the Magna Carta. They're exactly the totally spine in England. Tallest. Spiraling Lund's Salisbury. Another one Darren Durham, the great Norman cathedral in the best example of romanesque. I think minutes whip there in the north quit striking location as well as stunning love that spot. Yeah. Built on a hilltop almost like a fort. Yes, we talked about York and the minster what is minster mean we hear that word minster as a center of teaching ultimately, the York minster would be a very important church. There's four great churches, say Winchester and Winchester. And you can't do those big five ones. But I really an engineer, and I were talking really plumbed for some of the less well-known ones. Would they be well to their I particularly love for alien Lincoln share and Norwich Norfolk to beautiful cathedrals that aunt visited many elements on the that's fantastic. Our guests Gillian Chadwick and ROY Nichols our tour guides and English history experts. They're providing us with a close up few right now on travel with Rick steves. Of the many impressive gothic cathedrals in churches. You can visit all across England when you find a cathedral bits lit from the inside. I think Lincoln's cathedral is that way in bath. Also. Yeah. And you go there at twilight or something and the light is coming from inside of the church. It really is like a lantern really is is known as the London of the west Volve, jer the bath churches, actually nicknamed the lantern. Yes. Sometimes they're like a reliquary is a jewel box that holds something precious right and cathedral itself can be designed like a reliquary definitely well, they they made to act as a beacon for the faithful to draw people to them. And so they would often build like eat is built on a mound in a very very flat or in January two flat countryside. So people can see it from miles away in in medieval times, you would have seen you minster from miles and miles away this beautiful. And then the bills were important to that. When there was no formal timekeeping. The the monks would keep the time. And they'd ring the bells at York minster, you can. Actually have seen the bell ringer going there and the bills are so big that he gets that Bill going and he actually hangs onto the rope. He does this pin. The tourists in the bell lifts him six or seven feet into the into the air as he's ringing those bills, and they're just peeling all around you. I like that moment in in some towns for the bell start touring, and you realize they've been ringing for centuries with my little village endorsing Thursday nineties bell bringing practice night. And so they don't at seven o'clock on they practice for an hour and a half or something it's an throughout the year they practice, and this is not a bell choir. It's actually ringing the various bells to tune often surprise, they think that it's actually a recording. And then you say, no, these really people ringing these barrel in their pulling different bells for different tunes, absolutely stunned that we still do that. And they're all drawn from the local area from the village itself is a bell, captain, depending on the peal of bells that they have they'll be a variety numbers and they'll ring special bells the tramples. All of those exercises. Well, oh, yeah. Todd wanted signs. There's plenty of ways for a traveler to experience these drills along with worshiping on Sunday. Go to an even song almost any any day of the week. But be careful that the song is sung rather than said. Yeah. Also, we've been talking about the great churches. What's particularly delightful little church that even countered in your travels. There are so many of them all over the country, and is one of my favorite things about England and free little village has gone. A church has been there for nine hundred years. You know, the one in the cult swollen in stemware whether shepherds of well-known the chains around the backs of the seats, I love that. And you can see the chain marks in the shepherd's dog. If I'm the champagne still actually wearing a groove and the little wooden pinnacle of the chair there, and you think six hundred years ago a shepherd came here every Sunday with his dog. Yeah. There's one full book by Simon Jenkins, cold the thousand best English churches, and as Jillian pointed out there as of thousand bests, not one or ten right? Exceptionally English churches of all of those what a little one would you would you endorse it, and I'm gonna Plum for the beautiful church in bay Regis village? Not too far from Dorchester, which has got them as beautifully carved wooden ceiling. One of the sons of the village was John Morton who was chancellor to Henry, the seventh and he endowed the church at his death. And they've got this beautifully. Carved wooden ceiling these incredibly painted angels. That look so lifelike as if they're going to take wing at any moment of survived for generation of savant for five hundred years five hundred years, and you can step in there and enjoy without a guard frequently that little churches, nobody there. It's a beautiful thing. Gillian Chadwick for Nichols. Thank you so much for giving us a tour of another of the many wonderful dimensions of England. Thank you. It's comfort foods include cabbage and cucumbers selfish, and dumplings, ravioli and pilaf will wet your appetite with the culinary traditions of Slovenia. That's next on travel with Rick steves, you can expect really well when you visit the compact country Slovene for the history on the press tempers to million citizens. Enjoy a mix of culinary traditions from its Mediterranean and Slavic neighbours from across the Alps head even from the Ottoman Turks. To help you find the best of what we can put on your plate. We're joined now by tour guide. Mayan. Chris he lives in the capital city Nobile, Ana and Tina lives scenic lake bled resort region. They're here to take your calls about the foods of Slovenia and seven seven three three three seven four to five teen. How do you explain to people? That's Lavinia really has one of the most diverse cuisines in Europe just have it all because of the diversity and the Senator of the borders to our country, and it's BIC. So we cannot really talk about what's the traditional Slovenian because it goes from region to region, it's different. You know, there's Australian fluence there's terrain Ian influence there. Gary and influence there's Balcon influence, so it's all big. It's a look melting. We're go to a nice restaurant, and we're going to have several courses. How might we get a little dose of Germany of hungry of Ottoman and of Italy. It depends definitely the area of Slovenia where you go because it's such a small place. You can drive across one or two hours from village to the next recipes vary widely the ingredients the crops that are being grown because it's a meeting place of geographical geologic features providing all the base, the capital city Lubiana, and we'll go to a great restaurant. And we'll try several courses what might be some Italian influence food. We'd tan the menu. There's quite a bit of pasta fish salads, like Mediterranean dishes. There's fabulous of oil olive oil grown down on the coast. She one of the northernmost olive oil growing regions producing top-quality. And let's say my trouble partners in the mood for something. A little more Germanic little dumpling. Oh, very proud definitely of variety of different dumplings of our car. Ian sausages and about que- mush lots of pork grind sauerkraut around. Yes. I nearly. Oh, yes. It's big. deal. Everybody has their secret recipe on how end you've got more eastern influences. Well, how might get a little flavor of the Ottoman would say would the grilled meats would a lot of the X plant spreads that we use instead of catch up. Then we have a lot of pitas Buddha Filo pastries in our country as well. And that would be definitely the who say eastern influence. This is traveling Steve's or talking with Chris vich, teeny AT about Slovenian cuisine. Phone number's eight seven seven three seven four to five in Ken is calling in from Rome in Italy. You're actually home Ken just moved from near Vancouver Canada to Rome to be a tour guide. Actually. Right. You have any thoughts or comments for our guides about Slovenian cuisine? Yeah. I mean, a quick anecdote is my girlfriend, I traveled there last year and went to like region, and unfortunately, she got a little bit. Nick. And we are saying that recommended kind of Agra trees, I guess you could call it. If it was Italy and their solution was some homemade raspberry, brandy, of course. And it was of course and Dina goal. Yeah. I mean, homemade raspberry brandy. If you're not feeling well, lots of anti-oxidants. And they were kind enough actually after our trip. I emailed them. And they sent me pitcher by pitcher stuff by step instructions that we could make at ourselves at home. Nice. And did it help was it a nice remedy? Of course. It was. Yes. And then the next day finding out that they were very proud of their Honey brandy as well Honey is a big deal throughout this world. It's considered medicinal. Everything's medicinal. You know market from Slovenia all the way to Russia, and you'll find people with their Honey that has different medicinal qualities. And I want you to try this try that and people take it quite seriously and would like to say with everything that gross all the flour sold the Arps just dip them into schnapps better. Afterwards, Ken, what's another cuisine member? You have of Slovenia. The big hot horse burger and liberal. The big hot horse burger, Mario. What is? Oh, yes, that's been pretty legendary for almost a couple of decades. Guess now it was in the middle of nowhere on the edge of a park, but the word got out. So the very soon, and even if you were to go to AM there, there'd be long lines of people waiting to get their fix of horse, burgers, if you're not into horse, actually, Lipizzaner stallions open. Not everybody is into my my wife would never ever try horsemeat, for instance. But if you're kind of out there, not sure about it having it inform of burger is a good start. At actually my tilt you to the other side, Ken, describe your horsemeat experience in Slovenia. I think I was pleasantly surprised for me. It was somewhere around the taste of ice. Then like a sweet beef. But I think the most shocking thing of having it there is how enormous it is and spice it up or did it tastes just gimme like like horse. No. It wasn't gave me at all. It was really really good. I would have -lutely have it again. And you go there, and you can choose whatever you want as a topping as I'm sure you. Well, no. But in the end between two of us, we couldn't even finish it and it being a snack for later thing heaven. Snack. That's that makes me wanna go to Slovenia right now. I was reading that. There's actually wild barren Slovenian. One place words like legal to hunt and eat bears address. It's actually one of the bears, but there's a protected or there are, but since it's one of the bear richest corners of Europe every year to keep the population down since it don't have any natural enemies. There's a certain number that can be shot by hunters associations. And that can be limited capacity uses for instance, to put in bear salami and season. And so on us. It's not something that you would normally find on the menu. But occasionally, it can be another extra exotic delicacy that. You'll find Ken did you have a language barrier. When it came to eating in Lavinia was translated on the menu. You know, the thing is everyone. There speaks fluent English embarrassing because their English is probably better than ours going there. There's no language barrier. Even in rural parts of the country where we rented a car, and we're very far out. It was never ever a language and you slept at a countryside farm functioning as VN V like is popular in Italy and Slovenia Negra. Oh, did you have a chance to eat there on the farm? We gotta was twice that we did at one near lake bled. And another time near the Suinian L the Julian out there, and it was an amazing spread like it was more than a four course meal, huge buffet and very reasonable price. Everything traditional lots of mean, do's and desert probably fresh in seasonal and right off the farm, Ken. Thanks for your call. Absolutely. Thanks for having me on. Okay. Best wishes in Rome. Thank you very much. Keep telling you U2.. Kina Hiti Mariana Kristovich are taking us out to eat in Slovenia right now on travel with Rick steves their tour guides who specialize in taking visitors around so Venus and the neighboring Croatia from their home bases at lake bled. And in the capital love Yanna. Laurie's calling him from woodland, California. Hey, Laurie thanks for the call. Hi, Marion, my husband and my sister, and I are planning to travel to Slovenia Croatia in June. And we're wondering if you have any suggestions for must have dishes or restaurants that we can't miss in general are in the capital city of Lubiana capital city, actually because most people are gonna go to Louisiana. I understand. There's just a thriving foodie seem there you guys both live around there. What if if you're there in June? There's a wonderful event that takes place every weekend, and it's called the open kitchen. So try to be there Friday and you'll enjoy it because there's a bunch of restaurants from all over the city, and they are offering their specialties over there, and you can just try describe the open kitchen so open kitchen is a concept where all the restaurants of the city come to this one square. They do have a little stand and they prepare their specialties, and they changed every week. There's different specialty of the restaurant. And you can just go from stall to stall drink some wine, maybe a microbrews and leading restaurants would start. Serve up whatever their most proud of. Yes. Sometimes those leading restaurants, it can be quite expensive because they are really the top notch restaurants while over there on the open kitchen, they are not expensive at all. This would be Fridays and Saturday and Saturday after the summer usually starts kind of mid June. And it goes up until mid-october rate thing for the local food culture Marian. Have you been there for this definitely? What do you remember as a particularly happy surprise when you're at the open kitchen and Lubiana again, just a variety of one is indecisive doesn't know what would be more appealing. It's all there. You can see it. You can smell it. He'll part example, you and I are walking down. What should I give me something that's specific? Oh, Mao wonderful local sausages from some of the more. Upscale restaurants. You might have like many cooking demonstrations and see what all ingredients go in decorate. It's all prepared. Then you just can't wait to other celebrities. Oh, yes. It's a very thriving conc-. What's specific treats that unite might find on an open kitchen Saturday, maybe some frog? Lex frog. Legs insult. Yeah. They are a specialty Indiana seriously. It's not just sort of a French gimmick. But it's the real thing farther legs in Slovenia, Laurie. There's some ideas for you wonderful. I can't wait to try them. This is traveled. Rick steves. We're talking with my Kristovich and. He about Slovenian cuisine phone number's eight seven seven three three seven four to five and Dennis is on the phone from Duluth in Minnesota. Denise thanks for your call. We've Bizet it with my sister and brother in law and three of our many kids. So we had a group and rented a house up in the hills outside Lubiana in Ricky CNA. I'm saying that right? So we just got online and a rental and rented a car out of Venice where we flew into and had no trouble driving around and Mandarin. Download Biana several times and tasting food. But to thoughts as well. Three one. I have a cold. So I'd love that recipe for the blackberry raspberry online. But also while we were there some distant cousins of my brother-in-law were just gracious and showed us around. We went to several wineries because one of the cousins greats and supplied the wineries, and we were just overblown by how quality. A wine, and you don't find that in the US. So I don't know whether it's so good and you hear so much about it from Italy. But the wineries really whereas good if not better than the ones, we've as it in Italy. Describe the experience of going to align where he actually welcome to visit a winery and taste the wine. Very welcome. Now, partly we had an end because of the distant cousin that supplied grape. So he can know people. So they opened it up with a little private or semi private tours and some tasting and great food. And luckily the other cousin that was with us doesn't drink. So she drove a van, and and we could all in bide so nice to have driver. So you can. Yes. So we spent day during that. But you can't find the lines and. Are they not important? Our wineries are very small. So the maximum production is maybe forty thousand bottles so year for winery, and with two million Slovenes, those are gone after to drink it all ourselves or you come and visit we'll give you our wineries are just. Oh is that account had three boys? We had a great time. It was more personal. And the boys took our adult son out mushroom hunting. My son was pretty Larry. We we are. You know, just we do a lot of farming and gardening, but what happened on mushroom? So the the boys showed him. What was good? What was bad, and we had it to cooking for a picnic. So I don't know if that's real common in the area. Talk about mushroom. Hunting are much mushrooms are big part of Slovenian cuisine went in season. And just when the conditions are right towards the end of the summer when you go, for instance, the big farmers market into blonde. It's always fun. Just to listen to the different dialects of the vendors because nobody will tell you where everybody has their secret location mushroom. Never tell a mushroom or never tell my draw tried to have you here there dialectic Imbali. Exactly. Then my father is Vic mushroom. So I was when I was growing up as a kid. He would take me. And now he's taking my son's mushroom hunting. And I always remember how everyday he would come back. He would call my end. And they would be like, so how many did you? And here we only talk about Cini because particularly is d- mushroom the rest is okay. But for teen is the mushroom. And it's like, oh, I got seventy today. Go where where where did I don't tell? So. Yeah. It's a very big thing. This is what we always do August September. And we like to go into nature. So it's not just the mushrooms that we aren't for. But we also go pick up flowers, and we use them for tease for Brandon. Yes. Dandelions for the salads than the line for the cough syrup. Then the lion for you can even put them into air and intimacy desert. So Honey in the lion's verses bears nature is very kind to us. Yeah. About some canned sour pitted cherries. That were just Alicia. In fact, we we made a cherry pie which was unusual for cousins and tour guides. So they hadn't had cherry pie. The boys ate it up right away. They they use the cherries apparently. But it took me two days to hunt down tap Yoko, which I. I think it was a language barrier or we don't find it commonly. Denise you had a great experience. It sounds like it was a cultural exchange, you would share some, and you would learn some, and you you had a local contact which is huge. And think of the wonders of a new culture people have spent all their life going to Germany and France and Spain. But now you've got Slovenia as an option and I'd go back to Selena above many other countries. I love it. Thanks for the call. Denise. This is travel with Rick steves, we're talking with Mario. I'm Chris kovic and Tina Hiti about Slovenia and Myong Tina I can remember walking through the market in Lubiana, and it's like the farmers filled up there wheelbarrows and wheeled right under the square is my member correct on well Caesar and the old tradition when the city was much smaller one hundred years ago was what is today part of the city centre used to be one of the oldest suburbs. And that's just down the river. And that's where these people would come them bring in their carts. Send of course today. These little tiny little gardens are protected and is still grow vegetables. So that's locally produced as low as carbon footprint as possible right there in the city centres part of those veterans, unfortunately that traditional key would be to eat with this season. And. The coolest boss. So you said these little patches are protected are they protected by the EU or by the Slovenian government by the local Slovenian local government, and people are happy to do this. Yes. Very much. So preserving our heritage or culture. This is just really, quite inspirational. I know I know that there are some literally pretended foods and Slovenia would've you that would be actually protected for the national heritage. Can I ask Labasa so the cardio olien sausage? Okay. That's really I'm very tasty set unique. I think it's just richer. It's fuller in taste, and if you compared with any of the bratwurst, I think sorry to my German friends, but I think it's kind of plane and ours just has that roundup taste for personnel. More more personnel. What about it like dumplings is increasing? Come a liquor in some other. So they're typical regional dumpling variations which also protect it and their name, depending on the failing like with potatoes or other places with a Mead, some lecture ravioli haters are Aaron cuisine are. Oh, yes. Depends on the area you have from Brent dumplings potato dumplings. So the the different variations shape size fillings. This is travel with Rick steves who've been talking with Marian. Chris ca- vich and Tina Hiti about Slovenian cuisine. Let's finish our little fantasy tour through all of this beautiful tastes Slovenia. Just by talking about what you're going to have soon as you get home you traveling on the United States right now. What do you miss, and when you get home if your mother's going to sit out at the table, or if you're gonna go to a restaurant? What are you gonna have? I'm definitely looking forward to that beef soup with little noodles. It's every time. I come back home from the US. It's that we've soup beef soup believe noodles of goods at called him Slovenian ago via you. Governor Yuka go you. So good. Same here. That's always the start the Sunday meal anywhere. It's so simple. And with all variety we described, but it's things like that. It really bring the smell and taste of home. Close. Sounds great Tina and Maryanne. Thank you so much for stoking our appetite as we dream about traveling and Slovenia quality. Then travel with Rick steves benistead, Rick steves Europe. And Edmonds Washington by Tim Tatton, and is a captain Wilmot. Our website is managed by Andrew Wakeling. Our theme music is by Jerry, Frank. We get promotional support from Sheila Guzzo. Rick narrates detailed walking committee of Europe's most popular attractions, you'll find a link to Rick's audio Europe travel app that Rick steves dot com slash radio. Each year. Rick steves tour guides take thousands of free spirited travelers on the scooted to us through Europe. One small group at a time this year, you can choose from more than forty different fixations in Europe's best destinations from Ireland to Greece and practically everywhere in between begin your next trip. Rick steves dot com.

Rick steves Slovenia England Oslo Europe Norway Lubiana Ken Italy wells cathedral ROY Nichols Oslo Paul Johansson York minster Saint Paul United States York engineer London
Thursday 4 October

Monocle 24: The Briefing

30:49 min | 2 years ago

Thursday 4 October

"You're listening to the briefing first broadcast on the fourth of October, two thousand eighteen on monocle twenty four. Hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you. Live from studio one. Hey, Atma Dory house in London. I'm Tom, Andrew, it's coming up today. How did you get home? I don't remember. How'd you get there? Remember, where is the place? I don't remember how many years ago was it? I don't know. Donald Trump, mocked or women who accused his supreme court nominee Brett Kavanagh of salting her, but what will FBI agents have to say, also a hand. It will be live in Sepala with Monaco's fit and undergoes type shake, oh, as Brazilians prepared to vote in Sunday's crucial presidential election, and then we'll discuss a border dispute between Croatia and Slovenia before crossing to Monaco's Kiara Luella one of the world's biggest art fairs all that. And more ahead here on the briefing with me, Tom Edwards. The US Senate has received an FBI reports on allegations of sexual misconduct made against these cream court nominee, Brad Kavanagh, its contents of being scrutinized by senators, but won't be made public. We're joined in the studio now by Jeffrey Howard, his lecturer in political theory at University College, London, and expert on US politics and Jeffries. Interesting. This whole Cavanaugh issue oversee has been smoldering on and one feels that this dossier could tell us a great deal, but it may also tell us next to nothing in a way. Is that a fair way to characterize it? Absolutely. So the White House sense, it's, it's summary of the report that the FBI did to the the Senate just this morning along with reassurances that the FBI hadn't discovered anything new or untorn and the course of the investigation. And I think it's important to keep in mind here that this is not an ordinary criminal investigation. This was not the FBI deciding. To open up an inquiry into an alleged criminal offence. Instead, it was essentially the way to think about it as as a re opening of the background check that the White House does into all of its judicial nominees, and that has the FBI do on its on its behalf. And when the FBI is just doing a background check on behalf of the White House, the White House very much gets to set the agenda and put some constraints on exactly what the f. b. is going to to look at. And so we can expect in the following day or two that a lot of people are going to be saying that this investigation should have gone a lot further that they should have interviewed many, many more people. But the truth is the FBI was doing the White House's bidding here and was very much constrained by what the White House told it to focus on different. It's talk about the senatorial scrutiny. I mentioned that senators are going to look at this not publicly. It'll happens in in quite literally. I think in a basement which is so slightly Bizal. I want to is your sense that those senators who have a clear intention to vote one way or another on the cabinet appointment will do so anyway, and will find what they need to find in this report in order to explain that decision. I think that's exactly right. So first of all, there's quite a bit of mystique surrounding this. So there's the secure facility in the capitol building. They designated specific times in which the senators can come and look at it. They've done it on a partisan basis. So there's a particular our to the Republicans are going to come and huddle around the documents, and then the Democrats will swap in and they'll come in and huddled around the documents, no doubt thinking through the political strategy as they go look, there's a lot of people on a lot of people, but there's a handful of people on both sides that still publicly haven't made up their mind about whether to support Brett cavenaugh. So on the Republican side, you have Jeff flake from Arizona who's not running for reelection has been a strident critic of President Trump and he's the one we might remember who insisted on this investigation and really could have held up. Brett Kavanagh's nomination had he not insisted on this FBI investigation a week ago. So the question for Jeff flake is, is he going to be satisfied by what they've seen if Jeff flake in his heart of hearts really wants to vote? No, I think the fact that he was able to get them to this to do this FBI investigation and the fact that the FBI investigation hasn't dredged up anything particularly incriminating will give him the window with which to do that for the two other Republicans who are on the fence. So this is Lisa Murkowski from Alaska and Susan Collins for Maine, both quite moderate Republicans, both very much of the view that they want to remain in good standing with their female constituents in the face of supreme court. Nominee who made might chip away a protections on abortion rights in the United States. They're going to be very much putting their finger in the political wind and seeing whether this FBI investigation gives them the the leverage. They need to either support cavenaugh or not support cavenaugh, but I think that's going to be determined by the politics in terms of whether there. Ituen are going to be upset with them based on what they do Jeffey. I know this is wrong, the tricky to to explain and even second-guessed. But let's talk about the mechanics of the report details it self. Obviously it wouldn't be made public. That's the official line. But once the specs that if there's a sort of bombshell element that will make its way into the public domain. Similarly, if there's little to worry either side of the argument that fact itself will also make his way into the public domain. Is there sort of an established protocol for how things sort of unofficially get around this idea that they're not to be entered into the public discourse. I mean, I think this thing's going to leak like a sieve if there's anything particularly incriminating in here. And certainly, I think senators who want to use pieces of information in the f. b. i. report as their reason for posing the cabinet nomination will be very, very difficult to keep that information secret. And so certainly at some point, the information is going to come out, but I think the the real question here is whether this report is going. To be used as an ex, whether this the, the limited constraints of this investigation are going to be sighted as grounds for opposing Cavanaugh even though they've done the report. So for example, the FBI over the course of the past week, they didn't interview Christine Blasi Ford again, right? So they just accepted that her testimony before the Senate was her official testimony, and so they didn't want to put her in a room and ask her anymore questions which you'd think if they actually wanted to try to corroborate her story or look for weaknesses in the story, they would want to do. They didn't interview Brett on, so they didn't put him on the spot to try to answer for any of the alleged exaggerations or the views of some lies that he was alleged to have made in his confirmation hearing. They didn't interview a number of the people that Debbie Ramirez who's one of the other people alleging that Brett Kavanagh behaved inappropriately said was at the particular college party where he behaved inappropriately. So there's this whole raft of people who might have testimony that bears on what set on how Senator Senator should view Brett cavenaugh and they're just not going to have that information because the report was very constrained. They contacted ten people to interview. They only ended up interviewing nine of them. It's not clear yet why they didn't interview the tenth person. And so I think people who are inclined to to want to vote against Brett cavenaugh, they're, they're not going to be forced by this report into into changing their minds. They're going to be able to look at this report and say, listen, this is a farce. This wasn't a legitimate investigation because it was just way too constrained. Well, what false and this idea of lack of legitimacy or otherwise is this whole process working how it's supposed to work. I know it's tricky in the Trump. Ministration because a lot of things have been quite different. They've challenged a lot of the protocols. They've certainly challenge status quo, but has this broadly worked, you mentioned the FBI doing its job in a sense in terms of its responsibilities to the White House is this is this working correctly from system point of view? I mean, what's what's really striking is that if we're to believe Christine Bazi Ford's testimony in for from my point of view, there's certainly no reason to disbelieve it. Her initial intention was to raise this red flag while the White House was still considering the different potential nominees to the supreme court. Her hope as she expressed it to the Senate Judiciary committee was that she was going to communicate quietly to the White House that she had had this experience allegedly with Brett cavenaugh and her hope was that they would use that as grounds to quietly cross Brett Kavanagh's name off their list and opt for some other person who certainly would be viewed as equally qualified and equally conservative, and that. It didn't happen. It's a fascinating question. Why that didn't happen. There's probably a fair amount of blame to go around, including blame to to Democrats for perhaps sitting on the information larger than longer than they needed to in order precisely in order to inflict political damage. I think there's no no reason to deny that, but there's a bit of back and forth on this and people disagree about the exact rundown of what happened. But certainly had that happen. Had Christine blessing for delegation made it to the White House earlier before they had announced Brett Kavanagh's name. All of this certainly could have been certainly could have been avoided. Likewise had the White House and the Republicans in charge of the Senate Judiciary committee called for a investigation or reopening of the background check. Right. As soon as the allegations were made, we could have gotten into this before the television spectacle of last week ever arose. So there were there were like a thousand different ways we could have avoided getting to this point where the FBI is less than a week to undertake an extraordinarily complicated allegation investigation. Into an allegation of something that happened thirty six years ago. And yet here we all Jeffrey how thanks for well attempting in fine style to make sense. It will force that's Jeffy. How at from University College London, with the briefing. Brazilians will head to the polls on Sunday to elect a new president. They have a choice between a leftist leader whose poetry has been beset by corruption claims and the fall rights j. Abol sonata whose professed admiration for the country's military dictatorship, which on the line now from somehow by Monaco's reported there an Nando Gustavo Pacheco fanatic, great to speak with you from your hometown. Of course, what's the latest way you are toe is great to be here, but I have to say what a divisive election, because what we see here that the top two candidates and the post, they're also the, the two most rejected the country is very much a polarized. I mean before I was just reading the papers, but in the walking the streets, you see, when you talk to people, if they are four, both on our, they have hatred towards the Workers Party and the saying which people more on the left, you know, the progressive movement's. They say Brazil cannot have a president like both Tanada the the things that he does. So the country's divided and is interesting. I feel that everyone really wants like a centrist option, but then they're not doing well in the post. So they'll be scared to vote in the centrist option. They will think that their votes not counting some ways. Well, exact point. We've been tracking developments in polling terms over a number of weeks if not months on this station, and we've seen exactly that polarizing effect precisely because people fear. Oh, keeping the center ground leaves the way clear for one extreme or the other. One thing rather worrying though, is that there are suggestions now that if it goes to a runoff, both in our could actually win. I mean, is that a change from the situation that you've been describing? I over the last few weeks. It is the change because before I always said, oh, we'll lose with whoever is going to the second round because he does have a high rejection rate. But the thing is the candidate from the workers policy fitting dodgy. He's rejection has been increasing and funny enough. The reason because of that is because his image is now becoming more closely associated with newer, which again is the reason that he's doing well in the post, but also the reason that he's, you know, he's rejected. That's why many people actually even leftist they're voting for the third candidate cedar is which is kind of a centre-left candidate, but not very involved with the Workers Party. The problem is only polling about ten percent, which is very much behind. Dads and both scenarios. Well, now given all of the challenges, the turmoil within Brazilian politics. Well, essentially an entire political generation. It would be understandable. The voter apathy might raise its head. People saying, look, you know, no one speaks for me. I'm not bothering to take part of course in Brazil. Voting is mandatory, and I wonder what impact that will have. Could we see spoiled ballot papers, for example, maybe deciding the outcome of this race? Well, those defeating the beginning of the election Brazilians votes the the rates of people that are pretending voters quite high for Brazilian standards, but tone. But I think this is changing very much because of the polarizing. For example, someone say, I don't want to notice so they will vote not because they want the candidate they won just because they're voting against both scenario and same with Dodd, and there's been another problem as well to another very much spoiled ballots, but some seats in Brazil. Now they're requiring a biometric vote. It's very weird. Because it's just not the whole country of many people didn't register. There was a little bit of confusion. So there's being researched saying that about almost four million Brazilians will not be able to vote because of this. This bio, Matt does new biometric vote. So there's all sorts of things to consider as well. Well, let's consider one other thoughts. You mentioned Dodd earlier. I guess it would be in defiance of expectations now, but do you think that that could actually win the runoff? Is that what you'll get tells you? Honestly, I think it's neck and neck. The latest poll that was released less night dodge was beating out forty three forty one. So there is a chance befuddled enough to every every day here there's new parade more news about the operation car, washing voting, the Workers Party. Some people are saying that this is going, this is being used, you know. You know, just because it's the election in about three days time. So you know, we don't know. I mean, tonight's is the big debate at David global. This can change things, especially if the elections, about five percent of the electorate can decide who is going to be the new president for just finally, and this was something that we talked about before you flew back to Brazil. I was quite struck by the fact that some younger voters high profile, maybe some footballers as a black Brazilian footballer replies, these trade here in new. He's come out publicly in support of both an ARA which surprised me, and I've also been surprised to see that his support amongst women has risen by number of percentage points. Just in the last week, can you in any way? Explain what seems an incongruous at you too many observers from outside the country? Absolutely tone you. We had on Saturday. This big feminist movement co alieno not hin sure attracted big crowds, but if things. Been a study, the type of people that went to the March? No, they already belonged to left his party's. It's it was a different type of women usually richer, wider and younger, and I think you know some people, you know, the housewife for someone leaving northeast. They might see that they might not feel so connected is difficult for some people that live in the big senses to understand that. But I think precisely in in a way there was a backlash against those marches even among women in a way for Nando. It's fascinating such a compelling way says, you say, deeply divisive and federal Nando goes to Shaka who hearing there from some Pala. We'll have more over the next couple of days here on the station hit though. Right now is what else is making news today. A senior German politician says that the United Kingdom needs to climb down from its high horse and face the reality of separation from the European Union creek Baume added that the UK will not be allowed to dictate the terms of its exit from the block, the United States, the secretary of state. Mike Pompeo says his country is withdrawing from a decades-old treaty with Iran, the accord was used legal arguments, the international court of Justice after the United States reimpose sanctions on Tehran. Today's monocle minute reports on the prestigious twenty thousand good design award winners at the celebration of Japanese design included a fridge from Panasonic and a revamped, four by four that I came onto the market way back in nineteen seventy. Those are some of the headlines following stay here on monocle twenty four. You're listening to the briefing now fulling the integration of Yugoslavia. In the early nineteen nineties Slovenia and Croatia became independent countries, but more than a quarter of a century later, they still haven't reached an agreement on their shared border guide to learnings Monaco's correspondent in the Balkans and undelighted say he joins us now on the line from Slovenia's capital Liana guy. Tell us a bit about this. We used to talking to you about all sorts of disputes of different characters around the region. What's the history of this one never ends. Does it tell me the disputes arising from ex-yugoslavia should be a warning to anybody on what happens when you decide to break up your country old to change your arrangements with borders and so forth? I wonder what I could be implying have background. The background to this dispute doesn't they go back to the independence of both countries which was declared in nineteen ninety one. And they both, in essence, does bits of land of what you dispute it. But the thing which was. Catches the headlines the sea-border which is in the bay of on. Slovenia has a tiny, tiny coastline because it is a very small country and it's terrifically important for it to have access to international waters. This is a practical matter of course, but also warn in which it will allow Slovenia to be internationally recognized as a maritime nation says, bit of national pride coming into this as well and ever since they declared their independence in nineteen ninety one, the two countries have been unable to agree on exactly where that delineation should be with Slovenia making clear all the time. It absolutely must have access to international waters and Croatia, digging up all sorts of things and names from the past to try and prove that eight actually has ownership over the Wolters. Interestingly go, you mentioned is taking a long time, but these two countries actually don't get on that badly. There's much more fraught relations between some of the other actors in this area. So why has it taken so long when he rallied that don't get. Bodily Tolman. Slovenia was merrily selling alms to Croatia during Croatia's battle for independence between one thousand nine hundred one thousand nine hundred five. But on the other hand, if you look at Croatia joining the Repin union, it was the most recent Member State to join in two thousand thirteen that happened nine years after Slovenia joined and Slovenia. As the way of these things goes, we're seeing this happening now with Croatia in Serbia's potential membership of the European Union Slovenia in had a lot of fun. The towing Croatia's accession to the European Union. If it didn't settle this dispute over the bay of PIN on on an essence, what happened in the end, it was going to be stuck until both sides agree to international arbitration. This was the way full Croatia to get into the European Union without the dispute actually being resolved at that shouldn't have happened, but it did because they both agree to international all betray Shen the international arbitration panel ruled last year, and it ruled in Slovenia's favor. Which guess what happen? Tom. I mean, one imagines Craciun happy. Croatia cried foul. Of course. It said that's one of the members of the all betray shin panel had been in contact with Slovenia and not to tainted the entire process and said, it's refusing to accept the ruling of the patrician puddle. Well, I guess I have twin question just to wrap up with an eye virtually. Oh, did we sense that we all close to an agreement despite those those problems and Secondly, and this is more of a reach. If this is solved, does it hint the even some of the more complex yet problems could also be solved or is that bridge Defoe? Well, I think in the first place we've heard from president Pahar of Slovenia this week when he was visiting Zagreb saying that he was confident the bullet between Croatia and Slovenia would soon a all later be as determined by the international Albatros albatross patrician tribunal so that he gave sooner or later we can drawing conclusions from that in terms of. Means elsewhere in the region. I think what it's done is it's Halden be Europan Union's line rather than saying, hey, we can solve any soda disputes and went to speak, right. It's actually hauled in the European Union line on when they admit countries into the European Union as new Member States that they really really really have to have their border disputes sorted out. So we're going to see this coming into play with Serbian cultivar with Kosovo Montenegro with Serbia, Croatia, I haven't heard of only at between Serbian Bosnia, but that may well yet they won't all of these things sorted before they consider adding new members to the European Union precisely because of the experience of Slovenia. Croatia who, as you say, gets on quite well. Generally, imagine what happens when you've got Serbia and Kosovo gang. I said, yeah, we pops weren't hotel breath on that one guy. Good to catch up with you. Always that was Monaco's Boeken's correspondent guide alone, joining us hair on the briefing on monocle twenty four. Where it is now time to review some of the day's newspapers. I've been joined in the studio by motorcycles, deafen economies often in Daphne Cetinje in terms of the u. k. presses only really won't place to stall, sadly, Hello, Tom, yes, I'm starting with one paper, but with one, two, three, four. I've got the UK data via the Daily Telegraph the financial times the times and the guardian. All with the British Prime Minister Theresa may mid Dan's on the front page. If you haven't seen the video is worth watching, and we've seen her dance moves before you remember back in August on the first day of her trade mission to Africa, she showed don's moose with a group of schoolchildren this time. However, it was at the conservative party conference have finals. The final speech which took place yesterday in Birmingham, and she took to the stage to the tunes of Abba dancing, Queen specific, and she kind of made her way on stage in an upbeat way. Dancing to a new beat may declares an end tossed. Charity is the headline in the Daily Telegraph. I don't know what you think Tom, but people quite divided about how moves I think I can guess what you'll use all, but you know, it drew laughter from the audience on the day, but also a lot of people have mocked have a presence there and her decision to an end. You know, was it spontaneous? Was it not Downing? Street? Has said that it was spontaneous. It was definitely self deprecating, definitely self deprecating. I'm not sure Theresa May really does spontaneity. And my point is not so much to writing her for the moose themselves, which let's be fair were ridiculous. It's more the fact that she thinks it's good to have some fun even if it's her own expense as the country serenely sales tools, the oblivion of Brexit that's probably slightly take, but it just, it just feels ill judged. She's clearly playing to the gallery in the room, and I would have thought most people in the country are saying, well, hang on on this really profound and serious questions. I would like to see the prime minister may be. Focused on now. Definitely. I think she was trying to strike competent optimistic tone and she then went on in her speech to talk about how a good Brexit deal would mean an end to a steady here in the UK and specifically said that, you know, the key is securing a free trade deal, but provides more friction Lewis trade to trade in goods, or we'll see how that measures of which we go next stuff. Right? So the New York Times international told, no, what you'll thoughts on whether you'd like to live close to museum in the US how ever they saying that museums popping up annoying neighbors. That's the headline of this piece here and then you have time. So I guess the crowd was we can well in in your neighborhood in your actual residential, make good for for museum to pop up because you know how many museums is too many in this article. It says the in twenty fourteen. There were about thirty five thousand museums in the US which is double the number from nine hundred ninety. And you know, I think people generally tend to be museums as an improvement to the neighborhoods, but as a few of the the residents here in this optical point out the traffic and parking and the noise and it does, especially when it's in the middle of residential neighborhood tends to create kind of a negative environment. The backlash that it's talking about in this article specifically is in Mt. Pleasant, a suburb of Charleston and North Carolina. They wanted to build the national medal of honor museum wet, and specifically the planning to build on a park niche Allston Haba the reason that they want to build it that which is very, you know, in a residential neighborhood is because it's way the World War Two era aircraft Yorktown is dog. So there's lots of local position and museum developers are trying to find ways to overcome this specifically that giving the example of George Lucas, the stall was filmmaker. Of course, he's been trying to find homes. For the Lucas museum of narrative. I don't know if you've heard about this, but it's a one billion dollar project. It took him years apparently to find a spot for it and only now has construction gotten underway, exposition park in LA cuts where he's so I wouldn't have thought completed museum. Is that noisy generally? Yeah, maybe I'll have a lot to learn. Definitely thanks for making us that was definitely Carnets joining us here on the briefing. Not far away from hat majori house, just a few hundred yards. Stadium agents, poke freeze London. One of the world's most famous art fairs is well underway, motorcycles college edits. Is there for us right now. Let's talk to her good often and Kiara your freeze. What's going on and it's the second day of the preview today. And I guess the most of the or at least a good portion of the commercial deal starts being done yesterday. So speaking to the galleries ego, ready, we've already got inside to they've souls heaven, eight, however, many pieces. There's lots going on your city and a few very spectacular highlights. And then you'd imagine be with Mona pieces. But I guess everybody tends to gravitate towards the one that make purveyor big impression. Cura, I know that you will just having a bit of a browse around yourself, but any sort of particular trends that we should look at often, it's what's kind of moving. It's people who all those on all the rest of it was in the from who used spoken to Sipho well, speaking to the autistic director up the FEC he's keenum emphasis of the FOX dot South African conscious, but they're really well the shit, their few African galleries that have been here for the cost few years. But I think the mood around buying not just is also increasing. There's there's more interest a small gallery in the front of up and coming section of the fete, which is the section called dunk. Projects is particularly interesting showing wicks by a block south, get off and take some yourself told and these very beautiful portraits of, I guess, whole. I think she's actually a so full trait of a wearing fake crew tone close, and it's maybe I'm not doing it Justice but thirty. Quite impressive. Sounds very striking cut out. And I think that is always interesting to look at those breakthrough moments, whether it works from a particular region, particularly galleries that are really making making impacts is interesting to see those, you know, to sort of be president breakthrough moments. I think when you hear it, you can see the different galleries. All, definitely trying to grab people's attention in what have a white sauce boat because of habits every year and you have to reinvent ourselves. So one thing that I've noticed across different booze, it's like a few works like suspended hanging from the ceiling. Maybe I'm saying this because I'm Ed as an exhibition in town, dedicated entirely suspended, sculptures, but him, you know, exposes something hunting from the top of Everest more expensive, what injuries forever for an exhibitor as though that learning paley. If for example, having to say Kyra humming the base and they're all expensive works by an Egyptian Canadian office, which is, I guess, a big drape of of textiles hunting from yourself of the base and then dripping all the way down to the flow. So these things like dick state mental, this, the end, Joel kind of the attention of people. And if you want to look at the most impressive booth for goal, I think this addition, you have to head. To commend mino- that's shouldering a huge bronze tree trunk. I guess almost Hoff's of much into a pool of water that's formed in the middle of crap cement will. It's really impressive. And considering it weighs fifty tons, the fates to get it into the fed to begin with on apparently does a few discussions with different museums about acquiring this book. So we shall see gets in Dade. We will sounds very arresting. Enjoy the rest of your day phrase that was Monaco's cata that just a stone's throw from here Midori house at freeze London. And that is what we doing today's edition of the briefing which was produced by Reese James and researched by yelling afar and Martha Lieber. A studio manager was Sarah miles my thanks to them. Oh, we'll be back at the same time tomorrow. Of course, noon here in London for the Friday edition of the program. If you want more on the big stories of the day will certainly be covering the latest developments regarding the Brett Cavanaugh investigation. Emma Nelson will have that all Midori house. That's coming your way. Eighteen hundred London time, thirteen hundred. If you're listening in Washington DC my name is Edwards. That is your first briefing. Thanks very much indeed for tuning in.

FBI Slovenia Croatia Tom Edwards US Brett Kavanagh White House president Brett Cavanaugh London Brett cavenaugh US Senate Monaco Workers Party European Union President Trump Jeffrey Howard Brazil United Kingdom supreme court
14: Questions for Fuglsang and the reinvention of a Spanish institution

The Cycling Podcast

1:18:38 hr | 9 months ago

14: Questions for Fuglsang and the reinvention of a Spanish institution

"You listening to the cycling cast with Lionel. Danny Daniel free. I'm Richard. Hello my name's Richard Moore. I'm joined this week by Daniel from nearly three. But and Cheney Commerce Stein this week Daniel Acapulco this week cliff serving on at this point on. NF airy we're going loco. In Slovenia hasn't yet he's missing non. I'm actually in a sack. Poke the meeting rooms called Acapulco in Berlin and Napalm managed to squeeze in a jump in Slovenia a ski jump while. I don't think so because I heard from him this morning. He. He isn't Lavinia on a on a mission for or the cycling podcast and for Friends of the slate clean. podcast will hear the fruits of the trip soon but yeah he's he's He's he's having an an interesting time. There are admittedly a couple of people and I think we'll hear a little bit of his postcard from Slovenia next week and then a friend special will follow blue. And he's I think he's enjoying it though. Obviously the food featured quite prominently in his report from Savannah but he's he's a good time European Slovenia a have I've written about a couple of climbs in Slovenia for In the books about Mountain Mountain Mountain Higher Absolutely gorgeous part of the world. Particularly the dissection of Serena just over the Italian border The Julian Alps about Mountain Range the passive resistance probably pronounced wrong. But I'm it's sort of a famous coupled it climbs which actually inspired was the inspiration for the numbered happens at out duets. I kind of know the answer to this question. Would obviously it wasn't the question. The question question here about two thousand one made more sense for the Jiro to go to take that route back into Italy. No it would. It would have been fair away. I mean we were looking at logistics. We went we and So from the end of the third stage in Hungary that the closest major apple is grab We're supposed to in the north of Croatia. And Yeah you're right. Actually rich dumb that would have led to Levin is a pretty mountains place if the had been amounting on stage Leon would bit like this of two thousand nine zero the kind of upside down Jira that no one really was very nominal with it was quite quite an interesting group announcing stage early on which of course. We're going to see the Tour de France this year. I don't mean very mountainous first week. Indeed indeed well Daniel let with Lionel here to China has fallen upon me to do that. Unfortunately and as news. Isn't there law racing. I've been been saying watching the Saudi tour this morning First Stage of the first edition of outrace M A little bit disappointing. Maybe the The field is an ASO race. But only four world tour teams I think stage was won by recourse law of work done by barring McLaren an on Henry. Kaiser went very close. Very good ride by him. He was second on the stage recalls those when our team for at memories but elsewhere in Argentina of wealthier. US San. Juan finished with REMCO. Evan Opole the overall winner after winning the time trial in Stage three fifty kilometers and he was thirty two seconds up on Filippo Filippo Ghana the team any writer and a four kilometer world record holder with Oscar Sevilla. Third Not Evan Oppose Twenty and Ghana is twenty three the other ages together and you get forty three year old Oscar severe and finished on that way too with those three. The top three places and Brandon McNulty of love. You eight team members for severe rich. Who I've noticed again Not For the first time it's been speaking to the Spanish press. Press about his great relationship with Ligon Bernal and how they they train a lot together. which well yeah I mean? He Lives in Columbia obviously on trains the law that Colombian writers. I think I think he does. Yeah yeah he's He's been a regular training partner of better analysis for for few years now and a checkered history. Of course he was caught up in Operation Porto all those years ago. What fourteen years ago now extraordinary 'em anyway After time-trial there were two stage. Wins for Fernando Gaviria. Who looked very good one for Miguel Flores and one first denic St Bar Sam Bennett won the race talk in Australia? Israeli ahead of Jackson Solo Chapman of F.. Dj won the women's race in front of another Australian. Emily Harris in the Minorca challenged. There were wins for Emmanuel Book Men of Bronze Remark Solaar of movie star. We'll be hearing a lot more about movie stars in this episode and Bachmann Twenty twenty two. Well he looked good didn't he. And he I mean he he he I think he wrote well Muir Colossians. Well didn't book men but he did look good on and a bit of a favorite of mine view. Darkhorse guilty guilt guilty admit. It's a bit of a sort of a six success. Want success is to Pavel Tong of my affection. So I think if if I was a fan which was supposed to be fans with journalists. But what you're certainly Tonkov goal. Oh time for old money book man. 'cause because he's so MONOSYLABIC IS I. I knew that's That's nothing today without refrain anyway. I think he's I think he's going to surprise some people this year and you already had an lost you know. He's very strong and Mattia Moschetti of Trek Sega frito one two of the the Racism Yorker as well therefore one day races. In Merca Sergio Higgins thought of E F is Euclidean road race champion egg and Burnell the tertre France champion had a a very nasty high speed crash. So that has any st may even Sosa Bernard was okay and in fact finished second in the race does it was a broken finger and is out of the tour Columbia which starts soon back in Australia. Leeann lipper of teams somewhere. On the women's Cadel Evans Great Ocean road race and Devin ends of decoding quick steps. Brian bevere surprise in the men's he got away with Pavel civic off of any and I sprinted him to win and quite unusual. It was a cracking raeside. They did you see any of that. CROSSWIND SPLITS So I saw the Yeah the closing kilometers Yes civic of didn't like someone who's Necessarily you know the the best escalator to having that sort of finish in a sprint. Finish the best guy to be with. Maybe sorry panel civic or actually listened to the podcast so be careful if I mean it was a very strong right by him we should say he's a he's a great talent on the He not race you would you would start tip him for or has talents. Lie In probably stage racing certainly But evidence He you know thirty six years old a former classmate of love friend of the PODCAST. Jan Pieter Vlieger. They studied sports science together. And I used to live whether this is still the case but used to live on in a moment in the village which I think the village is actually called. Claremont isn't it which is like a little sort of Artists Colony Losses Living And andries definite yeah leaguer rights for news. Blood has been on the podcast broadcaster. Few teams of course in France the Grand Prix secretly slimmer says it was won by Ben. Wah Wah of eighty-two are had Valentim Doi- of Groupama J. famously cursed that race Too much in the same with the RAIMO. Jerseys supposedly cursed the winner of Martinez is supposed to be cursed for for the next twelve months old. That's another story and Francois would know about this of course Francois and Tommaso hailing from Monday. Yeah well don't look for Ben. What caused the walk for the rest of the season in Cyclo Cross Matthew Vander Pol won his third senior? Men's title led from start to finish. Tom Pidcock took a very strong silver medal. Men and twenty seconds back with two Nour's the bronze medal in the women's race. Selena Alvarado won a three way Dutch battle ahead of Ama- reversed and Lucinda brand. We'll have more on this At and on the winner in next week cycling podcast Femina Vassal Curie Anka the veteran Belorussian team any has retired the heart condition that my action for a bit of time last season and on medical advice he has now called it quits cameron worth. There's not correct the correct pronunciation. Common worth sounds like okay but he is thirty. Six Years Old Australian writer been being around many teams and tragically as well and he is a surprise replacement for surprised on you Surprised Prize. In the sense that way skis had very interesting career path coming with He started off the first stop in his spotting journey any was Rowing came in Olympic rower than Road is a professional in various different teams price different countries and And and retired a few years ago and has been doing triathlons but also been training a lot in the last couple of years with with Chris. F- room And the sort of relationship that was built up between Commonwealth and the team called coach. Tim Karasin which you know after a couple of years has has led to him being being recruited by them. I don't know how much shut why extent he's he's seen as a replacement Faquir Yankah similar sort of ride wider. I would suggest someone we can probably deal of compass On the front end on flat. Today's I'm curious I would. I would imagine bind to turn turnoff on your television screens. As a pundit or some possibly on a podcast. I wouldn't wouldn't be surprised if he lost his own party. Jira well I I. I've been to carry on. I tried to anyone that's interesting I've I've requested. I have requested into one. One of the reasons was that there was this fascinating story And it was completely incorrect. But it was written in the Italian press I think after one one of his State wins in the year. One two three stays in Jira in the course of his career and there was a story a story of great tragedy his whole family pretty much watch. A couple of generations of his family had been almost wiped out by by cancer which was caused by the the disaster because he hails from while batteries and the the exact town he's from is not very far from the the site of disaster and anyway in this story said released two or three relatives that been affected by cancer caused by and this is obviously well acqu alarming and an intriguing and first journalist tried to follow up on this and put it to carrying God and whether he actually answer the question directly all right. You know be unusual for carry anchor. It was it was completely untrue. Well I I did that. He did agree to you with me. Once the Jira one morning I think I think it was Towards the end of the year a couple years ago I said hi vassal any chance of an interview and he said yes in Russian so so it didn't happen but we do know thanks Joe Dombrowski. Who shared a room with him team? Sky that he likes to Spend his evenings watching cat videos on youtube and he caught him chuckling one evening on his bed watching something on his laptop and when he when he checked out what it was joe was shocked and alarmed and surprised to find the carrying was watching cat videos so that that was a that was a surprise and more seriously Danish Norwegian media reported at the weekend the Yacob fool sang and Alexi Sankoh had been apparently or have being apparently working with Dr Michaela Ferrari who is of course bond for life on any writer co working with him even talking to is subject to a doping sanction. This story apparently came from an investigation by the C.. A. D. F. The sort of independent anti-doping body that that was set up by the UCLA WHO this body in another development is going to disappear at the end of twenty twenty. And it's a story we discussed towards any loss you develop patio announced a review of the CAD F with a view to possibly moving responsibility for anti-doping cycling to the International Testing Agency which is quite a new you body and after an still being cross. What's Olympic sports? And it's been remarkably quick this review 'em paneth's being concluded in the management committee agreed last week to close the CAD. I fold them into the. It a. m. which has very close links with the IOC as well and we'll probably follow up upon that a little bit more in the coming weeks because it could be quite significant development bar the story concerning fool saying it seems difficult to separate great the leak of this story and with this news about the CAD. effing away and but it's a very strange one. Isn't that Daniel M with lots so strands to it involves Astana team which has been subject to manny kind of rumors and stories over the years including alleged links with Dr Ferrari which have been unproven and but full of course had this remarkable season last year. By selena's he was he was go up there and in lots of week long stage races in one day races and and quite a relatively old age thirty four and So for a lot of people at the story that he was working with Ferrari may might have confirmed some suspicions they had on the other hand Some of the details in this story appear slightly incredible such as food sign meeting with Ferrari in Monaco and motor pacing and behind him around around Monaco where lots of professional sake was living train. Of course then. The south of France the investigation itself does seem credible the that based on whistle blowers and tipoffs. The has been looking into full science Sankoh. I'm perhaps other writers astonished as well. Woah I mean what have you made of what we've learned so far well rich. I was struck by mechanic. Ferrari the statement yesterday before force. Hang on let Cinco. They issued a statement in evening but earlier in the day. Furry Hod put put something on his website just a few sort of bullet points. I'm a bit of a takedown of the allegations. I'm he said he hadn't been to Monaco Niece for twelve years. He's never been on a school most by the entire life You ever been on a scooter on my job. But that doesn't mean that I'm guilty of any the J.. No He's never been to Lugano a place that was mentioned in the in the story. I am I've nicest ninety people already sort of looking at the statement through a magnifying glass and already sort of picking apart certain and things Ferrari says I mean I haven't been to. Monaco needs for at least twelve years. Well there was a police investigation conducted now part of our in Italy in two thousand while the most of the information gathered regarded the period of two thousand ten. Two thousand eleven and the part of a police certainly believed that they had traced Ferrari Michaela Ferrari to the Monaco area In two thousand and ten and they believe that he received an Astonished Athletes Back then. really been any dispute that his son Stefan Variety is. WHOA well? I was in that period working with him And he was definitely based in Monaco. will the Monaco era area in that period So you know two thousand and ten. That's only well it's it's Ten years ago not twelve years ago it was very sad so that's inaccurate straightaway and but one thing you know just looking back investigation and there were hundreds of pages of phone transcripts. The part of a police tapped for always phones even but then ten years ago striking. How careful Ferrari and his son were in their communication obviously wasn't The first time the they'd been sort of under police surveillance and they had a very practiced Wave Way of communicating. We beat each other So as not to incriminate themselves so the idea that McKay for I was out on public roads on a scooter in an area. I'm densely populated with professional writers and people who you probably would have recognized them and stretches the bounds of of my belief anyway. Yeah and it was also claimed that. He was with the standard team at the tour of Catalonia. Las Year as well and one thing we can be pretty sure. His photographs will emerge of Ferrari honest guitar because only one photograph exists of him. I think doesn't it is one that we it keeps seeing again. You say that rich. I was reminded I was speaking to some colleagues Italian colleagues earlier today. And there is actually the still lawsuit going the on And I'm what I'm not sure what what stage it's out about. The allegation made by four or five years ago They claim that they had photograph. Ferrari at an astonishing training camp back when he disputed that and not dispute. Legal disputes is still going on. Yeah I do remember again. There were claims. GAZZETTA had a photograph but didn't publish the photograph of Ferrario this astonish coverage was very odd indeed and as I said earlier the the investigation by the F. into full silent. Sankor an astonishing as it seems to be based on You know claims made by twelve people who have served doped fool. Sciences is intelligence based rather than I suppose evidence space if you like am or certainly was at the outset and which is is interesting and certainly as you say surprising if any writer met with that Ferrari in Monaco itself certainly taking a huge arrest because that alone would be enough to incur a doping violation everything but but Daniel one of his other claims in his statement which is very you know. Didn't it didn't waste any words. Did a Ferrari steam and and straight to the point but he did also say Beena are professional bike races. One thousand nine hundred four when he worked for Google instant in ninety four am and you know that doesn't mean a lot because we know obviously the involvement with the sport didn't stop in one thousand nine hundred but you inline went to visit him. Didn't you win. The when the zero went to Ferrara last year or twenty uh-huh yeah we do we doorstep him. We went to his house which is just on the outskirts of Fed Outta on we unfortunately just just missed him We spoke to his wife. Who told us? She wasn't interested particularly in talking to us and and they weren't interested in the jury retire which which was leaving for Ferrara Day but she also said that we'd missed by a couple of minutes and we then realized that we had actually seen Michaela Ferrari because we teenaged cyclist right out of his front gate on a Bianchi bike. I seem to recall An head off But yeah fortunately we never we never go to in it to spin astonished Kit. No I don't think it was an astonishing cycling. PODCAST is supported said by science in Sports Science and sports fueled by science. Thank you very much to sciences sport for their continuing support of the cycling podcast and you can get twenty five percent off your scientist. Sport Sports Nutrition Products Science and Sport Dot Com with the code. SIS CPI TWENTY-FIVE AS S. I S C P twenty five. Am We mentioned the the story. Concerning in particular Yakup fool sang in. They ended last part. We will keep an eye on that and return to that. I'm sure next week as more details. Come out as as perhaps fool saying addresses some of the the the claims in a bit more detail. And we're GONNA turn our attention this week to movie star because this is our subject that we've been talking about for a few weeks Daniel. I am a team that has such a strong Spanish identity and tradition and history but appears almost like a different team in twenty twenty fourteen. Eighteen new writers. That's half the team and an awful lot of very young writers not just young writers but very young writers to twenty year olds to twenty one year olds. Three twenty. A two year olds a twenty three year old am not Gabriel colleague the British writer. His really a classics right sprinter will hear from him in a bit. But we're going to hear from Eusebio Lonzo a the the main man for forty years and movie. Saudi celebrated their fortieth anniversary last year. and you spoke to him recently. Dying Walser here from his son Sebastian. Who is taking on a more important role within the team and I think perhaps he's quite influential too and making the team more international? They've got I am a spread of writers from Scandinavia. America am as well as this the Spaniards Colombians and South Americans that they've always had but I I saw a real reboot for this team. This institution and I mentioned platoons recently am I mean he is. He's he's cut from different for cloth to some of the other team bosses. I'm thinking of Patrick. Lefevere from people like that he he seems like a very gentle and kind of a funky figure from the outside anyway and I don't know if I know you always enjoy talking to Daniel. Well I think Cam. He's quite quite similar to lefevre in a lot of ways in you know he's very charming radium much seems to enjoy sort of interactions with the a media has been criticized at times over the last few years representing sort of old school. The old guard with everything kind of my entail but particularly towards the end of last year I had a number of conversations with him about this sort of regeneration nations reboot that the team was going to undergo an in particular. The loss of of the teams Talisman Kintana who's really given movie star. He's been the focal focal point for the team's identity over the past few years As time went on the two parties molly we start and Kim. Thomas insists gradually fall out of love with each other So when I did sit down with we started with that we started with Kintana and we look back I on the positive legacy Kintana of course when the when the Jira with movie star and I else his legacy would be movie star but also Maybe in what respects container was was misunderstood and Maligned Unaware Kanton may be wrong in the last two or three years with more we saw frozen neidl has been very important because Telefonica. Ah On movie star to have a presence throughout Latin America a night always a kind of talisman for them so he was the guy who really brought cycling to the masses and gave the sport the popularity. It's now enjoying in Colombia. and Latin America with the help of the media so yes he's become a Latin American icon which has been very important go pat. He's taking Columbia back to the top of the cycling world and by doing that inspired a generation of ninety. Does these kids who were fifteen sixteen years old eight or nine on years ago when night or burst onto the scene and you now seeing that neidl became a major personality in many Latin American countries. That's great source. Oh surprise from Auburn Startling Telefonica and for me personally seeing the sport a night or as the focus of the attention of all those kids in those countries. That's very gratifying. For me and Telefonica was was the third night sometimes. What night was locked has been the ability to explain? Explain that he's human to ECOMOG always be on top but people also need to understand that they're not calculators they have good and bad days in Perez when they don't feel good and every day they're fighting against rivals who are sometimes just better than they are. That's why you have to save the victories and be braving defeat. Because because sometimes someone's better than you night always someone who's a fighter. He doesn't change whether he's at his best or worst and he never lost faith in himself Elf. He was always convinced the next day he'd have the chance to get the better of his rivals again. Sometimes that was the case and sometimes it wasn't okay thirty acres Darla was interesting to hear enjoy talking by Cantona's influence and hinting that his importance goes beyond on his results. And I think since twenty thirteen when he was second to the third of Franz am he has whether Baxter Design encouraged AH WAVE OF YOUNG COLOMBIAN writers to follow him. I mean he's made it easier for other Colombian writers to find places on on big teams for one thing but despite you know Bernal eclipsing him by becoming the first Colombian to the France when I got the sense. That container remains the most important cyclist in Colombian and prompts further. In lots of America's well so he is somebody who cannot pass be judged simply by his results else now. I think you're right. Richard I think from a commercial point of view. He's been hugely important to the sponsor. The group that owns Mavi star is co Telefonica. And they're the whether the second biggest corporation in in Spain Behind Santander but they've also got massive interests in Latin America and he can tonner has really been as Pied Piper the Talisman for this wonderful new public as well. He's always been a great passion for Cycling Columbia but It's really been galvanized by all the successive hard over the last few years I mean in terms mm sort of resonance of on the last day of a grand tour in terms of sort of crowd and euphoria numbers and excitement. I haven't seen the last day of a grand tour like the two thousand sixteen welter that was won by Kintana this the there are a lot of Colombian immigrants in Madrid but the the words tens of thousands of Columbians imagery that day and yet that was that was really quite memorable. And it. Really just underline. How important container was for the team but also there say we talked about this issue of communication with container and I think the movie? We watched him over. The years is dry selected incidents that particular incidents where you could see this playing out in real time. How his communication with other members of the team wasn't improbably what? It should have been times when he wasn't feeling good and he didn't communicate that to the team and this led to a lot of the sort of lampooning of movie stars tactics at Certain Times in certain grand tools that you know they'd be riding on the front and Canton would be struggling at the back. And the was I think a breakdown in communications. It was also breakdown in communications and various points with Cantona's entourage and his management and we've taught a reasonable amount already this year when law. She months about this breakdown in communications between wounds way and Canton agent but also the agent of a lot of other Latin American riders. The Talian Giuseppe Quattro and that's had a massive impact on recruitment for Mavi Star this year. And I and I think that's probably the single biggest reason why we've seen this internationalization of their roster roster. I would love to have more Latin American riders in the roster. The fact is that Quadra controls does the interest of of most of the top Colombian writers and going forward. That's a real problem that he has to deal with and solve. Well it's it's been probably unfairly Hobbyhorse of Arizona. Others to to Lampoon Movie Stars Tied Takes Times particularly when they've gone into say the Turkey France with their their their famous tried and of Alejandro Valverde. Not a container on mcallen Donde of course has also left nine nine am an. We have criticized movie stars tactics at times and you asked Explain a little bit but is is well I know that. Sometimes you can't change people's minds. I tried to explain to them why certain things are happening. We're obviously always trying to do the best for the team mm-hmm in this team. We've almost always worked for night on because he's been our leader but there are times when he can't do the necessary dommage and we have other riders Cam Dan. In those circumstances you have to apply certain criteria for who gets the support for the good of the team. Win The abilities of the ride is very okay. Well matched the race in the road. have to decide either in the mountains all the time. Trials understand that people who are watching races through patriots. Glosses can find it hard to to accept that logic but they can't ignore the on the occasions when we haven't supported neidl. It's because there's been a better option but those differences of opinion and the criticism unavoidable eat unity and okay straightforward there from NCAA an honest to intimate that there. There have been times we've seen were container. Just hasn't hasn't had it and the success big success they had lost. She of course was at the zero with Richard Caterpillars another site American from Ecuador and another departure this winter. He's gone to team any US. And there may be the another department Diaz to and Andre Amador who am his is currently homeless. I mean he doesn't appear any roster the more but he is he's trying together an agreement that had with movie star to Join T. Many US and there's been no recent update on that situation but yeah Daniel Fair or unfair to to criticize movie stars tied takes I mean is it. Is it title. Ix just legs usually I think in love cases it has been legs. Cantona's as we've said has been the focal point for their team in the grand tours and and he buys nature quite a conservative writer. Wha- The conservative or you might say just someone who's not particularly explosive and as consequently found it difficult to open in a big time gaps and and hold those big time gaps. And you know he's had more success. Oh we've really been able to follow the. He's he's main rivals in the mountains in the majors with Canton always felt that was a misconception which arose very early probably because we hadn't seen in major Colombian star for a long time and we sort of mythology is and heart back to these days that we all imagined in the eighties and when they first appeared on the scene where they with these sort of firecrackers in the mountains and spectacular mercurial and we thought that that was what can turn was going to be and national fast. He was never really that but I think the image or the expectation that he would be like. That should be like that stuck so I think that's one thing the happy times when they've written badly on the final mountain stage of the Tour de France last year wounds way himself that they wrote like amateurs or scores schoolboys again. That was probably an issue of communication can taunt. POPs didn't communicate with his teammates the way he should have turn or or they didn't communicate with him in the best possible way but then there are other times nothing. They've been criticized unfairly. The famous states to Guadalajara in in the well to last year when Canton had made the the front split and then Valverde was kind of Maroon behind and there was a sense point where they went to the front of the Peleton Moulvi Star and they seem to pull behind Kintana versus a good reason to do it. They were trying to eliminate a Primoz domestiques. But you know that that was the kind of thing which I glance was was almost incomprehensible and I think there have been various occasions When they've been the victim of almost this sort of mean that's been created? The tactics are poor or lacking the votes. There's been other times when They've really they've pulled off some tactical mall strokes. The Jiro last year was certainly one of those The way that cow pass really snuck up on the rails. No one was really paying too much attention to him in the in the Middle Week of the race and with two fantastic moves me out and he really bill his his victory. I think it's been a bit of a mixed. Amanda there was. It was the the perfect foil as well for caterpillars and probably important in in a win and they're gone example of where having to leaders it has worked very well. I guess you know when we look back in review the last few years the haven't been many if any occasions in the ground through is where you know to those three. We have been really going well. Enough to contend for victory. I'm thinking and the year two thousand eighteen th time as one the Welte Valvarde Ian and container were both up there but really only good enough for the podium and in fact in the end neither finished on the podium. And you know the haven't been not meant to many occasions Asians when they've had two writers capable of of fighting for the win. That's been there has been a big problem but I mean you also asked them this year and the the review of the team M. is hoping for some of their existing right is Mar Celera's one in particular who I think that's been a bevy disappointment disappointment. You know he won pioneered a couple years ago. Think big things were expected of him. He's not really delivered he wants. He's One Yorker which might mean that he's he's you know prepared well over the winter and we might see the the strong mark solar this year. Who knows but masters the Big Sammy? He's come from the quickstep and he will be the guy who they expect to fill the shoes of Kentuckiana on Lonzo really. So big things expected from him and a needed from him. I'm really and but some of the new the new guys and the of course including Valverde. I've got a lot of faith in the a young guys that we have and he'll be on the front line in twenty twenty. My Dad mass done even want to mention Alejandro. Because he's obviously sleep getting on and he's level could start dropping any moment at age forty but if the something that's changed in cycling is the big champions don't last forever and every year we're seeing three four or five great riders emerge who have the ability to light up the sport. A new can be the cornerstone of winning teams. The frames the Thomas them making way for better now while not team plus visit rogue late and Dumoulin who possibly be the to stand out teams in the grand tours besides yours has the capacity to surprise and throw all sorts of different scenarios that is squad think over underscore. He's been doing it for forty years. You asked him as well how much longer he'll carry on in this job. Well I'm sixty four years old now and there will come a day when I have to stop. I certainly still feel very lucky to head up this very important project in Spain. I know my sit as a moral obligation to ensure that Spain has a presence in this World League of cycling that we're in that's pretty much my go Yaas us as he entered Boko interesting to hear him talk about the moral obligation almost of running the team and they are Spain's only world tour team and you know they are. They're important institutions Spanish cycling. Yeah you're right rich. And and as I said I wonder how much of this internationalization is. Sort of been forced upon them. You know I think Serbia son. Sebastian speaks English and he's his sort of horizons and view is probably wider than the previous. This regimes have been and you know it might work out very well for them but I think they will want to remain very very much. The sort of rallying point four Spanish professional cycling there want to take the best talent and an ace. It's also the style of the style of racing racing that corresponds to them. The best they have this great tradition nations rich tradition of stage racing. And that's really what the Spanish public of have been most interested in over the years. So I'll yeah. I'll be very curious to observe next year or two how this experiment of diversifying the types of races. They're focusing on and types of riders Focusing on those races with them how how it works out. Shoot that door cycling PODCAST team car. The back of the tax lease Voice of Saint. PK reminds me to tell you that this week's episode of the cycling podcast is supported by stitch fix stitch fixes the online personal styling service or a way of buying enclosed. You like without going near a shop and squeezing into tiny changing rooms with bundles of trousers and shirts over your arm. It's really simple. You fill in a style quiz online where you can outline in your personal style and aesthetic if you have one as well as budget size and shape and any other quirks or foibles that you might have a personal stylist will send you five items of including each handpicked from selection of one hundred or so of the best European brands which includes established names cool emerging designers and exclusive brands for your stylus time you pay US dialing charge of just ten pounds which is deducted from the cost of anything that you decide to keep your five items clothes arrive in a box. You try on everything at home and keep what you like and send the rest delivery and returns are free both ways. I've been a customer for six months now and I enjoy it. Kept about fifty percent Santa Claus which seems like remarkably good hit rate includes close. I'm pretty sure I wouldn't have picked out in the shop. Get started with stitch fix today and support the cycling podcast asked by going to stitch fix dot. UK forward slash cycling. That's S. T. I. T. C. H. F. I. X. Dot Coll- dot UK forward slash cycling the cycling podcast for the latest news views and interviews from the world altered professional cycling support our work and get exclusive episodes by becoming a friend of the cycling podcast Goto the cycling PODCASTS DOT COM forward slash. Subscribe if you've become a friend of the podcast already. Thank you very much. Indeed that we've got a new system which Shah is working extremely well makes it very easy to sign up as a friend of the podcast releasing another episode for friends. The podcast we the Tour de France diaries. From las last year South Lionel Bernie and Francois Tommaso reading our diaries so many audiobook and that will be available for Friends of the podcast go to to the cycling PODCAST DOT COM forward slash. Subscribe to sign up if you As fifteen pounds for the the basic package of the exclusive live friends specials. But you a bit more. You'll get a signed copy of our book. The ground through diaries as well so thanks very much. Everybody who has signed up at our best ever ever start to a friend's program so we're very grateful to you. Your support goes a long way to helping US cover races sending Lionel to Slovenia and and the metoo Tilly and a couple of weeks. I think miles off to try to ban KI as well. I'm off to Milan San Remo and the Spanish season what started last week America but it really really starts properly in Valencia. This weekend. We've been looking at talking about The movie star team we heard from Sabia wounds. Way The the boss in the last apart. And we're going to hear from his son Sebastian. Who is taking a bigger role in the team? He set up the women's team a couple of years ago and since is becoming more important and running the men's team to doesn't refer to his his father has died a uh us. You say bill which I guess is understandable in the context of you know work and working for the same organization but as you said earlier Daniel he speaks excellent English. And that might be a factor in the team becoming more international and signing persuaded American writer some Scandinavians this year and by spoke to him last last week. I'm a by the chain. That movie star this year. Here's what he said look at the roster for twenty twenty almost looks like a new team team got fourteen year writers eleven nationalities. An eleven writers aged twenty five or under so very young team as well does it. Does it feel I feel like a new team to you will. Yeah like you said which I think We have fourteen new righties. These year in many of them are Charleston international and like you said a many of them are also under twenty five and that's a huge change for detained but it's also Tells me important that we were able to to keep all our core writers swill our big leaders which were returned applied miracle in China Midland. Who all of all three of them have left the timber? But we've been able to to give that core group of writer said. Tell us something really important Gordon for us. So we're pretty much rebuilding process at the moment and part of this rebuilding is bringing Um bringing new new young writers which is something really important for us to to bring you talented riders and tried to start working on the long-term also. We've we've tried. There is a deliberate strategy to make the team more international. I'm thinking especially you've always had a lot of South American writers. Obviously uh-huh you've got 'em Scandinavians British American writer as well first American writer. I think since anti Hamson way back in the in the ninety s am Is is a deliberate stretches attempt to make the team more international absolutely. I mean These past fifteen years citing has going through so many changes and I think we're going through a huge globalization. Our sports so so forth was key to to take that step on trade tool open open up to two different countries and different markets and also tried to try to 'em bring writer from MHM nationalities that that are also interesting for our sponsor so like you said until until a few years from until a few years ago we've been. We've we've always having already hit only having South American and Spanish writers. Maybe tally ounce some some French writers. But now we're opening up to to other countries entrees like you said Scandinavia the USA Great Britain and trying to to get that interest in in that were main sponsor. Telefonica has been in countries like Colombia for example or Argentina. We also go to take care of all of those countries on trade half brighter from from those nationalities but yet the Ada too to continue opening up to to other countries and trying to globalize the team. And I'll be more international team. And how do you balance the need. The every team has to win races in the president while also planning for the long term you you have a lot of young writers there and you know you're obviously planning for the future. How do you balance that with the needs? Every every sponsor at every team demands team does win races or has results in races. How how did you get that balance? Right obviously the golden for for every single team is to to win races onto perform the out the race. Obviously something that we cannot forget. And and it's it's not racing to find the balance between when you have so many young writers. It's complicated who to try to win with those young right but but I think that we have a few right. Hey there's There are GonNa be key and are going to be able to bring us some wind San embracing the the most important race in the calendar like for example. We cannot forget that we have five hundred zero. We have new writer Rick Mass. Who In my opinion one of the most talented writers of radiation and Other raiders like for instance smarter who's been taking steps every single year and on this year in the financial defensively blood. Here sorry age. He brought him whether financial defense that he gets more than ready to be. Fighting for the for Ba- goals by himself so so I think those guys are obviously going to be able to take a step forward. Dan and I believe that were new. Young riders will also be able to Oh to develop and progress during this year. And I'm sure that's home of them. Wish for Bryce. It's obviously not going to be easy to to win within like where years too But I think I'm really also memory optimistic towards the year and I'm sure the results goal men at the end. We game working like we have until now when you're working well and and with these writers that we have the moment word. They're huge talent in so many different areas. I think the results we Goldman needs not something that I'm worried about. The the main goal here is is to try to to work well and create a creative good group of writers and the rest week on. I'm sure about that. He's it's always been a team that's done very well in grand tours and stage races. Of course I'm on. The new writers are sprinters classics writers time. Trials is does not signal a slight change of direction orders. The team still going to be a change of direction. I just I. I think what we're saying here. Is you to become a more complete team and and have a team that can can actually perform any kind of races on team we now we've seen humbled cowell classics have not been a- objective in our best coast. 'cause we never have the the right person. We never put the focus to able to perform those races we did. They were never be go. Objective tactic for us. But do they bought ourselves of racist. He's increasing the bus demand and undefined on defense demand that the that the team will need to perform those races. And that's something that for us. He's totally Vadim to try to to start putting so more focus on on rakers. That are fake. I Know Neil for us but we can link them for so many years bypassing starting last year already we started reporting More important focus on the on the classic for example and and here is going to be. It's going to be the same like you say. winkled many writers that are making if the new raiders are broadly different profile of decent typewriter. What we've traditionally having the team but I think they're really completely? There's the writers that obviously like the classics and but I'm sure that they're going to form the classics. But also I'm sure that I have. They're gonNA GONNA become key writers for the grand tours for the one week races for Dr. Dan's for any kind of race has so we're going to try to put more focus on the some some of the races that we import so much fog before by my without losing the essence and the and our historic wail for false. All five trying to it to work in or the races that we that we traditionally light which hurt the grand tours and what we are actually specialized specialized. And we're GONNA keep doing at the end. The grants were our our special needs. Something bad the we want to continue focusing on but we don't want to forget that their social important races during the season we also want to be present in the racist. But we want to be Brisson. We've we have good team thrown team in a now. We we find ourselves with with many young writers which those kinds of of racism. I'm sure they will. They will develop with performed there. And there's a well. Well publicized disagreement with with the ages epic. Pick a QUADRA. Who who who look after of your? Your writers has not had an influence on will not have an influence in terms of the writers that you sign. Obviously you guys know that we in we've been working with with you said before a long time we. We have many of these writers these past years. We have so many of his writers. After two the year we have many professional these agreements and now we have stop working relationship nations ship and on to this. But but I don't think I don't see that as a negative thing I we tried to to you can either hunt. Opportunities are working with. We thought we'd and other agencies another agents and and that's something that I he's whole opportunity and the time we raise our professional relationship. It's finished it's done something that for the moment it's going to change. I wanted to ask you as well as your father has been involved in running the team right from the start for forty years do do you have any idea. I mean what were his plans. How long do you think he will carry on being involved in? Will you one day take over from him running the team. I think I think it will save you. Do get here for forty years like you said. And I think he's GonNa. He's going to continue doing these his whole life until an anti able to do it he will. He will continue hopefully But yeah at the end. The reality is that he's sixty five your whole all them and at the end a tomboy. He's GonNa he's GonNa Start to to not stop doing this right but he's GonNa Start taking some shown defense Han and trying to to relax Khalil. It goes because you guys know that cycling if IF AFFORDS AD ahead when you when you're into it you gotta you gotTa be a lot of time. Outside from the Manson needs a lot of work and a lot of time and and twelve point he would have to say. Okay I gotta I gotTa take a step to one side but but Horta moment that does look like it's calming coming so so so we have heavier for for a few more years for sure. Is He from what you can see. Is he still as enthusiastic. Does he still enjoy the job. CBS Much every year. More more emphasize take We were actually meeting a few a few minutes before before. Having this call with you and now we were talking about selling. We were sitting down with our with our sports performance by TV. Land on we. He was sending us how how excited he's. He's thought to start this week. We've we throw many young writers so many new faces and I'm trying to to see how far we can go and obviously as a he. He wouldn't continue doing this if he. If he didn't feel have the same dehavilland they want so foaming at its feel if Ayman and then he works with passion. And I think that's one of the main reasons why he's been able to to go so far inciting to achieve so many so many great things. He's the Basham. He has forgive sports and they love has sport he. He guy that live for Franklin he breathes cycling. He He. He's cycling twenty four seven so extremely passionate about this and finally Sebastian. When I mean when are we going to see Alejandro Valverde start to decline he coined the is are there any signs as he as he doesn't Keyna's ever over winter and are we going to see the same velvety we've seen in previous years? I asked doc myself the same question. How many times every year and I have no answer for the only thing I can say is that Alexander? He was thought that they've he uses bashing on the late day that he stops howling final by his. I think he secret these that he just loves riding his bike. He loves training. He loves taking taking care of himself. He loves keeping him forcing the right diet. He loves all those things are that they're not his job. They're just like hoagies for for him. So this is what makes him. I think the secret to his to his success and the on such a long time at this level. It's a passion. He has on them. How how much? He enjoys cycling on right now. Being honest at the moment seeing him by faith in the in the training we have been in my yoga with some of the young riders. As you see him how how he looked at them how he talks to them how he wants to to help them entree to to to transmit to them everything. He's learned it cycling. I I think for a few years and when he does will he. Will he get in the team car. It's almost impossible to imagine the movie star Team Without Him and will he D- margin the evil remain involved. Yeah I'm sure about that. I think we continue. We knew at least feel on the bike for for two more years. I think you will be on the bike at least for two more years than on right. After the he's one hundred percents Cheryl GonNA continuing continuing with the team. He's doing someone key for our for our organization for so many years in I think he he's someone that we can The weekend of outside the team and he's GonNa he's GonNa provide so many positive things to to add to our writer that it would be stupid to have him in exciting stuff riding his bike. We'll we're talking about the changes that movie star but one constant of course is Alejandro Valverde who is about fifty two. No he's he's he's told me in on his fortieth birthday Instill all suddenly last year. Lucas almost as strong as ever. He he will he will go go into decline at some point. it's It's strange isn't it. The for all the changes ages and all the young writers come in Valverde ensures that when when we do the average age is still. It's still twenty eight. Something yeah rich and I think they will be more relying align on him than ever in the sense that if you look movie stars results last year in that particular their race wins. If you take valverde out off the equation that there's very little there and you look at. The number of young ride is brought in this year and they're not going to be expecting many winds from those those guys so they will expect over in spite of his advancing years to to to come up with with five or six ten race wins but certainly be Very visible and prominent in the biggest races. They also need people people like perhaps like Carlos Betancur step up a better Ankara. Actually sort of the much maligned figure. He actually had one of his better seasons for a while. Last year was pretty consistent. That's been his problem for a few years now being present and correct throughout the whole season and he it was last year road. Kuala races goes from decent placings race latour Switzerland. They need guys like him. The experienced guys vice With this sort of puncher explosive ability to win races to sort of come through another guy I space face a more of a Carlos Verona and he joined from Scott a couple of years ago. As unfair or you know he certainly looked Mitchelson Scott Izzo. He was capable of of more and he hasn't really delivered an awful lot at movie star. I think and they've got a few riders lights Cataldo. Bela who both come from Astana. Who will guarantee a certain level of quality in the major tours and they'll be the guys who they're far enough down the road mountain stages in major tours and they'll be very much part of a team? I'm not sure sure they'll be looking at those riders to come up with many race wins. I don't think they can because those writers have not been you you used in that role there other teams for for quite a while now but you know the problem that I see the potential problem is you know what's happening with the B. Team team when the muroff either preparing for a major tour or Racing in the world tour. It's kind of what happens really when they're trying to blood the younger riders in maybe the lesser races. How to keep morale up if they're not Initially able to compete at the front of those races. I think that's going to be a challenge. Like I said I don't have to concerns about how they're going to perform at the Tour de France to jeer on the big stage races like the tour of the Basque country. But there's there's an awful lot of other racing encounter which is is going to be a challenge. Any mass you know. He's the guy when he finished diet second at the welter in twenty eighteen. Looked like he was going to emerge as the next great Spanish hoping in Grand Tours bevis sideways step loss year. Really I guess he might suffer from the what might call post quickstep syndrome. Where where are writers leave? The very successful machine is the current quickstep and Sometimes sometimes struggle and maybe they've benefited the quick step in ways that didn't even realize just by virtue of having so many winning writers on the team which traces of momentum and around them But he's going from a team with the impact with winners to a team that will be expecting him to take an awful lot responsibility for results especially especially those really big races this year. Yes I there's a lot of pressure on And Rick Mass. I'm lost. I think it's easy to overlook. Forget the fact. He was actually writing a very sort of Franz. He was well into the The hope ten overall until he had a terrible day. One terrible day in the parent Having a lot of work for junior felipe and and which after that sort of in the second half of the race was pretty much forgotten about in in terms of the general classification. But that would have been valuable. Experience then won the tour of Guangzhou Guangzhou. She didn't so you know. He's he's the guy really that they're looking at too well to replace. Three right is through. Replace Kintana Landa carapace. And it's a huge each responsibility. He's someone talks about Solaire in the waste of carries himself kind of temperament. I don't have those same concerns. Wouldn't have those same misgivings about mass strikes me as being very focused and he exactly the sort of psychological profile. We're accustomed to seen from a grant who lead up and you're absolutely right. You're you're right to point out but the the tier last year went in there as GC man and his role changed Allah. Felipe was extremely grateful. Timur remember on several occasions at the end of stages for the work they done some of which we don't necessarily see but I would have changed his race completely and so well let's hear from one of the young writers that they've signed Gabriel colleague the British writer. And he's not. The youngest August team is still a young writer. But he's been around a few years. I'm and there'd be another British writers on the team Alex recently on Jeremy Hunt before him as longer since an American on the team. Matthew Oregon is joining us. Andy Hamson was the last rider on that team when they were Banesto back in the ninety. S But Gabriel colleague does follow a sort sort of tradition there so I spoke to him recently just before he headed out to turn down under in Pfizer. He's made his debut movie star colors already. I mean congratulations. First of all on on a getting a ride with movie star. How did it come by the move to team because I Ferdowsi But it's just a time on Christmas. Hacienda candidate an Enron time. We pretty much agreed with him. But the with the didn't sign anything on my agent. Andrew mcquaid was pushed all options because the side and the he said remember texting me saying out can push the options awesome forty one out of furniture with movie star which was about blue and that was the last ahead of it for about month and I think it is under decided. Let's keep it quiet because it was so I looked promising and I wanted to get help and that thing and I was a European Games and he finished dry chop them joe some good news and I said it looks like it's on the table from from lowest responded speaking on the phone you can find things so yeah the day. I got back from Minsk Sebastian's Grandba- and then is there any rush to get certainly the teams bookie Meant to be started with okay. We'll get back to your students puffball. Let your next day de the contract was agreed and it was written up in San hose. Hundreds PRI PRI PRI and were you I mean you were surprised by that density of the timber. When did you in talking to Sebastian? Did you get a sense of a a bit of a change of direction for them. They've got an awful lot of new writers for next year is a former international team at a very young team as well Hours one other I kind of international Spoke to fell a Sabah approached undo the Kiro as I said I think basically said yeah looking for young classics guy who has been kind of consistent assistant rough last few years and on the twenty three race in and I think they you know they kinda tough less with aspects in Moscow two seven hundred forty seven what we eat. We know you know of a lot of young guy really guys. You know kind of stepping up to prone on dame prolific early on. But they kind of wanted to didn't WANNA go down that road. They wanted after the alcohol. The guys they wanted to also someone who they relates been consistent our theories that could say nightfall five years being a pretty reliable kind of leader in the Kasichs Because that's an area kind of specialize in but they won't. They realized that sponsors do one two results. He knows races so oh yeah for them to poach me about it. He's not sure because I don't think there's any other team rarely get this opportunity. Okay with in terms of the base calendars. All the coffees from him. We can pretty much every other one. Really gotta look and the Rally and you've got an unmet your your teammates m movie star famously. Don't really really have training camps but you've had a get together and what was that like. What was the atmosphere like when you went there? Yes we we ought to get together as one in Pamplona starting November as a week just to buy in and a L. thought stuff team linen. I'm not an concentrating. In Cowboy's training count stood at the got a It just felt like that. I really feel like if I mean everyone's so welcoming and I've been learning Spanish since new. That's well since June since the new is going on so I didn't have enough to understand what was going on onto hope. nope compensation lessons between I'm floating. Kalpana picked up modest to be able to pick up a little bit a bit. I just really felt welcome and everyone is trying to say. And there's no egos mostly some big names. Everyone is everyone was really friendly. There was no one like you know no not talkative or welcoming. Everyone was really really maybe they wallman is really nice atmosphere. NFL light straightaway and pump blood by the week already. Felt like you know a bit kind of family so I couldn't be more happy really really without welcome so by said all the guy still valverde. Ross doll and I'm accountable down for the lengthier and those guys are going to be a is going to be a really good opportunity to learn you. Know the land for the kind of road captains and learn the ways of state. Because I know that the saying if that's going to be relied on the very strong Trump the guys off the kinds that type of thing so to be able to learn from those skies as well as a mix of opportunity to win races just Yeah I'M GONNA have to really take on his culture I duNNo. I know you're a big fan of the the eighteenth and the nineteenth even though you weren't actually around then you you must have a sense of teams history. You know from the Reynolds Banesto days. Nice tape team has been around so long just knowing that secure and is low when we were in Pamplona the the the documentary launch inch Three and yeah I mean I I knew I knew it was reynolds And all up all the different jerseys over time you yeah you realize Oh yeah that that was the statement a free with just looking at colors. results over the past two or three years Domestically I mean He taught there about how they liked his his consistency consistency. And they see him as someone who can really thrive in the classics have makes three or four years. What's your feeling it's so I guess? It's very very difficult to transpose results on the British domestic scene to a well tour classics environment. You you know obviously now teams have a lot of physiological promises. They can look at but we saw a good example is homes lotto pseudo who won the stage in the in the tour down under and his first world tour rates. Really having you know not really. I jumped out the talent scouts with these results in British domestic races. We've been very solid it pro for for a number of years but not someone that you would immediately said. Yep He can definitely win a world tour level. No Book for a colleague colleague himself. I mean the point he made is he will have opportunities that movie star that he he might not have other teams so he will find a eh one way or the other and he certainly these these these Belgian classics that he'll get a chance in 'em you know movie star. Sebastian enjoy said that they want to to to target some of these races. And have a you know a good presence in those races. But the the the that's different to really having a a system or a setup that truly support success in those races I am and and it's always been a bit of a running joke as opposed the the the the team that the teams that movie star or in their previous guys have sent to the northern classics have been guys who on paper are suited to those races. But are necessarily you know given all the support and resources that they need to do well in them and I do remember visiting. Let's face it. When he was he was writing those races? He was pretty green in them but he talked to. By the the the sort of a ramshackle bunch of writers put together to write those. It might be different and with the the more varied squad that they have with quite different composition. uh-huh we'll find. I mean the only way for Gabriel color to find out how we can do any traces to ride them and if he was on the team he might not have the opportunity to even do. Don't yeah he he's going to be an interesting rich just looking at the roster and the other Aena pros you're the first year pros on the two Colombians. Wins the ones that really catch my attention. Aim Ed Rubio and when the Eggo Alba they've got fairmont in common both climates. There were two of the Colombian tried really dominated the baby. Last year they rip that race to Tishrin Colombians. The winner was Camilo Deland. He's actually going to the U eighteen but album rubio vendor ended up mob. We start to of this sort of rare Eh. Latin American talents on part of the world be aforementioned now infamous as far as this podcast is concerned quadros portfolio but not the common both from families of potato farmers. And it'll be always reading about him. Today I am he was born luckily the Colombians. Very high altitude thousand nine hundred meters of sea level but he's family actually moved to Bogota from the countryside. And because they've been terrible droughts over the past twenty years or so. The really badly affected the body affected potato farming and Y- changed his life but two very highly rated a young climbers and Alba Rubio and yet to look out for they could potentially sort of step into the breach step into the void left By container in the next two or three years Rubio Twenty one. He was seconded the the Baby Chiro. Yeah I mean that's the thing you know the so so many of these young writers the that one or two of them could really and we've seen obviously the last couple of years and we talked earlier about avenue pull twenty winning and in Argentina and Tina. I'm you know the age thing might not be the barrier that was an especially in a team movie star which looks and maybe some racist quite leaderless so there could well be an opportunity for some of these guys to step up okay. Let's wrap things up for this week. Daniel will be back next week. With the the pleasure of Weiner's company again maybe with some some some something of his dispatch from severe as well and but we should we. I should finish off with a thanks to some of you have signed up as friends of the podcast as from me a big. Thank you to Richard Night to Jodi cinnamon to Mike Hyman and Phil Clarke Christopher Dorner Rachel Bam filed a hope. I've got that correct Rachel Andrew Heaney Daniel Burke. Stephen Harris Stephen Harris was the winner of our competition for best friends. PODCAST last year. Two guests at an episode and Jim Wolfensohn. I'm from on Metoo Michael Joyce Sandy Jones Andrew. Smith's I'm a Morton Ryan Davies Chuck Hanko Poor Bonds Dominic Thompson. Peter Megawatts gets and James Robinson and thank you very much Daniel. Thank you very much rich. Cemex tweet you've been listening to you. The cycling podcast subscribe to a newsletter at the cycling costs Dot Com to get all the latest news and special offers delivered straight to your inbox. This episode was edited and produced by Tom Walley.

writer Danny Daniel US Alejandro Valverde Sebastian Slovenia Ferrari France Columbia Telefonica America Cam Dan Italy Dr Michaela Ferrari Ligon Bernal Canton South Lionel Bernie Selena Alvarado Monaco
2019 Vuelta a Espana Stage 20

THEMOVE

56:18 min | 1 year ago

2019 Vuelta a Espana Stage 20

"What really is remarkable and incredible is that he gets on the podium this year on the welter between the first time he got on the podium and now it's sixteen years in between I mean that's a longtime already. There's very very little professional cyclist who have a career of sixteen years so for him to be on a top level because you know if you're a podium and grand tour you're on on the highest level of cycling sixteen years ago. Oh and sixteen years after that you do it again. That's extraordinary. I think welcome back to the move podcast as we wrap up stage twenty hard to believe we've gotten here. It's been kind of oblivious stage twenty the Vuelta Spagna two thousand nineteen and I'm Jay Be Hager and our expert to take a look at the stage and look ahead to tomorrow tomorrow. Although there won't be much to look ahead to in as far as racing except for the party in Madrid we'll get to that but Johan Bruyneel is here joining us to give us his take on that before we look at an in a very explosive one particular writer today and we're GonNa have some fun talking about that. Lance has a quick message for you with a special offer from our friends at the fee. Today's show is brought to you by feed head on over to the fee dot com check out just the wide variety of products they have you know when we raised and actually actually as they still raise today. You know they go through. The feed zones a lot of races. There's a couple of feet zones grab a setback all of these writers whether they're male or female basically ugly get to curate their feedback but they want on there what kind of drink they want what Abbar some jails and choose and pick what they want. You know we as consumers are average bike. Riders have never been able to do that until now and this is what I saved him like why didn't why didn't I think of that item. Why didn't we think of that. It didn't J. B. and I think this is crazy but somebody thought about it. Matt and his whole team down at the feet down in boulder they have hundreds of products addicts hundreds of skews you go in and you curate your own music back now you can you can try drink mix ex and bar. Y and Aziz and you make it how you want it. They got a bunch of the products that we really love human power dot honey. Stinger all available which when you go to the feed dot com you'll see just how many different products and variety that's. They're pretty amazing. We over here at the move have curated a feedback essentially that we like. This is the product that we would use them. We are currently using at the time for twenty five percent off our feedback to the fee dot com slash the move get hours and then go to the feed dot com and curate your own. Ah Okay Johann. I know I'm learning now that we've done three grand tours together. I tend to come to you and want to jump ahead to the most exciting moment it hard to believe that we've done three granddaughters together. AB decided that that's that's a lot of a lot of days together but but I get so excited I wanNA talk about the most exciting thing right out of the gate. I'm GonNa Control Myself. I'm going to be patient and then I'll look for that opportunity to jump in as as Po Gotcha said before. He raised today patients. It's the patient's Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. Let's start with breaking down how things played out today with a big mountain stage and some bad weather to deal with too. Yes yes well today. You know the profile of the stage and the the the meters of vertical meters that the the writers had to overcome four thousand four hundred and thirty meters like I said yesterday. This was a really hard stage. When under these circumstances it was was you know fourteen fifteen degrees in the valley and raining so you know you could see on the on the second to last climb on the call. What does that opinion Negga nineteen hundred meters of altitude it was really cold. You know the spectators where it was like a in the winter basically quickly so you know obviously that had a big impact on the on the performance of the riders and at the beginning of the of the stage there was a lot of attempts for breakaways. little group got away but you know you could see there was there was too much going on in the bunch do much different interests you know and in the Peleton and so the the breakaway finally didn't make it far ahead you know the the nice thing to see though was that off that breakaway the two young riders Ruben Gerardo and Hagan Hearts the two x t he mates on the Axel Merckx steam and the two guys who had you know the the words don't if you remember it's a few few stages ago you know that the they were they they were not the best friends off the stage when when they were together I think it was behind the sap couse. I think probably yeah behind except when Seppuku sworn the stage those two young riders went away from that breakaway and and they stayed up from together this time they did get along right quite right well so I think that you know they they had forgotten or at least the forgiven each other. You know the the misunderstanding do young writers you know this. This has been the the Vuelta the you know of of the young the young riders and you know not not not even not even look. I think it's the year out of a lot of new young writers you know if you look you know premise which is going to win the Vuelta and he's. He's twenty nine in and he's going to be the oldest granddaughter winner of this year they took us one the euro at twenty four at number now the Tour de France at twenty eighty two and you know good old. Primos you know twenty nine years old and you're considered old these as whereas before twenty nine is is kind of what's kind of the age where you came into maturity and got the necessary experience and endurance because of all the years of racing that you were actually ready to win aground tour so a lot of things. A lot of things have changed. A lot of things have changed yeah. I'd love some more thoughts on that. Johann 'cause is it is it because of you know. Is it training or is it. Just a talent thing or is it because the teams are giving them an opportunity instead of no no. No you have to wait. You have to work for this guy or three four years or is it just a talent thing. I think it's I first of there's a lot of new talent. I mean amazing an amazing pool of talent this generation but I think you know if you compare it to other to other sports I think the the fact that from a very young age when they're starting to be junior and you know they're starting linked to look at what they perform and the you know cycling until now has been one of the sports where it was difficult to measure performance. You know because it's in a it's not the same environment you know. Swimming is always in the same environment track and field same environment cycling no so so obviously I mean the watts are africom tribute to the fact that the young riders or earlier at added good level because they are already working specifically with you know with the the the the capabilities of of every individual from very from a much younger age before you had to kind of feel get through get through all those categories youth categories and then finally make it to the pros and and get the experience so so I think that's definitely a big factor the fact that from a very young age they can measure the value of an and the potential of of a young athlete so I mean this year this year this year particularly you know it's so so many young writers you know even even even outside of Grand Tours that that are on a super super high level already where you know ten years ago this was this was not not even an option could not imagine I mean I just checked somebody who was on a podium below twenty one in in a grand tour and so now now gotch is going to be on the podium and then the next one. who was you know the the the one before was an Italian writer I I think it was bottled. Kelly nine hundred seventy five nine hundred seventy five yeah so you know I mean modern cycling before this before this new period that has started now yup get you obviously needed to get the endurance and the experience in order to perform ground onto her so so that's that's a big change you don't that's interesting interesting interesting to see but yeah. I mean today was you know just come back to the wealthy and today stage the lost opportunity for for maybe a turnaround and you know for DC to change and yeah I did change inch but maybe not the way we had expected right because when when does do riders too young riders Theo and and get eight were were upfront. There was a lot of attacks in the in the Peleton and you know like we expected the Astana was lining it up with with about seventy two kilometers to go they they went to the front until then it was it had been Jimbo visa wits. It's with their six riders. that six riders that were left have been just setting the pace. Astana went to the front. Obviously you know they they wanted to isolate Russia glitch in and tried to have me locked. Lopez do attack and tried to get a shot at the podium odeum so that's what happened. finely astonishes you know they went after the after after one of the claims they went to the front again and split the Peleton on a flatbed across and from then on rob which was isolated completely which was you know maybe not maybe not the best for me? Galaxy Lopez but could be good for the right because he was in second but from that moment on it was basically you know all the all the top favorite's the the top five the big Fi name them in this wealth of because it was always the same guys who were against each other and even if if at at some point Milwaukee Lopez still had two riders and and especially focus on Vogelsang within the mazing amazing job again today once again you know it was one of those those things that yeah I've seen this only in this wealth dine and only with Astana. I know I repeat myself but you know it was once again like a lead out for sprint but on a climb you know and like we like we had yesterday you know on the second to last in the second to last climb that was where Miguel Lopez had to try so they started to accelerate but Lopez went really early I mean he when he attacked the first time I was still ten kilometers to the top and so you know he tried and he tried and he tried and you know this the fact that the climbs were not very steep today. This decline lime was quite long thirteen kilometers but you know between five and six percent so it is very difficult. You know it's very difficult to to get rid of guys and so did get a gap up at some point but it was always it straight at straightaway. The top five game back together is slow down then teammates came back and so when finally really Lopes had tried a number of times and couldn't get anywhere of course you know when when when you have a team like donahue donahue ups the pace and makes it hard on on the rivals and then the leader Lopez launches an attack. It's hard for everybody but it's hard on the guy who has to attack. Do you know so after a few attempts we got this this. This amazing attack is amazing attack of of today poca Char Maybe a little bit unexpected right because we all thought yes okay you know he's been he's been great than he's won two stages and such young kid and it's normal you know he's he's dead now now and you know he's. GonNa have to drag himself Madrid but wow what a surprise to see that attack incredible attack nobody could respond and the guy who had the response was was Megan Lopez because first of all why Jersey Best Young Rider and and it also gives Donna but the guy just kept going kept going amazing amazing riding styles so I really liked the fact that that you know I mean I I've said it before. I'm a fan of of writers who have have a a high cadence that's that's. That's a guy with a cadence on the climbs. We'll got char. He he's like a machine. I can't imagine what well they both can. Tana and Lopez is it should feel good about their Vuelta right but yeah it there in this twenty year old takes off and you can't do anything it's it's just like the Indian you're watching a podium spot right away from you. It's it has to be. I think I'm not get done. I probably you know he he in the back of his mind. I'm sure he he was he was having that scenario as a possibility because you know there's nobody who feels better how you how oh how a writer feels that the writer himself we may say okay. He's fading out. He's tired. Zolt through but the one who really feels it is the writer himself so I actually thought he did quite welcome. Donna considering how he was kind of you know really falling back a few days ago but you know whenever whenever he had to do the work to try to defend his position you know you could see that you know he wanted but he just didn't have it and I mean I'm just I'm just speech us to for the performance of Pugachev because even if we take away you know his his youth and his inexperience variance. That's you know to to attack on that climb after twenty days of racing getting to the top having over a minute. I think I think he was close to a minute ten minutes fifteen. Then still took some time on the down. He's a great defender too. You Know Oh there's there's not much. There's not many things on a bike that that guy cannot do and on top of that you know in the bad weather so he already told any interview when he wanted aura that he prefers not that he prefers whether he's performing really well in bad weather. and today was bad weather and performed again you know he was he was he was incredible. It was incredible you know normally you would think make having to make that effort to get that minute thirty not on that climb. That's that's a big effort because you know you're racing against the top of the DC and so you know it's with about thirty kilometers limiters to go to the finish even if a part of it was downhill but then there was a lot of roller send you know like smaller climbs which which were not deep. Em's and and then in the last ten kilometers basically uphill again. You know logic logically. You would have to say okay. It's you know he's not GonNa make it and I think that's what the these these big riders in the back of Alva in Milwaukee Lopez in Tana. We're thinking great. We're he's a threat now for for spot but you know we're gonNA. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA get some time back right and and that didn't happen. He just stayed at the you know. I don't know how much the time difference was about one and a half minute right at the finish so I mean to do that again as a twenty year old it's yeah and it's funny. It's funny I saw I saw a tweet tough. you know one of the one of the writers who was competing with against him in in Albany last year and he's also now in the professionals and the three said you know while we thought we were challenging him because on the last day of the Tour de l'avenir which he won forgot you're he was in the leading on the last day. You know he had a problem. didn't it didn't crash but kind of got off the road and had to do a big pursuit and the top the top the front guys were were going full gas and he made it back and this guy said yeah we we. We thought that I thought we were challenging him. Last year in turns out he was just training last year to be at this level the professionals this year so it's this. I mean it must be. It must be quite a discouraging urging for certain riders. I mean even young writers of twenty two twenty three twenty four who are super ambitious and have a great potential and you know up until a few years ago considered you know. This is a young rider now all of a sudden you know they're twenty four and you have Bugatchi. Who's twenty you have Ramco AMC. Even Apu was nineteen and our wor- world top so you know all of a sudden when you're twenty three twenty four you considered older you know so yeah. It's it's it's incredible but you know what a day for today. Focaccia you know getting back on the podium first of all well getting back in in the White Jersey for took it took it from me Golonka Lopez and then you know getting getting leapfrogging Kintana who who a WHO had no response at all and almost almost making it in the second place because Volvo weather really had to give it everything in the last few kilometers to save his second second spot so you know it was almost one and two in DC for for Slovenia Slovenia is is definitely the the country. I mean we can say okay Columbia. We've been talking a lot about Colombia right and Colombian talent then there's been there's been quite a few. Colombian stage stage wins and they've been they've been a big factor but Slovenia Slovenian takes the price you know winning three stages with Bugatchi third-place for Slovenia why Jersey for Slovenia then Rog which I think once they tried to just the time Kerala. Did he another stage I. I don't remember anyway winning at least the stage winning winning the Vuelta. I mean it's it's all Slovenia Slovakia Slovenia and there was there was only four Slovenians at the start so yeah and these these guys are definitely putting. They're putting their footprint on on cycling in you know everybody outside side of Europe we'll also look where Slovenia's right I know you. I knew you look where I did. I don't know I don't know we've lance will know where Slovenia is though but I'll send send them yeah. He'll he'll think maybe he maybe thinks it's also next to Ecuador not that. This was a huge moment but I'm dying to know what your thoughts are on that quick quick acceleration firm at one hundred eleven where he jumped quickly fifty meters up looks over his shoulder What was that all about in European European. I it's it's it's a difficult. I mean you know I was also thinking. What is he doing? You know what's it didn't really make any sense because it was it was a very strong exploration solicitation and you could say wow that guy's gone. Nobody can respond and then you know after one corner he just looks back and sits up and all like an all I can think of as an explanation is that he was you know he was getting upset with us. Donna do not collaborate and you know Blotch Chow was up the road and he was he was a threat for for container in but he was also a threat for Megan Lopez but by then you know Michelangelo Columbus had tried so many times that he didn't have it anymore and and then from from an interview after the stage from Lopez. I heard that he said okay you know once. I tried and once I saw gay. It's it's this is not gonNA. It's not gonNA work for me. I was super tired and I knew that it was was gonna be difficult to to hang on and from that moment on he said well. You know we're not going to work with with with movie star after what happened happened yesterday. So there was some kind of yeah I mean even even if even if you know after all you know we for the listeners who have who have seen the stage yesterday the controversy of the crash and then movie star attacking just after that in all the all the discussions and debates. It's after that there was some hard words especially for me Galaxy Lopez after the stage movie star had their explanation the nation yesterday evening they they send out an official team press release explaining their position and you know apologizing due to the the people who you know thought that they took advantage of of the bad luck of somebody else and then this morning I saw at the Lopez went to Alberta and they talked and Lopez apologized for his words after the finish that you know it was in the heat of just you know the disappointment and and but you know there's something something kept hanging there you know when and so they they said they were not going to help movie star the defense the third place of of Catanha which which I can understand you know. They had their own strategy in. They had their own goal. It didn't work so that's the way that's the way the sport works and the way cycling works right. So Uh you've got you've mentioned it and Lance talked about it often. The the politics is a big part of big aspect of cycling. Yeah Yeah Yeah and for some reason I think that between those two teams because he knows Donna and movie star. It's you know it's not it's not a big laugh. It's not a love story. That's you know they they. They're a big rivals. I mean this deuce very strong themes and they they encounter each other Latin and big racists but but yeah I mean the one is not. We're going to help the other even if they have the same goal so yeah I mean today we saw that once once the plan of Astana didn't work it was all up to movie star and while I mean luckily they could save the second place you know it's that's that's and also Valverde said after the finish that he was it was it was very confusing because it had been you know it had been raining so much and has his radio communication. Nation didn't work so at some point. It's radio stop working. He had no information on the gap so he went to ask it to another writer. to a to a Spanish Spanish Spanish rider from Astana what the gap was and then the people on the on the side of the road were were shouting that he was about to lose the podium and he said that's that's that's how he knew that he had to go 'cause it was the communication with the car was was not working anymore. Well why we're talking about a Valverde We should talk about the years the wins the stages. You know it's it's so impressive it is it is the guys almost forty second in the Vuelta this year. It's the third time he is second Kawada in his career and ten years ago he won the welter and then you know since then he's been three times second and also seven times on the on the podium of the tour of Spain. That's that's quite quite as serious serious amount of times and then what what what really is no remorse an incredible is that he gets on the podium this year on the Vuelta and between the first time he got on the podium on on a grand tour. I don't know if it's the wealth out Jiro where I think is the Vuelta between the first time he got on the podium and now it's sixteen years in between I mean that's a long time. I mean there's already. There's there's very very little professional. Road cyclist who have a career of sixteen years you know and to be so for him to be you know on a top level because you know if you're a podium and grandeur you're you're on on the highest level of cycling sixteen years ago and sixteen years after that you do it again. That's that's extraordinary. I think you know it's it says it says says a lot about the quality of Alejandro Valverde. You know of many times in this in this podcast you know he now he he didn't win dwelt. Abbott I don't think he started really as one of the top favorites but you know he was. He was the closest you know and and even got a little bit of time. I'm back today from from primos really shit. Oh he kept fighting till the end he he did since he didn't have the exact information he he knew he needed the benefit Gatien to the six seconds and and yeah enrich for some reason in the last two hundred meters couldn't stay stay so you know obviously he didn't push him so he knew he didn't have to kill him to stay on the wheel of but if you would have been able to he would have done it it so that's the prove that everybody is really really super tired and it's it's been of wealth which has taken a lot of law the law of all of the writers. It's you know it's the third it's their grand tour of the season. The season is very long season. Most of those guys have been racing since some of them since January most most of them since the beginning of February yes you know they had some some respiratory inbetween but still you know three three three grand tours and some of them have done to you know ruggles has done. Jiro and Welte Alvin has on touring welte in just just I think char is the only one in the front who who has done a as only done the wealth I which you know initially I already ready thought that it was early for him to do a ground to her but and then if if the listeners remember I was thinking you know at his age that the team with you know be careful with him and make sure that after ten or twelve or two weeks take him out of the race but while if you're able to to do something like that after twenty stages yeah that it's not this is this is not this is another guy they have to be protecting and be in be careful with he is already you star in cycling and he's you know he's ready to perform at the highest level so world. I think we've addressed it but let's not gloss over a twenty year old getting three stage wins and their grant it's just mind boggling well and on top of that three mountain stages right and you know there were a lot of climbers in this in this race incredible this is it is it it is it. Is something you know. He's he's a I mean he's. He's physically really good but he just he knows how to race and you know he's it makes no mistakes strategy wise. He's an incredible bike handler dooming the way he goes downhill and is in control of his bicycle. It's just the whole package you know and yeah. You know we know now. you know we have gotten used to the pronunciation of his name today. POCA Char. I knew I knew we have. We have to talk about him a lot in the yeah. He's done the podium. He deserves to be on the podium. I think you know he had to today's where he was a little bit off but what a way to what a way to fight back right yeah. Oh unbelievable unbelievable yeah I K- I think that's that's going to kind of wrap up everything that happened today. re really was a remarkable stage. If you're tuning in to listen to this it's it's well well worth watching pogue. HR's performance just remarkable today and undoubtedly he's your patrol of the day. Oh Yeah Yeah we forgot yeah. We forgot to mention our title sponsor pro-trump Tequila and yet. There's there's just yeah is no discussion. He's the patrol on the patrol thrown. I mean okay Rog Leach Ranch It's his first ground to win so he's going to be pro rated patrol of the wealth about you know. Pogo looked at the same level. He's he's also the patrol of the Welte you know Slovenia Slovenian cycle the two Slovenian cycling the patrols yeah so remarkable. I can't can't can't imagine what the I'd love to see some statistics on viewership a out of a country. That's only what two million people roughly yeah yeah yeah yeah and remember remember J. B. You know when we had earlier earlier in the wealth. I won't be Yanni Brockovich on the show when he predicted it. Dan already that he in his opinion poll. Gotcha was going to be on the podium Yeah I. I think I think back then in the Baraja was in sixth or seventh place and he said I think he's going to be on the podium. well good prediction Jeff Junior yeah good good for your good Kalyani that was him on that is incredible to see it because you know America has been through two of these for the most part you know once with Lemonde and once with and it s you know in when it was lance well when it was Lamont. We only got like an hour of footage on a weekend. You know MHM recap. We barely saw it with lance it. Was You know the on a mountain stage. The bars in Austin Texas would be filled build at nine. Am Eight am and you know it's just incredible to see what it did not only to Austin but just into this whole country so slow again Slovenia which is just barely bigger than Austin Texas. I can't imagine okay so. Let's you know. We don't want to gloss over tomorrow stage. We know for the G. C. Guys it's it's a bit of a parade but you know for a sprinter. It's it's a stage win. You know it's still a big deal now. It's it's it's always it's always a prestige win. You know the last station aground tour typically the Jiro normally not not every year but before it was always in Milan you know Paris for touring shows and typically for the for the wealth is it's Madrid and the Paseo de la Casta Yana which is a little bit. You know the the same thing as the chassis lizzy in Paris so it's a prestige sprint ninety five percent sure. It's going to be a bunch sprint again. parade. Let's I haven't checked the weather but it doesn't the the weather doesn't look great. That's you know that that could spoil the party a little bit that three that that's not that's not fun to do that. short- shorter stage into Madrid in bad weather. That's that takes the fun out of it you know because once they get on the on the custody on their race three starts and you know there's there's certain tax and then you know the teams sprinter strata. Bring it together together so yeah. That's hope let's hope that ends I think the Mar- There's also is also a world to race for or women love. Welte for for for women in Madrid whether in Madrid raining all day day yeah yeah yeah. It's raining now. It's raining now and it's can tell you it's it's it's not it's not very warm big shock. It's a big shock for me because I come from almost forty degrees this morning and I landed in Madrid around noon and that's that's a big big big difference. It's it's fall yeah three PM. It's because I know that I think you told me it's it's a later finish. three-piece sixty percent chance of rain and up to seventy percent percent at six PM okay well. It's the race starts at five so it's far ahead as I can see on this on this APP real quick yeah. It's not it's not it's not going to be funded and that's that's too bad. That's too bad that's learn you know. Let's hope that everybody stays upright and you know normally what will happen but then if it rains for the sake of of the race in the stage normally the UCI commissars will make a decision Asian that you know the the The Times for DC or taken when they get on the chassis lizzy the first time they passed the finish line and then because you know if it rains especially in Madrid. It's slippery those those avenues as there's a lot a lot of traffic. There's love Greece on the on the on the on the asphalt so it could be very slippery so hopefully hopefully if that's the case and reigns the the commerce and I'm sure they will make that decision that times times will not be taken into account and it's it's it's. It's just a race for for the stage win where the spouse can find out. That's that's better for. Everybody yeah that. Is You hate to see anybody. Go down but yeah unnecessarily where it doesn't get that totally he's actually yeah great We have a couple of questions remaining few she. If you've got time you'll hon yeah yeah for sure and they're both very very general because you know this. Race is pretty much decided but it says high. JB's I really enjoyed listening to the move. I hope you guys find a way to extend your season towards the World Championship and cyclocross boy cycle grow my goodness. I want some time off grand tour says can you tell me something about the hours intensity and kind of training top cyclists on average do that's from sander in the Netherlands and and I know that's a difficult question to answer why it's a very general question but of course it all depends on on the type of writer and the type of racist they they prepare for but you know you could say professional cyclists usually his his straining days. Are Let's say an easy day. Is You know an easy recovery day would be two hours just just pedaling and in terms of the time be seven seven and a half eight hour sometimes on the bike depending depending on which race they're preparing. Britt preparing for you know one of the things for example I see in the and there's been a there's been a trend to focus more intensity and kind of neglect neglect but not not focus so much on on long writes one thing for example. I've seen of young writer. Are you know a Gumbo now to France winner. He still really old school and does really really long rights so it must be for something. It must be that it's still instill you know the old. The old method of of long rights still still is valid so so in terms of times that seven to do eight hours is the maximum and then depending on which type of rider if it's a classics rider of course. There's a lot more intensity. There's a lot of training on on short. short climbs five hundred meter climbs basically explosive sprint training uphill. If it's the writer for foreground tours they do training camps in the in the mountains. A lot of a lot of those riders do altitude camps throughout the year to you know they start to start to go to altitude. I do too in the beginning of the season. Even before the before the season starts get used to the altitude because you need to adapt and then uring the season they go back three or four times to altitude and usually then you don't need that a long period to adapt to altitude because your body gets used to it more and more How long does that if they spend time at altitude. How long does that carry over when they when when they leave. It makes sense yeah yeah it does it does it. Does I don't know exactly. I don't know exactly what I do. Know what I do know for example. I have my own experience with without a toot and you know it was when I was an amateur and there was not a lot of science yet about that then we didn't we. We basically so you didn't know we just knew that okay. If you're at altitude than you you'll go back to sea level you would you would feel great and so. I had my I experienced as in my last year as an amateur in I was selected for the World Championships in Colorado Springs and so we went we went there for a month before the race ace and I do know I mean I thanks to that. I actually got the professional contract because when when I got back to Belgium and did a racist it was it was unbelievable label the you know. I it felt like I was riding on a motorbike. one. I would like five or six races off each other and then won the won under the National Championships time trial and got me a pro contract so I think I personally I had like five or six weeks of real benefit from from that month at altitudes I think I think nowadays you know if you do it more frequently. During the season you can kind of get a You know a a continuous benefit of it because you just you know you you go back every every two or three months. you know that. Ah You know I I know of riders who go three or four times. A year spent like three or three weeks altitude so so the benefits must be you must be a long lasting. I guess you lance would be great to answer that question now that he's going back and forth between Aspen over for eight thousand feet and Austin exit at four hundred twenty five feet yeah hundred and thirty meters here okay buddy buddies not on the show is he now. He's not he's not and and you know he's you know he. He's not measuring. He's not measuring his his performances anymore or either so it's it's yeah in you know in the same regard of going to the terrain where you're. GonNa race to the to the classic six guys go spend time and Belgium and Oh yeah yeah yeah yeah well first of all these guys they know these they know these races is off by heart but even then you know they they train they rico they recon them every year they all those like flanders and Perito Bay against him just name it all these you know where where where the terrain is really crucial to know because sometimes as a little little change they go rican them and they also train on them. You have to be able to perform the to to have that power output on those so on those short cobbled climbs so day specific train on that terrain yes interesting. Here's another one question that's very general but I I think it's a great question. says Johanna J B. Thank you so much for the move podcasts this summer the giro-tour and Vuelta commentaries have been great to hear as longtime cycling fan and writer. I would love to know Johan take on professional cycling personalities in the Peleton. It seems like a lot of new personalities emerged watching coverage of the Vuelta this year but I wanted to get your thoughts on some past present riders that had a or have that charisma and style on the bike that attract people to watch the sport and develop interest in cycling at Londono Johan aac on cycling personalities analogies past and present that helped grow interest in cycling. That's Dave from Saint Louis. yeah interesting interesting thing question and you know. I have to think a little bit about this but you know I'm I'm convinced that every sport no grows grows and expands with with heroes idols it's not it's not just enough to be a great athlete eat. you know if that great athlete that champion has an you know an attractive personality it's you know it and that's what sport needs. cycling is known actually to you know to have low profile personalities in general you know most of the the cyclists are good cyclists and then in terms of strong personalities. That's that's that's a different. That's a whole different question. and that's also why you know the ones who have that strong personality and and charisma stand out you know just to name a few from the past for example you know. Lance of course was was and has a strong personality and and charisma SMA and and I think you know he transcended the the the status of being a champion. was a lot more than that at others have been for example an ever. I think everybody knows Mario. CIPOLLINI no great sprinter probably the best Sprinter Sprinter that I've ever seen at least the with my own eyes and you know just very very colorful personality you know there was always something with Mario and you know there's always stories and and he I mean he liked that then and still does by the way Cipollini on instagram and he he he likes to ride with no shirt and or or or at least sleeves minimum sleeveless shirt but no shirt not is preference yeah any any still. Has You know incredible hair yeah yeah yeah. That's true yeah also right. It's something you can also see him a lot riding without the helmet you know he he Did you see that. Did you see that picture. He put up when you know there was there was something he was in an ad or something and he was he was criticized for not wearing a helmet on social media and then he posted the clip of him on the on a home trainer. I think I don't know if it was a home trainer or it was it was on the road and he was wearing a helmet but that was the only thing that was the only thing it was wearing. He wasn't wearing anything out. He's completely naked on his bicycle wearing a helmet so you know that's that's that's. That's a that's a personality. Y- you're never in different. You know it's it's either either like him or you don't like Kim but but you never indifferent Pantani on Townie was was also you know how the Great Charisma Nowadays Peterson Gone mm-hmm you know he's a he's a great personality but it's difficult to find other new. Now is a great. Everyone in my opinion was that you're not hinault over now. He no yeah yeah but Bernandino was. Yes yes and no because you know he was. He was a very strong personality inciting but you know outside of cycling. I mean back then cycling was not so global as it is now true. Um he was definitely he was the portrayal of the Peleton and very very strong opinion very strong personality but you know it was just within cycling I I think you know for example a guy like typically and a guy like lance through name does do they were. They were also known outside of cycling. I'm but nowadays I mean I think Segawa is the is the most known and attractive media is cyclist nothing not that these guys do it just for the money but I have to think if you have the the big personality and ah more sponsors are attracted to that end you get more TV time yeah. I hate to pick on rug lidge because he's he's an interesting guy you. I know but his interviews are thirty seconds because he has lay instead of minutes of TV time or five minutes of TV time for your sponsored yeah. I think I think role rugged. There's there's different different factors here first of all. I think that he's he's quite a you know especially publicly I hear that within the team he's very funny and you know great guy to be around but publicly in the media. He's quite an introvert. I think doesn't does not enjoy enjoy the spotlight. That's so and you know you force that eater. You know you can't fake that. You can't just act because then it's not genuine. It's counter. It's it's counterproductive. You know you you have to have a minimum of of you know you have to kind of know. Okay you know this is this is part of my job up and I need. I need to be good at this and I think I think you know. Athletes can improve on that. You know there's there's a lot of techniques. There's there steams who pay attention to media. You're training for the moment. I think primos raw glitches. is happy and content with being you know a great cyclist and winning bike races now if he if he keeps winning he's going to have to is going to have to improve a little bit on on his on his communication skills and on his his interviews because right now. It's it seems to me like okay. He's just an obligated exercise that he does but he doesn't really want to be there. You know he wants to He. Wants wants to just do the race perform. Well you know get in the car. Go back to the hotel. Have a massage have dinner. Go to bed now. which which which is which is very very understandable but yeah for sponsors these kind of these charismatic personalities are of course very very very interesting because it's a winning back races is one thing and then you have your your sponsor name on TV on the podium but you know the story that that person has to Ital- afterwards. This is really what sticks with the with the people in the audience you know. This is probably been a bit of a this summer has probably been big. Lou Curve for you. where you're doing commentary. You're not beholden to any boss or sponsors in where I'm going with. That is maybe some of the current riders. The personality emerges when you don't worry about upsetting people right. You realize I'm yeah you know love. You and some are going to hate you. I think that puts fear in a lot of current cyclists while they're racing. They don't want to upset people people and when that's where the personality comes quite exact a charismatic personality is you either you know it's it divides lights. It divides people right. You're either in favor supporting or your You know a critic or not. GonNa say Hater but yes awesome sometimes yes so that's what actually makes an interesting personality your eater for him or against him and yes. It's true athletes. Do have that disadvantage that you know. They know that their time you know a professional career of an athlete is very limited. Let's say you know you know that you have ten to twelve years of of you know time at the top potentially and you know it's not just it's not just just performing. It's also it also means that you know and when you give your your opinion when you when you give a strong opinion there's if you have a strong opinion about the about the subject so you're GonNa have you know pros and cons you know and mostly if you have a strong opinion there's it's it's the establishments that that will that will upset upset. I for example. I have this advantage now that I I don't care if I upset somebody because well I mean I it's not an I'm I I wouldn't I wouldn't I don't want to upset somebody to for the sake of upsetting but I mean but I if I have a strong opinion about something I have all the freedom in the world to to broadcast my opinion and you know if even if I know that certain certain people or certain institutions will not like it at I'm fine with that. You know I'm fine with that. That's that's something that an athlete who is currently in the sport and you know not just athletes order everybody everybody who's still in the sport. is limited and always has to pay attention of you know when they when they want to have an opinion they have to astaire's super neutral and and be careful of what they saying very very true very true. It's also you know that's that's. That's that's what what makes no. I'm pretty sure there's a lot of lot of athletes with with strong personalities and charismatic personalities but you have to back it up with results. You know if you have results and you win. You're you're you're you can you can you can give your opinion. You know because you win and you if you keep winning now. If you have a really strong opinion and you're not winning delivering results or you stop winning then you're in trouble at you're in victor actor Hugo Pina on Lamma Vida have special guest today right. Yes yes yes we are. We are very very fortunate to have Fabio Fabio Parra. you know for the people who who have not been who are neutral cycling. Fabio Parra is one of the first I mean. He's an icon in Colombian in cycling. He's one of the first riders who came to Europe he was stirred into France in late eighties. I think thank he was second in the Welte was national champion won the tour of Colombia. I mean he's been on the podium of of several granddaughters and he was the first I Latin American writer to be on the podium of a grand tour and was the only one since eighty eight hundred eighty nine until two thousand thirteen when nine Kintana the podium of of to France I so so yeah we are you know. He knows a lot about the Colombian cycling of course he was he was let's say East. You stood out there was back then there was a whole lot of Colombian cyclists coming to Europe. They had their own team also cafe the Columbia was the sponsor with with literature mainly an FOB Yukata stood out because he was seen as the the climber who could also do other things he was. You know he was not the not too bad in the flats and he was a decent time-trial list list so he was not just the Colombian climber who basically you know the European champions and European teams. They knew how they had to deal with these climbers because they could hurt the flats so far was was a bit of an exception and so you know. I I raced with him. When he was at the end of his career I I was in the middle of my career career so erased together in Spain in the wealth Dine Dur and so e- currently fabulous Bara is involved in cycling cycling which is supported by the government so we will be able to ask him questions and and his brains on on what the reasons are behind the this blossoming of Colombian cycling while they fortunate very fortunate to have him on the show and so whoever whoever speaks or understands maybe even a little bit of Spanish he's also you know he doesn't give a lot of interview so it's a privilege to have him on on Komo Vida today it's your last day to send any questions or comments and of course tomorrow being the final stage more of the general questions for Johan or or better because the race has been set. If that makes sense so you can send those to the move it we do team It's the move at W. E. D. U. Dot T. A. M. Thank you Johann Cheuse. Thank you very much and a stamina the.

writer The Times Lance Madrid DC Grand Tours Golonka Lopez Peleton Welte Donna Johan Bruyneel Astana Slovenia Europe Colombia J. B. Spain Alejandro Valverde Vuelta Spagna France
Coronavirus news, updates, hotspots and information for 05-15-2020 COVID-19 AM Alert

Coronavirus 411

04:56 min | 5 months ago

Coronavirus news, updates, hotspots and information for 05-15-2020 COVID-19 AM Alert

"This is corona virus for one one the latest ovid. Nineteen Info and new hotspots. Just the bags for Friday may fifteen twenty twenty three million more. Americans filed for unemployment last week bringing the number to over thirty six million since the start of the covert crisis the former head of Barda testified to Congress for nearly four hours yesterday. Dr Bright said that the outbreak will get worse unless the US develops national testing strategy and Vaccine Distribution Plan. The president said Dr Bright is a disgruntled employee. The trump administration announced they will replenish and modernized the national stockpile of masks ventilators and other p the manufacturing. We'll be done in the US. The House will vote on a rule change to allow remote voting and to three trillion dollar aid package today. The package is not expected to make it through the Senate in New Jersey. Beaches will be open in time for Memorial Day. Doctors in Italy. Say they have scientific evidence linking Corona virus to pediatric multi-system Inflammatory Syndrome reports? Cbs News Brazil has reported over two hundred thousand cases of Cova nineteen they now have the sixth highest case. Count in the world. After two weeks of single digit cases Slovenia announced that the epidemic there is over and they have opened their borders Lithuania. Latvia and Estonia have opened their shared borders allowing free travel among residents of the Baltic states. Australia began to reopen today. The country suffered fewer than one hundred deaths and only a few dozen remain in hospitals. According to The Washington Post China has now gone one month without a death. Dacoven nineteen the locations of hot spots in the US country diagnoses in a moment hot spots in the US displaying faster rates of growth as of May fourteenth according to The New York Times Lake County Tennessee Liberty County. Florida globally Sudan Gabon Zambia. Benin Haiti Nepal and South Sudan have faster rates of growth. There have been one million four hundred seventeen thousand eight hundred eighty nine confirmed cases of kovic nineteen in the united states and eighty five thousand nine hundred six deaths known active locations with fifteen thousand or more cases new york three hundred forty eight thousand one hundred ninety to new jersey one hundred forty two thousand seven hundred four illinois eighty eight thousand eighty one massachusetts eighty two thousand one hundred eighty two california seventy four thousand nine hundred forty seven pennsylvania sixty three thousand one hundred fifty eight michigan forty nine thousand four hundred eighty nine texas forty five thousand one hundred sixty nine florida forty three thousand two hundred to maryland thirty six thousand twenty one connecticut thirty five thousand four hundred sixty four georgia thirty four thousand four hundred twenty two louisiana thirty three thousand four hundred eighty nine virginia twenty seven thousand eight hundred thirteen indiana twenty six thousand six hundred twenty seven ohio twenty six thousand three hundred sixty three colorado twenty thousand eight hundred thirteen washington eighteen thousand nine hundred sixty four north carolina sixteen thousand five hundred ninety three tennessee sixteen thousand five hundred eighty eight countries with twenty thousand or more cases russia two hundred fifty two thousand two hundred forty five united kingdom two hundred thirty four thousand four hundred forty one spain two hundred twenty nine thousand five hundred forty italy two hundred twenty three thousand ninety six brazil two hundred thousand one hundred sixty five francs one hundred seventy eight thousand nine hundred ninety four germany one hundred seventy four thousand four hundred seventy eight turkey one hundred forty four thousand seven hundred forty nine iran one hundred fourteen thousand five hundred thirty three china eighty four thousand twenty nine india eighty two thousand one hundred three peru eighty thousand six hundred four canada seventy four thousand seven hundred eighty two belgium fifty four thousand two hundred eighty eight saudi arabia forty six thousand eight hundred sixty nine netherlands forty-three thousand six hundred eighty mexico forty two thousand five hundred ninety five pakistan thirty seven thousand two hundred eighteen chalet thirty seven thousand forty ecuador thirty thousand five hundred to switzerland thirty thousand four hundred sixty three sweden twenty eight thousand five hundred eighty to portugal twenty eight thousand three hundred nineteen cutter twenty eight thousand two hundred seventy two belarus twenty six thousand seven hundred seventy two singapore twenty six thousand ninety eight ireland twenty three thousand eight hundred twenty seven united arab emirates twenty one thousand eighty four. I case reported in Lesotho for the latest updates subscribe for free to Gerona Virus. Four one one on your podcast APP or ask Your Smart Speaker to play the corona virus. Four one one. Podcast sound that brands.

united states New Jersey Dr Bright Italy Lesotho Senate Cbs Congress Slovenia Times Lake County Tennessee Li Barda president Haiti Australia Baltic states South Sudan Lithuania Cova Latvia
NPR News: 01-22-2020 9AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 9 months ago

NPR News: 01-22-2020 9AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Korva Coleman the next step in president. Trump's impeachment trial happens in the Senate today with opening statements. Democrats will go first. NPR's Brian Naylor reports. The Senate concluded a marathon session early this morning and voted on rules for the proceedings. The Senate adopted the ground rules for the impeachment. I'm at trial. There will be twenty four hours of opening statements for each side to be spread over three days. They rejected efforts by Democrats to subpoena documents. The trump administration has refused to turn over. They also rejected an attempt to subpoena Mick Mulvaney. The Acting White House chief of staff to testify. It's still unclear. The Senate may hear from witnesses later in the trial. NPR's Brian Naylor in the proceedings overnight. Chief Justice John Roberts admonished both both sides in the case he said that the speakers trading fiery words on the Senate floor needed to remember they're addressing the world's greatest deliberative body the World Health Organization is holding an emergency committee meeting on the pneumonia like respiratory virus spreading in China. At least nine people have died more than four hundred others or sick sick countries are screening travellers. Illness Jason Strother reports from Seoul tour agencies are saying that North Korea has closed its borders to to China based tour operators say traveled North Korea is temporarily halted notices on the websites of young pioneer tours. And corio tours say. Pyongyang has banned ban foreign tourists out of concern over the corona virus. Both agencies say it's unclear when the border will reopen companies like these specialize in group tour packages to the north and the greatest number of foreign visitors come from China so far. North Korea has not reported any outbreak of the virus for NPR News News. I'm Jason Strother in Seoul. A new Gallup poll finds a record number of Americans are unhappy with the nation's abortion laws as NPR's Sarah McCamman in reports. That change is mostly caused by growing dissatisfaction. Among Democrats close to six out of ten Americans say they're dissatisfied with US abortion policy. A new high and thirty two percent are satisfied. A new low since Gallup began collecting this data in two thousand one Gallup's Slovenia Saad says attitudes among Republican leaning voters have remained relatively stable over the years but Democrats are expressing rapidly. Intensifying displeasure with the nation's abortion laws. which they see as too strict the one really unique thing that we're seeing is that Democrats are now saying? Hey wait a minute. Basically which they haven't set for awhile awhile. Saad says the shift in attitudes among Democrats could be driven by president trump's opposition to abortion rights or the growing number of states working to pass restrictions on abortion early early in pregnancy Sarah McCamman. NPR News. And you're listening to NPR news from Washington Lebanon's new government has met today for the first time. Lebanon has been without a government for three months. Citizens have packed the streets for weeks infuriated over the country's stories economic collapse. The new government is backed by the major Lebanese parliamentary bloc Hezbollah supported by Iran. But Lebanese ministers must I deal with inflation to Japanese automakers are recalling millions of vehicles because of airbag problems. NPR's Giles Snyder reports. The problems comes are separate issues. In Toyota's case that concern is more about whether the airbags will inflate properly rather than the airbags themselves. The automaker is conducting A recall for some three point. Four million vehicles globally because of defective sensors. It's believed they could be vulnerable to electrical interference. The recall covers twenty eleven through through twenty nineteen corollas and certain Matrix avalon an avalon hybrid vehicles. The Honda recall covers about two point. Seven million vehicles in the US and Candida including certain Honda Acura automobiles from the nineteen ninety. Six through two thousand three model years the issues with a different version of the Kata inflator later. That's blamed for killing some two dozen people trial Snyder. NPR News Washington. The National Weather Service says that a storm will develop over the Central Plains and start tracking tracking to the northeast. By this weekend. It will bring a wintry mix over parts of the plains and the Midwest. The northern Gulf coast is expected to get heavy rain meanwhile the northeast will get the chance of heavy snow by this weekend. I'm Korva Coleman N._P._R.. News from Washington.

NPR News NPR Senate North Korea president trump Washington Korva Coleman Brian Naylor China Jason Strother US Washington Lebanon Slovenia Saad Seoul Sarah McCamman Giles Snyder Chief Justice John Roberts Mick Mulvaney Central Plains
578 Walking Ljubljana; Munich and Bavaria; Wild Animals

Travel with Rick Steves

51:17 min | 1 year ago

578 Walking Ljubljana; Munich and Bavaria; Wild Animals

"The about the hardest thing you have to do on a walking tour of the capital of Slovenia is learn how they spell the name of the city but we have time locals. We love to come to the central market and see how the seasons are changing and to know. Slovenia is located. Donna is low Q mid. The president of the market. Things are pretty casual casual in the southern part in Germany as well even the way they speak the language radius different languages a bit slower. We drop a couple syllables. We used the wrong articles us and we don't mind that and Marquez learned a few surprises about the wildlife photographs in exotic places around the world. Well it turns out that vampire bats have the most effective anticoagulant known to man in their saliva stroll around liberally on him. Get ready for October fest in Bavaria and get up close goes to some wild creatures. It's all in the hour ahead on travel. Rick Steves stay with US whereabouts for two cities heart of Europe that are easy to enjoy on foot today on travel with Rick Steves a guide from Munich. lets us in on what makes her region of the various stand apart from the rest of Germany and we'll get walking tour ideas for Slovenia's comfortable and modest capital city of Lubiana just a moment plus nature tiger for Mardi s and joins US later in the hour to tell us about some of his favourite creatures in the while even the slimy and slithery ones. Let's start the our discovering why the Slovenian capital is often called one of the greenest and most livable cities in Europe joining us in our studio. All the way from Louisiana is tour Guide Barbara Yucca Pitch and Cameron Hewitt joins us as well. He's the CO author of the Rick Steves Eastern Europe and the Rick Steves Croatia and Slovenia guidebooks. How Bet that Cameron has written a few of his updates from the comfort of a Riverside cafe in on at least a few occasions? You know it's so funny Barbara. When I think about Libya it's hard for me to well first of all. It's kind of a strangely difficult word to pronounce. How do we say the capital you plan. Ah Louisiana Oakland so it's very simple when you don't over think to just have to say it and it's kind of like the city. It's very simple if you don't over think it when I think about I have a hard time relating to any particular site but there's something that I enjoy about. It doesn't have to remember anything about your plan. If you enjoy it that is enough because it's a small town and nothing is super important in planner so just enjoyable time that you spent their enough and if you take that with you that's more than enough for us so that's enough you. If you just relax and let it happen and yes the Cameron how do you. I think that's exactly it. It's just purely enjoyable. It's a it's a beautiful city. Small City got gorgeous riverfront promenade with outdoor cafes. It's got a lively thriving market right in the city centre welcoming and inviting squares and bridges and embankments just a fun place to relax and spend time and browse and not really have a sightseeing agenda. It seems to me like it's just on a on a human scale but that doesn't happen accidentally. There's an architectural sort of genius behind uh-huh Slovenia architect exactly and early twentieth century this guy named Josiah pledge sneak who's from Louisiana and he gained fame throughout the Habsburg Empire and then when he retired he came back to his hometown hometown and he he basically redesigned the whole city he laid out the riverfront embankments lots of bridges lots of buildings and kind of remade the city in his own image and what's really interesting about him ms he lived in the city and he walked to work every day so he designed the city to be pleasant for pedestrians. He wanted to have a nice walk to work everyday so he had he had an incentive to make it a very liveable city so barbara talk a little bit more because you live in the town of Pledge Nick what people think about Josie Pledge Nick Yours literally created plan as we know it today and Cameron is absolutely correct oven politically deterrent to Lebron she was already a well known architect working before in Vienna in Prague Rock and then returned into plant in the time after the first World War and Selena was not the capital at that point. It was a provincial town. It was a small town on in one of the provinces of Hungarian monarchy. It was never meant to be a capital but polytechnic this idea that it should be something more so that was his starting point and Lecomte said he was designing the city on his walks. You have this access. Indo Blaha when she's works are concentrated thrilla and he would add to his ideas in different points of time so it was not straight forward he would start here and and in the other part of the city but whenever he would have a chance and there was money available he would add to his vision and a lot of his work was never finished so when you're in Louisiana and you're just was thinking God. This city is such a joy. You should probably pause and think think pledge Nick. He has definitely definitely we do that every day and our architects. It's this even today. It's a small city like less than three hundred thousand so small by European standards for a national capital exactly and I should say it's the setting also beautiful. It's it's the twisty river that runs around the base of a mountain so it's a little bit like Salzburg Castle on top of the mountain and it's in the foothills of the opposite you look off on the horizon and you see Alpine peaks awesome so it also not just the man made architecture of Lucia Pledge Nick but just the beautiful setting is is another part of its appeal in Cameron. There's this sort of unique triple bridge. Can you describe that that's one of there was a bridge they're already but it's the main bridge that runs right through the central intersection of town across the river right by the main square and he added to little side bridges just kind of funnel the human and vehicle traffic in a more natural way creating three ridges which is called the triple bridges. You can just hang out on the triple bridge and sit sit and watch the world go by and it just you see how everything flows and you see the mountains on the horizon and it just has that kind of relaxing feel to it. It's got a nice cafe vibrate there and there's arcades and nearby. Oh by is the market Barbara talk about the market because I found the market to be just particularly inviting and characteristic yes. That's the heart of the city meant again. Glitch Nick would add to it because we cut the last big earthquake in one hundred ninety five that left them empty space that was later used as America but which nick connected acted this area with the triple bridge through the colonnade which is now the covered part and the fish market as well but it remained the heart of the city so the opener an advocate with older thrash product very important people like that in retail market. You've got coming in exactly it's a real market. It's where people go go and buy things I mean when we have time. Locals will love to come to the central market and we see how the seasons are changing and to know. Slovenia is low key. He looked down is located mid. The president at the market can famously beat the president and I do actually I think the other thing about it is it's not like like a touristy market. There's one little tourist area that the area that's closest to the main square but then you get deeper into the market and it's it's really just local producers and sometimes you can see the actual carts. There's garden patches that are not that far out of the city centre and people will actually just load up their carts and walk them into the market so you're really getting stuff direct from the producer. One of my favorite things at the market is there's a Malek Lecco Matt which is farm fresh milk and you just put in a few coins and they they loaded up every morning with with milk milk that morning from the cows and you take it home and it's it's you know you don't see see that kind of direct connection to the producer and a lot of I've been to Libya enough to to recognize the joy. Both of you experts have in this city and to think how few people go there and how accessible it says if you're in Salzburg. It's an easy train ride if you're in Venice. It's just a couple hours away. There's so many opportunities for people who will venture to the capital of Slovenia. This traveled twix. Steve's we're talking about the capital of Slovenia Louisiana. We're joined by two guides who are experts on Slovenia Barbara Yucca Pitch and Cameron Hewitt our phone number's eight seven and seven three three three seven four to five Joyce's calling in from Kirkland Washington Joyce. Thanks for your call. Yes thank you well. I'm hearing you review the city. It reminds me so much. If my trip there in two thousand thirteen I was there in June and it was beautiful and it was the beginning of tour and I felt at the end of two or three days as that I could have just stayed. There was so much fun. The city seems so authentic it. It's almost like the perfect host as if the OH Scott at ready and invited us there but then got out of our way and let us enjoy it. I love to walk so I especially enjoyed walking up up and down the river and up to the castle. If I remember there's a funicular but I prefer to walk whenever I can on the other hand. We had a wonderful guide ride with us. Who would give us information that I wouldn't have gotten if I had done it completely on foot without any help so the whole experience was great. I love to take pictures so then I get away and try to find the quirky little things whether it's the lovelock's through the shoe's on the telephone wire or some other strange range states that I saw but all in all it was a great day. That's great well. Thanks choice for your for your call and your memories this is travel with Rick Steves or emails emails radio at Rick Steves. Dot Com and Jabe has emailed us from Titusville in Florida and JP rights. What are the taste treats of this region not to miss he. He says I remember the spicy grilled sausages and the seasonal fruits and vegetables are they're special tastes from your experience that we should plan on trying. Your plan is right in the middle of the country so really cut influences from all sides of Slovenia in Slovenia is small but it's very diverse so you get the sausages from the north and the the Sauerkraut Sauerkraut is actually excellent in Louisiana and on the market you have to try to for autumn winter times and then from the Hungarian influences from the East from the Atlantic coast wicket pastas center risotto's everywhere into Blanda. You will get all of that. It's all OK P ties excellent in Louisiana Ana but now this traditional blonde dishes are coming back to the city centre and one of them fried frog legs really if you're Louis Frog legs land not sleep right wow so when we talk about a cultural crossroads where Italian Germanic aw it's also the cuisine and also liberty was the green capital of Europe in two thousand sixteen so it's a lear in sustainability and climate change sensibilities allergies and so on what makes locally on a special from a green environmental point of view there was so many things were done in the bladder in the last last fifteen years. I mean according to the traffic regulation. We kicked out cars from the city centre. It's all bicycles Sustainability Green Energy in the city centre recycling product lots of trees. It's very green. Lots of parks and people love recreation. They all live with this project and also whatever was done into plan. It was done for the people who live there so not for the tourist tourists can enjoy it. Of course there are welcome but it was done on for us and I think it shows that's an interesting point because in Europe now there are many cities suffering from tourism that are just too popular and in Libya. You don't feel that you feel it is done for the people it is still down for the people I mean more people are coming but for now also I would say that there are so many little places to explore that we we don't experience the big line sent. You know that there is no rush to see one important. Thing is just you can disperse to different areas and just enjoy either side so cameron. You're an expert at knowing where the big sites are the marquee sites in these great cultural capitals and Liberals WanNa. There's not the marquee sites exactly exactly as Barbara was saying because there's not any big name sites. It's easy to spread out and everyone can kind of discover a corner all to themselves beautiful cobbled old town. This is travel with Rick Steves Steph's who've been talking with Cameron Hewitt and Barbara. Cope each about the lovable capital of Slovenia. We're out of time but just like one more little capper from each of you cameron when and you're going to be on a what's some experience or insight you'd like to share. We'll you know I'm not much of a shopper but it's one of my favorite places to just go shopping walking down the main streets and browsing and it is kind of up microcosm of this whole little country where you can get sea salt harvested from the seaside in Slovenia. You can get mountain scenes from the mountainsides It's just a very charming place. Were you can sample different aspects of the of country and Barbara. Lubiana is heading towards new products and our mayor. He was now reelected for the fourth time. It has this new ideas to improve our life to maybe make the develop planets are suitable for swimming. He promised us that he will go swimming this year. So we are all waiting robbery Pitch Cameron Hewitt. Thank you so much for giving us a better appreciation of Louisiana Anna it's getting to be Tober fast and a great time to be in Bavaria well explore Munich southern Germany next on travel with Rick Steves where at eight seven seven three seven four to five for six centuries. Bavaria was a distinct nation from the rest of what we now call Germany it had its own ruling family and its own favourite foods and culture culture from its capital Munich up into the Alps. Bavaria is a region that provides many Americans with the images picture when we think of old world Germany today nick is often called Germany's most livable city. I like that it's pedestrian-friendly historic core kind of makes the big city feel like an easy going Bavarian town. It's also where tour guide than yellow fatal was born and raised she joins us now on travel with Rick Steves to explore the highlights of Munich and Bavaria and they help us kickoff kickoff the October fest season with a look at what's unique about southern Germany Daniele del Carmen. Thank you for inviting me Rick Scott Gross Gut. There's a good example. You wouldn't say Truscott in Berlin. Would you know he wouldn't you would only say that. Chris got in Bavaria into southern areas particularly air. Maybe even over the border to titled. We'll tyrol in Austria Austria or in Bavaria. You would have that charming southern kind of dialect when we think Danielle of the dialect between the north and the south of Germany. That's the little sort of the little topping of a deep cultural difference between the north and the south. How would you as the Bavarian characterize the difference between somebody who lives in Prussia in the north and somebody who lives in Bavaria in the south so me coming from the South. That's probably a little bit subjective but I would say that in the South the language of ideas different language a little bit slower. We drop a couple syllables. Bulls were used the wrong articles and we don't mind that and everyone else minds it otherwise I would say probably people a little bit more relaxed than the idea of the German people take their time. They want to be outside. A Lot. People are Mubarak and when I say Baroque I mean it's always a little bit too much a little bit of too muchness whole Ed like oil the top. Yes we like to celebrate in the in Bavaria. Much I was going to say when you talked about your talion in the south and Bavaria and in Italy when somebody is over the top they're easy mo Maybe maybe the Bavarians a little bit you see see more often you hear even in Italy that people from New Orleans would say or Italians would say that Munich is the most northern Italian city that day is now that relates. It's also to the religion because the pope I think took good care of Bavaria because Bavaria was up sort of foothold of Catholicism in the land of the reformation and so the pope central extra dose of relics Tube Riveria to Munich so that they felt closer to Rome is very dense net of Abbey's Abe's we have Benedictine averaging particularly countryside in various so when you drive through the countryside the pre Alpine lands you have beautiful most of the time Baroque style counter reformation style. Abe's is simone is simone various. Does you see some church. Maybe the vs Kirk exactly Obama overall or go you know the onion domes the onion domes that you see all over the country sites that are very recognizable. I think that is typical for the Bavarian countryside and you would not see that in Hamburg no spire northern story Protestant spire and in Bavaria. You've got those elegant onion domes because also is that often think Germany is considered as being a Protestant country yeah because we connect or particularly in the United States maybe connect with Luther Luther and so we think Protestant. It's not southern Germany now. Everyone moves in so things generally in the south particularly in Bavaria. Varia people are Catholic. One of the most impressive relics I can think of is in Saint Peter's Church in Munich you walk into Saint Peter's Church just as you enter. There's this it's amazing jeweled skeleton. that was a gift from the Church you step into the church and he go whoa. This is not Martin Luther country. This is like Catholic Komo. It's it's way you have these baroque style on the ceilings to open ceilings with the Pastel colors and a lot of gold and richly decorated rated. Now you said on the dialect then you have some wrong. sounds like you're saying intentionally wrong is we're you know the standard. German the formal German his Hawk Deutsche Right. Yes and you can write in hall storage. Yes you probably have to write in high German. That's formal but you don't speak in like a Shakespearean Experien- actor exactly on the countryside so you mean what's an example. Can you give me a little a dialect to Berliner Hamburg. Let's say so we go to a restaurant yeah in dodge so in written German we would save again in festival. We used arresting go to we are going to the restaurant okay beginning restaurant and in Bavaria we would say McCain Gustov to begin an interest along so gear gang gang a person from another city would know Oh. This is a a bavarian. It would definitely whenever they have. I've traveled there with no notes from the person from the south somewhere or with the article for example it is we say the plate. The plate is Taylor right in the very thus Taylor. No you get the set mixed up. Yes totally. I didn't know you can do that. You can when you Bavarian because that's why I quit. Germany was because I couldn't remember if it was dared dior. Dust there is a male or female neutral pronoun and I was all stressed out about that but I could have just said hey hey. I'm very whatever you want you. Just celebrate that you have particular. You'll give you an exceptional. It's a declaration of independence. You know we're not been not berliner been kind berliner. I'm also a bill inner. Let's like that. I'm also besides that I'm Bavarian and I'm also villain okay so you've got your your independent spirit traveled. Steve's we're talking with Daniele Vidal and she's proud of ovarian. She's a guide who who gave to all over Germany and we're talking about the difference between Bavaria and the rest of our country when we're talking about this I almost think about how proud people from Texas are in the United United States and there's that sort of spirit that yes we can do it. We don't need to be told how to do it from New York or or California. Is there a little bit of that between Munich and Berlin Yep. I do feel I do think that there are some malaria as far as the perception and maybe also do consciousness between Bavarians and Texans in the way that there are similarities in the sense that its various rod a conservative Bundesland state religion place still quite important role then then Dr these islands Indus conservatism like I think in Texas too so the countryside is rather conservative very Catholic and then you have Munich for example as an island ray social democratic graddick government since Second World War so the state government of Bavarian could be very conservative and if the tourist goes to Munich they would think no this is liberal. What's going on well. It's that urban rural divide that we have here in the United States as well. The perception may be also from the outside what I experienced with the guests how Texans sends in Texas is perceived of course it's I mean they're wonderful people everywhere but it's the same thing that other Germans would see always with a little bit yeah uh-huh added today they are different and they want to be different to. We like like the lone star. Texas has Lonestar in Bavaria has the loan I do yeah. Ill make our rules. Do it your style now. When American thinks about Germany there's certain cliches but a lot a lot of times. Those German cliches are actually not German but very yes. What's an example well for example. I do believe that a lot of Americans think that all Germans humans eat pretzel or big the Big Pretzel yes or that everyone who is kind of in the folkloristic club has a lederhosen or whereas dwindle that in all the cities are may pull in when you're happy. Yodel and Yodel everyone and everyone plays the we say entered a music you say papa music the data and that's these are all things that are German but they are particularly are Bavarian and so you would never find anyone who eats a Schwann's huckster or pork walking Nakal in Hamburg. They hearing it's so funny because I'm just thinking of Hamburg because Hamburg is like close to Denmark and it's a long way from Rome. Yes and you don't have the dirndls. You don't have this lap-dancing. No you don't have the yodeling but the American would think all those things are German but they're not are between the fund is in Bavaria. The Fund is in Videri and speaking of fund very has the biggest beer party I think in the world yes October fest and and it really is a celebration of Bavaria because the first October fest was wasn't at a wedding party for the Royal Family Salute the eighteen twenty one it was the wedding the precept therefore we call it Terezin visa also oh yeah so the research meadow that's the area how call it and it's still Tova Festival so it's a way eighteen twenty so we're going to have the two hundredth anniversary of octoberfest coming off. That's going to be even bigger. More than seven million. People will then probably seven seven million of that's a lot of two weeks a lot of a lot of oxygen a lot of oxen on a spit. Yes a a lot of chicken. A lot of happiness call it. The fifth season in October. Pets is the fifth season of the year it overwhelms it takes over the city in a beautiful away just coincidentally because of my work. I've been in Munich two times for October fest in the last two years and both times when I went to octoberfest Daniela at occurred to meet. It's not really touristy. It's very local local people I mean tourists go there a lot but this is a chance for locals to celebrate their or clan their their friends their style. Each tent has a different personality. I think if you have the chance to go to the octoberfest on the weekend and also in the middle of the week then you see the two different worlds of October fest on the weekends. It's the tourists in there and if you go at lunchtime during the week that's wonderful. It's calm it's quiet. The weather generally is very beautiful still so beginning of October end of September. You have warm weather. You can sit outside and there it is common. The locals and people makes up and I noticed the security security is very good and injured in Europe. There's a lot of soft targets in Germany like France and and he has had to be careful of people that want to make a terrible event yeah and Germany is very good at not closing down but just making good security so the grounds would be controlled and there's one or two entries and exits in each of those you have police checking you and then I noticed beg check and so on and I think it feels it just feels wonderful inside and I'm so thankful they can still have big parties like that. Yes it is it is somebody told me the biggest risk is people fighting with a with a glass mug which was always which was always the biggest. I danger because some people when they get drunk. They're they're just crazy. Physical and these mugs are ounce a leader. It's a it's a liter of beer ear and when you are empty with that you've got it in your hand in your anger you can. I understood that it's like it's considered a a serious crime if you hit somebody with a Mug just because they have to. I'm very careful about that. They're even designed to the handle breaks easily. Yeah I talk about interesting things when you're sharing beer doctoral best so they want interesting still wanNA keep them up because at some point but it is dangerous so they have to design it so they handle breaks off if you hit somebody with it but they wanted to forbid one time was to stand on the bench is actually actually to dance which did not go through so you cannot smoke anymore into tents which you still they did not get through with not standing on the it was traditions in fact. I've got a photograph of my plate with the beautiful Sauerkraut and and so on and the pork knuckle with two big German boots right next to it because people were standing ending on my table and I was just thinking. Don't step on my crowd. Our crowd never step on tour guide. Dan Yellow fatal is giving us. That's a good taste of Bavarian culture today on travel with Rick Steves then yellow also lead small group Tours in Europe and Morocco and displays her beautiful photography work at had her own gallery in Avenue in France. Our phone number is eight seven seven three three seven four to five and Doug selling in from Bristol in Maine Doug. Thanks Spear Call Hi Rick and Danielle my wife and I are traveling to Europe for the first time and we're we get TAB TAB two days in Munich and obviously we're doing the research on what to see Munich and it seems like everything starts with Marian and plots and the Glock and Spiel but everybody then mentions you gotta go to the Hoffbrau House in that's the beer whole you need to see but here in Maine everybody wants to lobster and seafood in they want that quintessential seafood dinner and end phrases fine where the locals eat and that's where you're going to get the best seafood dinner at the restaurant that has the tour bus and so the Hudson how songs you know like fun but would you recommend like other beer halls in the area that maybe the Munich people actually have a beer at the end of a workday they were we could feel in meet some German people right all right doug. You know it's so important to see the hoffbrau speeds. It's historic. It's classic. It's got live music but remember. It's just a touristy thing. I really really enjoy the hoffer house actually for a lot of reasons. The history is there. It's too stretched in history but people have there's many beer halls and different people have their favorites Danielle. What would have different beer hall to consider a different one would be definitely and if you want to meet the locals and probably eighty percent of the locals agree on that the best Bayern Munich is to Gustin beer so augastine Augustina like the monks and so one beer garden is for example behind the train station can walk there from the train station Augustina via garden close to the train train station. You just have to ask people noise so there you have ever locals people from all over the place and then there are these gardens all over the city spread out in the different neighborhoods so if you who are adventurous and you get yourself a public transport pass and you go out and then applets is a good place w. e. n. e. r. Vena like Vietnam Edna written in German that you write it out and then you'll find it and then you go there. There's another Augustino Beer Garden and that is the one where I grew up flakes. Okay so Augustino. That's a very very good idea because it's great beer and Beer Gardens Nice evening. You're outside and you're going to experience this wonderful word that as a tour guide in Bavaria you always he's probably have to deal with Kate. Yes you'll feel that in the in the garden in the beer garden what is what is communicate communicate this phenomenon. We have I would say in Bavaria in the pre Alpine on the Alpine air is communicated coziness. You feel safe. it is if you're outside in a beer garden. Obviously this is not the case generally. It's a little bit too warm where it's community. because you are close together is a closeness cozy. It's sir you feel just comfortable and you time. Maybe there's no importance him. Every winter it would be shelly or somewhere in a hut in a mountain hut in somewhere so particular invade smaller space smaller areas so communities tied yes in the beer gardens with the music so that's probably something maybe maybe an in a small cafe or field he doug. Thanks for your question and enjoy your trip to Munich. Thank you one quick question. What's the Radler Rattler Radler a mix of sprites lemon sprite like you have it here. half sprite have lager beer and Radler is called a biker occur rod means spiker in Bavarian and so after that you easily ride with your bike through the city on the bike path didn't put that together rattlers for the bikers yeah. If you want to feel like you have a beer but you're not that interested in drinking cut it with your seven up and if a real beer drinker you don't order rod leads to sweet rhetoric and it's kind of the feminine drink to a lot of a lot of women will go for the radnor but the men will be insulting so that's like an English. There's publish and it's too. It's a Shandy handy but another good drink to know about is a apple surely absolutely apple all schol- as an apple apple means apple now so it's a mix of juice which generally are other sweet and we don't like things so sweet often and so we wanted refreshing and then you mix it up with bubbly water so so half half refreshing or insurer any any throw any choose mixed with a public water. I like Radler your woman. I'm a bike lake riding one he doug. Thanks for your call. uh-huh we'll take more of your calls. Danielle fatal in just a minute at eight seven seven three three three three seven four to five as we get ready to explore of Varia on travel with Rick Steves by email you can reach us at radio at Rick Steves Dot Dot Com and in just a bit wildlife photographer. Marty tells us about some of his favorite animals and reptiles that he's encountered in the wild Danila Beatles our guide to Munich and Bavaria Right now on travel with Rick Steves and Catherine's on the line from Decor Iowa at eight seven seven three three correct Catherine. What are your plans for southern Germany. I'm taking my sixteen year old grandson communicative area and that guy was one of the places that he would like to visit and so my question I too is there easy public transportation from Munich out tobacco and back and then how can I best prepare him for that experience. visiting concentration camps good questioned Daniele. You're a parent you want your teenager to get a respect for what happened. In the Holocaust that takes a little bit of thoughtfulness well I sixteen. I don't know what they have been taught at school maybe to find out already what he we know so far about well if he says he wants to go there. It's probably interesting to find out why he would sixteen wants to go there so he must know something about it. then if if I'm not wrong there is a show recently about the Holocaust but you didn't know we we made a TV show on interesting ashes people that would be a very good thing to watch beforehand Karen. If you find the Rick Steves show about Fascism and you can stream that on the Internet easily and then you have plenty of museums also dedicated to the Holocaust so probably would be a new docu center immune immune goal so yes for the Holocaust and you would see that before going out to doc. It's a very good good exhibit. right in Munich. What is important I find personally very important is to make sure that your son understands the rising of fascism and not just out of context Holocaust and it has happened in Germany so I think you have we. We should try to get it puts in the context and then to get to Dachau and Beck is very easy with public transportation it takes forty five minutes so you you should dedicate probably a day to this the whole subject theme Minimum Day also tours in hood offered by companies and it's the parental rental thing for a teenager. I can see what Danielle is trying to explain because as a tour guide I'm sure she's dealt with it and some kids can handle it other kids. You'd have to be careful about this. DACA is probably a good example of a concentration camp for teenagers more than some other camps but you would wanna be there with them mm-hmm and help curate what they're looking at because it's it's a powerful powerful experience and it's a valuable experience good for your teenager for having a curiosity about it and good good for you as a parent to help make that happen does that help. Catherine yes and I've seen on the show them and but I don't believe my grandson isn't has seen it so that's a good suggestion to make sure that he's he sees that before we go and Germany's doing a very good job of sharing the lessons from it's hard history for travelers these days much. It's better now than twenty years ago so as you travel around there's a lot you can see do i. I would say something fascinating is going to work discarding where there's another documentation nations center where people that you learn about it and then you can actually go up into Hitler's Eagle's nest and that's quite a fascinating experience without the graphic heartache of a concentration camp. Thanks for your call Katherine Amandus calling in from Concord in California Amanda. Thanks for your call. Hi Rick Hi Danielle. Thanks for taking my call. My husband and I are planning a trip and we're planning on bringing our six year old daughter so I was hoping for some recommendations of places in Munich and around. I'm very that are kid friendly. hopefully some places also that are kind of in nature. Maybe some short hikes something with animals that she might enjoy all right. Yes yes for example in Munich. You have of course along the easer river that runs through Munich. That is beautiful beautiful. You can stroll you can walk down. They can have a picnic down there. She can play. It's like a park yeah yeah yeah. It's it's wonderful. I don't know if she's riding a bike in Munich. Children with six years ride their bikes already that could be in. There's enough space otherwise there's something nice just outside just about five kilometers outside outside. Even the tram goes down to public transport it's the Bavaria Film Studios where the Never Ending Story was filmed in where they still food. who were you know the dog kind of fluffy one? It's there and there's also in the forest as some wildlife where they have years bore and all the animals and they explain about the forest animals in in Bavaria so that's nice. That's very close together again. That is extra slightest is st next to the Bavaria Film Studios so when you go there and it's it's next to it and there's a tram public transport ghosted takes twenty minutes in the park the English Garden English Garden Beautiful Place. You can see the People Surfing yes also. There's a river where there's a constant wave and people are surfing just like you know in in the ocean right on the river in Munich which is a lot of fun for kids to watch and it's not nature but it's certainly interesting the deutsches museum exactly and that's down at the river so kid oriented things a wonderful planetarium and and and that would be like going to the Smithsonian Institute but in Germany and then of course all the robot on all the year lose rights that are surrounding the Louis Rights to do so if you have a car in the hills of the Debit Yeah Amanda the Ski Lifts in the summer they still run but they don't take skiers. They take nature lovers up and then you go down the slopes not on skis but unlike go-carts that are in these concrete slalom courses back and forth and it's really really exciting and that's the summer robot yeah and you'll see people doing that in very in kids. Google Lucia. If you lose you should find something and so so if you have a car and just going towards the mountains. It's a thirty minutes drive. You have all these lakes also where you can swim in and Wonderful Things Nice to have fun with your family. Emily thank you so much. It's such a trait. Thanks you bet this is travel with Rick Steves. We've been talking about Bavaria in Munich and Bavarian culture with Daniela Vidal then yellow. Thank you so much this is this makes me want to go back to the Baria. Thanks for having me. Thanks far and I bring in bring wildlife photographer. Mardi Essen likes thanks to learn the stories of the birds and animals live in the places where he camps out sometimes gets him into situations that you can only laugh about after your return home. He joins us now to report on a few of the more memorable encounters he's had in the world's wildest places Marty Welcome. Hey Rick good to be on your show if I wanted to travel and appreciate nature. What kind of prerequisites are there? What sort of knowledge should I have before I leave home to appreciate all these great things. I might be able to see what I did. Is I picked up every a book. I could find on wildlife in that particular area because I wanted to know what I was going to see. Once I got to that particular area of the world but it was amazing that no matter how much research I did ahead of time. Nature always had a surprise for me that I didn't expect and that's kind of the fun part when she got there once. I got there a lot of these rain forest regions whether it'd be Costa Rica especially when I was in Borneo. It's such an under researched area. They're still discovering hundreds of new species species every single year and so you know sometimes you just don't know her. I I was in Borneo and we see this little snake on the ground and I'm with a guide right from the sun segment tribe who was born in the rainforest live their entire life and he was probably about fifty years old and we come across the snake and and before I touch it I call him over and he looks at it and he says worm snake harmless and so I reached down a pick up little snake bites me a couple times of the finger but it's a small mall snake and it can't quite break my skin and take a couple pictures of it and I put it down and I don't think anything of it hell I'm back in Montana and I'm working on my chapter chapter doing my post trip research and matched up the photo with a book and it turned out to be venomous banded coral snake that was dying on my finger so didn't break the skin so you're lucky and so I was lucky but you know so even when you're with guide sometimes when you're in a remote area you know you're both everybody's learning at the same time I was so charmed by the cute little brown blunt headed vine snake of that was that was really cool fine that was in Costa Rica we were out on a night hike and I'm looking around in this the dainty little snake I'd ever seen it's probably about maybe a foot and a half long but it skinnier than a pencil but the head is like too big for its body. That's how it gets. The named Blunt headed snake so I'm trying to take a picture of it and I can't it quite get my camera to focus where it is and so I turned to my guide and ask him is it venomous and he says well it might be rear fanged venomous but but being a snake generally means unless you're in Africa generally veer frank snakes aren't very venomous. It's just mild venom so I picked the snake up and he was very docile. Oh my hand and my camera to my wife and Deb took the photo of me and that's one of the photos I have in my book endangered Edens of me holding this dainty little snake and just moderately venomous Venema just moderately venomous MARDI yesterday's wildlife photographer and naturalist from Montana. He frequently speaks on college campuses about the amazing things. The natural world has showing him all around the planet. He's written endangered edens depict what he found in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge the Everglades Puerto Rico and Costa Rica Gotcha and is earlier book. Cool creatures planet takes us to all seven continents since we recorded our interview. Marty has also published two science-fiction political. Oh comedy is in his time is irreverent series. His website is Mardi S. N. DOT COM that's E. S. S. E. N. So you've had had some incredible adventures you've written about one of my favorites was canoeing down the Zambezi River in Zimbabwe and then you hit what you thought was Iraq. Can you tell us about that. Yeah Yeah we had spent five days hiking across Mana Pools National Parker Fifty Three Mile Hike and ask for hiking we see these giant. Nile crocodiles along the riverbank and we see all these hippos in the water and after we finish this hike we're GONNA get into canoes or we're going to head down the Zambezi River on a three three day canoe trip basically retracing our tracks and my wife and I were two other couples with us. We were all real nervous about this portion of the trip and our our guide sensing how nervous we worry satisfied. He said listen. I've been taking people down the Zambezi River for sixteen years. Never once if we had anyone attacked by an animal sit sit back relax you'll be surprised how safe and easy this trip is. GonNa be and so we get into canoes five canoes and all and we head down the Zambezi river and any immediately we come across as barricade a hippos and the hippos they're snorting and they're roaring and I'm wondering how we can pass these hippos. What's the barricade is that is that like the word for a heard or I just line hippos that were in our way right there crossing the river yeah right across the river in but as we get closer to the hippos sink underneath the water and then and we can new rate over them with our hearts just pounding and your guide is saying relax relax seriously then we come to a part of the river where there aren't any hippos and one of the rurals was canoeing with hippos. Is You always want to be in deep water in deep waters rate against the riverbank at this point of the river so we're rate against the riverbank my wife Zairean the second to the last canoe and just enjoying this beautiful sunny day and all of a sudden. We feel this bump and both well. Maybe we hit a rock next singing over six feet up in the air. The hippo had come underneath this bit the Canoe Dead Center in the middle of the canoe. It's lower. Tusk went right through the bottom of the canoe. Its it's top jaw came over and snap the gun whale and if you can imagine a front end loader lifting gravel and then dumping it on shore. That's what the hippo did to us. You know I can still see it in my mind and slow motion is a happens we go up in the air and I fly out of the canoe first and then deb flies out of the canoe and she hits the ground with this eerie. Thaad and I'm thinking Oh my God she's dead and I run up to her Deborah you okay are you okay and she gets up and then we remember the hippos and we will toward the water and the hippo drops a canoe and then melts back into the river. You also had a guide who is a little sloppy up in the Arctic. on on a river to Tulsa awesome yeah that was up in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and you know I've been with some of the best guides in the world I think but this guide boy you know oh he just your rafting taking a canoe down the river and we're going basically from the brooks range mountains out to the Arctic Ocean and you called it a braided river was braided river and what that means is the river will break off into smaller channels and then come back to then come back to gating yeah okay and I think our guide that we had there had been guiding way too many years and he was basically in Fort for himself and not necessarily for his clients yeah my wife and I are experienced canoeists but we're not great fast canoes and the whole idea for me when I'm in an area as you go slow and you enjoy. It's not a race ace. The there is one scary moment where he gets ahead of us and we find yourself all alone on this braided river in if we take the wrong braid. I mean we're up in the Arctic in there is no one up there. How are they going to find us as we're going on. These braids is not like you can see for they would read a scary moment when and you don't have your guide within sight when you don't if you got to go with the flow yeah ever and you know and what do you do. I mean it's it's not what happened. Well we happened happen to take the right braid and caught up with them and basically said don't ever do that again. This is traveled. Rick Steves were adventuring through the some of the most gorgeous places on the blend with Mardi. S In his book is endangered Edens and cool creatures hot planet Mardi. You've got in your books. That seems you love to take photographs of critters. Most of them are not the kind of critters you'd want to cuddle up with in bed or on the SOFA. These are like you know lizards and snakes creepy things. Is there something that you find find attractive for. These kind of you know it's just I don't think animals like that. Necessarily have an advocate and I try to be an advocate for them. As steeper when the crocodile hunter hunter was kind of the original advocate for a creepy crawly creatures and I do have a lot of birdlife and a lot of fuzzy and beautiful creatures in my books as well but it's I think a good example is a vampire bat when we were in believes in my first book Co Creatures Hot Planet we go into the cave. That's filled with vampire bats and their little guys early about the two inches long. You're one of the problem with vampire. Bats is wherever humans move they tend to want to kill off all the vampire bats while it turns out that vampire bats have the most effective anticoagulant known to man in their saliva scientists have taken this anticoagulant and they've turned it into a life saving heart drug dragging your love this name it's called Dracula and so- Dracula is given to heart patients who've had heart attacks or strokes so here you have a little creature after that some people might WanNa wipe off the face of the planet that is actually saving lives of humans all over the world. They're also venomous snakes that they're using for. Maybe things things like diabetes and things like that so there's just a lot of different things that can come from these animals. Mardi understand you give talk around the world ninety minutes on campuses all over the country just STA turning people under the wonders of nature of all the images you show in the stories you tell what's the one that you really enjoy that. That really gets reaction well. I think the most fun one is I'm in Zimbabwe and catch the biggest snake I've ever caught. My life are ever will catch my life. I wouldn't dare try thing bigger. It's about a ten and a half foot long rock rock python and it takes me several minutes to catch a snake in its snapping at now does that mean you're just like running through the scrub brush grabbing well no he's kind of out in the open on a riverbank okay and so he's coiled up in a defensive position and I'm trying to grab it by its neck and it snapping out at me and I'm kind of doing the Steve Irwin thing jumping up and backward with my hands in the air. Eventually I catch it and you know it's told a few moments and then the picture that gets everybody in the show is the last picture of me giving the snake great big kiss on the head and I can see the audience and and people covering their eyes when this pictures up on the big screen this travel have with Rick Steves who've been talking with Marty about his book endangered Edens We haven't talked about penguins yeah. Let's finish just with a story of one of your encounters with a pill yeah. The great thing about going to downtown Antarctica is the animals do not have a natural fear of people and so we could get really close to the animals down there. Although there were always rules we couldn't get we had to stay fifteen feet away but they could approach us as close as they wanted to. So yeah we'd have penguins coming up to us and they would pull pull on our shoelaces are pulling our pants legs then if you walked away. They'd follow you as if you were mom. One of the neat things that we got to watch was the penguin swimming lesson and who knew penguins needed to learn how to swim but we're watching these penguin chicks and they're in this little pond or little pool at the yeah typically and they'd stick their head underneath the water and they'd hold it for about ten seconds and then they would come up and then they would joyfully run around and announcer accomplishment to the other penguins penguins. It was just adorable. They were so just wonderful to watch and we were just cracking up Marty. Thanks so much for joining us. Well thank you so much. Rik travel with Rick Steves produced at Rick Steve Europe in Edmonds Washington by Tim Tatton is the Kaplan Wilner and Casimiro Hall we get websites support poured from American Nicole and promotion support Sheila Girls off in our theme music is Jerry Frank. You'll find guest information program extras and you can listen again on demand look for our show notes there updated each week at Rick Steves dot com slash radio look for you again next week with more travel with Rick Steves Rick Steves teaches smart European travel at Rick Steves Dot Com. You'll find an archive of interviews from his radio show free auditors of Europe's top sites and a world of information summation to help turn your travel dreams into smooth and affordable reality begin your next trip at Rick Steves Dot Com.

Bavaria Rick Steves Munich Germany Slovenia Cameron Hewitt Barbara Yucca Pitch Europe Danielle US Nick Yours Libya Steve Irwin Rick Germany Small City Marty Rick Scott Gross Gut Louisiana Zambezi River
Signature dishes that matter

Monocle 24: The Menu

28:40 min | 11 months ago

Signature dishes that matter

"Hello onto welcome to the menu and monocle twenty four. I am Marcus this week. The signature dishes that really master I think the focus here is on the quality of the produce. There's no hiding behind sources or anything like that is simply great. Fish cooked very well then. Donna Hey stop tips for easier and healthier cooking Kerlin putting on a piece of chicken or steak in my here Salvador. Some simple veg on the side is really quite easy. No it's a bit of a no brainer but when you add complex X. amounts of vegetables. And how do you prepare them. In what flavors do you add. It gets a bit tricky all that plus a renaissance recommendation ahead on this week's edition of the main Hughhewitt Bureau monocle twenty four Ristorante. Business can be tough places. Come and go however every now and then a great chefs create dishes that make history and our remember even when the restaurants themselves don't exist anymore a new book by Fighting Laden signature dishes that master delves into the history and reveals the story of over two hundred ristorante creations from around the world spanning from the first ever gelato created in sixteen eighty seven to the legendary holter but at London's spreads restaurant the book or I a unique angle angle to the history of eating out Richard Vines is Bloomberg's chief food critic who has also curated this book. He joins me to discuss the most important signature dishes and he started with a philosophical question how to define the concept of a signature dish as quite tough question friendly friendly enough for somebody WHO's contributed to a book on signature dishes. See People think as signature. Maybe it's got to be wildly original something like that. But in fact it doesn't some of the dishes in here things. Things like mashed potato from friendship. Show robishaud summer complicated some simple so I think the first thing that has to have good flavor before you even think about about. It's not enough to be novelty or beautiful has to have great flavor then to be signature. I think he's got to be distinctive and it's got to be memorable for the right reasons if we look at these as dishes included in this new book we have over two hundred creations for more than a hundred eighty shifts across thirty countries. What kind of common denominators are there for all these dishes? The dish is actually differ significantly. Because we go back to Peach Melbourne saw which is niskayuna dish from from about three hundred years ago right through to brats in London their whole turbo. which is the current fashionable dishes in London? I suppose they're all memorable dishes all well distinct dishes and with any luck the dishes we'll be lasting but of course for the contemporary dishes because no internal twenty years or so be around by thinking lots. It's a new dishes will be for example. Hasn't been tells meat fruits. I think which serves dinner by Heston Blumenthal. That's one of my favorite dishes. The book and I think that's going to have staying power. You work work as the chief food critic at Bloomberg here in London. You've been following for example London's footsie and for many many years. What is the relationship between we in dishes? You see over here and all the trends you see in what is what is the relationship between the teachers and friends. Have these been threatened to win. Their first appeared. See London restaurants. He knew thirty forty years ago. The wasn't really of unrest in the toll so one of the interesting things here is most of the dishes a fairly recent and when you look at some of them for example Pierre Coffin's picks trousers. There's a very strong French influence. That was gosh around the eighties. I would guess invented that and now you go through to the current trend for example for Cook Nova Fire in London new. See that's perfect for example turbo and the new also see for example. Tailby tailby doing modern dishes using creative techniques and chemistry and so on. which is the meat fruit? So they are kind of waves of fashion but a great dish of crosby dependent on fashionable. Have Staying Power and Richard. You are one of the key racers for this. Bergen you've been looking after the UK. What was your approach? I would you describe it. What was the thinking process when he thought about all the great dishes you see in in your life and whether they are great enough to be included in this book first thing came to my mind was dishes? He's I really really like and some very simple echoes cake with Lancashire Cheese Syndrome for example and also the roasted bone marrow which is one of the really big international dishes issues so I I thought in terms of dishes the widen out in terms of chefs. I admire and then try and think what are their special dishes. Well I use this example of mentioned already from London breath restaurants holter boat what makes that dishes special ties. Perry the chef is a young chef is making quite big waves in London and really just taking a fish and putting so much flavor into it. I mean it's beautiful fish already but wait. He cooks it over over coals fries. It's is the favor I suppose the theater of the restaurants as well. I think the focus here is on the quality of the produce. There's no hiding behind sources or anything like that is simply great. Fish cooked very well and this thing cooked over fire is very popular at the moment. So it's There's a theatrical element as well but it comes back down to quality of the produce expose. What do we learn about evolution of food through this book from these pages us at the moment in London things going from complicated too simple I would say and you can see that starkly? This older dishes have more sources than more complex and the thing now is coming down to two or three ingredients. I take again the John Examples Johnson so influential in Cuckney over the past twenty five years in London Ondon Bone Marrow with posse salads echoes cake with cheese just going down to two three four ingredients and I think that's what you see and then if view back to older dishes with their complex sources many ingredients. I think this book is very inspirational for those of us who travel around the world. Basically we get a nice list of restaurants and very clear instructions on which this to choose over. There is something you find from there that you want to try so you still haven't tried well. I'm actually thinking I have tried this edition. They're roasted cauliflower. Take you taste. It is necessarily chef now says his restaurant in in tel-aviv. Infant is a Shamanee's name is even like cauliflower. And then I'd taste got its and another dish. You might not even think about D. bag from Daniel balloon in New York Walk. It was the first posh Burger in the world. And it's fantastic. But I just keep travelling keep wanting more things that whole areas opening up now rusher and so on Russia the at least and to be honest the whole of Africa where the dishes are known nationally. I think there's so much to discover. I'm wondering how controversial these Pixar to think they're going to be the debate where the various dishes should be included over here or not for example. Well I've seen history in the making. I happen to live in New York. What around two thousand and thirteen fourteen when crow semester credits people love crow? And that's I think I doubt that will be controversial though I suppose if you have some some dude very high guest nommik standards they might. I wonder what it's doing in there against dishes by classic French chefs. I've seen the book will be controversial because the question is obviously what's put in what the hours even though that dozens thousands of dishes their dishes probably should be there haven't made some people argue dishes in there. They don't should be like. I'm looking at vegetable. Pope Burger for example apple by Dan. Barbara moments I so. I think we'll be talking points but I think it's beautiful book and I hope people like it. Obviously the world of food is constantly instantly evolving. And I'm wondering if you've seen recently news English dishes in making anything that would have the potential to be one included in the next extadition of this book but that just appear to be too late in order to be included in this first edition of this book published in ten years time five or ten years time. There's going to be had lot more vegetarian dishes in and so on it's really. That trend is happening so quickly known as so. Comprehensive is changing the way people cook I used to think of vegetarianism. Teheran has been particularly veganism as fashion. And I now except it's changing the way we eat but over for change myself when the current dishes. I'm enjoying enjoying a lot in London's crab crump. It's rabbits with Worcestershire Sauce at cornerstone restaurant. Hackney Chef Tom. Behram are awesome Latin lab who knows if that tissue around in the air time Ivor feeding a vegetarian trumpet. That was Richard Violence. He's the cokie rates. It's raw the new book signature dishes. That matter up next we hit to the Balkans Slovenia's winds may have a low international profile box. They are starting to take all the taste about sof. More discerning drinkers in fact the country's sparkling winemakers picked up trophies and more than a dozen gold medals at this year's glass of bubbly awards in London and there is more so Slovenia then fees Monaco's money the region guide Delauney took full advantage of November's Saint Martin's Day by taking a trip along the Lubyanka wind root welcome Tila on this historical center where Somali stay wine rate is is in full swing now. Saint Martin is a pretty big deal around these parts which is presumably why they choose to own a him this back canal which involves sausages his prime cheese waffles. But most importantly as you'll gather from the title wine there are schools of Stolz here stretching shing as far as the eye can save from in front of City Hall down to pressure and scavenge beyond towards Congress Square and people are staggering between them with rented wine glasses in hand keen to try out. What each of these winemaker's skill to offer my name is Dasha Castilians steelers and I'm from the main organization for the Uganda Right? Wine routes and beyond route is the traditional route. And you'll it'd be. I know this is the seventeenth edition. Today we have ninety wins nurse in Uganda wine route. And it's it's The first time from the host of India from all parts Slovenia and this Really special day today so should we. Should we find a few interesting thrusting one magazine. We've made it to the first of the Stolz Franking Franken you have. You noticed okay and yes and to you use I take care of the wine ranking specialty wine we make White wine out of red vapes vapes. It's called Bill Frankin. Yeah it's out of Grapes of other tracking frankish technique gently presses the Grapes together so we only extract juice. It's a little bit sweeter wine wine but very powerful on the taste and on the smell and people realize so. Is this a traditional one. Ores Walnuts you've developed over the years. Oh yes we have tried and writes writes about five years but we succeeded and now we are very proud very proud of it. And what sort of foods do you think this would match. Well with certainly some desserts. Some maybe with whites chocolate something like spicy foods. I was thinking sweet. One goes quite well the spicy foods. Yes smaby with spicy or maybe with some sort of seafood sore. Would you like White Franken. Yeah since you've spoken about it I think I should Arthur. It's called the SORTA flavor Robert say of maybe something on the side of maybe and and I could see that very nicely with a good some spicy food which of what I had in mind as well as with the the seafood. That you mention as well. Hey that's up some chocolate say when I was a stool which has got a Salami slicing and and also a wine barrel so we can. We can tell what's going on here and I've got a gentleman in front of me. Who are you hello? I'm Andreessen. Yeah I'm a nephew. The wind on my salary owner. We make sparking wines. You'll wind reap Vehicle must knock easy for you to say yes I so winery must knock. Yeah last name is must knock and that's it wherever you paste We are based in sailing. Melania trump comes on. Yeah exactly exactly from the town of Melania trump and yeah owner alchemist dogs. She worked like in lines for all his life and now he's making sparkling wines and we are rich are really great because one of them The Yellow Muscat SOM- Competition in London Bobby Glass and we won the gold price price. A lot of people here in st be sparking because want to sell that to other countries and stuff like that and one thing I love about with the countries of the former Yugoslav is you can travel to Slovenia and Bosnia Croatia Macedonia Montenegro hindering great local wine and every country entree that. You've never heard it just doesn't seem to get out of the country because you like it too much or you don't have to sell it. I think it's a little bit of boats so we are all three the great sellers but we really like our wine because Sweeney is really known for For alcohol or drink a lot of all I I would say so. Yeah I really like. I don't know maybe we are not recognize the ads for good wine. Because I know everybody know french-italian attention to talion. Yeah but also we are really high quality but not so known in the world so I think we need to do something I uh-huh Wadad but some stuff gets recognized in the world on my way through the modern stay crowds. I've been looking for orange wine because orange wine is something I've only ever tasted in Slovenia. I I see walking towards me with a glass of orange wine. If you could introduce yourself please Linka from Uganda Linka. It turns a your something of a specialist in orange wines guide so I do I tours tours of all what is it about orange wine for those uninitiated in it as I was before I moved the other what. Why is this interesting? I think is interesting because it's different. It's not what you can find everywhere So it is white grapes treated. He did As you'd be making red wine so it's about skin contact. It means you get sort of a different result from grape. You you still. So that's I think is interesting people would be used of the same grape but this is sort of a new side of it. The services are going to Slovenian wines. How would you seem things developing in recent yes? I think we're going to direction of good quality. Not so much focused on the quantity which I think was sort of more what was going on through Serbia versus the last few years It helps with foreigners coming here that we have people that are willing to pay a little bit more Focus more interparty not so much when the quantity And I think people are put into experimenting more than they weren't a fast Learning that they're different different things which we were not may be exposed to as much previously that we are now now one thing. I've noticed this the you don't really find Slovenian wines. In a lot of shops or restaurants view going elsewhere. The thing is We're very small country and most of the wine with be small wine estates Wayne families. So it's a lot more personal info moment. I think they care a lot more about what specifically is happening. which also so means? When you go for wine tastings you meet them personally? They're the ones doing the wine tasting. I think that's a bigger difference softball homework to do. Definitely it should be cling sunglasses to become style has passed in a happy. And I'm now a little bit wiser in the ways of Slovenian wine. Perhaps it's time for the rest of the world to catch on for Monaco in in Ludhiana and finally finally today Donna. Hey Sorcerer's favorite cook a bestselling cookbook author and also a regular guest here. Dorey House busiest always she has recently. He released a new cookbook. which this time? Focus is on Super Fast Hill. Seditious Donna join me at MIDORI. House studio wanted discuss her top tips to make cooking easier global food trends the print industry and first of all. Jose got the inspiration for her new book. Week lights superfast meals to eh. You feel good. Well it's kind of a global happening of we all know we need to eat mortgage but how do we do that. Because let's face it putting on a a piece of chicken or steak and making Salvador. Some simple veg on the side is really quite easy. You know. It's a bit of a no brainer but when you add complex amounts of vegetables in how do you prepare them. And what. Flavors do you add it gets a bit tricky because you know as I discovered as I started to test the recipes asking you to cook quid move vegetables actually involves more prep time which none of us have so. It was a really interesting starting point because I can cook quick. You know and I am quite mindful when I write a recipe that I can probably cook. You know five times quicker than the average person that gets home from work so it was a step back back when I started I ran into the book of. Yeah let's eat more veggies and I'm GonNa take down all the barriers of all the phobias that I have of the vegetables that I hated hated my childhood and that was a lot of things to consider Saudi. Make it easier. Then what are the top tips by hey to make it easier to eat your Greens. Well it was about how to prepare the vegetables really simply so I was quite mindful that on a Tuesday night. I don't WanNa drag out a food processor from the cupboard and start right you know. MINCING UP California-berkeley. I discovered that if you actually have a box greater just a standard books greater you can great cauliflower and Broccoli you can get out your food processor by all means but actually is great. It really quickly a lot of the prep of the vegetables. I've used a greater or appeal or a Julian Pila instead of China. Prep like his chef. Because I can't chop that Julianne. Perfect like chef. I kind of get bored anyway but you know lots of just really simple things like books greater and I'm really shocked vegetable peeler just made all the difference her show any other smart shorts coats for preparing. Well there's a Julianne Pila as well that makes really nice long shreds switches lovely for crunch like even just in Rosza Keeney this beautiful cauliflower bowl. That's got lots of Chili and like a peanut dressing. But it's nice with that crunch of this Akini Kenyan. You just do it with these little Julian Pila super cheap but such a lifesaver. What is your relationship with food surrounds? I'm wondering how much do you think about the business of books you'll like this talk about going meat free now that some kind of a starting point for releasing this book but he's bracing come from elsewhere. I think it came from a Lotta places like usual. You know in my lifestyle how which is always a big factor global trends which. I often have to wait to catch up. I'm really always good at going a little bit early. And you you know like you can't ignore it from environmental issues to health issues. You know this book is like a can of worms when you start to analyze it about the effect that our food food is Madison Edison and when we get there it's GonNa be great but we've certainly got a long way to go. All the pages of this book is a spot at one page where you share. three-quarters noise rules. They are be adventurous. Insurance be organized be realistic. Yeah I don't usually kind of like to be preachy. I really hate that about cooking. I I'm not about the do's and Doisneau I'm just about. Let's get in the kitchen and have some fun and make some food for some friends or yourself and and it's GonNa be great but it was just like what I was talking about before I kind China's stumbled in thought. Okay this cooking with Veg- thing this is different. You do have to get organized and and you do have to go outside your comfort on. I had a fear era of cabbage except for calls. Learn things that you know but cooked cabbage. It just took me straight back to my childhood have smelling terrible smell. You Walk in to you. Know Your House after school and you can smoke cabbage and it's terrible. It's really terrible so I like a lot of people had to take their childhood phobia vegetables and turn them into something amazing. What did you do that? I kind of am okay with the Japanese kind of cabbage pancake. But I don't like hostile. Jesus so I took that sort of little kind of idea and I made a really crunchy crispy caramelized cabbage pancake. We'd lots of pickled ginger crunchy carried on the top like an agenda Salad at took took that theory of really yummy Japanese pancake. But I made it lighter and fresher and crunchy and so you know things like cabbage and Brussels sprouts caramelized in the oven till they're really dock and Brown is just delicious having them steamed or boiled and that smell when you come home from school that just stays in your memory that all had to go. It was a good testing. I did test them on my teenage boys which was met with what kind of feedback results. So it's good to be adventurous. It's good to be organized. But what do you mean when you say. That sued also be realistic. Well I think a lot of people start with really great plans on the weekend or during the week and go okay. This is the week this is the week. We're all we're GONNA eights this this and this and I'm GonNa make my lunch and it's all going to be great and I think you have to look at the weekend and kind of be a little bit realistic of how much you can and tackle because otherwise we have a fridge full of vegetables that are going to win place which is my compost heap. Usually and so i. I've been trying to be more mindful about about okay. What am I really going to have time to cook this week? So that was kind of my more bieb. Realistic Lake must not kind of overdue. What we think we're going to get done in a week but this before we talk the bus you all the projects What do you want to share some of your favorite recipes with us? What kind of gracious are you most proud of what you have included in this book I really liked? Does Akina Pancake on the covet. Divide Scott just graded Zucchini lots of eggs almond meal. So it's really protein-rich as well so when you eat it you don't feel like you've had a salad you feel like you've had a really substantial dinner is also really fantastic broccoli doe in there see great the Broccoli again of eggs and normal and you can press it into a hot dish and make for Totta like a quiche type of thing makes a flat bread. Make so many things of fritter so and not that I have sweet tooth. No I do. There's a really fantastic tiny cookie. No butter just heaney. Whole wheat spelt flour bit of Ross? Sugar and Dr Antioxidant of course but it's one of my faves. Such go. Cookie recipe makes done fabulous not talking about two other projects. I have to admit that many people here at Midori house were a bit shocked. When we got the news? That you're closing Donahue magazine last year. How have you spend all that free time now? Considering that you don't need to worry about monthly magazine anymore deadline every six weeks. Plus the special editions of the magazine is Seventeen. Years chasing deadlines really long time mm-hmm and was a long time to stay in that job. Unfortunately as things grow I became so far away from the styling I was always involved in the what was going in the magazine and lots of the pre-production but actually going out on location or doing any starting a recipe development. I just didn't have time. I was caught at my desk and caught people managing so it was a big decision for me but the MAG was doing really well was a really tough decision. But I couldn't see a happy future so it was coming up to one hundred issues issues. That's very nice rounded number. Yeah those about what's happening in the print industry at the moment. What kind of time are we living in? I think it's really sad. I was is just thinking about it on the flight over. There's a long time to think and I was thinking what's going to happen to all those glued creative people that I used to see coming up through the ranks. When it's being so tightly at least squeezed you know industry these teams that work across four different magazines that? How did they find a voice? How do they be creative when they're being that squeezed so I felt a bit despondent? And I'm not talking about those amazing creatives. I'm always wondering whatever you release something what I pay attention to his the amazing luke of your books for example the amazing photography however you created that distinctive style is it down to some specific creatives individuals worked with here. Actually I have worked with. This is creative director on this book. Chee Lamb for so many years and he is just one of those brilliant genius soft touch creatives natives that just continually delivers the magic. You know like I say to him. I want this and this and I'd like to have a casual field and you know I ramble on for a while. And what he always always comes back with is just something absolutely beautiful and then one of my favorite photographers returned to Australia after very longtime living in New York so I decided assigned to buddy up with him again and to photograph this book with him which was Great Avenue Book. Week lies is out now. I'm wondering what kind of future plans you have now. Are you the working a working on the same next book already or any other. I've been thinking about an expert. Think the Nice thing about closing. The magazine is that I've been really conscious to have no plans after seventeen years of deadline. It's been absolutely liberating to look into my diary. And there's no kind of red splotches through it that our deadline markers and I've just been a little bit conscious to not do that again. To fall into that habit so I just take projects as they come along and things that I think I can do well and add value to clients as well not just working on something for the sake of it so it's been really fun. I'm so so happy being back styling and testing recipes and being in my new kitchen. I can't tell you it's just made world of difference to my life. Don't Oh hey there. Her New Books Week Lights and Christmas feasts. The trees are out now. And thus offer this edition of the menu for previous episodes of this program to Monaco's website soundcloud or itunes and remember to subscribe to the service automatically arrives onto your device every week for more food entering stories. Check out our menus spinoff show food dude neighborhoods. It's a special costs to that stakes you to some of the world's most interesting cool narrow district and it premiers every two state. This show was edited and mixed by Kenya. Scarlet and David Stevens by Marcus was again. We finish this broker with innocence. Direct recommendation here is school site with. Do you believe thanks.

London Slovenia Donna Salvador New York Heston Blumenthal Marcus Monaco China Richard Vines Hughhewitt Bureau Pierre Coffin Bloomberg tel-aviv four Ristorante Bergen Teheran Peach Melbourne Balkans Slovenia
Central Europe Largely Avoided the First Coronavirus Wave. Why Are Cases Spiking Now?

TIME's Top Stories

07:56 min | Last month

Central Europe Largely Avoided the First Coronavirus Wave. Why Are Cases Spiking Now?

"Brought to you by lucky charms magical mission let lucky the Leprechaun take you and your kids on an interactive adventure through the eight magical charm lands to restore magic available on your smart speaker. Just say open lucky charms, magical mission or search for it wherever you listen to podcasts. Central Europe largely avoided the first corona virus wave. Why are cases spiking now by Madeleine Roach? Central Europe in the past week has seen a spike in daily confirmed corona virus cases a major setback for a region that largely avoided the first wave of the virus in the spring. The Czech Republic an e you member state of ten point seven million registered a country record of one thousand three hundred eighty two new infections on September eleventh bringing the country's total cases to over thirty, two, thousand, four hundred and the last week nearby countries Hungary Slovakia, and Slovenia have also recorded their highest daily caseloads since the pandemic began. Infections in the Czech Republic previously peaked at around three cases per capita per one hundred, thousand residents in late March but reached eleven point six cases per capita on September thirteenth by comparison, the US at twelve cases per capita. Now, the Czech Republic has one of the highest fourteen day infection rates in Europe according to the European Center for disease, prevention and control. Check Health Minister Adam Bolshevik said on September thirteenth nobody expected such a spike in the country. Governments of Central European countries keen to not impose national lockdowns and prevent further damage to their shrinking economies have reimposed travel restrictions and renewed social distancing measures for citizens. The coronavirus pandemic has dealt a major blow to the European economy particularly countries that rely on tourism. The E U economy will decline by an average eight point three percent this year, the European Commission said in July. The twenty seven member block formed after World War Two is expected to fall into the deepest recession. It's history the economies of the Czech Republic and Hungary are predicted to drop by seven point, eight percent and seven percent respectively compared to last year. Where our cases rising and central Europe. The sharp dries has been recorded in the Czech Republic but other countries nearby including Hungary Slovakia and Slovenia are also seeing worrying increases and daily case numbers. Hungary on September twelfth saw its largest daily reported infections since the pandemic began with nine hundred sixteen people testing positive bringing the country's total number of infections to eleven thousand, eight, hundred, twenty, five, according to Johns Hopkins University most infections have been registered in the capital city of Budapest. Slovakia registered a record number of daily cases on September fifth when two hundred, twenty, six people tested positive for the virus according to Johns Hopkins. University Slovenia recorded its highest ever daily caseload with one hundred, eight new infections on September eleventh. How did Central Europe Fair during the beginning of the pandemic? Central Europe avoided the full brunt of the first wave of corona virus infections during the spring on April fifteenth. The UK had one hundred, fifty, nine cases per capita while the Czech Republic had fifty, eight and Hungary sixteen luck and foresight initially helped central Europe to shield itself from the virus experts say some countries in Europe benefited from less international visitors from going into lockdown when their transmission rates were relatively low central Europe was protected by not being as well-connected as international travel hubs and by heating the warnings from other countries. Says Jennifer beamed down associate professor of demography and poppulation health at Oxford University. Why are infections rising in the region? The Spike, is likely connected to increase travel combined with a relaxation restrictions. Experts say in mid-may, most of Europe began reopening its bars, restaurants and nightclubs subject to social distancing measures by mid June most of the continent welcomed back travelers from the EU and other countries with a stable or decreasing trend of new cases. The Czech government reopened bars, restaurants and hotels and allowed gatherings of up to three. Hundred people on May twenty fifth as new daily cases that month or below one hundred eleven. Hungary, reopened all shops and the outdoor sections of cafes and restaurants on May eighteenth when new daily infections remained under ninety by June twenty second the Czech Republic and Hungary had opened their borders to visitors from the EU and other countries when daylight infections were below eighty three and twenty nine respectively that month. But in late August, the number of daily reported cases in these countries, as well as in Slovakia and Slovenia began to rise Europe as a whole opened up too quickly said Martin McKee professor of European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and tropical medicine. There was a great deal of optimism when cases were coming down but we were only containing it with severe restrictions. As soon as you open up the people, you open up the virus spread, he says. Opening up indoor poorly ventilated spaces has been particularly dangerous large gatherings crowds in indoor and outdoor spaces have undoubtedly contributed to the rise. We're now seeing says down, it has a ripple effect that appears later on experts have linked local outbreaks across to the opening of bars and nightclubs in the Czech Republic. France and Switzerland among others at the end of July at least ninety eight people tested positive following an outbreak in a nightclub in the Czech capital Prague and what our country's doing to prevent the spread of the virus. The Czech government reintroduced mandatory mask wearing and taxis public transport shops and malls starting. September. Tenth when daily new cases topped one thousand for the first time officials also ordered bars and restaurants to shot between twelve PM and six am but stopped short of bringing back measures that could hurt businesses such as closing restaurants and non essential stores. Hungary's nationalist Prime Minister Viktor Orban. Who has blamed migrants and foreigners for the spread of the virus reintroduced an entry ban on all foreigners with some exceptions the ban went into place on September first as the country began to see an uptick in daily cases. And a September twelfth interview with a public broadcaster. In one Orban said, he is drafting a war plan to prevent a second wave. We do not want to introduce a curfew. We do not want movement restrictions Orban said, we won't everything to happen as it normally should the added that measures to protect the economy and stimulate growth would be introduced in the coming weeks and the second quarter of the year Hungary's GDP fell thirteen point six percent compared to last year. The average decline among e U members was fourteen point four percent. But experts say that prioritizing economic considerations over public health hand backfire it's false to frame the introduction of new restrictions as a trade off between health and the economy. If you don't get the rates down, you can open up the shops but people won't go into them says, Mickey Europe can continue to expect to see a rise in infection transmission in the autumn and winter as people return indoors experts say but the level of cases, hospitalizations and deaths are unlikely to reach those seen in the spring peak. We're in a much better place but we need to prepare for a difficult autumn and winter says dowd.

Czech Republic Europe Hungary Infections Slovakia Slovenia Czech government Prime Minister Viktor Orban Mickey Europe EU Madeleine Roach Czech capital Prague Leprechaun University Slovenia Johns Hopkins European Commission Europe Adam Bolshevik
#45: Semi-Final 1 Part 2  Oof Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Australia, Belgium

The EuroWhat? A Eurovision Podcast

38:17 min | 1 year ago

#45: Semi-Final 1 Part 2 Oof Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Australia, Belgium

"Hello. And welcome to the euro episode number forty five for the week of April. First twenty nineteen. I'm Ben Smith, and I'm joined today by my foot home. Hey, mike. We are a pair of Americans trying to make sense of the Eurovision song contest. And this week will be talking about these second batch of entries from this year's first semifinal has it going Mike, it's going. Well, how are you doing? I am good. Springs here all of the internet's April Fool's day. Jokes are bad at I dislike them strongly. Yeah. It's really the most useless day on the internet, which is really saying something given the current state of things in the universe. And just a reminder to the professionals there. You don't have to send that Email. You have to send that jokey million to post that fake press release. We'd be fine. I wouldn't mind without it. It's particularly difficult when we're trying to compile stories. All right. What do we actually need to pay attention to and how rigorous do we have to do our research like it felt like we had to add extra layer of looking stuff up just to get through this week's episode. So. Yes. So much cross-checking so much so much making sure that there's a second source reporting the same thing, it's like serious journalism over here. Oh. Okay. So one bit of news. We actually have a news desk this week. There's going to be a new score presentation method. We are shaking it up a little bit. Again. Not too much though. You're still going to have separate presentation of the jury vote and the Tallaght, but unlike the last couple of years where we have gone from who got the least points who got the most points. We are going to go from the bottom of the scoreboard up after the jury vote. So whoever's in last place, we're gonna find out. Hey, they did really really well tell about or we're going to have a situation where just thinking about Sweden last year where oh boy they were doing real. Well, the jury's. But nobody likes that. Everybody was good. I am so excited about this new method. It's going to be like it's going to be kind of bonkers for the Sweden situation or the one that jumped to my mind immediately was Austria in two thousand seventeen where they got zero points from the telephone even though they were in like eleventh or twelfth place after the jury and there were gasps in the room when zero points were announced but having that happen. Midway through the presentation. Like, I mean, sorry Austria. But at the same time that's gonna be really fun to watch. I was initially disappointed because I've sort of loved finding out who everybody really strongly disliked or that. They dislike them, it's just that. They didn't vote for them. Yeah. I mean, it could be eleventh place across the board. Yeah. I liked knowing the those things right up front on the other hand, the idea of spreading that out across where things lie after the first round of votes. Just feels very exciting. I like it. So well done team thought of that. It gets rid of the goofiness that happened last year where it came down to the final score revealed between Israel and Cyprus, and they were still trying to drum it up as could Austria still score the upset and like sitting at home, and you know, it's mathematically impossible for that to happen. But they're still trying to Austria to be like, no, you got to stand up and pretend that you're still in the running for this. No, they're not. But yeah, I think if you win the jury you should have the right to be in the big dramatic moment at the end, and this and this new system guarantees that. I see no real downside to this one. And I'm very excited to see it executed for this year's contest. Agreed how the rest of the Eurovision planning process going, Mike. Oh, goodness. Yeah. There's just so much goofiness. That's happening right now in terms of security at the contest so funding's been kind of an issue throughout your vision. Preparations like there was the big kerfuffle back in September of whether or not Israel was going to pay the deposit. They needed to pay the you for the hosting rights. And that went down to the eleventh hour over the weekend. The security screenings that were happening. So like bomb sniffing dogs and like other protocols that are pretty standard for your vision. Just in terms of getting the venue set. Yup. And like all of those logistics funding stopped so work stopped and they've been scrambling for the last twenty four forty eight hours as we record this trying to secure funding because the broadcaster was saying that they didn't want to have to pay for the whole thing. And it's usually not the broadcaster that pays for the whole thing. Usually the government helps with some of that funding. The government was saying we don't really want to pay for this. And they came up with a split between various ministries within the government. But then the ministry of tourism is just like they didn't wanna pay their share. So then the prime minister's office had to step in. It's a huge unnecessary mess. But apparently, it's all been resolved. Now checks are starting to clear and work should start up again and getting the venue all set for the contest happening in less than two months time now, so Yup. Yeah. Good luck with that. So. Elsewhere in Yana, listen head, right? A very stern letter. And then take a big sign news news plot everyone's favorite drama de about a terrorist threatening very similar to the Eurasian song. Contest has been postponed to Aaron hill. After your vision is done because remember how the like, yeah. We're gonna show this before the contest and France was like, hey, it would be great. If you didn't portray a Muslim character threatening the bomb this when we were setting someone who is Muslim as our entrant. That would be great. Could you just hold off for like a week or two that would be great thanks in Israel's like, no. And for instance, like, okay, then we're going to drop out and again all of us on like come in and give everybody very strong talking to go come on guys. But that seems to have also been resolved because it's going to air after the Eurovision is done this year. Yeah. I agree. I love it. How like the phantom counting down the days grand final. It's gonna be so exciting. Whereas I could just see Yadollah Sanju counting down the days to when he just get a Margarita sit on about this. Wearing no worry about which ministry is gonna just refuse to do. What it's supposed to do as Dulles don't really want his job at this particular moment. So no, thank you. I'm good in terms of phantom, your vision interaction news, my heritage. The title sponsor of this year's contest released an app last week. That's doing these sort of photo matching with their photo database me m-, I guess and upload a photo of yourself and it spits out your vision act. They think you look like I tested it out with a few photos. Some with me wearing glasses some from a few years ago and all three times, I got Greece's Sokha's Rufus as my match. Oh exciting. Although that's very flattering. I do not see it at all. They said it was a fifty three percent match. I don't even see it as a twenty percent. That is not a high percentage. Oh, no. I mean in fairness, I also use the app and one photo, and I was matched with Iceland's entry from nineteen ninety nine. So was very happy that the photo clearly indicated I'm a big fan of Iceland right now. But I have like fifty two percent match. That is not a good enough match in my book, I was very pleased that when I tried to upload another photo and instead selected these screen shot. I have taken my first results. It did identify the person. In was the Icelandic entry from nineteen ninety nine with eight ninety nine percent confidence rating. Okay. I it's a little troubling. That was only ninety nine percent. Yeah. Yeah. Percents enduring large screen shot with other things in the photo. So okay. Maybe that threw it off. I tried a second photo. And it did not it said that it was broken. Try the photo again from home still said, no, Nope. Not gonna do this. So from the other postings that I've seen on Twitter, and such I've not seen anybody have more than a fifty percent match. So if you're somebody who has a significantly higher match and actually agree with the result. Let us know. I would really be curious to see. Sitting over here to fifty percent match. And it's not great. I do not like the app. I don't know who I would look like meal because I've never really thought about it. Also, what is my heritage doing with these photos? Yeah. There is that element to it as well. But of course, if everything's matching it fifty percent, that's. Well, I guess that doesn't courage people to post more photos to try to get a better match lined up. How about instead of going down conspiracy theories? Let's let's move onto our main topic. Yes. Let's okay. So last week we kicked off our second. Look at all the entries. We are currently in the thick of the first semi final. And this is the second group of five Chris king was was with us last week. And he was delight this week is just the two of us, and we're gonna we're gonna talk about some entries. So with the first semi final. You're taking things in alphabetical. Order fingers crossed. We will have some sort of running order for for sunny. Final two in the next couple of weeks, or so we can do those in running order, but for now we're going to cover Poland, Serbia, Slovenia, Australia and Belgium's because we are hitting the mid point of semifinal one and starting up again with the second half, the first item on our docket today is Poland and to Leah with fire of love or polish. Okay. Mike. How are you feeling about this one? I have some pretty extended thoughts about this. So maybe maybe you should go first with what you think of the song. Okay. Cool. Yeah. I feel like my thoughts are a little more concise on this one. So let me I listen to this one. I liked that Poland this are of approaching things from very folk tradition. This year, even though this particular folk tradition is now I enjoy so the official version of the song has been released. I think the thing that's really not working for me is that they are trying to do through like half English half polish here instead of one or the other in a way that doesn't really serve either language. Well, you know in prepping for the show this week. I look I just typed in the name of the song click on the first link and was like something feels different about this. And I clicked on the official video on the two page, which is entirely in polish. I think the song works better. If it doesn't have the English like the English feels very shoehorned, Dan. And it feels like they are trying to. Bridge the gap between just being full like a fully folk entry and having something for for viewers to grasp onto I'm not sure it works. That makes a lot of sense. My main issue with the song. Well, it's dealing with the studio version of the track which has the production values of kids pop song. Part of the reason why I have such extensive notes about this is I realized that kids bop might be something that doesn't exist outside of the US. And I wanted to double check that. And I fell down a rabbit hole that I just find fascinating. Yes. Yes. So gather around kids, we've got to talk about for our friends outside the US. What kids bop is it's sort of like the now, that's what I call music compilations where it's just taking the hit songs from the last three to six months give or take. And they're all done as covers by children singing the songs like a group of three to six studio kids with Z. Yes, kids. Bop is spelled with Z or said, the first thing I wanted to check up is just like, all right? Is it actually children singing and in most cases? Yes, there may be one or two adult studio singers that are in it. But for the most part there, it is actually children that are singing these songs and with with some of the hits of the day the lyrics sometimes need to be cleaned up to be child appropriate. But yeah, it's just songs that are made kids safe that parents can buy them and listen to this like all right. This is a cover of a song that I like it's not going to drive me. Crazy. If we have to listen to this like five times on a road trip that sort of thing. But because they're covers like the production value is just very I don't even know how to really describe it. It's like the like heavy emphasis on the vocals and just a backing track playing. Yeah. Like, I feel like the production values fuel like the sound alikes that various people stick on Spotify or I tunes that when you're not paying attention. You click on the wrong one, right? Yes. Exactly. Looking more information about kids, Bob because like, okay? This is already kind of weird. There've been thirty nine main albums thirty ninth. Compilation came out this past January kids bop nine which came out several years ago, peaked at number two on the US billboard chart like the overall album chart since then twenty four of the thirty nine additions have reached the top ten all but to have hit number one on the US kids chart, so these are very popular compilation. The lowest ranking one was number thirty six which peaked at one nineteen for whatever reason, which I thought was really funny. I like no one is buying CDs anymore. But I mean, this is like this also encompasses I tunes charts and all of that. And like I was just looking at the track list. And it's like, oh, I don't immediately recognize all but one of these songs so there was that. And like one of the songs that was on. There was a post balloon Sogwipo really had to be cleaned up for the kid mix and stuff like this brand has gotten really weird. There's a point when you were sanitizing song which to ask should I continue doing this? Right. Right. But it's just so wildly successful. And like the kids pop kids, which is the official artist associated with kids. Bop, they hold the record for the most top ten albums ever. Like they beaten out for Springsteen and Madonna and like other like legacy acts to have this record. So I feel. That record has the largest of asterisk next to it though. I guess, but yeah, I mean, it's just like it's should be more of oak local phenomenon. I think not that. I'm advocating for it. But don't do this. These are bad. They are starting to branch out internationally like there's German kids. Bob, I think UK Australia like it's still kind of in the predominantly English-speaking world, but it's starting to grow out there. But during my research when favorite blurbs that I found this on Wikipedia was about their first ever world tour, which was the kids stop world tour was a nationwide rock concert. For kids featuring. Children and one adult performer MC backed by full rock band, which kicked off in the fall of two thousand seven in Minneapolis at target center. The tour traveled the upper midwest east coast comprising some twenty nine shows during a six month run. So to review the world tour was actually a nationwide tour so long as the nation was not west of the Mississippi. Initial tour that itself was not nationwide. Given the started in Minnesota and proceeded east. Yeah. Yeah. So it has ideas. But anyway, that's just all say that. It's just placing Poland's entry in very weird head space for me. It's if I was just going by the studio track I would have major reservations about particularly kind of going to their other catalog. They do a cover of Depeche modes. Enjoy the silence. Yes. And I think that's what really cemented the whole kids. Bop, analogy in my mind. Just because it's like, oh, yeah. It's just the same sort of like nasal higher pitched overly produced cover. So I kind of want to reserve judgment on this one until a live performance of this is more readily available. I believe they're performing at your vision in concert in Amsterdam this coming weekend. So I'm really looking forward to the video of that. Because I think I think as a live performance this could be really cool like I think what they do. At least the way that what they do is described. I think that could be interesting to watch. I don't know if it's necessarily going to be success. But it going to be different. Yeah. Whereas if it's going to be just kind of like a weird studio version, and like an for whatever reason, but immediately jump to mind, I was saying this was Yulia semi Lula's entry last year where it's like, oh, the studio version sounded one way, then you hear the life form insz, and you're just go. Yeah problems. Yeah. Yeah. So yeah, this is all going to hinge on how they sound live. And I think it's going to be it's going to hand on how they sound live leading up to the event not necessarily at the event. Okay. Yeah. I I agree with that. And like when the band got described as blending traditional polish music with modern production. I did not imagine that kids. Bop was going to be the modern production end of that. Or just they're saying this is like there's an electric guitar in the background. I agree with you that I really want this. How this works live and how they perform live because based on only the video I feel like the performance styles very traditional which means standing in line next to one another which is not going to be dynamic television, bright the video presentation, and what you you're comparing it to Cold War when we were I talking about it a couple of weeks ago like there's just so much of this. It's just so overly produced feels very plastic and. I just want to kind of cut through some of that. And see what genuine attributes at has. Because I think there's something there. I just it's it's just shrink wrapped at the moment. Yeah. It feels very like three minute promotional clip. Just putting a giant asterisk next to Poland. In terms of all of my rankings until there's a little bit more information. I think so next on our list is Serbia's and tree which is navene a- bows of ICs Croona. So this one had a little bit of a revamp since Serbia's national final back at the beginning of March. What you think of this? Oh, so one thing I picked up during the week that I found very interesting and just thinking about how we're thinking about the pre parties Nevena is actually skipping believe London to get married, which is a great excuse to not go. Yeah. But it's also really weird one because it's like, you would think that would be circled on her calendar. Conflict here when you check when you check your planner and like, I get it. You maybe weren't expecting to become your nations entrant in the middle of wedding planning. But life was her both up, but that has nothing to do with the song. Like, this one has grown on me the more. I listen to it. Especially now that they revamped it before I think I had said that I really like the way this builds and the way that it's through voice, and that's still very much true. I feel like there is a lot in this semi final that feels very strong and this one feels a little bit more towards the middle. But I still really love to see this one squeak through in like eighth or ninth. That makes a lot of sense. Yeah. Yeah. I think this one in the second semi-final, it would be way more of shoo-in, whereas this one they're just so many entries that are just hugging that middle and pretty much anything below third place is the bubble at this. Yeah. And what makes it so tricky being the bubble is I keep finding myself with a lot of the. Entries this year. Just being like, I don't know what to do with the song. Like, it's fine. It's not it's not earth shattering. Yeah. It's not earth shattering. It's not transcended. It's there's not a lot in the semi-final were listening to and be like, yes. This could potentially with like ten of these songs slowing through. Yeah. Going through. I would love for this to be one of them. Although one thing that gives me concern is I feel like what we see in the video on YouTube right now, which is their national final performance is about what we're going to get in the final staging wise. Yeah. I I don't see them doing too much. I could see them adding like a couple of instrumentalists behind her. Adding a couple of I could see them throw in like a couple of contemporary dancers behind her. I don't even know if they do that. Because I don't really think of contemporary dancers with Serbian entries. But I don't know that could be trying something new like this song feels like they're trying something new in a way where it's just like it doesn't have that like really hard finish at three minute. Mark the way that a lot of. Serbian entries have had in the past. So like it's kind of losing that I- density marker for the song. I bone objective the song goes through. But I don't think I'm going to be too troubled if it doesn't. Yeah. It's so middle of the road. Yeah. It's middle of the road. And I'm I mean that in a good way. But I think this is not the particular semi final to be middle of the road. There's such a large margin of error. I guess that. It's just it's just encompassing. So much of the field is like, yeah. This could really go anywhere. And it may just be something that it depends on what the weather's like that days. Like, oh, it's a rainy day it might do better than if it's a sunny day. You know, so yeah, it's there it's a good power ballot. And we're done we're done. We've said everything moving on a next we have Lavinia, which is Zala Kraus's and Gosper Santi with savvy. Win. This one came out. It was in a slew of things where we were just like. Wow. Your vision is a mood this year of those entries. This is one that I think is stuck with me the most like it feels very much like my thing. But I'm also very very cognizant right now that it is my thing in a way that I'm not sure it will be everyone's thing at Eurovision. Like, how do you feel about this one this one more than Serbia? I do not know what to do with the song. It does have a hooky nece about it where but it's kind of droning hooky nece. And I don't know if that's necessarily a good thing. It's definitely not one that like I'm singing along to or like doing chair dancing while I'm listening. Yeah. I agree with you. That's kind of drone. It's thrown in a very pop way. Like, it's not like dirge looking at how we ranked things on this one. This one was very high for me. And it was just under the bubble for you for of not qualifying. And I think that's about right? 'cause I don't know which way this is going to go this one it might come down to staging a little bit just because I found there. Stage performances Slovenian final to be very high school prom with a lot of drama attached to it. But not really not like in a dramatic way. Just being like teen angsty, and yeah that doesn't make for super compelling television. Especially to make your imprint in three minutes or less, right. But what's interesting for me? Is that? So again, we just got done talking about how Serbia we think that what we see is what we're gonna get. This is one where I do of want them to refine what they did. But the thing I liked about this long is the intimacy it feels between sort of the player and singer here where I want it to feel like the those are the only two people in the world like maybe some very simple lighting effects going on kinda him. Just kind of I keep thinking of the x acts in relation to this act, and the excess were very very good about having very simple, very minimal videos for their first two albums where I think this would fit in with that same style as you were talking about the intimacy. Aspect? I'm thinking of the end of Lithuania's entry last year where it's it was a singer. And her husband standing on the bridge if they can capture that mood and expand upon it. I I think that would work really really I want this to. Yes. The stage smaller than usual this year by just want it to feel just very intimate very close just these tomb. And I think that's something that clever camera work could accomplish. Because I think that was part of the issue with the Slovenian finalists like it was a lot of just like shot. Basically. Yeah. Yeah. And if they can have it the much more close up focused, and maybe focusing on the is like that might pull it together or like finish making the sale. Okay. And I could probably get more behind that. But yeah this. This one's definitely a mood. And I feel like I should like it a lot more than I do. And again like it's not that. I dislike it, I just haven't found it to be transcendent or particularly grabbing just yet. I feel like it'd be really negative this totally. It's just that middle of the field thing that middle of the field feel now that we are at the middle of the field. We're going to start with the second half of the first semi-final and going back to the beginning of the bet that puts us at Australia with Kate Miller high keys zero gravity. So we covered Australia pretty extensively the season. They had their first national final ever. And I still think this was the correct one to advance out of their national final. But I'm not as thesaurus it. Now, as I was when it was selected, and yeah, but I mean, I think part of that was they did select pretty early. So there were like thirty five songs came after it. So I think that's to be expected a little bit. But yeah, what what what what are your thoughts on this one? Last time we talked about this. You corrected me and said that this was not opera, this is much more Broadway. And I get that. Now, I've listened I've listened this more times. And I get that. Like, the the way it builds in the opening is I don't wanna see good. I will say interesting, which is which has a mid westerner is terrible. It's nice different. Yeah. My opinion of song has improved since initially because I did not like this long initially. I was very appointed that two thousand or whatever did not take it. But like this has grown on me. And I see I see why at one the the performance heels very dynamic if you'll like something that will capture the I and again, my opinion it has improved. But like, I still have this being the first time that Australia doesn't quite make it. This is another one that feels very on the bubble for me where it could be a very easy placement in the final or can place eleventh. I'm not as pessimistic not the right word. I think this will do fine in the semi-final. They're planning on retooling staging, which is something that I think needed to happen. And I think there's a very strong team behind the song. So I'm not worried about it qualifying. I think it's really going to struggle in the final. Yeah. I know that Australia's goal is to kind of get out of the lower ranking. On the right hand side of the scoreboard, which they've been experiencing the last couple of years. I'm not sure that's going. Yeah. Not sure this is going to do that. So I'm glad to hear that they are kind of retooling the staging of this. Because my my notes for that were like we have seen somebody with a big dress in an equally big voice last year with Estonia, if they were gonna keep like the same kind of big dress thing, I want her in the full harness pop out of that at the end like doing full zero gravity floating around. But there's something about like, the kind of operatic kind of high just doesn't work for me. Still the whole structure of the song does have a surprisingly standard verse than going on. But like the there's like the bridge with nothing holding me down. It just becomes like a lot of elements going on by the end. I think the studio tracks incredibly strong, particularly the the the bridge part of it. But I don't think at least from the national final. I don't think they were emphasizing those parts. Or really allowing them to shy in the way, they need to shy. I I've not seen what the specifics are of retooling. Oh, is it just going to be a different color dress, and like two people swinging behind her or is it going to be a complete reimagining of the staging? And if it's just tinkering, I think it's going to be a problem if it's like a total rehab. I think they have a lot to work with. So this was the one I'm most curious about I think in the first semi final because there's a lot of unknowns. But like what we do know. I'm already excited about. Our final song for today is Belgium's entry which is wake up by Elliott. And one thing that's really popped out. In repeated listens for me. Mike is totally tell this is like these same team that did Blanche's entry from a couple years ago. The same thing in the background, and especially the chorus. I think I I'm just like, oh, yeah. This is definitely that team. Like, I I can I can see their thumbprint on this. Yes. Absolute. And I think that's I most worried about. Yeah, entry. I'm so glad to hear that you're worried about this one too. Because the more I listened to the more like this is kind of generic. Yeah. And I think I kind of find Elliott's vocal to be rather thin like even on the studio version, and I mean, he does have experience being on the voice of Belgium that your vision stage is like it's like even though it's going to be a small stage compared to previous Eurovision stages. It's still a very big stage. And I could like if he's doing the same sort of wispy vocal than he has. As I could just see him getting swallowed up. Yeah. And I have a lot of concerns about this one. And I think part of it is I immediately fell in love with city lights in two thousand seventeen and this one I didn't have that same instant attachment. Again. This whole middle set that we're talking about is just completely middle of the pack. Just bubble city. I could see this one landing exactly in the middle in field to seventeen. That's good news. That means that you qualify. But I don't think Belgium wants to just just get on doesn't want to eke out a placement in the final. This is definitely in the part of the bubble for me where I think it has. I think has stronger chances in like some of the other bubbly entries we've discussed, but I feel like I feel like a bad performance. Be like a surprise out for this. I mean, that's what happened to Belgium last year, and almost probably could have happened in two thousand seventeen. I mean, she. Yeah. 'cause blanche had was like a deer in headlights. Yeah. And if that happens. This year. I don't see there being a second chance with that. Yeah. And which is a shame because I think Belgium's been making a lot of good choices. And yeah, it's just like at the end of the day. If you just make that one bad choice at the very end that that could be don't stick the landing that could be enough to to keep you from qualifying. I find myself like elements of the song when I like I like the chorus kind of get stuck in my brain from time to time, although not not enough. I can like definitely recite the lyrics to you. But like enough, I'm like, okay. This is this is like the the rough melody as a whole the Morris it with the more. I'm just like I have no clue what's going on with this lira Klier and the verses, and what this is trying to say, it definitely captures interest for for the time that it runs, and that's good because I find myself with this pack of songs like I I will I seem to be voting more for interesting because that that means a more interesting show. Exactly, I'll take that over over just safe choices and middle of the road. Ballads. But but it doesn't keep it. And it doesn't really fully burrow into my brain. Like, it really needs to be typical concrete that this will go through. I guess one thing it does have going for it is by being in the second half. And until we get the running order late. It could get placed toward the end of the running order. And if it's the last song to go or the second to last song to go that's really going to help it. But if it's number ten in the running order than there's gonna be some problem. Yes. Oh, purely looking ahead to what we're discussing next week. There is a lot of things that are going to have very strong visual performances. Yes. Not if not vocal performances as well. And if this is lacking in either of those areas, it's at risk if Belgium performs before Iceland does this one just getting completely low. Oh, yes. Yes. Is immediately followed by Elliott who. Yes. Yeah. Exactly. Sorry, elliot. All right. You do a very good job with the song. But also Atari. This is a rough set. Yeah. Like, what what what are your overall thoughts on these five on this pack of contestants? So this is such a weird set of five and like I had I had done sort of a mini ranking of just these five just to kind of catch where where my brain was on these five because they about them in the whole they're kind of just all over the place, and there it's very hard to nail down. I think of the five I like Slovenia best followed by Belgium, then Serbia Poland just sort of drew the short straw, just. 'cause I think I Meyer what is going for. But I think is a very hard sell compared to the rest of the field Australia. I really kinda wanna see what this retool performance looks like what the you know, what the sounds what this continues to sound like live like can Kate Miller had Icke deliver this level performance. Every time I think she can just like all of these feel like the wrong, performance choices. Just sync them. Yeah. Which is really difficult and like not outside the realm of possibility. Twelve other entries in the semi-final. So all five of these could fail. We just thinking through what we've discussed. I feel like we've mentioned things that for each of these acts that feel like they could be the wrong production choice and with the wrong production. It's not even like a high risk hybrid word type production choice. Like, it's gonna be like, oh, you were the red thing. Instead of the blue thing. Like, it's very simple choices like that. That shouldn't be that big of a deal could cause these to sink or swim. Yeah. That's sorry. All five of these acts that we. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, like Poland as I said, I think it's gonna come down to what their lives vocal is several weeks before the contest Serbia like we know what the live vocal sounds like. But there's nothing particularly. Citing too far in Poland. Like, how do they sound live? And also is it just going to be a static shot of them? Standing into line singing, the song Serbia shrug Slovenia. I think Slovenia is maybe the like in the safest position of the five. Yeah. Like like you were saying if they can really drawn that intimacy and thinking back to their national final like that audience was into that performance. If they can there there's something going on by they had going on there. I think they are the safest of these five Australia. There's just too much and not enough going on with that one. And yet, and with Belgium, it's not enough going on, and there should be much much more. So yeah, it would be easier. If I strongly disliked any of these songs, but I don't like all. That's what makes it the toughest is that like, I don't actively dislike any of these. This is the heartbreak grew up. The inclusion everyone who f-. Yeah. Yeah. And that's a tagline for this. Title for this episode. Yeah. Anyways, that's gonna do it for this episode of the year what thanks for listening. You're what podcast is hosted by Ben Smith. That's me and Mike McComb. That's me. You can find us on our website at euro, what dot com and on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at your what we'd love to hear your questions and comments and also if you higher percentage like fifty ish on that your vision natural this week. You can subscribe to your what on apple podcast, Google podcasts. Spotify Stitcher or the podcast your choice rating and reviewing the podcast. When you subscribe also hopes other your vision fans, find us, it's pretty great. So please read us review us we will be back next week to try and make sense of what's new in your visions.

Australia Mike McComb Belgium Poland Serbia Israel Bop Slovenia Ben Smith Spotify Austria Iceland official US Twitter Bob Kate Miller Serbia Tallaght Elliott
Eurovision Showcase on Forest FM (20th January 2019)

OC Talk Radio

1:01:16 hr | 1 year ago

Eurovision Showcase on Forest FM (20th January 2019)

"Hello welcome to another episode of the Eurovision Showcase this one hour extravaganza eurovision music is hosted by me Karen Ari Tussey sit back. How's relax and enjoy this eurovision rally? This is Martin embarked up from on Czech Republic. Hello this is last year from Slovenia Hi. This is not banned from listening to showcase on Forest F._M.. <music> yeah thank you okay uh-huh <music> leave on a month Zuma Rosen news all the time just waiting including Donald uh-huh with all out of luck. That's the Icelandic Eurovision entry to the nineteen ninety nine Eurovision Song contest in Jerusalem Israel was the last time that that we were in Israel for Eurovision Sir Twenty years ago this year and Twenty Years Ford from Nineteen Ninety nine to two thousand and nineteen where going back to Israel for the first time since then to Tel Aviv for the Eurovision Song contest wow all out of luck and Salma the Icelandic Henry this was the first occasion on which the Icelandic entry had not been performed entirely in Icelandic Atlantic owing to the free language rule being reinstated on from that year onwards on this was the only first diverse Icelandic entry not to have version recorded in Icelandic by the original artist <hes> and basically it's such a fantastic song the performance of Je two backing dancers wearing trench coach a trench coaches and described by BBC commentator the late Great Satori Rogan as the to Egypt's in pregnant coats who knows very norris as it now are the clothes avoiding a perceived Andrea and forty six points placing second in a field twenty-three Aisin's hice contest placing to date which was equalled by your Hannah in two thousand nine with with a sit true. It got to number one in Iceland but it sadly didn't qualify it didn't chart in any other countries <hes> after did the contest or even before contests. That's a shame but in mind good hotel won an amazing Ostlund Ken Shree now Wigan Bruce slightly further away from Israel over to Azerbaijan and the two two thousand and Twelve Eurovision Song contest was held in the crystal hole in Baku purposely built for Eurovision are still standing and <hes> apparently still having many large concerts taking place there in Baku in the crystal hole and <hes> one of these one of one of these songs off the grandfather and in the semi finals was them not tip to do that great there. There was a lot of hype about them coming back from the previous year so yes I'm on about jets. Words and Jesuits Sook Pau in two thousand eleven for Ireland's with the Song Lipstick coming eighth but sadly in two thousand twelve well. It didn't go down very well for them. A tour well I say at all <hes> they came nineteenth with forty six points joint nineteenth as she would the Icelandic entry that year which was Greta Solomon Dan you don't see with never forget <hes> I could go on a really good and <hes> so so let's hate you tweeden waterline yes Ireland's Eurovision entry in two thousand twelve. Eh the best to black the way it's been in the big vote. <music> never been deeply the big can't she comes shadow fan yeah. As the pit we know Beth be all eh done. Show and uh-huh in relation started improving. Maybe this was is back-row Stat shutting down that yeah yeah this makes percents talk yeah Belarus two thousand thirteen a loin land sky with Leho the coming sixteenth with forty eight points or drained of all emotion off to singing along to last what a performance to it was she came out with this huge disco ball on stage in Malmo in Sweden season and it was baffling. I'm very Belorussian but I think personally to me. That's my favorite better Russian Eurovision entry. Yes it's very close to they wanted two thousand nine if not to thinking about it now who writes the joys of being a eurovision fan now time for a Eurovision classic here on the Eurovision showcase here on Forest F._M.. With me Caryn Ari tess haired. Oh Yes yes. We're going to play a song song from the nineteen sixty three eurovision song contests and this lady ended up becoming a huge international star Jeez originally from Greece. She represented Luxembourg in nineteen sixty three and she didn't win but she managed to really wow tonight choice. You just obviously came into such a legend. Yes I'm talking about none of miscarry and see sang a song completely Liam friend. She was called a fos disappear which means in from French into English by persistently praying yes. It's the Luxemburgish entry for nineteen sixty. Free is not a miscarry scurry Shaw uh-huh uh-huh <music> <music> <music> <music> Hi this is monster Lamelo from Sweden. You're listening to your vision showcase on Forest F._M.. Joel aw uh-huh in Doc nor uh AH. Boulevard representing Finland the nineteen eighty eight Eurovision song contest shockingly that came second last Makamba leave it one of those great songs I at least for me of <hes> great positive team <hes> the Song is scored Nail Uva Navarra Navarra Simone moisture ton an inch from finish into English means laughing eyes are the ones I remembered yes <hes> yes. I would love to learn finish I I I was in waterstones in Southampton. Then on Friday evening. I was looking through the language books and I learned finish book so popped out right in front of me and I was like wow I fancy Boeing that I really do. I gave some of it a uh of a go for about five minutes trying out and <hes> I love it as just like good evening in Finnish is U._I.. ULTA yeah you see it's just silence or Keith does <music>. Thank you just love it I do. I love languages and finish. Is it beautiful language. The probably Finland the one of the most underrated inch <hes> countries in the Eurovision Song contest just last week <hes> our live and kicking was Finland nineteen sixty free up so lund with fantasy now that should have been in the top free on the many times for nuns should have been in the free will may be in one thousand nine Hundred Ninety Five Lulama at Amar for example. I just it baffles me. It does sometimes but that is why we love and is ideal viewing the the Eurovision song contest every every every year now it's just gone to ride about twenty two minutes past the hour and it's time for us to do something incredibly randomly yeah yeah it's now time full aw robes rand. Yes it sewing to get the hats Alps now yes to them at a little bit to pay for them and in one of the hats little cut little bits of paperwork years on on the other one. We have little bits of paper with countries on sorry again. We're GONNA do the year. Stop Okay Rob. Are you ready K now. The year we're going to do is Oh nineteen ninety one taer the nineteen ninety one eurovision song contest is in Rome that it was meant to being signed the raigmore but due to proper Yugoslavia apparently that can do it there <hes> so they had to move to Rome at the last minute and the country we're going to do is Finland's. How random is not a Finland Finland's century one thousand nine hundred one Eurovision Song contest from Collier Kaik align with the song who which came twentieth with six points yes out of twenty two you songs Finland came third loss thirty six points completely sung finish a course this is back when everybody had to sing in their own national language a cardio <hes> is a Finnish singer and an actress? Yes <hes> who'll you means a crazy night. Yes and the song was performed sixteenth on the night following Israel's dear dots Khan and preceding Germany's Atlantis through thousands thousands with this a toy doff numale is to be I mean that's how you pronounce him. Another voting earner six points now the song was sung from a perspective of a woman who had a one night stand with man despite both of them claiming that this was all the relationship was she singing that she wants to spend more time with him a cadre or recorded the song in English and unusual fusion and very unusually in Italian <hes> under the titles one more lonely noise and own the naughty fale which means I crazy night yes so the English version and <hes> isn't the correct one or more learning ratings the crazy noise but these tally room was anyways nevermind <hes> so yeah poor old Finland they didn't do particularly well. <hes> as you say the that came third law so Finland only managed to get points from the following countries one point from Iceland one point from Greece and four points from Ireland and why was it how sad that's not fair not fair to write ironed Finland's points at the Eurovision Song Contest Nineteen Ninety One <hes> the gave their eight points to the eventual winners Sweden was Corolla refund got up stormed vind then gave a ten points to the French Century which joint king I on the countback came second ethnically so France is I mean Ya will the Senate Kenyan Pike Hawk Zone and <hes> and then finally gave twelve points the Italian injury. Yes a Pepo Peppino di Capri come meadow CEO Mayor which sang in Neapolitan Yeah I was just voted was an ice cream before anyway so let's move on. Let's play Finland Nineteen ninety-one rob's random requests hetero. You're as you said on the nights to Catania his there the hearst that noise and Hayes Khania for Finland it is it is luck us aw also see day name. How are you <music> <music>? It is I the <music> AH <music> aw. In John Yeah Klay leading the uh-huh mm-hmm Eh yes. You're is not even you that is back from yes sir I can bougie and poly foam say fame for Luxembourg in nineteen seventy eight. Yes Backer Soy Tu Venus for Melody Festival in the Swedish to follow in two thousand four random isn't air random indeed Jonah represents Sweden and this Spanish rush bizarre but then they represented Luxembourg in seventy eight so I'm saying no more right <hes> we've got who we call it coming up live and kicking of course yes to stay tuned for that. That's where we pay some life in the Eurovision song contest itself but it's now time to keep you all day to the latest goings on in the world the Eurovision Song contest hauling it is now time fuel eurovision it showcase news today on Sunday the twentieth of January two thousand nine. The Belgium brew cost <hes> Our C. B. F. as in Terni picks Eddie Art of us <hes> to represent Belgium. Your vision two thousand nineteen in Tel Aviv Belgium has to eurovision costs to rotate every year as broadcaster in charge of Eurovision R._T._B._F.. french-speaking broadcast now high school student Elliott's the old is eighteen in this previously participated in the voice Belgique the balloon edition of the voice that he managed to get through to the first live show in which he was eliminated but don't count your chickens checking your vision fans remember branch and we were also from the voice so this is very positive from Belgium. I think I'm we'll have the song released at a later date. The second seventy von when Frans that's the Nice You own vision was finished and we got the complete lineup of the national final and also the pre-selection shows also from Lithuania. Georgia and Hungary took place as loss noise. Sorry if you want to find out the results of that head over to your favorite Eurovision websites and two nights in Spain Spain we'll have the eurovision operates Janta Info gala back so tonight. The Spanish will have a eurovision entry and it will be the second one for the Eurovision Song contest that has been announced sorry for other than the Albanian entry in the Romanian national autonomy high. Hey has withdrawn from the Romania national fire and finally all sixteen acts are going to take part in the Croatian national one with Dora. Two Thousand Nineteen have been released an ulcer. You can find Emmaus at your favorite Eurovision whips. Yes indeed so <hes> pence he isn't that you've got your Wallet Dot Com E._S._e.. XTRA DOT COM WE BLOCKS DOT COM EUROVISION REVISION WORLD DOT COM the list goes on lots of great content and lots of journalists ready to give you the scoops of the Eurovision Song contest and that is your Eurovision showcase news. I am been your host care in Rita's yet sicker Ryan. We've got some some fantastic music including live and kicking so sit back relax when not done yet beat the Eurovision depression as you favor duration lady shows our available at one place every week not only Europe's top Eurovision radio show presenters produce a wide variety brighty of great eurovision radio shows for you to listen to but even beyond such as Australia and Canada just to mention a few own miss that I fought cast of these favorites Eurovision radio shows fear naught as the website of rage of the National uh-huh w._w._w.. Dot Regular National Dot TV keeps all of these shows in the show archive for you to listen to whenever you want book market now on your web browser even better subscribe to the podcast by W._W._w.. Dot Radio Radio National T._V. and she never have to miss. You'll favourite euro-asian radio shows that'd be missed. Previous episode of the Year Vision showcased never fear Karen his head visit the websites e._S._e.. SHOWCASE STARTS PUMPING DOT COM or search for your vision showcase on any podcast including I tunes and put big case on Forest F._M.. There is no needs to be making your mind Zad those city Ak Yeah uh-huh and the uh-huh okay yeah. <music> nine what a chain Slovenia two thousand eight coming eleventh in the first semifinal but is valve of Rog nine visa may which means to hell with it oh brewed and that was sung from Rebecca dumb. We yes from Slovenia. Oh what a cheering great party tune. I think that one is is one of my favorites. It's Tony's right so now it's time for request and if you would like everquest played on the show and you can tweet us at e._S._e.. Showcase economically send us an email e._S._e.. Showcase at the g mail DOT COM and of course you can send us a facebook message and our facebook page is called the Eurovision showcase nice and easy for you yes and now this song has come from Robert Vol Strom in Gothenburg Sweden. I Robert Thank you very much. This is an amazing song. This came second in the Latvian National Final and two thousand eleven and it should have gone to the door and I think if it did it would have been the top ten in the grandfather of a shore aw so here is the amazing order today Knicks with Banjar Laura. This is fun sing-along stuff enjoy it was okay so she walks into a bar and talks that nicest here we go is on her a stranger from the north and while she goes back and forth Vesey's tops and magic frame wait what was she glance. Just a little dance browser reminds right away as she starts this way and spin girl from out uptown and down up and down seagulls on and I'm mad extreme see Jason Take these Asala Alto from in Finland. y'All listening to your vision showcase on Forest F._M.. We'll do full and damn they say. We're good combat to restore L.. Do russert gagging Eh Luke and I I know your Heart's still love. Don't say men holding back. Oh we go released a free and the yeah we released the free <music> Sada Alto who's currently starring on ITV's dancing on ice that is dance with three exclamation marks and that is from her album wild wild wonderland is an incredible red <unk> incredible album which every Eurovision Fan Muskat is awesome and he'll some fantastic tunes like that great to working out at the gym too as well or even driving along to is fantastic right now. It's time to go live and K._k.. Yes live and kicking is a part of the Eurovision showcase where we play a song live from the Eurovision Song contest itself now doing a year which is quite recent. We got into the two thousand fifteen. Dan Collins fast and this from Vienna Austria. Those Song came thirteenth. It was fantastic in the grand final. It was great in the semifinals and Marcel from rope no to friends matthew and Jamie Amy were standing with us in the audience right in front of the stage watching the second semi final and when this came on my the goosebumps the Harum back stood up on his ends and <hes> it just something magical and I never really thought about this ah tool before the contest as many of you guys may not from listen back to the show in two thousand fifteen but confides wow. All he has got one hell of a powerful voice. It's a fantastic song the song code and ear and it's from canal this is Montenegro two thousand and <music> story Goalby this losing Moya new bobby the FBI cows she sir clean and metal uh-huh uh-huh <music> hello uh in Falen from star Betas for PA look slowly now shoo we run show stay in know who is all these surreal that yes they can Italy now read them. Let your in a sense of all these braid you of Biden thing. We've got three madness super shiny hair shoe southbound me new. Oh yes still hair. We just you know who is all these yes. They can still be l.. E. Freedom thanks freedom freedom. They will home runs you care about his run together about these. They Garcia with freedom hearts here on the Eurovision showcase that was from the U._k.. National FIDO in two thousand seventeen just before we go don't forget if you if you've been living under the rock you may not know but on the twenty third January yes this coming on Wednesday at ten A._M.. On Ken Bruce's show on BBC radio to an announcement will be made where we will find out the songs and the artists who will take part in Eurovision you to soy so stick around now. It's time to end on a quick song before we guard and I show leave you with this amazing song the U._k.. Entering Twenty twelve care what anybody says I love it. It's Engelbert Humperdinck with love will set set you free so take I'll be dead he of what Evita Sane and W V slats no see you later too so graceful and smile and light nomad produced some miracle of site the wires should have no I could not turn away what faced with your beauty. No reason can stay as you kids with say if you so one follow your because the comes once if you're the one around missing heard will run only trusting your dream run would know and here you shoot stung. Remember Mexico's Wobble Tea Banh Basso Amaya you give me that so as you K- him Asu one follow your comes once there were June some slow comes ones the third one eh do it right to spend less than the things you need to update and Organiz your home lows is here to help you save every day. Plus bonus savings this week upgrade to a newer more stylish ceiling fan and save with up to twenty percent off select harbory ceiling.

Eurovision eurovision Finland Sweden Eurovision Israel Ireland Finland Nineteen Tel Aviv Karen Ari Tussey BBC Luxembourg Slovenia Ken Bruce Iceland John Yeah Klay Baku Slovenia Hi Greece Belgium
Friday 12 April

Monocle 24: The Globalist

58:40 min | 1 year ago

Friday 12 April

"You're listening to the globalist. First broadcast on the twelfth of April two thousand and nineteen on monocle twenty four the globalist in association with UBS. Hello. This is the globalist coming to you live from studio one here at Midori house in London. I'm Emma, Nelson and a very warm welcome to today's program coming up. New Zealand spy chief warns that countries at risk of foreign interference. But he's behind it. And how can it be counted? Also ahead, we asked whether a crash involving in Japanese f thirty five fighter jet raises serious questions about the world's most expensive weapon of war. And then Austrailia heads back to the polls visited the Jaffna general here in camera, and he accepted, my voice for an election to be held on the IT eight of my. We'll be asking a Saturday papers chief political correspondent, Karen Middleton about Scott, Morrison's, electoral prospects. Plus the latest headlines in the world of technology the day's newspaper front pages. But my tourists are falling in love with Slovenia. That's all ahead right here on the globalist live from London. We begin with knees. Eland spy chief Rebecca kitsch who's expressed concerns about foreign interference which she says the agency is doing all it Cantu. Stop. It follows claims by the government of Canada and also a stray area that they are being targeted, but what exactly is foreign interference. And how can it be prevented? Well, Michael Clark is a former head of the international security and defense think tank Royal United Services institute and Paul Rogers is a professor of peace. Studies at Bradford university, welcome both to the program monthly we may begin. What exactly is foreign interference? Will it takes many forms Goldman's? Of course, tried to influence the societies of countries in the world in perfectly legitimate ways. They tried to as we're put that perspective on the world over the that's some autocratic opens call that foreign interference. But most people would say, well, let's just normal interchange between societies and governments. But interference is usually the word that used when in some ways are the Cova. Vote where a government is trying to thundering or help what they would consider it to be subversive organizations within that country or interferences often used to refer to intelligence operations, particularly in the western world around elections trying to influence elections. There's a general convention within democracies in the world that whatever else you do. You don't try to influence elections casually because people break that and when it becomes public. It becomes a real problem. But democracies generally say whatever else, we do in the world are elections are up to us, and they should be left alone wants respect that Rebecca Ketteridge is referring to she doesn't say exactly where he's is coming from. But if I had to guess, I'd guess it's a of Chinese and possibly rushing, but more likely Chinese involvement in electoral politics of New Zealand, and why do you think Paul? She's going so public on this because she's a woman who was described as making a rap public appearance when she came out and said, look, we are being targeted by foreign states who wished to interfere with our democratic process particular cassette, president in relation as far as Australia museum into concerns to China. And I mean, Duncan Lewis who's the director of the Australian security intelligence agency said something very similar, very recently. Did some no coincidence that although he's not the director of intelligence Canadian politician, David McGinty, who's actually running a sort of an all party group in the Canadian parliament has also said this and they're delivering a report probably before the next Canadian election. So it is more or less across the board. That thing there is this concern, it does relate popular to China as essentially as Michael was saying, I if you look at this more widely obviously any country that is concerned. With trying to get information from another. It's intelligence agencies. Maybe trying to persuade people to get that information in a way almost a bit betray their own countries. It's the question of elections, which I think is pretty key here, but one has to accept that countries. Do not like this being done to them, certainly not democratic countries. But many democrat catcher critic countries do it to others. I mean, you look at the United States history in Latin America over the best part of one hundred years for taking the postwar world. You look at the claims, and I think the someday just a messy to them about American interference in Ukraine elections a few years ago, but the main concern that president I think relates to Russia, and particularly China and release very specific to the idea of interfering, particularly because of all the new methods of their in relation to electron IX, Valence and electron ick. The the IT era if you like the use of Facebook and the rest, so this is why it's come to a head. But it's very interesting. You have three different. Agencies or groups in three Commonwealth countries saying it all at the same time. Well, equipped of these these countries to deal with this kind of interference the last place. One would suspect that there would be any kind of foreign interference would beat New Zealand which until a few weeks ago has been rather sort of like happily benignly getting on with its own business. Yes. In a way, the countries we're talking about stralia New Zealand Canada apart or the five is intelligence sharing arrangements alongside United States and Britain. And that's the most sophisticated intelligence sharing operation in the world. And it includes the British and American monitoring services security monitoring services N G C, H Q and the national security agency in America. So in a way, they've got th the best network to find out if this is happening. So that they've got plenty of of technology as it were to discover. If somebody is trying to interfere in their electoral system, not that's not in a sense the issue. The bigger issue is how can they respond and in a way all democratic governments? They've got to be in a technical sense. The got to be agile. I've got to be able to pick these things up when they're happening and refute on Trues or issues as they arise. But ultimately, they've got a plate long. They've got to be strategically long-term in the sense that we need to show that democracies are truthful twelve cells and truthful to the outside world. And if we show that we can also show she'll be able to show that we most successful the being truthful to yourself and truthful with the outside world is a recipe for economic and social success. And that's a that's a commitment. You simply have to make over a period of forty or fifty years as a strategic investment in as a holding holding onto the rules that have done reasonably well, I mean as Paul said with Cuando slippage on many on the part of many countries, but it's time to get back to those rules and. To take them seriously because they're under threat as never before dates, very very noble thing that Michael says there, isn't it pull we have to be truthful we have to go back to our rules. But how able are we to do that not just because we live in a world where fake news has become such an important part of our unpicking of the way the world works, but also the difference between public and the between private and state a lot of the information and the and the interferences coming from foreign governments is done via internet the internet platforms, which are privately run privately run. And also, of course, the the some evidence that you have groups would tragedy non-government, very sort of very big transnational groups commercial groups that are very interested in this. And I think over on degree very much with Michael. But these you here is really twofold, one is if you also intent on preventing other countries doing it to you. If you yourself are doing the same thing, essentially, recent example of Ukraine, then it does not. Look good in terms of trying to complain about other countries. But the other is who isn't it just relate to the the five is that Michael mentioned if you do have probably the world's most sophisticated system for working out. What is happening the Moyer publicize that more openly. The more becomes rather more difficult for other countries to actually have their impact. I think this is why you're seeing this coordinated response. Interesting youth from from those three of the five is kind of draw straight here in New Zealand, but we come back. Centrally to the the issue that if you have countries which doing it to themselves democracies to others, then it is more difficult for them to complain. What is being done to them? Even when it is quite clear that the threat of the being done to them, not leaks. I think the likes of China is actually expanding president, Michael. Let's look a little bit more about what what people can do together pulled suspension, the idea of Canada, Australia and New Zealand coming together in order to to come up as a stand. But he. Has got a point that hasn't. He you have to absolutely pay play by the rules, but every single level you want to go back to the rules, but tell that to the Americans tell it the United Kingdom tell that to every other single state which likes to sort of have a thing is sort of meddle in the affairs of other countries. Yes, we banged on about the rules in very pompous way for the last twenty or thirty years in particular, and we've played fast and loose by the rules in the United States, certainly has and we've collect could been complicit in some of that in the United Kingdom, and as we face here in the United Kingdom as we face are very uncertain future. And we keep banging on about being a rules based international society that that's a our futures and rules based order, I say, yes, that's absolutely true. So let's start observing it a bit more. Clearly, I'm very critical about the way a number of governments reacted not least our own over recent years. And it is the case course that we live in a world in which a lot of non-state groups now behave like states and states behave like non-state groups. So this whole. Distinction between states, which are as respectable and sovereign entities. And non-state groups which are in a sense an archaic distinction, which is held for two or three hundred years is seriously road it now, and it's time that if we want to live in a more ordered. Well, we've got to restore that distinction at a period where non-state groups are becoming ever more powerful. So it's even more important that governments play by rules that they all agree and understand and those of us who set up the rules in Britain and America where the two countries that had probably more than anyone else to do with setting up the rules of the twentieth century that were carrying into the twenty first that we are seen to as enforce those rules within ourselves really important point and pull Haley is going to take the lead on this on the on the bringing everybody together. Well, it's it it's up to our governments. But I think that civil society also has a great role to play and in this respect, the sort of technologies that we're talking about now also aid civil society. So the civil society groups. You know, the Amnesty International's, and the international crisis groups, and so on all these groups who have great influence around the world, and whose whose will and view is very much respected. I think these sorts of groups are also odor in a sense. I knew they do implicitly, but I think they should sign up more explicitly to establishing and thinking through the international rules of the global order, and I think our future governments have really got to take that on if they want to serve their own interests. So it can be done. It's just that. We've let our distractions of the last twenty years and the the effects of the international economic crisis since two thousand eight let we've allowed it to lettuce drift away from all of these rows important points at a time when we need the most clock and Paul Rogers. Thank you very much. Indeed for joining us on monocle twenty four year with the globalist and a little later this ad China wades into the argument about the delay Llamas successor and cases, the latest business news and the newspaper headlines to but I with the time seven twelve. Here in London. That's a summary of some of the other world news headlines. Protesters in the Sudanese capital Khartoum have ignored a nighttime curfew and stayed out on the streets. Today's long-term President Omar al-bashir was overthrown by the military on Thursday the demonstrators claim he's been replaced by members of the same regime. The Indiana line Jet Airways suspended all its international flights. The carrier is one billion dollars in debt and to seeking a financial lifeline. And the man with close ties to the WikiLeaks founder, Julian Assange has been arrested while trying to leave Ecuador the man hasn't been named. But it's to be a software developer it happened hours. After Julian Assange is diplomatic protection with was withdrawn by Ecuador, and he was arrested at the Ecuadorian embassy in London. This is a globalist. Stay tuned. Seven thirteen here in London. Eight thirteen in Milan. And the Dalai Lama has spent the last few days being treated for chest infection. Although reports suggests the spiritual leader of Tibet is now eighteen three has made a rapid recovery and is indeed out of hospital questions have been raised over what will happen to debate and the influential role of their spiritual leader when indeed the Dalai Lama dies. Well, let's get more on this with Isabel Hilton whose the editor of China dialogue. And also just happens to be the author of the book the search for the pension llama, a very warm. Welcome bites the studio. Just explain this is about this. This jump from an elderly gentleman with a chest infection to an existential crisis with China. How have we go here? Well, Tabet before the Chinese occupation was essentially as theocracy or had been since the seventeenth century when the the leaders of Tibet were God kings. They would the leaders of a particular school of Tibetan Buddhism, the the Glueck per, and, and you know, they they inspired enormous devotion because Tabet was heavily spiritual. Buddhist kingdom when they were kicked out when the Dalai Lama was was kicked out in nineteen Fifty-nine rather when he fled after a rebellion into bet against Chinese rule. He went to India and maintained a large leadership over both over people inside Tibet who never forgot him and a large exile community which settled in. Nia after nineteen fifty nine to the question is always been given that he continues to hold the affections of the people Tabet what will happen when he goes. It's celebrate school of Buddhism. So there are no successes in the normal biological sense. So reincarnation serves as the succession system for this school of Buddhism. So after aid Alabama days, a spiritual team scars landscape finds a promising child brings in child up in in the traditions of the religion and eventually on on his maturity, he becomes the Dalai Lama. Now, clearly that system the Chinese want to control and they had a rehearsal for the control of the system when when the second most important Lama in this school, Buddhism, the pension Lama died in one thousand nine hundred nine and then sought to control the process of identifying his successor because they always thought through the religious leaders of. Tabet they could as it were pacified to bed. So it becomes a kind of political crisis. It's just on gino's. It's the Dalai Lama get suggested infection, which is not uncommon in in the of. In the mandate t three eminently treatable. However. And he doesn't have anything that's going to take him off to to the next the next dimension. However, Beijing sought to swoop in incredibly quickly and start to issue all these rules and regulations on reincarnation inspired by what you've just said. Well, it speeders astonish. In fact, reminding us of the rules of reincarnation that they have been steadily putting in place for the past twenty years. In fact, there was one there was one point at which the polit bureau appeared to the politburo, which is officially atheist box is entity issued Reuss reincarnation, and and I have seen the party card that a reincarnate Lama because there are lots of reincarnate lamas into bed. I have seen the party card which officially sanctioned him. You know, the communist party says this is a genuine reincarnation of it becomes really fairly ludicrous. But it is all about political control. And it's it's about trying to maintain the appearance of a system that. Tibetans are attached to whilst exercising Chinese control of it and the Chinese, you know, have very little experience. If you like a ruling Tabet, historically, they claim, of course, it's always been part of China, but Tabet was was pretty much, you know, left to its own devices until well, two important groups who did periodically ruled China really valued Tabet and Buddhism. The I was the Mongols, and it was a Mongol prince who put the first alarm on the throne and the second one with the Manchu. The ching dynasty the last industry of China to from sixteen forty four until the ching dynasty fell in nineteen eleven you had a relationship between the Chinese emperor, the the Manchu emperor and the Dalai Lama which was described by the thebenz as a priest patron relationship. So when the fifth Dalai Lama went to Beijing. The emperor got off his throne and went all the way to the gate to meet him. And in fact, built a palace in in Mantua. Area. This wasn't a relationship of subservient monarch to an emperor. It was much more evenly balanced in that so the the Chinese afforded the thebenz protection from invasion, they were periodically invaded from Nepal and the and the Dalai Lama's afforded if you like spiritual leadership to the emperor, of course, in a communist state that doesn't really apply. Exactly, the the thing that I found interesting about this. Is it the communist stay actually has which in unofficially atheist state? Although it has promised religious freedom O'Toole citizens in in in whatever shape that might take decides to almost decides to knowledge the process of reincarnation and decides to acknowledge the spiritual aspect of this. When it tries to acknowledge it to the degree that it can use it. So there are many arcane parts of this. But the Chinese have latched onto an object called the golden urn, which is a golden. On this golden was gift from the air from one of the ching empress to to bed at to be used to draw the the lots if you like for the next Delilah tomatoes said thank you very much. And and actually didn't use it until they were compelled to use it in the search for the pension Lama, the last Panchen Lama compelled by the Chinese government because the Chinese took this symbolic object as evidence of of the fact that Beijing had always as they put it controlled the process. So when Adela or any other spiritual leader dies any other reincarnate Lama died into bed. There would be a spiritual search committee, and you know, they would look for signs. They would they would consult oracles. They would do all the things that you would expect a spiritual process to do. And and then they would choose their their child what the Chinese tried to do was interpose estate process on that. So the. Golden urn becomes you know, the the final endorsement by the Chinese if if the if the lots are not drawn from the golden, and it's not a real reincarnation. But of course, Tibetans find this absolutely ludicrous in the case of the pension Llamas. The number to the rehearsal for what will happen when the Dalai Lama goes, the search committee head in Tibet smuggled the list of names out to Dharamsala, the d'arme the Dalai Lama then identified his chosen candidate made the mistake of announcing it the Chinese then arrested the head of the search committee had a hastily convened process whereby the golden urn was used and announced a rival candidate to the this. This boy is now a young man known as the fake pension Lama into bed has all the trappings of office, and and the recognition and the other child. Disappeared. He was he was arrested with his family and has never been seen again. So you can see what can go wrong here, it it could be really quite a bitter process. The Dalai Lama has basically said he's indifferent to whether he reincarnates. But if he does it won't be in China. So what you saw the other day was the official spokesman for the Chinese government saying, you know, the Dalai Lama has to reincarnate in China. So the likelihood is that we're going to get to. Fair enough. Thank you very much. Indeed, Isabel hilson. Thank you very much indeed for explaining reincarnation. You're listening to the globalist. Stay tuned. UBS has over nine hundred investment analysts from over one hundred different countries over nine hundred of the shop is mines and freshest thinkers in the world of finance today. No one knows more. Find out how we can help you contact us at UBS dot com. Welcome back. If you've just joined us, this is the globalist with Emma Nelson. It's seven twenty two here in London and a little later on. We'll be going through the newspapers, and we'll be finding out the latest from the Australian general election, but I the search is continuing for Japanese f thirty five stealth fighter jet the vanished over the Pacific Ocean. Earlier this week the plane is being billed as a best stealth jet technology in the skies. So what is going wrong? Let's get more with this on this with monocle Tokyo bureau chief Fiona Wilson, welcome back to the program. Can you bring a salacious, please? Well, the story is on Tuesday night for these amazing jets went out on a training mission from Misawa base in the north of hunt shoe northern parts of Japan and about half an hour into the exercise, the the the lead pilot who's now be named. I can only hope for me said that he was aborting his mission. And that was the last I heard they know he didn't use the effective scenery. So we don't really. No where he went. And we don't know where the plane went basically all it's been found. So far is some wreckage from the tail and that's it. That's still looking for the plane. You know in the assumption that probably very deep of the now of the east coast of Japan Tennyson, it's a bit more about the affected. This is having on the Japanese Self Defense Forces who have only just started to use the efficacy five. It is a plane which everybody has been pushing incredibly hard to to try to introduced to all the great air forces to kingdom has it s the pioneers in it must this must really knock the Japanese. Absolutely. I mean, this squadron at me, so it was only formed last month. It's a squadron of AT personnel. There were thirteen jets there at the moment, they've all been grounded. Now, the other twelve have been grounded. And yes, I mean, this is a huge blow Japan has become, you know, second only to the US in terms of ordering this phenomenally expensive plane from which is. Use by Lockheed Martin. So it it's raising a lot of questions up -solutely Tennessee bit more about other incidents involving the f thirty five. It. It is such a beautiful Achraf everybody up slightly adores it, but this is settling into make people look around to say hang on. We got something mechanical happening. Yeah. Well, the only being that'd be no crush with yesterday. Five eight a particular Malysz on this is the first one the only other s thirty five crash was one last year in South Carolina, which was explained by technical fault. That was then fixed that was actually five different model. So, you know, one thing that could be said about this plane, which you know, you have to say it's cost a trillion dollars to develop this plane, everybody talks about the expense of it. So it's, you know, it's considered a very very plane, and they really don't know what went wrong, and there was no sign of distress from the pilot. So at the moment, it's still a bit of a mystery. You know in the STF everybody's out looking for it. You've got the coast call at the US also volt in in in looking and of course, they want to get their hands on it as soon as possible to find out what went. Wrong. And it's you know, it's a highly trust the fide hung piece of equipment. They didn't want. Anyone else? Getting the hands on it locals Japan bureau chief fan Wilson. Thank you very much. Indeed for joining us on the line from Tokyo. You're listening to go blissed. Let's continue with today's newspapers. Only globalist to help us go through what's being Richard overnight in this team, Beal agenda, Frenchman media. Welcome back to the program. Marie right. So what comes breaks it's in a minute. We'll steve. Always always always. But I the stuff that that momentarily replaced the headline on the top of the headlines yesterday. It was the arrest of Janus own. And and it's been a while he has been sitting there going grizzled in the inequitable embassy with the cat, very deep. Trenches have been ruled by the majors to what starts they take on him hasn't it? Yes. And you can see that with two newspapers. Although the reporting inside is quite, you know, even handed basically, but we've retired as you can see a difference, the one you think you basically the guardian tight says in style assault faces five years in US gel as stand of ends. And the time says Assange faces decades in US jail after Spain claims physically the the idea that that I saw is being sought after by the US has been confirmed and the extradition demand that has been done. On the second of may he'll go to the Tribune all to start an and settles charges. But the idea is at the moment is it would be prosecuted apparently in the US for charge that would make him face five years in prison, and that would be it, basically. But that's what basically guardian explained don't talk about more years than justified years for the offense. He's been accused of which is basically dealing with comp- copy computing offense. But what the time says is that he faces decades because that's just the first of the charge that going to be brought against him as soon as he's back in the US. They say that he's going to be accused of of espionage and some and some of the offence that can carry up to more than twenty years in prison. And so only node that up. It could be a lot of a lot of years. But of course, at the moment, it's not the case at physically the time's going basically a bit over was being done at the moment a bit like the supporters in a way of John. Outside of the embassy NS trivial yesterday saying that Gerna Sol's will face years and years in prison US. This is interesting there were supporters yesterday despite that despite the fact that I think a lot of us had forgotten about him slightly. They hadn't been seen. He hasn't been making much of annoys. And yet there are those who still believe and in the British Labour Party one of them. So believes that he is a whistle blower. He is he was a man who was doing something that was absolutely necessary to preserve democracy. Absolutely. Yes. And yesterday, the inflow Tribus in particular, there were chanting free, journalist and free press and all that. And it was even little plague that was basically in front of the embassy saying that all the bicycle there will be a attached. Again, this will be removed and someone put a sticker on bicycles. And it was written journalist attached to this rail will be removed, basically Sarah a bit of a bit of a pun there. But basically, yes our soldiers. Prospered rented himself, and it's being presented by his supporters as a journalist doing his work as a journalist uncovering truths. That's what the the his lawyer said I thought of trivial uncovering truth about the US, and that's why he's being sought after by USO. Yes, there's a very strong opinion on him being kind of a kind of a savior of democracy and being being attacked for for that. That's not the tack that the the British government is taking at the moment, but that's neat attack. The labor related were position is is taking one thing that it did say was vindicate the sailing yesterday the US indictment. This is in the times vindicates years of claims WikiLeaks too secretive grand jury has been convened to investigate a sonya's work. So something been listening in and that is happening in other parts of the world at the moment as well. Article in the guardian talking about Amazon employing, it staff to listen to recordings might Alexa. Yes. So visibly. Amazon is always said that basically Alexei is activated only when you say the word oppressor butcher onus fear that we've been knowing for some time now that sometime Mba's knows no his can be a heard by Alexa, as a trigger word or trigger. No. So sometimes it's a it's eight registered a bit more than we think it does. But what we have is that there are some people who employed to listen to some of the messages to physically improve the service of Alexa, basically say they will be the idea of trying to taking a few samples of things now being recorded by Alexa, and making sure that basically DeAnne D question genzer match two questions than everything has been understood corrected by Alexa, and basically saying that's just physically, you know, more procedure. Can we're trying to provide the best service then we can. And that's how we do it. The only thing is that is very. You know, technology take no higher advanced technology and the idea of humans behind it. And can listen into your conversation when you were short that you will not listen to you. But humans a something that's not gonna make Alexa, Animas mobile oven. It's not all still carry on buying them daily. Telegraph up skirting cases double in the before change in the loan up. Skirting is a situation it's incredibly grubby where someone takes a photograph of woman up her skirt Simba's that it became a criminal offence yesterday here in the United Kingdom. But this is not it is about time. It is about. Yes. And apparently, I mean just for last year into AT, and there was one hundred and twenty incidents of skirting in twenty seventy was fifty six cases. So of course, there's always this. I think that perhaps it's just more people reporting it than just more incident happening. But the fact that it's been very, you know, making being. Made an offense and it was in the making for some time. Basically incited women to go. And and what happens you them? So that's that's that's one of the reason why the figures are that's higher year on. Yeah. But that's also, of course, when you feel when you talk about about a phenomenon has grubby as this one basically people are just interested in sometime trying themselves. There is a kind of a cut up ability that that happens. That's what the paper says, basically. But the idea is that at the moment, the people convicted of taking a picture or video, and then if someone's closing with the mission face two years in prison and being placed on the sex offenders register whereas you can this kind of fence, but it was for the many people as one of those victimless in a way crimes not victimless oftens, basically where sometimes the person doesn't realize obesity hasn't been touched. So shouldn't feel to fended but the low now has decided. And that it's not the case, and it's completely private which in the privacy of someone and completely, you know, an acceptable and two year sentence, plus the sex offenders register is a kind of a tough tough sentence. That's that will make us wanted to wanted to put on this. You know, this this very trivialized defense in a way until unto now finally amply wouldn't mind in loans. There's an issue the majority party risking sanction vote. Yes. So we notice the EU elections coming up on the twenty six million FRANZ, and we know our school. So that Eman coins, not the most popular of presidents. So there's always a tendency in this kind of you know, elections are nominally popular with the voters to try on something else. And that's something that basically by always very much afraid one because it's not popular. So we could basically take a beginning bitching in the polls too because he has this project for Europe, and the French people are not behind ING behind it behind him. Sorry saying. That. Yes, we want to see another Europe that could be, you know, a blow to his ideals in a way. Maybe I'm thank you very much. Indeed for joining us on the program still to come on the program. We look ahead to Australia's general election. And we find out why tourists the funding Slovenia attractive, all of a sudden listening to the globalist. UBS global financial services firm with over one hundred fifty years of heritage built on the unique dedication of our people. We bring fresh thinking and perspective to our work. And we know that it takes marriage of intelligence and haunt to create lasting value for. It's about having the right ideas, of course. But it was time about having one of the most accompany systems and unrivaled network of global experts. That's why at s we pride ourselves on thinking smarter to make a real difference. Tune in weekly to the bulletin with UBS for the latest insights and opinions from UBS and experts from around the world. It's been confirmed Austrailia will head to the polls next month. So what should we expect to tell us more? Karen Middleton is a chief political correspondent at the Saturday paper in camera and she joins us once again. Karen, welcome back to monocle twenty four at tell us more about this innoncent by Scott Morrison. Well here in a strategy. We don't have fixed terms for our elections held every three years, but it's up to the prime minister decide when they are held. So it's often promises try to make it have an element of surprise leaving number of options open. But this government is really running right down to the Y. It has to have an election before the end of may. So we really only had two weekends lift because our lectures, they hold on a Saturday. Normally election is called on a weekend that seems to be the tradition for prime ministers. But this week prime minister Scott Morrison surprised everyone overtime one tiny element of surprise announcing it on a Thursday morning and perogie in the parliament. Straight away. We have to have at least thirty three days between each wing of Ritz and the election. So we are often rising on what is going to be an extremely robust campaign. You say extremely robust campaign. I can't imagine it's going to be anything other than that. Well, I don't know. I lost time in twenty sixteen. We had a prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull who didn't want to run a negative campaign. Some of his campaign strategists were beat frustrated by that. And indeed he almost lost by one Satan? It was a very tight race much tighter than we expected. This time around we have new prime minister because we keep changing them here in a stray Leah. And that in itself is a bit of an issue with versions, and he will go very negative. Scott Morrison is. A very political animal quite ruthless in his campaign strategy clearly already and he's up against a more popular position. But a less popular opposition leader. So it will come down to where the voters decide I want to follow the party and its policies or whether they're more interested in whose leading it, exactly. I mean, given the fact that Australian politics is has a notoriously turbulent nature to it. And we've had the announcement recently of the departure the retirement of several liberal MP's, and no one really sort of stays two longest prime minister. How can the Australian electric make sense of who to vote for? Well, I think there's a great deal of disillusionment here. Thanks to the past decade. We've seen that turbulence that you talk about on both sides of politics in both major parties the lighter party, which is currently and opposition and the strangely nine liberal party. Which is actually a center out conservative party currently in government in coalition with the rurally based national party cowardly. The focus in terms of the turbulence is on the government that I've changed prime minister's. 'twas this is the third one they've had since I took office in twenty thirteen and that as a cities issue for people. They are looking for stability the government's trying to argue that the that it's a better economic manager to Sipho choice for stability. But the opposition is saying look at the sign guy in charge Bill shorten for six years. We've got a good solid team. And even though you might not lock Bouchut and terribly much. And that's what the opinion poll say where better option than the got in at the moment. Karen middleton. Thank you very much. Indeed for joining us on monocle twenty four. Nefer technology round up. I'm joined in the studio by monocle tech. Correspondent David Phelan. Welcome back. David tell us what's happening while away in the in the press rule, the wrong reasons but desperately trying to push it self and with new products and new phones. Yes. That's right. I think that's one of the things if you'll finding you'll getting very bad press for one reason or another then to distract people with new hardware is a good way to go. And indeed the new far away p thirty pro looks great feels great. And it has a remarkable I is really focused on photography. And it includes a periscope camera. Now, you may well give me. The surprise in your face was what I had as well when I had about this. In fact, I hope that, you know, would sort of rise up out of the final doesn't what it means is when you look at that particular camera square looks like squad because actually a prism Mira rather like on S L camera, I suppose that is bouncing the light into and along. So that you can get a five times zoom which otherwise would bulk up the the phone considerably. And combine this with quite clever electronics, you can actually reach fifty times on this. The lot of that is as digital on the camera. So you can get right up close to when you along away, but this has the advantages as well because this four cameras on the back, including a time of flight camera, which takes a depth map of what you're looking at to be able to absolutely with much greater clarity. And shop and get an image. It it will. So means that you can combine them so that you can get special effects or a greater optical zoom. And so on. So in other words, it's a camera almost I it does make phone calls saying that we have to longtime now just to seem that we will take off at graphs on a fan. Sure. But the way you you talking. No as it it looks as if that could be a product for serious camera enthusiasts as opposed to somebody who simply wants to enjoy taking pitches as I go alone. Yes, I think this is definitely the area that it's not that they only want to sell them to professional photographers who might indeed use them as a backup camera in the way. The photographer would take a polaroid before they took that proper short as a way of understanding how the light is more. Clearly, but definitely that if you kind of want to do a little bit more than just grab. A moment. But want to have something that you'll proud of when he puts on Instagram, then suddenly your phone is going to be able to do this in much much better detail much higher quality. And it means that is aiming to overtake the likes of apple and Samsung, this is a serious f. Yes, the actually already are ahead of apple that number two in the world. And they have said the CEO told me a couple of years ago. It would be easy to be number one with that's not our purpose. Well, I'm not sure I think now it is let's move on Amazon. I was quite astonished at that read that they've introduced a new entry level kindle. I didn't know it was still buying them. Oh, yes. Very big sellers. The the entry level kindle until Elliott this week. I think was fifty nine pounds thousand nine in the UK that one is now up to forty nine nine thousand nine it's being withdrawn the new one has a front light. So that you can read it in the dark most kindles. All the candles now, do many other Abe greatest do as well with the just light. So that you you're not tell to just reading in brightly lit situations ideal. If you're eating in bed and he'll pound risk onto sleep. And they don't want the the light on. But to be able to make it for the price of now, sixty nine pounds nine thousand nine hundred nine nine thousand nine dollars is a kind of a remarkable technological achievement. But also, although it is entry level. It looks fantastic. It's it it doesn't have the flush front design that the more expensive ones do. But it's light it fits the hand. Really? Well, and it's a it's I have to say it's not a book. It's not a real book. I'm not saying it can compete with that. But it it comes quite close kindles market. Nah. I think everybody, but one when it okay when they came out because it's it's easy to carry around twenty books on the kindle than it is in the carry back. But then then husband of see the resurgence of books, and then tablet. It's now axes a redes-. Well, the two that's one of the things that I was in his deliberately gum for what the highest quality one is called the elisas. And the idea is that unlike a tablet where suddenly a text message or an Email come into distract you. You can cut yourself off with this one purpose device that will allow you to become completely immersed in the book. And we were talking on the paper if you all the papers today. The that's Alexis the Amazon staff at listen humans. Listen to us talking to Alexa. Yes, it's an enormous. Revelation isn't exactly a lot of us thought that Alexa. Okay, was listening. But it was a computer. Well, it is it is mostly a computer. There is a very very small amount of human interaction. But it's the problem is those people that to fill in the gaps that Alexa, has not managed to conquer words that she hasn't understood yet, and that I just called his she is it's real person. And and that's the thing we're prepared to talk to Puta that as she's Rayo, but we don't really want the idea that human being is is listening. You can actually go onto Amazon orientate to apple and listen to everything you've ever said to your speakers. If you want to base recordings cap present amount of time, I identifies doing it is very very dull. But I have you done it. I know. Well, no, I've checked transcript to see what sort of things I've said, but, but you know, and that's the thing actually is a very dull job these people are doing except when it hits these. Rather serious moments with the the as you'll know there is an alleged sexual assault that may have been perceived, and that's where it gets very difficult for some because they can't do anything about that. Even if they want to because it's all Nana Mize's. So they would find it very difficult to get back to the individual person. And and it raises a whole ethical quality of what you should do not situations. Very difficult one. Finally, am Celona in Milan has been doing it for things design and tech and design and financial beautifully welding together. Yes, tech was quite prominent Salani this year. But this particular story relates to Sonos, the the hi fi speaker company who've combined with idea and have made a table lamp, and a bookshelf speaker, and obviously with Sonos involved, you know, that there's going to be very high quality audio, and it seems to be very affordable way to get into mull. Thai room speak. I am one of the thing. Neither of these new speakers has microphones built in to allow you to control them by. They do have Mike friends, but nothing that sends anything you say anywhere else. What's been the reaction to this? It's rather is not an elegant piece of kit is yes, yes. It is. It's im- both in the case of the table. You don't really know it speaker until you look quite closely and. See the dial on the back, but it's it's quite subtle quite nicely designed and the the thought of building this kind of technology into the bookshelf speak, for example, ninety nine pounds. It's a it's again, a technological achievement that I think will transform living rooms when people don't want cables everywhere, and they don't want speakers everywhere, and you can talk these away on into a table number onto a bookshelf to fill the space with other kinds of time. Thank you very much for joining us on monocle twenty fold. One of the things have been exploring throughout the week during our coverage of the Milan design week is mobility and how it's intertwined with design. How will the evidence the cities of future deliver effective transport and infrastructure, although some of the questions we put to the French architect automony, the man behind this year's installation for fashion label costs in Milan medicals Daphne Connie's KOTA with him Milan's Palazzo is embodied to find out more by name is Arthur many, I'm an architect a teacher and a fabricator, and I just wanna stop by asking you on this theme of mobility as cities becoming denser, populations grow in one of the challenges is how oven on and designers can create cities that are easy for its residents to get around to make them more livable. What do you think the biggest challenges when it comes to mobility? And then we can talk about the role that you think architects and planners can have enough. One of the biggest challenge is at the fact that we are still very much to the specie, and we're reading very much just using our roads, and it hasn't evolved that much in the recent times, and I'm still amazed. We're not using the sky. I'm still amazed where still building fixed things and that there's very little room for an application or nobody's them. The other thing is that we're still bringing a separation between urban natural just amazed. There's not more vertical farming not more forestry that can be used within a C T. There's a lot we can bring from the natural to the manmade and the urban, and you mentioned things like nomadism that people are increasingly working from different places. I don't even maybe have fixed office anymore become increasingly mobile what role. Do you think technology can play? You mentioned a few things such as using the effort, and we know about things like driverless cars, even though we don't know how. Soon. They're going to become a reality. Do you think? That's just a little tool. Go what what role? Do you think that technology can play? No, I think we need to be very precise technology because otherwise it's just imagination. And I every enjoy cable cars and using the sky not with drones or things that seem really just technologically impossible because Jones helicopters. They're just create a massive updraft. And so why not create a three dimensional network of cable cars and have this network. Also be used for shipment, and potentially shipping blocks that would form a new kinds of architecture that that they've over time and links the factory was the site and have robotic into construction. There's a lot of topics that I find possible. And I'm surprised they're not implemented, and what role do you think that octaves can play in the way that they design that buildings allowing people to I guess moving out of the more effective. Lee. But also even simple things parking space within busy city centers, especially. Yeah. I mean, architects of a massive responsibility, you know, the the carbon footprint of construction industry that includes the highways, and is really number one in the classification, the use of concrete is really kind of high on that list. It's about eight percent of all carbon emission for some reason parking spaces highways where associated with concrete, very ernie'll. And so there is a reading to just be think rethink could there be timber parking? Could there be a better link between the kind of electric car movement and the use of battery spaces and could there be more room for for bicycles and could could some of the parking's or the accessibility be linked with that could lifts of our of our skyscraper be linked with transportation that we're using again thinking dimension three-dimensionality he can there be a network. In the sky that is linked with our buildings to we really have to think with the the mobility tools of today, are can we already anticipate that we could use. You know, more spatial approach. I I just really wish that the urban planners and the say, the transportation state companies would would sort of think about side the bucks a little bit and bring the heir to the transportation network. That's an interesting and just finally you live in London. But you're from power is now her Milan is that a specific example that you can think of an initiative that you've seen maybe in one of these cities that you think should be an example further afield as well. Put you on the spot. I'm trying to think of of one I have seen several cities bringing the idea of cable cars within main avenues. There are a lot of talks about pinstr in is ING Oxford streets and entire neighborhood. But without the solution, basically often, we try and do something, and it blocks the network, and there is no alternative. I think anytime we try and block network. I know in Paris, they made life very hard for the people with cars and without necessarily proposing an alternative, and they just expect that kind of going against the flow will somehow change the minds of people. But I mean, that's really unfair. That's imposing from the top new ways of being mobile. But just I really don't believe in that every that if you're going to be punitive with with people you have to also allow for alternatives. I mean, there was a mess. Scandal in France when we raise the price of diesel fuel and then the zone in the streets were rebelling. And I really on the stand because there wasn't a an alternative that was suggested, you know, and so. I really just hope we can suggest alternatives that are credible and that can really be a win win. And that's why I'm suggesting to use the air, the French architect that out till money in conversation was definitely counties and don't forget to stay tuned to monocle twenty four throughout the weekend to hear much more from the team at Senator Moberly in Milan. Listening to the glazed. Finally move over Airbnb for the moment at least because a capsule hotel is on its way back in not in its original home of Japan, but in Slovenia's picturesque capital. Lebron the space age sleeping quarters resemble the suspended animation units in the science fiction films, like two thousand one space odyssey. So what are they doing in Slovenia allow man in Libya guide Aloni can tell us more. Tell us you've had the the lights guy of experiencing both Leona and Japanese space capsule hotels. What's the different indeed around? We're speaking. I got to tell you the Slovenian one looks much much much Porsche ama-. I mean, the the ones in Japan, really not for the claustrophobic. They are more like the draws. You would find for a corpse in a mortuary than they are know actual sleeping quarters that you went to spy on to spend time with strictly on sufferance. I would suggest whereas the the Slovenian variety. Look very much sort of a theme hotel kind of thing. They even got a space hotel branding on the side of them on. They look like very much for people who want to have this idea of pretending. They're on this. I international space station in their own sort of private relatively spacious. I have to say sleeping part. The quite impressive looking things. But the projected prices are quite impressive to the prices. I've seen quite about one hundred and forty dollars for a double capsule, and this is not sort of drunk salaryman missing the last train home and having to just bunk down somewhere for a couple of thousand. Yeah. And it's it's it's a lifestyle choice show. We size. Why are people why why are they opening capsule hotels in Louisiana? Well, I think in this case revamped hotels, the central hotel, which is a couple of streets away from the main railway station. So in some ways, the location is absolutely fitting because the original capsule hotels in Japan kated near railway stations for people that missed the last train. But in this case, it's a it's a hotel which had been lentil shabby it's undergone a renovation. It's owned by one of the local hotel groups, the union hotel on a thing. They've seen an opportunity to bring some attention to the hotel. It's got normal rooms as well. There's only one area which is laid out with capsules of which the ten and as a sad thing. It's more of a sort of slight novelty option for people who want the experience of sleeping in a space age capsule. There's a lot more luxury involved. I think you're you're Japanese version of, but it's bringing something else the accommodation mix in Lubiana, which to be Frank is a little bit limited and lacking. Now, we all assume you're just about some wrongly incorrectly. That the Japanese the people who rejected the the caps he'll hotel you'll just about tummy that it's something that can be claimed by the Balkans. Well, I'm telling you the link between the two because the monument vented the capsule hotel was KIRO Kotak our and he wasn't. Justyna somebody designed the coffins for people to sleep in. He was very influential architect designed lots of things in Japan. And he was one of the founders of the metabolised movement now fans of architectural, no the reform city in the world, which was designed entirely along metabolised principles, and that Skopje in what is now northern Macedonia, but which have caused at the time was in Yugoslavia and the coulda cowers mental was Kenzo Tange Kenzo Tonga was the mastermind of the rebuilding of sculpture after an earthquake in the nineteen sixties. So in some ways, and I'm making this claim there is a Di wrecked line between capsule hotels, and the former Yugoslavia, and that's why it's fitting for us to have one in Lubiana. And here we disagree guide. Aloni? Thank you very much. David journeys on the program. That's all we have for today's episode of the globalist. Many thanks are produces Reese James and Tom whole are set to page Reynolds and stadium energy Kenya. Scarlet with editing help from jank Jews of the headlines. Mummies on the way with finance Augusta per shekel in charge of the records. So I'd stand up now in limbo rap. If I were you the briefing is hit live at midday in London. Globalist is back at the same time on Monday, but fanatic for me MLC's. Thank you for tuning in goodbye. And have a great weekend.

United States China London president Alexa United Kingdom Paul Rogers Karen Middleton Austrailia Scott Morrison New Zealand Michael Clark prime minister Milan UBS Slovenia Amazon pension Lama Canada
balkanize

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

02:41 min | 1 year ago

balkanize

"Merriam webster's word of the day four august tenth. This episode is brought to you by blankets. The the blinked app takes the key takeaways from thousands of best-selling nonfiction books and condenses them down into just fifteen minutes for you to read or listen to right now. You can get twenty five percents off your first year at bleakest dot com slash word. Today's word is balkanize spelled b. a. l. l. k. a. n. Is e e balkanize is a verb that means to break up a region a group etcetera into small and often hostile units it can also mean more broadly divide or to compartmentalize. Here's the word used in a sentence from the new york times. By cecilia king and katie benner tech companies and civil rights advocates warn that the increasing push by nations to create their own internet rules will balkanize the internet and potentially actually lead to privacy violations and the stifling of political dissent. The balkan peninsula of southeastern europe is lapped by the adriatic sea in the west and the black sea in the east. It's named for the balkan mountains a mountain range which extends from its border order with serbia to the black sea bulkin as a word derives from the ottoman turkish word meaning wooded mountain or mountain range. The balkan states are commonly characterized as comprising albania bosnia and herzegovina bulgaria croatia kozovo montenegro north macedonia nia romania serbia and slovenia with mainland portions of greece and the european portion of turkey often being included as well. The the english word balkanize which is often spelled with a capital b is the lexical offspring of geography and history. The decline of the ottoman empire in the eighteenth century led to a series of revolts that accelerated the fracturing of the region into a number of smaller states. Who's unstable. Co-existence lead to violence that came to a head in world war or one since the early twentieth century balkanize and it's related noun balkanisation have come to refer to the kind of divisive action that can weaken countries or groups as well as other things with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit marian webster dot com today way for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

Merriam webster serbia new york times peter sokolski katie benner cecilia king albania slovenia europe greece bosnia herzegovina fifteen minutes
Tina Pisnik - Former WTA Top 30

The Functional Tennis Podcast

20:34 min | Last month

Tina Pisnik - Former WTA Top 30

"Hey My name is Tina business and you're listening to the functional tennis broadcaster. and. Welcome to episode sixty, four of the functional tennis podcast. I'm Fabu Molly your host. Today we speak to Tina patiently a former top thirty player who runs her own Tennis Academy Chicago. We talk about her favourite moments as a tennis player and challenges she faced along the way. Before we get started I'd like to mention our new free webinars that we are launching. Very soon, we will dive deep into tennis topics on and off the court we have some great speakers lined up including some previous guests of to show if you WANNA find out more head of to functional tennis dot. com. Forward Slash Webinar and leave your email address. Also a big shadow tour podcast sponsors slinger. They're slowly roll now more countries to the delivery list. Okay. Let's chat with Tina. Hi Tina welcome to the functional tennis podcast? A. Great. Thank you very much. You're actually you're the second Slovenian to be on the PODCAST. Can you guess who else? I heard that blocks cosmic Kia all your she saw an ISOS was great speaking tour Dnr she's a little younger than he and I already left. Slovenia when. She came to the scene but like scores you know. Slovenia is pretty small country. So we are all one big happy family basically. It was excited to talk to her on as a as I'm excited talk to you right now. And even hair Coke Colona and she's gone off the radar little bit checking our instagram account today no posts from Hereford past year. So she must be concentrating on Tennyson life and keeping away from social, which is important. Yeah I mean. The social media is kind of like a blessing and a curse. I thank. You know it's fun and it's it's nice. But then at the same time, it's time consuming. It takes the focus away. So you know if you're able to balance that boats and maybe have a little help, you know you can use it to to make really good true. Yeah. You're right. Find the bounds harding like everything in life find the positives eaten her sleep and her party and or work to find a balance. But yet let's let's talk a bit about your tennis career. From my bit of research you're world number one junior you won the orange ball and your two time Olympian you. Want some duty terms. He got the top turned into world. That's pretty rare dea I mean I'm not. You know I'm super proud of it a bit sad that he got cut short by a car accident when I think I was peak of my career was thirty in the world playing tournament in La and got into a car accident with the official drive in driver going back to the hotel. So after that, you know I had neck surgery and had to after what was it like a good year ahead to just come to stopping my career and stop playing pro tennis and kind of went into coaching after a how old were you when the accident happened Twenty Four. Okay. So look even you weren't that you're nowhere near peak yet you were still no you're on the right road and devastating was the accent take yet straightaway did you get back on the court after so I kept trying coming back to? Actually. Injured my neck So you know I was out for a few months after that. Then tried to played a thing, it was us open and then the Olympics but it was it was more of a me trying to get back into it not really accepting the fact that you know it's not good and it has it it will require a little more treatment and Mike. At the end by God next surgery. So that Kinda helped me gain probably back to like sixty seventy percent of my you know normal where I used to be some at least happy I can still play tennis and I can still coach but I was never able to really go into like back to competitive tennis and being back on tour in after we can you know train Hours. A day. So Yeah, I was it was Kinda of like from today to tomorrow my career basically ended good. So yeah wasn't plan to not an how did you deal with that? Manley, that's a big talk these days the whole mantle side of injuries and after Tennyson. How is that side of things? I mean I'm not GonNa lie was depression. It was you know I was super low with everything everything that I known up until I was twenty four just disappeared overnights and I think athletes nudges tennis players but athletes were treated more like robots no emotions no feelings and it's not true right and if we expressed that we're treated as we're week you know why are you complaining you're living arrived and all that but I don't think it's stocked about off and Might time I didn't really get much help. It was more new myself and a high and You know just trying to figure it out and it took me good for years to actually Kinda. Accept what happened and you know you're not going to go back to where you were and you need to find an move finding a and move forward and Saw It was it was it was tough but you know looking back I think it just made me stronger And it was I. Guess that was my face I don't know. Undue, where did you go after you stop playing? Did you go back to Slovenia re in the states? So I, always lifting Sabena and moved to the academy a little bit of when I was sixteen for a few years to us. But basically, I was always based out of Slovenia. So I, that Oh, my preparation and all the training there So I went back to I was back in. Slovenia and I opened my own tennis club. I was always saying that after I'm done with my career, all be a coach I always enjoyed coaching and I guess it was Kinda Indemnity because my dad was a soccer coach. And I saw his passion for sports. So I I kinda felt that's going to be my pats. It was a started a bit earlier than I thought. But you know like I said I I open my all club I had us for five years but then it was, you know I enjoyed the coaching part I enjoyed the the kids you know everything that involves tennis but then being an owner, it's Kinda everything else as well. You know and I of like wanted to go straight into coaching coaching no office work. So, he had no payroll taxes VAT also here and I don't think I was mature enough to handle both sides of the business. So then I opened my coffee place So I went into that tried it for a few years I tried to work in the Office for a little bit you know and just wanted to make sure that tennis coaching is the thing that I absolutely want to do in the future and It was important for me to to see what I don't WanNa do So I'm one hundred percent committed to ten is coaching now and you know after after I was Fed Cup captain in Slovenia I was Kinda like okay. What snacks can I you know? What else can I do in? Slovenia I've felt like it's a little small. I was like, okay. Let's let's let's go unexplored the states. So that's when I moved to Chicago and this is where I am now great and you run the program there moment yes I have my own program. At I do run both sides of the businesses now so Taxes and also work has long but I feel like, okay you know I'm mature enough I I know how to pace myself. I know how to put time into you know being in court and then do the other stuff as well. So it's been fun. Gradient or there's so much you can learn on did you you mentioned the coffee shop there yet? A coffee shop I can Slovenia Yeah I had a you know I. Always Kinda. I was like, okay. Maybe I'll have a restaurant I I love to eat right so. Does higher have. Yeah. So I was like okay I'll have a restaurant, but it ended up being a coffee shop and it was a great experience that it's not my home field. So it's it was you know it was a lot of things to learn and It was Super Fun but you know asked three or four years it was time to move on and and go back under percent into tennis and. Comeback to your tennis we also had some the else you worked with on the podcast in the early days Mark Petchey. He was your coach. Yeah Yeah. He was my college. was a few years back. But those were fun years I. You know it was super super good to catch up with him when there was a Labor Cup in Chicago and and he was here. So we got together and I learned a lot a lot about that from from Arkan. He helped my game the good amount when we worked together because look back at my notes, your names on my notes. But I didn't know who you were the time on. It's good to be able to put two and two together put the puzzle together. But at long did you work with him for? It was about two years. Okay on tell me. Did You keep working with him? Was He rancher injury-time or was it after dot there before? It was actually before that it was like the beginning of my pro career he was he was there he actually met through Sylvia Eliah. So he worked with her and since I knew Sylvia a little bit We kind of like you know that together started practicing together and then like I kinda hop on the team and we traveled together and then So few months it was just one on one with mark Great Great I love hearing a Monty does a great job. He's on Amazon there on some of his lines are are pretty good. He's getting to be as good as Rob Cohen now with some of his one liners, he's good from all your tennis matches which ones for you stand at the most it was probably finals ration- open in bowling at played. Emily. It's Kinda like I. I never went into matches believing I can win but that was the match were we started playing. It was like one all too old, and I kept waiting for her to like switch gears and just overtake and take control of the match and. I kinda hung in there and and was like, okay, maybe you know. I'm I'm in there I'm playing. I can actually win you know but like looking back that was like the mental part was I. I always thought can she's GonNa just step often? Take control but it never happened and that's Kinda like stuck with me and I saw like that gave me that extra confidence that like okay. Maybe I belong there I can. I can play this big girls big names that are up there for awhile. Actually beat them. So that was that was probably one of the matches that gave me that kick in the that you know. Yeah, you belong. So D-, tink tight you belong feel make such a big difference whether you're cracks widsom top players or whether you do get that opportunity in a match and you may not win the match, but it may be really tight much site than you expected. Benova sudden you this newfound belief that way I'm good enough to hang out these. it's very much about mental part, right so I think everyone that does play those tournaments they learn how to play for his back in CS. Obviously there are some weaknesses in you know some of their games, but it basically comes down to you know believing that you can win and obviously always give them respect but never fear anyone just having that experience and being exposed to that I think does show you that you can play. You can be there. You can beat there. So it's it's obviously a big part of tennis as the mental part that you believe and then you can achieve. If you don't believe you're in trouble, he feels that's probably what team ranch can help to build up your belief in your own game. Absolutely. Yeah and what learnings did you take from your your short shortish career in tier after tennis after tennis career what Demane Lennon's you can extract from them. It's obviously hard work. The hard work pays off. I. Think that it teaches you time management. It teaches you how to handle adversity teaches you how to solve problems you know because. We we all went when when you're a kid everything is like La land you know everything is it's nice. It's perfect. All someone else takes care of your problems but. Once once you're there, you're exposed to that your auto double. So you have to learn how to deal with that you need to learn. How to be mentally strong and and a lot of times, you know just ignore your emotions and feelings because you know that can just it does it does break you. You know. So I think that just gave me an extra push and like being exposed to all of that or when I was young helped me get through the problems or the accident and halted to get back may be easier than someone that didn't experience that as a young kid. So I think teaches you you know lifeless is just tennis in sports is it's after that. You can use the skills that you learned when you were younger and. Speaking of those skills learned encore coach and are you for or against it? I'm guessing you're against that but I could be wrong I. Probably Am for Awkward Coaching when there are a little younger to teach them to understand the game. But again I think you have to be able to solve problems you have to you know start reading the game and I think that's missing. You know like they just wait the issue not issue but the thing that I'm running into as a coach now is kids just wait to be told what to do. Instead of you know figuring things out there all so I think if they're thought that from a young age, then you know you don't need anyone else to tell you. What needs to be done. So we we your kids there in your in Your Smash Tennis Program. What do you do to help them figure it out themselves. I asked questions. Okay. I tried to hear what they thing not to tell them what I saw and what I see with my eyes but in what they see what how they felt. They think they could have done better or differently, and that's one that's like specific on tennis. But then the other hand is you know a lot about to respect and hard work that with that I'm a big believer in. So. If you show up late you're in trouble. Yes. Thank you to Spring Day. Yes I. I do not like that and if you don't say hi bye. Thank you. Yeah. That's my fat piece. Yeah. No you're right. I'd look tennis. Beat look be part of your personal development off to court and the can make you a better person. So it's great that you know kids may not become the best players in the world but at least they you're teaching them an education. Yes which is, which is really important. I was onto the kids. So understand US coach also yeah. Yeah. It's really interesting. Tell me what about the Olympics? What's it like to represent? Your Country Olympics, not many players get to achieve that. So it's the next level right? We have. We have grand slams that we you know hang around the best players, tennis players in the world. Once you get to the Olympics, it's you're hanging out with the best athletes of the world It's a whole different animal. It's a it's a great achievement. I'm super proud of being part of two Olympics that it's. Like it's hard to explain but I just I just being around all the athletes and see them. You know I hope Human Day are when we were in like Olympic Village and just to talk to them, and then then stepping on their field and just being almost not human anymore. So that was that was the great great experience in my life. Great to be ran these people that they can help you push yourself to nurture level. Yeah. When you think you're working hard. And you look at them and like okay. Maybe I'm not working that hard is have room for improvements Yeah. That's another thing never never stop improving we lend shortly. But what other Laron and can you tell young kids who want to be pro tennis players bought as you said, you never know what can happen long journey. So walk in day best to to prepare for what may occur I thing you need to enjoy the journey, right? It's like you have to love what you. Do 'cause it's it's not gonNA be easy. It's not easy So you just got a you know just love it second a lot of them expect result overnight and it's it's not a sprint is its own. So you need to be patient you need to put the work in need to do the work in when things are not going wrong because this is when it's you know majority of people will quit. You know it's like this is not working it's not for me. But this is where you push. This is when your patient and just wait for deal paternity that's GonNa come and control the controllable. You know you never know what's GonNa Happen But create a problem before the problem exists than this is this is what's going to be stopping you so I think you just have to be open minded and keep pushing and keep working hard and and be able to get out of your comfort zone on daily basis I'm be very positive hunger Madison. Okay just ask you one question before. This goes live on just after the US Open final is finished. Who Do you think will win demands and females and thing Novak will take the mass and Kita law women's faith bet there say fetter a whole I hope you're right? Yeah. I haven't seen too many matches because obviously his work a lot the you know we're in the same time zone so it's Kinda. They play the same time as I worked but as much as I saw that those to look very solid on the court and they looked like they put a lot of work and during the Corinthian to yet times on thing is we're not so good here too much start now actually here on and actually this morning when I get up at five am. City pass was in the middle of his meltdown. I watched I. watched that I watched that yet six matchpoints in the fat off terrible Tim. Guy. But anyway, you get over to come back strongly, not actually happy for Borna. He's a local. Player? Yes. Yes. Balkan. Yeah. He's a hard look at thanks a lot again and with spear you're welcome by sounds got already we'll be in touch. All right bye-bye. I. Hope You enjoyed that chat with Tina, if you've any feedback at all, please send it onto the functional tennis podcast can't over at instagram or you can email ace at functional tennis dot Com be could've bought feedback. I'm always willing to listen and learn and improve the podcast finally head over to function functions dot com slash web to get more INFO on new live webinars which are launching very soon. Really excited about it a big tanks to you our listener and also to our podcast sponsors slinger until next week gweat there and hit some forehands by. and.

tennis Slovenia Olympics Tina US Chicago La Tennyson Tina business Fabu Molly instagram soccer Arkan Chicago Rob Cohen Mark Petchey Sylvia Eliah
Friday 8 February

Monocle 24: The Briefing

30:43 min | 1 year ago

Friday 8 February

"You're listening to the briefing. First broadcast on the eighth of February twenty nineteen on Monaco twenty four. Hello and welcome to the briefing coming to you live from studio one here. Midori house in London on Tommy, Tom. It's coming up today. What will the US exit strategy from Syria mean for the country's bitter? Civil war will also find out how Germany is clamping down on big tech and take you on a tour of an expressionist landmark in Vienna. Plus has Maloney Trump's time in the White House benefited her homeland we're off to Slovenia to find out all that and more head here on the briefing with me, Tom Edwards? Reports suggest that US troops will leave Syria at the end of April. It follows Donald Trump's claim that his forces are about to launch a final assault against Islamic state militants in the country. Well, let's get more on this with Scott Lucas, who's a professor of international politics at the university of Birmingham, Scott good afternoon to you. And obviously we've spoken a number of times in recent weeks about this withdraw role of the US. What do these latest reports mean do you think well, what it means is we got one battle which has been growing rate years inside Syria. And then we've got another battle inside the Trump administration with those the White House and US agencies spending. But what's going to be done, and that's because of this fundamental tension in December Donald Trump decided during a phone call with the Turkish president wretched Poudel on that. That's it all US two thousand troops coming home immediately. Well, quite obviously, the Pentagon didn't like. That military commanders didn't like that Defense Secretary. Jim Mattis resigned over it. And indeed the national Security Council doesn't like it. So what they've been trying to do since December. They can't directly say to Trump. No, no, no, no. There won't be any withdrawal at all that they're spending this out. They're spending it out in terms of the need to retain a US presence. If not inside Syria just on the border for multiple reasons, and they are spitting out the timetable. So they have been saying that it might take up to six months to get all the troops out. I suspect what's happening is the White House is trying to say, oh, no, no, no, no. This will draw we'll be taking place if they definitely will be out sooner. I e within the next three months and go tell us about because I I can imagine listen to say, well, hang on. These things seemed to be in. They seem to be on my. Almost contradictory. If you start to pledge a drawdown of troops, and you put a an end date on whether that's you know, the end of April, which is any a couple of months away. How can you square that with the pledge for a decisive finalist sold because by definition there's so many vagaries involved in coined of offensive. I mean is that is that a fair point? Point the doll from tried to resolve the contradiction this week by declaring that the defeat of Islam estate is imminent and not one inch of the caliph. It will remain now. Technically in one sense. Trump is correct in that the Islamic state no longer controlled cities or towns in a longer has a status such. But of course, what the military has looking at what other American officials are like he had is. These Lum state doesn't need a state. It doesn't need a cities to carry out attacks. It can't do. So and it continues to do so inside Iraq, for example. And so the possibility of a resurgent is all state, which is something you remember we saw two dramatic effect in two thousand fourteen there say you can't just simply withdraw all US troops in north that possibility. But in addition to that, something that Trump is not referring to is that American planners believed that an American president is needed for two other reasons. One is they see that is vital to support Kurdish partners in Syria because if they leave those. British partners could be overrun by Assad forces or more likely by Turkey. And they see American presence is being a necessary counter to Iranian influence in Syria. Whereas Trump said a few weeks ago. Well, you know, you're on his can do whatever they what they wanna do the country. Let's just let's go pups finally, a Trump's domestic issues, and the this relationship with miniature you mentioned Jim Mattis departure, and so on we've heard this week from the likes of navy commodity, she'll Robertson, and he said, you know, win discussing timelines for withdrawal is destroyed remain at odds with the military establishment. And I wonder who really gets to to cool the shots. And is there a I don't know is that some sort of defacto leadership on the ground where they say. Well, yes, yes. That's what we're hearing from the Oval Office. But the fact remains we're going to do X. And why do we know who's really going to be making the decisive decisions in this space? Well, first of all say the military's at odds with Trump is. Very diplomatic way of putting here if you looked at the state of the union address when they cut to shots of the commanders in the crowd is they listen to Trump talked about the greatest military in the world, they weren't clapping. They weren't smiling. They were stony-faced about this. They are furious. Jim Mattis was pushed out they are worried. Not only about Trump's plans over Syria. But over Afghanistan who wins this. Well, we're in the middle of the contest because what you have seen in the last twenty four hours is the White House trying to reassert itself. No, the president says we're coming out. We'll be out by avait parole. And you've seen military spokesman who say no, we don't have a time line the outcome of this probably is not just a question about what happens in Syria, it is a decisive outcome. If Trump remains is president for the rest of his first term, whether the military can't offset his whims, his desires, or whether in fact, the White House can impose it stamp of authority on the Pentagon once and for all always good to hear from me. That was a friend Scott Lucas joining us here on. The briefing. Oh, Monaco, twenty four. Oh at the time at six minutes day. Let's get the latest business news. Now delighted say we're joined by Sandra Kilhof from Bloomberg. Good afternoon into you, Sandra. Let's start with well a couple of big name sounding positive Lori. Alan m as what have we been learning? Well, essentially, what this is is the story about luxury because Lori Al, of course, has some very high end brands among aside from the mainstream brands when it comes to close metrics, and of course, this luxury handbag make a scoff make as well both proposing earnings and the loss twenty four hours have been surprisingly positive, and what's interesting is that though both citing being surprisingly positive on Chinese demand. Saying you know, what the slowing Chinese economy has not hit consumption yet. At least, for instance, Laurie alva- polluted a yen sales growth that beat expectations rising seven point seven percent. So this comes in line with what we've heard from other luxury makers lost week LVMH said something similar, and it's. Quite crucial because concerns about the Chinese consumer have actually been dragging down the luxury sector in recent months, but this season so far proving those concerns might have been overdone interesting as you say flies in the face pups of number of people's expectations about the so-called. China slowdown intriguing as as well as all these reports of a potential German Bank merger. Yes, we we're, of course, still watchful whether or not what you might be forced to merge with commod spank by the German government. Now, the latest today comes from via shocks, which is reporting that Gemini is pushing for this magin now by the end of may now, it is reporting that a preliminary decision could be made over the coming weeks and confidential talks between the Bank CEO's now such a module would involve setting up a wind down Bank phone one unwanted assets of both companies, and quite crucially, the publication is warning that this could be interpreted state and attract the attention of e competition authorities, which we know, of course. Would be watching such thing very closely. If we were to see a big German megabank Bank, just briefly, finally, I'm sure many of our listeners will have seen. If in fact, you other extraordinary story about Jeff basis, which has been knocking around he's taking on the National Enquirer. This extraordinary suggestions allegations of blackmail. He's tried to sort of preempt that by releasing a whole bunch of personal information that they held on him. And this is extrordinary story. And to be honest. It's just it's the most read store in the Bloomberg terminal this morning, so it's really interesting to our clients for sure I mean, this is Amazon busted phase, essentially, what you said accusing the National Enquirer of extortion and blackmail now, we know that the tabloid published in expose on his relationship with TV personality Lawrence Sanchez now. Basil says hi at investigators to find out if the story was politically motivated he saying that the Enquirer has threatened to punish revealing photos if he doesn't stop the probe. It's such an interesting development and. And I I will say I'll be intrigued to see if we get fun. The news over the weekend. I think more surprised that's the most read story on Bloomberg tunnels, and I was about news of bucking Li China's slowdown trend discussion, I guess for for another day, Sandra. Thanks for being with us on the program. Another interesting story coming out of Germany that we turn next the countries who ordered the technology giant Facebook to stop gathering data on its uses. Without permission represents a potentially seismic shift in the way, social media firms, operate, David Phelan as Monaco's technology. Correspondent delighted say he's here right now David we've talked before about privacy and privacy concerns being the key narrative for a number of tech brands on this program before potentially seismic. I mean, could this be something that significant for the whole industry to to to pay attention to? Yes. Absolutely. It depends. How you make your money? Apple was talks about how it will never use your data to make money at charges high prices for its product. So it doesn't need to to do that. Which is always a veiled comment about the likes of Facebook and Google who do use that data and one of the things not the anything. But one of the things that has led to this is that Mark Zuckerberg recently talked about combining. Facebook messenger, and the the the the messaging capabilities of Instagram and what's up into one product. And this is one of the things that the Jim McGovern have objected to the that means that data that you had agreed to share with one of those organizations suddenly was being shared with all of them. Of course, they're owned by the same company, but you may not want that after what's up conversations are into end encrypted in the way that Instagram is not encrypted not point. It's interesting as you said, it was like a talked about that that move on his behalf leading to a better messaging service, and naturally he didn't add the caveat and more effective potential marketing opportunity for us. And so so forth is part of the battle hair. The before we talk about what what is happening in Germany, specifically that soccer bug and others who are in the decision making roles need to be more transparent. He's kind of dip to toe in, but it's not really working still a feeling. That these companies are trying to pull the wool over the consumers is to a degree is part of the problem of PR battle. They're still not really with sending up winning it. They don't even get correctly at the moment. No, that's right. And I think I think you've hit the nail right on the head. It's not that data is going awry on the whole it's very tightly controlled. And it's it's they have good data hygiene. But ofter basically from the moment, the the Cambridge Analytica issue happened known quite trusts Facebook in the same way. And that's a difficult thing. When it's go to your photos is go to your posts got I it could if was malevolent doing awful lot with that data that you don't necessarily want it doing. And I think that's right in terms. They haven't got hold of that Nederland unturned himselves into something trustworthy again. Let's look at the substance and the the the Federal Cartel Office on my favorite institutions. That's Germany's antitrust watchdogs. They're looking at restrictions on the collection of data. We. We've also spoken before about whether it is indeed the role of governments nation states to try and regulate this space or whether it only effectively done by the the main players can the likes of that cartel office and others can they control. What goes on with these social networks there? So the so vast so complex. I think there is a limit to what they can do and e-. You're right. Do you? Then want government looking in a this data in a way that it's bad enough. If Mark zuckerberg's reading this stuff, right? I mean him personally. But the the government's might be doing it is is spooky in a whole different way. But I think at the moment people tend to trust the governments in a different to a different degree and would brother that they came down on Facebook heavily to prevent that from the data being spread. Now. Don't interestingly here, I think in mid week in the UK. There was a a senior figures shut us exercise. I think food digital culture media and sport was talking about regulations took about breaking up monopolies. And once again, this idea of a digital Bill of rights was mooted sounds good in theory, again, can you legislate? We know legislation itself takes time and the developments technologically are so rapid is. Is that a good idea? Do you think? Yeah. I don't know. This is Tom Watson deputy leader of the opposition labor party in the UK. And of course, it is part of the the the role of a partisan opposition to come up with. Big ideas like this and breaking up monopolies is the part of the lep down at me because that seems to go very much in line with the labor party's current thinking in terms of not liking megaliths of any kind. And I think it is difficult to know how well that would work you'd break it up. But each of those individual companies would still have all that data. It's it seemed to be one of those statements that that would attract attention, and and of course, it's very timely a soon after the teenager, the UK teenager. Molly Russell committed suicide and her father said Instagram was partly responsible and safe internet day was also this week. There is a very torrid feeling to all these social media interactions moment. Hello magazine is just started a campaign could Hallo to kindness to encourage people to have civilized and friendlier conversations online rather than. Bitter nasty quarrels and to protect youngsters in that way. It's it's a very I it's easy. Then for someone to come in and say, we'll break up the monopolies as though that will solve it. But I'm not sure that it's doable. In that sense. All that. It would have the desired effect so often in these cases, if you look at it, the big picture, the consumer still retains ultimate power in the sense that they can forgo these platforms. They can abandon them can the consume as though when you're dealing with these huge powerful corporations who move sometimes it seems in these slightly nefarious ways can the consume as leverage their individual power. Do they need to get together? All their forums to do that. Is there a means by which people can say look enough is enough. How how could that happen? Or is that rather vainglorious idea? No, I think it's I think it's true. First of all, you can just stop using Facebook or Instagram what's up, but actually that's tougher than it. Sounds you? You can you can come off one of these sites for while. But then you kind of miss it or you just need to send a message to someone. There's so many ways that we now see contact each other. And I have to rank my brains as to whether a usually talk to this person on messages on my phone or what's up or Facebook messenger or Email or whatever. And because they're details main what be across all those those sites. So that one I mean, of course, it doesn't stop me from Saint can I get your Email? I'm not using WhatsApp. But it just takes away the convenience of those things. But perhaps it it comes down to using them in a a mo-modern it way, you can still use it. But don't put so much of yourself out there. I don't know. It's fascinating conversation that could go on for many hours, but they we should leave it for now. David failure, Markle's technology. Correspondent joining us here on the briefing. His what else is making news today. The United Nations claims Saudi Arabia seriously ca tailed and undermined Turkey's ability to investigate the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. A preliminary report says Turkish authorities were prevented from entering the Saudi consulate where the journalist and dissident was killed. You don't Tober? Australian authorities are investigating an attempt to hack into their parliaments computer network. There's no evidence that any data has been accessed or stolen. The government says it's trying to establish who's behind the attempt. And John Dingell the longest serving congressman in US history has died at the age of ninety two. The Michigan democrat was a driving force behind many key liberal laws. Dingoes first elected in one thousand nine hundred fifty five and served in the house of representatives for almost sixty years. Before retiring you'll with the briefing here on Monaco twenty four. All city focused show. The urban has a little sibling tall stories which tells the story of a fascinating building or landmark each week. Let's hear this week's edition we head to Vienna to tell the story of the odd. But architecturally fascinating Hoon at Vassar house. Markle's executive editor Josh venit has more. Freedons Reich hundred Vassar was always fascinated by molehills in one thousand nine hundred sixty four the eccentric, Austrian artists and later architect dog the picture that he called in typically the question fashion, the seven prosperous years of the mole. This colorful, canvas reveals a chamber of concentric rooms built beneath the ground like much of his work its fanciful naive and not that simple to decipher. But it's also a good starting point to understand how this outspoken and at times outrageous because I did moved beyond his colorful, art, works and outbursts into some of the strangest buildings you're ever likely. To stumble across. Born in Vienna. In nineteen twenty eight as Friedrich Stoesz Friedrich ins Reich hunters faster, a name literally meaning peace realm hundred water in German was a painter before he ever made his Mark on the builds environment by the nineteen fifties. The autists was pending screens and mounting demonstrations against the state of architecture hundred transfers suggested that people are forced to live in coops like rabbits, chickens. He also argued that architecture had become criminally sterile. And most provocatively that the straight line at self was godless and immoral. Few in the world of architecture took hundred Fasces renting's all that seriously debated all bowl could often be seen in pinstriped flares self made shoes and usually picked bakers cap renting about trees. In one series of lectures in the late nineteen sixties he administered his addresses about the downfall of civilization, and saving the whales. Whilst completely naked. It's all the most surprising than the Australia's chancellor took the time in one thousand nine hundred seventy seven perhaps having seen hunter of increasingly popular architectural models to send a letter to the mayor of Vienna. Encouraging the latter to take punt one hundred Vassar and allow him to build something after all the bold move gave rise to the subject of today's tale and the building Vienna's hundred faster house. Located in an unassuming stretch of land. Stressor pebbles skim from the done you'd canal this apartment building was built by hunted Vassar and the architect Joseph Krajina between one thousand nine hundred three and one thousand nine hundred five the collaboration bought about one of the most unusual buildings ever realized. Yes, yes. There are the fifty three apartments for offices and sixteen private terraces. But every facet of the strange swirling, Dr Seuss s creation was a statement of hunter trusses architectural intent like the molehills heated Miot hunted. Vance's homes seem to rise from the earth with trees and bushes emerging from within and Grassi roofs. Water natural curves. The trees were more than decoration though. The answer stop them as tenants and vital part of his brand of organic architecture. He created intentionally uneven floors to stimulate the experience of walking outdoors and encourage those walkers to think about their footing is one is where they were going. Punta transit was also an avid exponent of what he called window writes, the parochial of tenants to customize the facade of the building the bits within reach of their window. Anyway, in any way that they chose and other way of hitting out against what he saw is the personality of standardized architecture. He wanted people to reclaim their places. The centerpieces of the built environment and more broadly within nature two hundred transfer went onto build throughout Austria, Germany, Switzerland. Plus, a smattering of edifices in Japan and the US before passing away in the year two thousand today, the hunter transfer house is a museum to the master's work complete with a gift shop and cafe and perhaps unexpectedly it's one fin as most popular buildings the mistake. One shouldn't make when visiting the structure, however, is to dismiss it as novelty or even oddity there. Many of the artists I did Auden novel to say the least. Hundi transfer took architectural influences where he could from Antonio counties work in Barcelona to watch tower in Los Angeles. And of course, the natural world. He also appended existing architecture wisdom, he hits out for the free expression and pre-stage a fair few important ecological concerns that contemporary architects, still scrambling to keep up with despite his influence on art and architecture hunter trust was delightfully unsentimental about his own work. He refused payment for the design of the hundred trust house entirely claiming that he was happy to offer his services simply to have prevented something ugly going up on the site. Instead for my part. I'm sure that this unusual other-worldly reimagining of the architectural landscape this given the world altogether more to think about than hunted faster claimed to dust off. And re imagine an old it in there's still amounted of inspiration to be mined from this very intriguing molehill. Thanks, josh. For more from the urban his team head to monocle dot. Com forward slash radio. Download of course, wherever you get your podcast GIO with the briefing or Monaco twenty four. And it's time next on the program to review some newspapers periodicals and other big stories from a certain part of the world. I'm joined in the studio by Monaco, twenty fours financial goes to prochet Cohen fair you have forty two so Paulo and others. But really this one terrible story out of Brazil, kind of a breaking news story, really, which is likely to dominate headlines for the foreseeable. Well, absolutely. I mean, Brazil's recovering from the tragedy. Bruma genome. We've we've the mudslide, but this story of things going to be quite big. There's been a fire the training center for Flamengo, which is basically the most popular football team in Brazil, and so far ten people have died because of that and some people have been hurt. So it is going to be the big story. I think you know, there's lot of new up dates coming up. So let's see perhaps we'll have another update tonight in one of those shows. Yeah. Because I it's interesting because it happening real and the main story in today's paper is actually because yesterday rained so much in Rio that the rain queued six people's lot of tragedies. In Brazil, and I was talking to you Tom Brazilians love saying, oh, we don't have natural disasters. But we do. I mean, every February when the rain comes. It's it's disaster. Not only reopening Manu or the cities as well. It feels to me that some of the cities they are not equipped to have such a heavy amount of rain as well. And certainly would this early days without Flamingo story? But it seems that particularly of a building that maybe how some of the youth team players who were staying there was particularly affected and naturally when young people are the victims that tends to focus people even more with laser clarity. So they'll probably be a lot of anger one imagines. And it's a story because the beauty apparently have been renovated only last year. So it's not that he has been an old building. So we need to understand why it is. Goes fairly. I mean, there are they put a wealthy club. There is such a huge name around the world. Let's move on as you said we'll come back to that story. You found something in time magazine time magazine, a very interesting feature about China's aging population. I it's a very nice feature. Visit president they have a lovely picture here from some of the rhetoric in China, and they are in the in. Hainan island, which is known as China's Florida, but there's a little bit of a pessimistic tone on this article saying that by two thousand twenty nine China's population will age into unstoppable decline, so they'll have more than three hundred million people over sixty five and this caused some wreckage in the economy, and you know, and and basically the the young kind of have to work with so many people that are retired is something that we've seen a ready in Europe in Japan as well. But this will happen to China, very, very soon, very soon and on a scale. That's almost unimaginable exactly about the the gray wave in that pace. A fascinating longer read. You've also been diverted by something in Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, they also do film reviews as you know. They have a nice review of velvet birth. Saw. The new Netflix fume of Jake, Jalen hall and Rene Russo that premiered only less Friday it deals with the art world. And and this this film critic James Tommy said that finally you've got some things right about the art world. I mean, I thought it was a bit exaggerated. But I think James it's a horror film is this right? It is surprising boundaries talking about how this proves. It's his bloodthirsty as people may count at times, it is an and I love their some trashy elements in the film. I totally recommend people to see, and I did think it is quite realistic. But there aren't people that can be a bit bitchy at times, according to the film, according to the film hands carefully. Thank you for that. As always still time for one more item on today's program. And let's close by talking about Slovenia, the certainly no shortage of tat dedicated to one Melania Trump in Slovenian shops. But has the first lady of the USA had a positive overall influence on the country's? Image will guide looney as Monaco's Balkans. Correspondent and he joins us on the line from these Slovenian capital Liana his base guy. Good speak with you, Melania is. She is divisive. Where you are as one imagined. She is across the US. You know, I think people are very keen not feel embarrassed about it tall Marshall after Trump's inauguration. I went to her hometown Saone. It's actually one of my best friends in Slovenia is from CEO needs and knows the Trump extended family as indeed the thing. Most people do in that town because there's only about five thousand people there. So you can play, you know, six degrees of Melania Trump. He probably got about two degrees before you you. You got to have you know, what I mean? And at the time people didn't want to say anything bad about her. I would be interested to go back now to be honest with you because the thing the whole. Judah time was not to say anything disrespectful, and the terribly. Nice people in saying it's and I suspect it would still be the same and they have been trying to do a little tribute to her locally with some of the local produce rebranded as first lady. So you have first lady slippers and first lady chocolate and things like that. But you know, I think making a little bit from tourism is one thing, but the way that people really feel about it. Well, they could probably be expressed in the words of the jacket that she will from Zara. Indeed, I remember that pays for a fairly. Well, I am just on that point about products. It is, but if cashing in this is inevitable, but some of the things first lady slippers first lady pies, wasn't there certainly quite headline grabbing Milania sausage raised its ugly. Head can I say that a one point surely, it's all just gone rather? Too far, well is known for its sausages so far enough to label project. So it is genuinely under. If you're going to have local produce with the first lady's name, and of course, she's very defensive about the use of the name Milania. She will see people as you sued a local Honey producer who wanted to call his Honey Milania Honey that wasn't Talna tools. She's gone after a language school in Croatia, which was using her image to promote that language school as saying look how far you can go. If you learn English. That sort of thing has been happening, but my favorite thing and say, and it's to be honest with you was the president burger at Rondo restaurant, which was. It's hard to sort of fly away cheese hair on it. In tribute to her husband and was served with with chili peppers because of the hot statements, which he liked to make an and that was a couple of years ago. Imagine how hotter things have become since. Then it just imagined guy. What I like is is when we do things we've never heard before on this program and fly away cheese hair is definitely never been said outed before probably by anybody. So I'm proud that. It happened this day that was our guide looney in Libya for us talking about Melania's motherland, and that brings us to the end of today's edition of the program, which was produced by Reese James in research by yelling gafa and mainly Evans studio manager was Kenya. Scarlet my thanks to the mall. We'll be back at the same time on Monday, that's noon in London. But in the meantime, why not join Andrew Mullah Commodore e house that's coming to you live eighteen hundred London time later today. Hero, Monaco, twenty four months. Tom edwards? Thank you very much for listening.

US Maloney Trump president Syria Trump Facebook Monaco Melania Trump Instagram Germany Slovenia White House China Vienna government Jim Mattis Scott Lucas Mark Zuckerberg London Pentagon
[Unedited] Whitney Battle-Baptiste with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

1:10:01 hr | 1 year ago

[Unedited] Whitney Battle-Baptiste with Krista Tippett

"Support for on being with Krista. Tippett comes from the fetzer institute, helping build the spiritual foundation for a loving world. Fetzer envisions a world that embraces love as a guiding principle in animating force for our lives a powerful love that helps us live in sacred relationship with ourselves others and the natural world. Learn more by visiting fetzer dot org. I'm Kristie Tippett. And this is on beings. Unhurt cuts up next my unedited conversation with archaeologist Whitney battle Baptiste. Hello. Hello. Hi. Can you hear me? Yes. I can hide Krista Tippett. Hi, nice to meet you too. I'm hearing a bit of an echo, Chris. So how do I sound to you? Hello. Hello. I hearing your voice echoing back or anything like that. Yeah. Okay. All right. All right. We'll take care of that. Because that will drive us crazy. Okay. We'll let other people take care of it. Thank you so much for doing this. No problem. I've I read the source of black folk a long time ago, but I've just really been blown away getting back into this again this week. Yeah. Actually boys is overwhelming. And the more you read the more complex, it seems. And there's never he's just written. So many different things that is hard to put your finger on just who he is. Sometimes, you know, this phrase to kind of cliche, you know, fierce intelligence. I don't think I've ever really experienced it. They way when you start getting into his writing, you know. Yeah. And the, you know, like the soaring language. I mean, there's just the power of this man's voice that jumps off the pate. He's rob Cox. We just talked to and special collections described it as he writes, as if it's music and in pros, even if it's not technically poetry some of the ways in which the words he chooses in the way, they're tied together. It seems as if it's yeah. So let me just make sure we okay, okay. No. I'm actually I'm not hearing anything. I'm okay, you're okay. Can can part here. You. Yes. Okay. But looks good on. Okay. Attention. Yeah. So let me just. You you may have already heard this from from lily in Mariah. And this is part of this. I mean, I think you know that this is series. We have this funded by the National Endowment for the humanities. And and the idea is, you know, these are not history shows, but it's an interesting line to dance back and forth across, but really how you know taking some figures from history and really exploring how their lives, and ideas resonate for modern people, and we've had a lot of fun with this series. And we we've done Einstein and roomy and Amos EMI, Semple McPherson, and Darwin, and yeah, and and we so so, and I I think this one. Feels really important to me. And and I think the boys is one of these figures who should be better remembered and more substantially remembered, so I think I hope that you know, can be a contribution. So I think I might just start by asking you how you and what do you do you? Remember, how you first became aware of W W E, EP two, boys. Earliest high-heeled old. I'm trying to remember because. I feel as if I keep getting reintroduced to boys, but my earliest memory, I would think I grew up. My mom was a an educator and there was. We thought very deeply about history in the past. And what I what I learned in school. I go up in New York City and went to new city public schools, but I always had an added, and I don't want to call it a debriefing. But there was an added element of. Learning the history of African people throughout the world. That was supplemented it someplace. It's supplemented, my formal education. So do boys I learned about the boys, and I learned about Martin Luther King, and I learned about Malcolm X, as so I learned about the civil rights in a very different way. I think than was kind of prescribed by the public school system. So what where were you? When were you born can I can I ask? Five. I'm a grown up now. So I was born December nineteen seventy-one. Okay. Yeah. So you're going you're you're in school in the seventies and eighties events. Yeah. So so the civil rights movement was very recent history. I guess but still not happening around you. But I I like to describe my childhood is having the back the Backdropped the backdrop of the black nationalist movement. So I think that my mom was around during the civil rights, but heard Malcolm X speak, but was around when Martin Luther King was assassinated in Malcolm X, so her I mean, she saw him album speak on the streets of Harlem, which was PECH which made her extremely scared, but made her think about the complexity of the civil rights is not one thing. And so. I grew up thinking understanding two boys as part of the architect of civil rights. But at the same time, I thought of him growing up as a Pan Africanist and not a civil rights. Net kind of points at where I wanted to go because I think people now, they they know something about king, and they know something about Malcolm X, but two boys the memory of deploys is more faded. I mean, what do you what what does what does he bring at? How does he fill out your imagination? Even now, you know, why why what is important for you to know about him as part of that architecture. Well, it's it's part of how in many ways, I understand my identity. Do boys for me brings the idea of being a global citizen into perspective for it. It will it it the more. You learn about two boys. It's not a matter of him turning his back on the United States, but he understanding himself as. As a member of the world and growing up in the in in that with that idea as kind of part of my background, the term African diaspora is means so many things in it's so layered, but someone liked to boys has a prominent place in understanding, the different waves of migration of African people. So they're voluntary migration. It's involuntary migration. It's immigration at different decades and over time and him leaving the United States and going to Ghana at the invitation of president Kwame Nkrumah and Ghana is important in pan-africanism because you have to think about it is the the beginning of independence for African nations that spread from Ghana. I would I could say, you know, some credit those. Two in Chroma. But the idea the African mind the idea of the African being as not being just in one place, but the dispersal. As a part of the shared memory, inexperience of people of African descent that for me is now what do boys it's is how I think about two boys. So there's an element of the beginnings of civil rights, but civil rights in many ways in the United States could not contain him. And who he was and that changed over time. Of course, what what tangible our time that civil rights change over time or just two boys is understanding of the world, right? Yeah. Of oppression as well. As to be honest. He began to understand the oppression of African descent people in the United States as not just being a problem of the United States. It was this this global thing. And then he was very much. Into understanding humans, and peace and equality in ways that would not sustainable in the United States after I don't know the thirties in the forties. When he was still pretty optimistic about the directions and the promise of of the United States and he began to look to the world. And ironically, you talk about how we how we can think about two boys and honestly in other places two boys has a very significant role in the history of memory of places like China, Germany, Ghana, right? Yeah. One of the things I was thinking is as you're talking is that there's I it all seems to me that deploys is one of these figures, whose whose ideas whose time also wasn't big enough for his ideas. Right. And and that now some of the things he was saying some of the way kind of the global way he was thinking some of the the, you know, the large way he was diagnosing issues, and you know, that he he wrote he wrote the the souls of black folk, but he also talked about the source of white folk. I mean, he he saw race as something that that was about all of us, and it it feels to me like, you know, maybe in the twenty first century. We are just becoming receptive to these kinds of kind of thinking. Yes, I, and that's why I mentioned that I feel as if I'm constantly being reintroduced to do boys because. He started writing really writing at probably about the age of fourteen or fifteen and he passed at the age of ninety five so and he wrote more than one autobiography, which he joked as if you live that long you should be able to revise what happened in your life. And so because if you read different moments and different ways in which he writes, he has their different sensibilities, and there are different ways in which he remembers certain things that was interesting. Is there anything like just a specific example of that that comes to mind? Yes. Memories of his father. He was born and raised in great, Barrington, Massachusetts and his mother was married. Mary Slovenia burkhart. His father was Alfred do boys. Alfred was born in on the island of Haiti and came here as a child he and Mary Slovenia had a apparently a very quick courtship. Marriage two boys was born and then the marriage was no more. It ended quickly. I think it ended as quick as it began. But if you read different moments or different texts. There's one where he recalls his father having passed away him never meeting him. And then there's another one where he talks about his father having gone to Hartford to pursue a better life for the family to never return, and he's never and never saw him again. And then there's also a story about perhaps his. Family the Burkhard family never really accepted. Alfred boys for two reasons. He was extremely fair skinned as it was described by the boys as well as he was not one of the established New England families. And so he was a stranger. He had no kin, and therefore was not really acceptable for Mary Savini to marry and stay with. So those are three different stories. So he was kind of pushed out by the Burkhard family in great Barrington. And so which one is true. It's. The perspective. I guess of. Did he pass away because the reality is is that he actually was a barber in Hartford to very late age. I mean. Just one of the things that jumped out at me when I'm looking at hit him in your work how you have approached him as a scholar on. I mean, I like your description, I actually watched you did an interview which we will put up on our website because it's very interesting, and it's great background. I think to the conversation we're having you didn't interview with a doctoral student in anthropology. Do you know what you want? I'm talking about just in done in on. Anyway, it's online, and it's really about you. It's about you becoming a scholar, and you talked about, you know, you're on your I guess is on your mother's side. You're second generation Bronx. But you had family you had family in the south. So that legacy of race in the south was with you. But you also have this as you've described this afro Centric, north, you know, New York Bronx world, and then when you go to and again, you know, that's like that. That's this multiplicity of African. Experience African American experience that they've also an example of this. And then, you know, you talk about when you went as an archaeologist to work on two boys estate that his that. He was he that he his situation and racial history was in the rural north, which is actually a phrase. I don't think you ever hear when people talk about even in a complicated way about this history. It just kind of fascinating to me all these ducks to positions the small soliciting. Really, right. I think I I'm from New York City, and I. I I never thought I would end up in New England. So that was a part of the the complexity of not being Red Sox fan in this place. But. Also, my idea of how I would do the archaeology of race or racism in and. As a New Yorker, I really still thought of the ways to get it was going to be in the south plantation. This is the obvious place in which we can understand the the the boundaries about how racist formed and shaped in the United States. But as I come into a place like New England, I'm fascinated by the history of race in New England and listening or actually reading and learning about a families like the Burke art family generations of Burke arts were here. And at the same time. There's a discussion of the opportunities that were afforded yet there were limitations, and there was a certain level of control in which it was not free movement the fugitive slave act when that came caused serious repercussions for the lives the daily lives. Interesting African people in a place like Boston where you need it to be careful. You know, now, we're having I call it a. A wave of of films about slavery right now. So you learn about, you know, twelve years a slave Samuel note Northrup in upstate New York never thought about slavery, yet his freedom was very much. It's not a given and the ways in which do boys, although he was born three years after the emancipation proclamation. His freedom is guaranteed yet. The ideas of of of the ways in which he is to understand himself as not he knows that he is not white. He is reminded that. And he says the first time when he figured out about race was actually when he tried to give a one of his classmates, a female classmate a Valentine card, and she would not accept that. And he reiterates that. And he talks about how that hurt him. And that was the first moment where he realized that he was not like everyone else that second moment is when he left New England and went to a ten Fisk university in Nashville, Tennessee, and it was at that moment where he realized that he had never experienced what it was to be black or African American or of African descent he had never experienced it. Like he did. When he went to a place like Tennessee because it was. It was obvious that there was a segregate. He it was segregation. But imagine in Berkshire which I call the rural north imagine the numbers are so low the idea of segregation. How would that work and yet at right any third language? He uses is so resident and also in its way. So kind of biblical, you know, the other world being in the world and not of it. Right. You know, and I wonder. The way he diagnosis, you know, the that experience it's so complex, and it's so powerful. And you know, I mean, I I want to ask you the question of as a as as an African American woman in the twenty first century. I mean, obviously, you you were raised in such a different world. You're living in an America with a with a black president, the the issue, the the global issue that your family was that you were engaged with growing up was, you know, part hate in South Africa which actually ended right? I mean, so you had told different set of historical circumstances, which is fascinating try to magin. What would he say about all of this? But when he talks about, you know, in the very first essay. In the souls of black folk, and he talks about the real question that is there between me and the other world this ever unasked question, you know, unasked by some through feelings of delicacy by others through the difficulty of rightly framing it in the the question is how does it feel to be a problem? And he feels that question, even you know. No one it's not willed their it sometimes unconscious, it's in people with the best of intentions and ideals. I mean does that does that question speak to you? How does his you does his diagnosis of this still make sense one hundred years later? His words. Speak to me, directly and. I I've written about how in writing my dissertation. I wrote it on Andrew Jackson's plantation in Nashville Tennessee, and I often read a lot of African American women fiction as in many ways away to see it was like a way to heal and to to stay kind of whole into to read things that were made me feel as if I was not alone. Do boys is words. Due very similar things for me. Because how does it feel to be a problem is an and the problem with the twentieth century is the color line? Yeah. The idea that. We have a president President Barack Obama. Yet as an African American. I'm not I look around at the kinds of things that happen in. We constantly have new words to say what these are. It's it's it's post racial at the same time. Right, right. The emergence of microaggressions. And what does it mean to for me? I teach most of my courses were about slavery there about race about gender there about the intersection of all these things. A majority of my students. Do not look like me. How? The ways in which I walk as as an African American woman who is a scholar who is a teacher. I live in an academic world that is somewhat hostile to some of the lessons that I teach some of the research that I do it's. Two boys is words, whether there are one hundred years old or one hundred and fifty years old they are very prevalent today. They are very. They are present in how. I teach my children how to walk through the world because it's very important that I was a quick with the tools to be able to to handle academia. And and I like academia because I it's kind of in some ways not a real world. But. But yeah, we don't keep going. It is. But it is. I mean, but what if I if I talk about race, and it makes people uncomfortable. I I know that that's a learning moment. And I think that do boys is conversation about blackness about whiteness about the the idea that I know that I live. And I look through veil. There is a double consciousness because right? What can the devil consciousness one ever feels his Tunis in American negro to souls to thoughts? So that's that's real for you that still it's very real. Because the way the way I'm speaking to you right now, the the the ideas on the books that I've read and the research that I do in all of these things are a very much a part of who I am. But at the same time, I grew up. I'm part of the hip hop generation the soundtrack of my life, the things I listen to and not often what my colleagues listen to. I'm from the Bronx. I when I talk to my friends on the phone from home. I don't speak like this. There's I there's there's what we call code switching. There's what we call is. I know how to speak to to a donor. I know how to speak to I I still there's. There's there's my accent. Is there my personality? Is there? My passion is there. But yet there is this double nece in which I walk in the world with because to be completely honest. Whether I have a PHD or not if I go into a store, there's still a chance that I'll be followed based on what I look like. And so that double consciousness that idea that race racism is in still in existence in an operation is very much a part of what do boys talked about? It's not it's not necessarily about I could possibly evoked the talented tenth which. In some ways is often very misunderstood in a contemporary light. It wasn't the ten percent who be comes educated at and leaves behind the masses. What there's a responsibility that that tenth has with the uplift of race as he described it, you know, I was NF as I was reading you and getting to know you and and reading him really struck also by. This. You know, he was I dunno somewhere. I think it's in you know, one of the preface it someone wrote to one of his books. He was the great black intellectual of American history. Which is probably a little, you know, there are probably other great. But there are other great Plunkett. But he is certainly right. You know, he one of the absolute great black intellectuals and in his time. I mean, you know in nineteen three when he wrote the source black vote. I mean to use Barack Obama's word. It was a completely audacious thing to be to be a black intellectual the way he was to wheeled that fierce intellect. And yet, you know, I found also it seems to me that he also be in his global in his ability to see as you say globally, the life of the mind was also a refuge and a place that transcended this history. Right like, so here's something he wrote in this is of the training of black men. Sure. He would have written black men in black women. If you're ready today. I, but it's beautiful. Do you know this I sit with Shakespeare, and he wins his not across the color line. I move arm in arm with ball sock and do moss where smiling men in welcoming women glide and gilded halls from out of the caves of evening that swing between the strong limb to earth and the trae Serie of stars. I summon Aristotle and a Raliess, and what soul I will. And they come all graciously with. No, scorn, nor condescension. Yeah. His grandfather's name was a fellow really. Yes. Wow. A fellow burkhart is where is the house. He spent the formative us, and so the the reason why that it makes me smile because I'm smiling right now because. Sometimes sometimes what I read two boys. You know, it gives you goosebumps in some ways like this. How did he put those words together? And why does it happen that easily for me? But I think that. His mother. Was an amazing inspiration for him. But she pushed him in ways that are remarkable Mary Savina. Did not she was not well educated. She did not go beyond. I don't think she did high school completed it. However. Mary souvenir. Burkhard saw something before her in her son that I maybe she recognized or understood there was a certain level of talent that she had to grasp an and expand. But what happened was she looked at the world around her and factories were springing up in places like pittsfield in Stockbridge in great Barrington. African Americans were not being hired at those places. There was an influx of Irish immigrants coming which two boys writes about pretty not in good, terms and. This the industries that African Americans could kind of count on to work in and thrive in which word agriculture agriculture was threatened somewhat because of railroads and the ability for things to move quicker between place from place to place, and then even within the service industry. Remember, great Barrington. The berkshires has always been a place of vacations, and we're playing go to relax, so the service industry in the restaurants, and people who are cleaning and maintaining homes is shifting away from the hands or out of the hands of African Americans Mary Slovenia, and this is my interpretation Mary Slovenia's saw this and realize that there was one way that her son would be great and that was through education. He in among the Burke arts, he's the. Only one that went as far as he did. And he was valedictorian. His mind is just incredible. You talked about this before it started. Just leaps off the pate amazing. And women, right? His. I suspect and I haven't really investigated this. But I suspect that as a man of his time there was complexity to you know, how he thought about women and treated women. But the some of the messages, you know, I just know that's got to be true. But again, you know, thinking about him this prescient figure who belonged more in this century than that. You know? I mean, there's this writing he did in. Oh, this essay the damnation of women. And again, this is dark water. When did he write that was that early? Twentieth century also. Yes, nineteen nineteen. I mean, if you think about how well, so, you know, he, you know, these the ways he reflected as a man of that time on you know, when in this world a man comes forward with THAAD Dita vision, we asked not how does he look at? What is his message? It is a passing interest. Whether or not the messenger is beautiful or ugly. The message is the thing that he was thinking about that. And then he says what is today? The message of these black women to America into the world. The uplift of women is next to the problem of the color line of the peace movement, our greatest modern 'cause. One. Now, two of these movements woman and collar combine in one the combination has deep meaning in. That's pretty amazing. When you think about how the women's movement in this country grew out of women becoming awakened in the civil rights movement. Not. I is this is this is this an important piece of him for you. Yes. I. I think and everybody is is. Not in agreement. I had a review or that disagree with some of my. Assertions about. Two boys and women and not necessarily completely calling him a black feminist. But the problem that I have is that for me. Feminism should never have an M. It should always have an S on the end feminism's exist because we're all complex people. The fact that the crisis the literary arm of the NWC p he employed and published many many women in a moment where that was not common practice, which meant that. He is written essays on on everything from birth control to write then he was even thinking about those things. It's it. It's it's calm. It's complicated. At the same time. He later in life. After the death of his first wife. I want to say maybe not the after the death of his son Burkhard who died. In infancy, he realizes that all of his time spent away from home had to impact as wife, and he realized how much. That hurt him. And so it's because it hurt her. And there's you know the way in which he talks to women in his personal life is for me is telling of a man who understands and has written that if our women are not equal than this. Civil rights movement will not work. So there wasn't. There wasn't integrity to do. They his ideas matched his behavior in in his private life. Right. But I but again, two boys is so complex. And if you talk about him in nineteen ten or nineteen thirty or nineteen fifty he's very different his changes, his views. He changes his mind. And he says he's old enough at a certain point that he can which is why you know. You know? And I the critique of this reviewer. Talk specifically about his condemnation or his dismissal of either be wells and some of Miami Hershey Wasim. I would be wells. She had a big play in the anti lynching movement. Okay. And. She. I think so I see I do my research on on that. Okay. Well, it doesn't matter. Just right. But the idea that he wasn't one hundred percent supportive of certain movements. Right. That could demonstrate his affinity with women who were against the destruction of black men and black women and discrimination, etc. I think that it's problematic because we can't hold onto the standards for which we have today. Yeah. Yeah. And and and that for me is why I like to use that the concept of feminism's because for me, I don't look I don't I don't find a lot of strength in the suffrage movement because I don't think the suffrage movement. Whether we include suggesting the truth or not for me, the suffrage movement did not speak to the the needs and difficulties that black women were experiencing. I think that even the civil rights movement to an extent and second wave feminism to an extent held African American women to a decision, which was I is it race or is it gender, right? And I think that do boy. In a very complex an eloquent way demonstrates the idea that these two things influence and shape each other. They can't it's difficult. I can't separate those two aspects of my identity in order to fit into a movement. And I think that boys giving voice to women in the crisis him writing on particular topics that could have been seen as extremely controversial in which the NWC P often did not agree. And he was fired. I believe twice as editor of the crisis because of his views. So you're talking about him writing in a very bold and audacious way his conversation with the nation about women. Whether it be in the crisis, though, so it would probably be mostly contained not entirely contained within the African American community. These are topics that even the African American community might have been a little unsettled by. Yeah. Yeah. Right. I so much of what he's saying. I it's hard to imagine, you know, most of it didn't land. Well, right. I mean so much of it. There is no place for it to land. It's amazing. Yeah. I I know where I this. I feel like I could talk for hours on. I know I think we just booked on. Our I wanna ask you about something that puzzles me as I look at the especially the biographies, especially the acclaimed biographies of him. They they tell the story of a political person and completely strip out all of his that, the spiritual the very, vigorous, spiritual nature and all the religious imagery in his writing. Now, I I know that he had a complicated relationship with religion. But that's a very big piece of him. And it's a big piece of his rhetoric. And again, the the symbolism he uses now, I'm pretty intrigued by so I think like, you know, it seems to be that. There's this kind of simplified line that a lot of these biographers have drawn between saying he wasn't traditionally religious. So this doesn't matter. And so then I like, so then I learned about you and and their religious tradition in which your children are now the third generation. Which is this recovery of which was an which is another way of being African American and religious say something about that about the the tradition you belong to. So I grew up. In is a lot of ways to say it, but it's basically a African traditional practice. That began southwest Nigeria in a place called euro by land. Was brought here through the middle passage slavery. It's very much alive in places like Cuba, and Brazil, and those are places that had an influx of African people well into the nineteenth century late nineteenth century, and those are places where it survives most rigorously more not stronger, but there are millions of practitioners of this faith in the United States. Now. And I grew up my grandparents were all. Well, once I was baptised. The other side was church of God in Christ. Which is a holiness. It's very than large African American Pentecostal charismatic. Yes. Yeah. Yes. So I. And the the interesting thing is is a lotta times. Also, when I when I initially do field work and things like that, I've gone to a lot of churches where I meet people, and this is where I engage with communities and. Sometimes they ask me. You know, am I am I saved or do? I my Christian. They don't actually ask me if I'm Christian. They I think is usually along the lines of two I believe in Jesus. And I I I have to refrain and say I believe in God, I believe in one God. And. Because the assumption is I'm African American. So I'm yeah. Christian. Or Muslim if I'm radical radical in the sense of. A tradition. That's very much a part of New York City and African American communities steeped in black nationalism. Right. So I come from the group that did not feel that Christianity or Islam spoke to them and spoke to their spirit and provided for them the strength, and and just the connection that they needed. So. Nigeria is a very complicated place, especially right now. But. African traditional religions are under assault in on the continent of Africa because of event will Christianity Islam in the sense of of what is acceptable and their practices that I want to say in a certain way are kind of. I don't want to say underground. But it was described to me once as there's an aspect of of African traditional practice that is a part of your culture. But then you have religion. Yeah. Right. And this interesting complexity is is is diff-. It's not separate for me. Because I grew up understanding the different forms that my family practice Christianity. And for me. I have no problem going with church be going to church because for me gospel music. I listen to what I love it. And because it speaks to me because it makes me acknowledge my ancestors who were not African traditionalist right? And I cannot separate myself from them because they did not call God a loaf. Like I do. Right. So so that's that's that's what I'm that's kind of why I can understand relate to do boys. Because when I when I read him I understand that his dedication to his race. But his dedication to humankind is a very spiritual thing, right. His I think he was extremely spiritual in the ways in which he describes his world. The love for his land the love for his people. But yet, it's the the actual ways in which people who claim a certain amount of faith treat each other that for him does not compute. It does not. There's no way. There's no reason why rational people should behave in ways that eliminate marginalized and discriminate against a people because of certain past or because of some kind of philosophy that that is seemingly different from your own. And I think in some ways Mary Sylvania has mother was influential in him understanding, the I don't want to say dance. But the the ways in which he writes. Is. Is a part of his spiritual. He was he was in the church with his mother, he heard, and you know, to be honest as other part of him that I have to say, although she was a member of the great Barrington. First congregational church. He was very much tied in attached to. Clinton AME Zion church aren't and for him that was beautiful. That was wonderful the Fisk jubilee singers were probably one of his most favourite things in life and that negro spirituals at its final. Well, he writes so much about the spirituals which and he writes, and the fact that they were called sorrow songs MandA. Yes, he really really gets to the root of that. I mean, you know, I it's again, it's really hard for me to think that an Abaga offer of deploys could think that what however you wanted to find spiritual and religious that this is doesn't matter when you know, the first essay in dark water is Crato, and I'm going to read this this these first lines, which really as you just described the the fusion of culture and religion and religious tradition. You know, he says I believe in God who made of one blood all nations that on earth, do dwell. I believe that all men black and Brown and white are brothers varying through time and opportunity in form and gift and feature but differing in no essential, particular and alike in Seoul and the possibility of infinite development. I that is so beautiful. Yes. I'm. And. And I think because it's that separation. I think that it's hard to. I think an perhaps it's it's an it's an easier way because of his embracing of communism very late in life. Yeah. But it it doesn't take away from. His understanding of of of people and of the beauty of an the spiritual. This there's so many things that are tied together that I've always seen him as a spiritual person you have. And I know an keep an example is the the to be completely honest, and to kind of really momentarily move back to what I was just talking about one of the places where my African traditional religion is strongest is on the island of Cuba. Last time, I checked that was communist. So how the way you walk in the way, you think and the way you orient yourself to to your environment. The people around you the the world around you is a part of that spiritualism that if it's if it's condensed into. One day a week or a particular book. The now has to limit the way you see someone as complex and and incredibly intellectual as do boys was, and and you know, he's not still alive. But the way I see him today. Yeah. And to say that he was communist, it's just so important. I mean, Americans don't really have much of a memory of the very different thing that meant in the early century. What it came to the latter part of the century? And and you know, I I know that he had some some kind of sympathy. I'm not sure how much relationship with the social gospel movement of the early twentieth century, which which was very resonant with a lot of, you know, with communist thinking or or or liberation theology. In in in, you know, Gustavo Gutierrez the in Latin America in the latter part of the. Twentieth century. It was it was taking the highest human ideals of communism. And and seeing in them some kind of, you know, bringing them together with the gospel. So I I, you know, I don't I think that it has there's actually a very robust lineage of bringing communism, and even even you know parts of orthodox Christianity together. But I have to stress that he the you was nineteen sixty one. He was ninety three years old. It was with trepidation that. He I've read the letter in which he joins the car America, the communist party USA, and I want to stress that because he did not join the large he joined the United States version of it. And it was he had he had been put on trial. At the age of eighty he realized that. His efforts to radically eight or to bring attention to inequality at a level where McCarthyism was. And McCarthyism age, Tim, I would say extremely well. Because for him, it, it is so difficult sometimes, and I talk about this some of my classes, why is it so difficult for for us to understand why African Americans would look at something like a system of communism or just the idea you have equal distribution of wealth. Yeah. In a country that benefited from free labor for how many years the concept of. Equally distributing that wealth is something that is not completely foreign for someone of African descent who does not see themselves as benefiting generation from. I mean, the United States. Sometimes I mean, it's hard to be African American whether our president is called and looks like Barack Obama or not there's certain levels of disparity that still exist that when we think about communism or socialism or the idea of going to a doctor and and being able to not pay for it. But be a being able to be treated not based on your class or the money in your pocket or your health system. Right. The idea he talks about healthcare, he talks about the welfare state. He talks about all of these things that are very resonant. But they're also. Someone could argue ideals that we have not been able to achieve at this moment. It seems to me he has such a complex and fascinating, you know, and wise analysis of the unfinished business of reconstruction. And and then it seems to me that a lot of what he allot of his diagnosis. Also applies to what we're grappling with now. Which is the unfinished business of civil rights, right? Right. So let me just ask you this. You two more questions, you know, this idea this famous sentence. If is the problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line. How do you hear that now? And you know, it is the problem of the twenty first century the problem of the color line. Does that still apply or would you would you nuance that statement, or do you think he would nuance it if he was with us now? I it holds true. But I think it would be nuanced a little bit. I think the problem and also I have to back up just a little because I'm an anthropologist, right? So. According to anthropologists the idea of race as a biological fact is not racist. A social construction race doesn't exist. Yet. The repercussions the material facts of racism is very real. The problem with the twenty first century. Is our. Our amnesty. That the color line exists. It took me a minute to try to. What that okay? Because it's it's when I hear post racial, and I hear. I it. And I understand there's a level of complexity with what race means to different people. And because to be completely honest. If we read some of the work of of of of scholars like George lips itch, which talks about the possessive investment in whiteness, right? We we have to be very careful that if we talk about race, we're not just talking about other with a capital. Oh, that's very nice. But we're talking about. And two boys discusses there really is technically no black without white. Well, right. And I this is another thing that he I mean, as you say, we know more now, we know things now even in the last few years about how much this is a social construct, right? That that he they didn't know definitively biologically scientifically, I mean, but you know, here here he's writing this essay called the souls of white folk, and he says, the discovery of personal whiteness among the world's people's is very modern thing a nineteenth and twentieth century matter. Indeed, the ancient world would have laughed at such a distinction the middle age regarded skin color with mild curiosity and even up into the eighteenth century. We were hammering our national mannequins into one great universal man with fine frenzy, which Nord color and race even more than birth today. We have changed all that. And the world to today, we have changed all that. And the world in. Sudden emotional conversion has discovered that it is white. And by that token, wonderful. I mean, he wrote that. I. I'm just speechless. Because I I he this is this is what I'm saying is the am nesia. Yeah. That is what you're saying standing. How completely overarching the ideal of races? It's like saying that Jim crow the Jim crow south. Segregation is over. It's illegal. Everyone must do. You must go to the same school. Yes, right now from this January first whatever year that does not change the practice. The thoughts the beliefs of generations of people law does not change the way people live and walk work in interact until it so. Yeah. And isn't that just? Again, isn't that? What we're we're figuring out. I mean, right. And I mean, even in this year of fiftieth anniversaries of civil rights all these milestones that laws did change and progress was made. But it didn't it didn't take this all the way. Yes. But I mean, I I do I I wonder I feel like we're at least I to me I wonder if it's progress that we're starting to be able to name. This fact, I don't know. I I think I think it is. I think that and and for me, I. I know that I'm only one person and I. But I know and part of the reason why I think I do what I do. And I teach the classes that teach or because it is about exchange. It is about even just making someone think twice about something that they've never thought about a teacher course race in the American Museum. I I have class, you know, most people I'd never thought about race in a museum. And I say, wow, maybe you don't have to. But I know personally, I walk into a museum. I'm not really the person you want to come into your tour because I'm where where are the other people? You know, I just and I look for myself. You know, I look for vestiges of of the fact that. Where is my representation, how am I represented along multiple lines and the INA or the the ability to walk through a space without ever thinking? That is just as important as thinking about how you're not reflected. Right. So it's it's marking and I don't want to say this in a negative way. It's it's it's understanding privilege at the same time as it is to understand how it feels to walk as that veiled other right? This this duality is a duality because of the world around us, but it's up to us in a lot of ways as we named these things. It's the possibilities are endless. And I I don't I know it's to a certain extent. It sounds a little pessimistic. But I'm an optimistic in the sense that the conversations that I have at my children are fascinating. Because they see themselves as they look at the world and they're amazed. And they want to see other places my eight year old almost eight year old son. You know, one of the things we that I joke, and I said well at some point I want us to live in a place, even if it's for a short period of time where where there's people that look like us that are all on the money and for him that was like that was this marked like seminal moment like really, and when I do work in other when I go to other places, and I bring back money, we have a discussion about what that means. And how what does it mean to had not just have a president of African descent? But what does it mean when everybody in the government looks like this, and there are places on this earth that looked like that? And and so it it expands us into not being. So I. Delated in narrow into thinking that the world thinks in black and white as we do in the United States. Let me ask you this. Have you have you talked to your kids about two boys? Or if you did, you know, what what would you and I'm kind of asking this question. And it's kind of a larger question to, you know, how would you begin to reintroduce what this man this mind has to say to us now? Yes. I talked a well. Yes, I talked to them about a lot of things. I'd I talked to them. About race. I talked to them about philosophers. I talked to them about, you know, Malcolm and Martin and. Two boys. And I think when I talk about do boys because they associated boys with you know, that that's mommy's work. It's all right. Okay. And but they also know he's from great Barrington. They've been out, you know, to his home site. And I think more along the lines of I try to talk about him. And you know, we we books on Rosa Parks, and and the civil rights movement. And but I the questions I think will come. I I talked to them about the kinds of things that he stood for the thing that stands out for my son is that he lived and died and is buried in Ghana that boy him is it do boys. Yes interests. My son really wants to go to Ghana, and he really wants me to be somehow work in Ghana for wise. I want to go to Ghana, and he was like, well, you could do work in Ghana because the boys went there, right? What one what would you have them? If he if your son at some point as it gets old enough. He started reading boys, and again, this would be advice to other people to where would you have him start? Oh. Oh. It. It would be the souls of black folk. Yeah, that's that was the first deploys book, I read, and I I want to say I was. Oh my gosh. I think I started skimming it when I was probably like eight or nine ten I thought it was interesting that there was this little music on top of this chapter. No. It was my my my mom's musical scores. And. Yeah, lyric my mom's. My mom's version of it is an old version, and it was teeny. So I thought it would be an easy book to read. It was complicated. Any any just final thoughts on? You know, what would you want to offer up to people in one out of heard of deploys that he has to offer them? Two boys. Think about the boys. Today. And I really in many ways, however, complicated and complex. He is. The spirit and the legacy and the words of devore's need to come alive again in this country. We have a lot to learn from him from the Philadelphia negro, which he wrote in the eighteen nineties to the souls of black folk his dissertation was about the suppression of the slave trade. I. Autobiographies span. So much that happened in our lives or in our history as a country, but I also want people to take away he was born three years after the emancipation proclamation, and he died on the eve of the March on Washington the things that he saw means that what ever you're interested in. I have a feeling that two boys wrote something on it. Do you have any like I, and it's you may not cause I'm terrible. These kinds of questions. Do you have a favorite line of his or? Favorite phrase or image? I'm still unpacking it, but it's. His idea of how he remembers the Burke arts and his family, and he talks, and I'm I'm gonna probably misquote it. But he talks about. It is the mothers and the mothers of mothers. Whom I seem to remember and the fathers are in the shadows. And I I'm still unpacking that because he talks, and it's is a couple more words that I'm probably missing net. But he speaks about the beauty of his grandmother. Sally. The the sadness. In the face that he remembers of his mother. And then he remembers his uncles and his grandfather as kind of distant for him. What what what what he remembers is these women and. In many ways that could have been because after he left his grandparents house, he went to live with his mother as she was a single mother, and I don't want to. And the reason why I say, I pack this, and I say this with caution because I don't want to create a double standard or reiterate a stereotype of mothers. As being the only thing that we remember what that symbolizes for me is that although the time he lived in it was his mother's and his mother's mother's. He's the quotas is mothers, and his mother's mother's that seemed to count. That's what it is. And the reason why stressed that is because of the influence of those women in his life. He as complicated as it was he always. His. Saw the liberation of women as part and parcel to the civil rights and the liberation of black people. So it was never about. African American men civil rights. Are we say even the civil rights movement the liberation of black people ended of humanity? Right. Yes. Yeah. And I mean, that's that's one of these things it suddenly this century's waking up to is women, women everywhere. Well, this is just really great. And I'm so glad my colleagues are with you there. So thank you for being part of this. And we'll, you know, obviously will you're getting to know lily, Mariah. We'll let you know what's happening with this. And it's just very thrilling. I just really loved our conversation crew. Thank you. Okay. Bye. Bye. Okay. Bye. Bye.

United States Barrington president Ghana New York City America Burke arts President Barack Obama Malcolm X New England Hartford Mary Slovenia burkhart Krista Tippett Burkhard Martin Luther King Mary Slovenia Kristie Tippett Nigeria
Wednesday 20 March

Monocle 24: The Briefing

31:39 min | 1 year ago

Wednesday 20 March

"You're listening to the briefing. First broadcast on the twentieth of March twenty nineteen on monocle twenty four. Live from the Dory. House inlands and this is the briefing on Monaco twenty four. I'm Ben Ryland coming up, the British Prime Minister Theresa may says she wants to postpone breaks it. But will the European Union agree to it? We'll also profile the outgoing leader of Kazakhstan who stepped down after thirty years in charge of the former Soviet Republic. Plus will find out about why China's ambitions in Asia taking a turn and a plan to build a huge border tunnel between Slovenia and Austria all that ahead on the briefing live from London. The UK's Prime Minister Theresa may will run to the European Union today to request a short delay to Brexit. It comes just days before Britain is set to leave the block by default. Will let's get more on this now with the political commentator and regular monocle twenty four contributed lands price lands. Welcome back to the show a short delay. Do we know how long well, yes. To the end of June is what they'll be asking full. So that means that Britain doesn't have to take part in the European elections. And and therefore the cliff edge as it's been described simply gets moved to the end of June. But that is only if the other countries and every single one of the other countries in the European Union all twenty seven of them agree to a show delay and the signs are that they're very skeptical about the value of doing so and one might look at that and say we'll fair enough to because not a lot has changed in recent history is. They're an argument for looking at that and thinking, well, maybe the e you will agree to a change. But it's going to be a lot further away. Or there's going to have to be some sort of indication as to well. What for? Yeah, I'm in the certainly not going to turn round tomorrow in the European summit starts and say, yeah, that's fine. Okay. You can have the end of June. And they I imagine they won't resolve it tool, and we'll have to come back to a separate meeting next week, which is literally days hours away from Brexit happening. And they are quite sensibly. I think from their point of view stick into their guns, which is to say that if there's got to be a delay. It's gotta to be because there's some material change in the situation in the United Kingdom. And there's no evidence of what that change would be. So am I think actually this probably the summit that's coming up this week? We'll be a bit of a damp squib. They've got other things to talk about quite frankly, negative, his board with the Brexit is as most other people are and that. Next week in in parliament is just going to be it's going to be extraordinarily Brexit talks ending in a damp squib who would have thought what if the delay? That's often is only a long one though, how's that likely to change situations here in London when if it's only a long one, then the UK parliament has to decide whether or not to go along with that. And I think if you look back to last week there was no ten then there to get the parliamentarians MP's themselves to take over control of the timetable, and so not only failed by two votes. So if next week we're back in a situation where the only option available was either a hard Brexit literally days away on Friday of next week all along extension, which the which the European Union is willing to agree that I think parliament would assert itself, and they would be all kinds of moves and attempts to get that agreed at the same time to resume will. I'm sure be trying to get. Both through again, and she'll be presenting an pays and the and the eurosceptics, and the Brexit is with exactly what she wanted to present them with this week and last week, which is it's either my deal, or it's a long extension which could lead to no Brexit at all. So she she hasn't stopped flowing the dead holes. There is this I suppose fear in Europe that if they were to agree to a short delay that they would then be asked to agree to another short delay potentially in the future in another one. After that is there some God against wanting to protect against sitting some sort of president the might be looking this insane. Well, we can't we can't allow a delay. If it's only going to mean more delays into the future is that something that they're going to be absolutely. I mean, they they they don't want to be played by trees million and the British government in that way, and they have their own institutions to be concerned about and also the interest of each and every one of their Member States, but in particular island, and those are always going to come come first. So. Don't think the option of. I mean, this is taking kicking the kind down the road to a new extreme. Where actually your go to Europe and asking them to help you kick the can down the road that just went into it. And I think if they all much as they disapprove of the idea and dislike the idea would have to do what they can to prevent the idea of Britain leaving without a deal that will come point at which they think actually if that's what it has to be. Then just go the prime minister as you asserted earlier has been putting more or less the same question to parliament over and over without success regarding Brexit, the prospect of asking voters, whether this current situation is what they really voted for is often shouted down as an assault on democracy or similar such wording. Can you see a scenario in which people are once again asked whether this really is what they want. It is possible certainly as possible. And I think I mean we've been saying for a long time that all options are still up in the air. But none of those options. Appear to have a a an obvious majority in the house of Commons. But I think the the idea of it going back to the people. He's he's growing in strength. And there is this option put forward by a couple of labor. MP's labour backbenchers that says, okay, we'll will allow Theresa May's deal to be polished. But only on the condition that then goes back to the people to see whether or not they endorse it, and that still has legs people are still talking about that quite seriously. So, you know, all of those options that can have to be thrashed out in a real pressure cooker environment in parliament next week. This of course is very big news here in Britain. You can't pick up a newspaper without Briggs at being in there somewhere usually on the front page, a brief glance at the newspapers across the rest of your suggests that much of the block has really moved on quite a bit from this. As mentioned, it's usually in the back pages in the middle pages, certainly not on the front page and this on the astronaut Michael really has happened. I was in Italy recently. And you most of the news was consenting Italian politics. Certainly know what's happening in Brexit at Britain, or the EU is do you get the sense that the rest of Europe, not just the EU and the institution of the EU? But really the rest of Europe has a whole has really moved quite a long from this. Yeah. They've I mean, they've got bored with it in a sense. But they've also moved on from it being a crisis for the European Union to one simply about Britain. It's a crisis for Britain. Britain's got to sort it out. And then we're going to play along with this very much longer. And and so beyond bewilderment and a certain degree of derision and a hint of sympathy for a once proud nation of finding itself humiliated in the way that it has. I mean, Theresa May's going back to the European Union cap in hand. Now, we were supposed to be taking back control. And and the destiny of this country is in once more back in the hands of the European Union because of the way in which these negotiations have been handled. How does that change things from the perspective of the year? Japan union, then because they are in they are in essence, a political organization, and they run on public sentiment. A lot of time and that really has altered quite a bit. As an does that mean that I suppose the lodge degree of strength is being restored to the EU in that they can look at this. Now as more of the domestic issue for Britain, not something that is gripping the EU as an institution. Yeah. But it does have a very big impact for them, the European parliament elections that are coming up in may of very very important to them and the existing sort of leadership if you like if you want to describe it that way of the European Union are alarmed at the kind of right wing nationalism populism that Brexit represents in many ways could spread throughout Europe. So they need to be seemed to be standing firm against that. So it is. I mean, you're right. They are all politicians. They have their own domestic concerns, and they have the concerns full European Union as a as a whole and and ensure. During that the the virus of Brexit. If you can describe it that way doesn't spread throughout the entire European political system is what concerns them rather than what's in the best interests of this country. The story rose on lands price. Always to get always good to get your insights. Thanks for joining us on the briefing. Chinese leader Xi Jinping says he wants to strengthen his country's global strategic partnership with Italy. Mr. cheese comments, come ahead of his visit to the eurozone's third largest economy. I'm joined now by Steve sang who is the director of the China Institute instituted so asked the university of London welcome to the program. Steve look, there's no shortage of grim economic headlines coming from Italy. What do you think is behind China's interest? Well, China has wanted to secure and -dorsements for is sexual Dow and road initiative policy for some Tom and most of the meat leading European countries have refused to do. So Italy is the first amongst the. EU nations that aren't doing. So and utility is also the first of the key seven countries which will give endorsement to the initiative. The wording there. I think he's quite interesting. He he's written that China wants to strengthen a global strategic partnership. We usually what do you think we can gain from that language? Well, the global strategic partnership really is a co name for the bell road initiative, and that is Xi Jinping's policy of a rich to the rest of the world losing Chinese money and infrastructural building capacity to spread Chinese infants in two countries that it has not have as much infants as it would like and getting it to the on board is therefore a very important deal for them. Now, this wasn't just the usual press release was at a he wrote in an article for the newspaper Corriere della Serra, it seems that he's not just speaking to politicians, but perhaps to people. Well, I think there is an intention for Detroit. These governments to reach out both to the Y that U talent audience and to the even wider eagle audience. So do you believe that this is part of a wider push not just within Italy? Then the bird perhaps to other parts of European Union as well, Steve, yes, is is the intention. But then of course, there is happening a few days after the European Union issue, a new document owned EU China relations, and in that document, the EU is now saying that in you really must watch that relationship, very carefully. That's the are complicated issues in laws also in terms of China as a strategic competitor rather than just a strategic partner. Steve sang, thank you very much for joining us. Now, a look at what else is making news today. The European Parliament's? Biggest block will decide whether to expel the party of Hungary's, Prime Minister Viktor Orban's later today fit is is a member of European People's Party. But Mr. Alban's verbal attacks on immigrants and the European Union have left many members of the group feeling uncomfortable people in the Netherlands of outing in the country's provincial elections. It's thought that populist parties could make gains following a suspected terror attack in the city of attract on Monday, pre election polls have indicated that Mark rotors center. Right coalition is expected to lose its majority in the Senate and Europe's first underwater restaurant opens in Norway today, it's called under which also means wonder in Norwegian and is located on the country's southern tip. It's already proving popular with Reuters reporting that seven thousand customers have pre-booked to eight among the fish. This is the bridge. Thing. Twenty past the hour here on the briefing will turn Nazerbayev who has led because stunned since the country's independence from the Soviet Union has resigned, although he has introduced some important economic reforms. He's rule has been largely unchallenged since nineteen Eighty-nine. Let's get more on this now with the foam of foreign correspondent Mary digest scheme. Mary has recently visited Kazakhstan Mary, welcome back to the program. I give us some background on another by of. Well, it is very interesting that he's chosen as it were to step back completely down because he retains two crucial posts, he retains and leader of the nation, which was sort of invented particularly for him. And crucially he remains the Security Council, but he's leaving the presidency. Of course is hugely symbolic not just because he's been there for so. Long. Because certainly I as you say, I mean, I was recent. I was there at the end of last year the question that everybody was asking was what's going to happen? When Nossa Tom doesn't five goes. And when might that happens, and how might not happen. And now, we know, but that question was being honest interesting with mixture of. Positive interest. But also with a degree of trepidation because knows by this really represented stability through the last thirty years. He's rule has been characterized by some of the homework that one might expect vocal critics of the government have been jailed in in relatively high profile cases. Well, that's unlikely to change those at Mary because I mean, as you say does by isn't really going from political fray we'll to ever. No, it would be very interesting to see what difference if any it makes. I mean, he's no Minet to these speaker of the Senate somebody cooled because mortgage coyotes to take over for what remains of his presidential term, which is actually a year. So we may not be looking for change of great significance before that year is up even then, but if you look across it was Becky, Tom when Islam Karima died, suddenly then everybody predicted that regime change, either it would be more of the same or it could get very messy. And in fact, there was quite a smooth transition and was Becca stone now is seeing quite a tentative, but quite a significant flowering of degree of liberalization and. The people in Kazakhstan who will be looking for something if the same now 'cause done was already more more liberal Sutton than the MS Beck is done. But the will be people saying, you know, we've had thirty years and the last ten years of this beaten degrade of stagnation, and this opens the possibility of change because stem. In his inaugural speech. The the new president that you mentioned early customer Jomon took Kiev heaping praise on the bio he called him an outstanding reform. He also floated the idea that the capital city, Astana might be renamed Nursultan after the former later it's almost like saying, okay. So we are moving on where entering a new age, but don't worry with still going to be very much in the hands of the former president knows it by of. Yes, I think that's because he'd been a widely such a stabilizing inputs in in a place, which could have really it could have descended into a degree of. Conflict after the end of the Soviet Union because because down the has the greatest number of all the central Asian states. It was the country with the greatest number of ethnic Russians. Certainly at the beginning. The we're not fears that the who are in the ethnic majority would return on Russians and quite the Russians who predominant in the north of the country when back to Russia. The current ratio is about twenty five percent of Kazakhstan is ethnic Russians, two-thirds ethnic Kazahkh. But something very interesting has happened in the law sort of five years, which is that after periods when Naza by really spearheaded an attempt to Cuza 'cause I stunned to boot a new national mythology. To make all the public announcements and presentations to be in Cuza, another by food only spoken Russian in public before the end of the Soviet Union. Switched almost effortlessly to give war his presentations in Cava over the last five years, they've changed policy. Now, you've got what they call a three three language policies that ideally should be schooled in Kazakh, language, Russian language, but also in English. They've also go to appropriate. I think quite soon to to have language in Latin script Nelson's severity. Eric. It will be fascinating to see how the change of power continues to play at Mary digest ski always good to hear you of used. Thanks for coming on the briefing. Thirty minutes past twelve here in London time to dive into today's newspapers with Monaco's culture, editor Kiara Ramallah Yara wishful, we start when I've brought you the papers of my home country Italy because I think it's quite an important news day that today. Most of the papers are opening on the news from last night that a NGO boat was in fact allowed to dock in the port of Lampedusa carrying fifty migrants. This is important because as we know the minister of the interior Salvini has been adamant as to not allow boats to disembark and he had prohibited. Or at least said that he would prohibit them to import they managed. There will be an question as to whether they the the people who did allow for for it to be docked will be prosecuted for favoring illegal immigration. But it's very important. They with regard to this issue. In Italy today because Salvini is actually speaking parliament. And there is a bait debates going on right now in the Italian parliament, whether when he did stop the migrant from this embarking last August with the case when there was a huge E you standoff, whether he will be prosecuted for alleged kidnapping of all the migrants that had been on the boat, then so there's a real conflict between the interests of the human rights activists. And whether this is a human rights problem or whether he has as an interior minister the authority to stop these things happening. There's a lot of political news coming out of Italy of domestically. Interested political news, where do you see this sitting on the agenda for most people? How does it sit in the media, for example, is is it playing out of something that perhaps neither top of people's concerns? As far as the political pages are concerned. Well, I think the dozen bucking issue in in in Italy is not an Italian issue. Mediterranean issue. It's a European issue. And the fact that Italy has had to feel the lot of these these boats in these instances of doesn't mean that it's an Italian issue. And I think the decisions are made within neat Harlem parliament about how Savini should be held onto account for this will be a lesson for for for leaders around Europe as to whether they can themselves refuse these boats to to arrive in their ports, and this decision may have a ripple effect on the whole of southern Europe. At least absolutely we'll keep our eyes on that unfolding issue here. Let's move along to some of the other newspapers you've put in front of you. Yes, I'd like to move onto La Stampa because on the front page. We have a story about Las scholar. So this is the main opera theater in Milan. What's interesting is that it has been a lot of controversy because the skull was discussing a plan with the culture ministry of the Saudi emerets to accept some funding. For the next few years and eventually after much controversy. It was decided that the three million years eight already received out of a plan that would have given them fifty million years will be returned and Lega, which is Salinas party has been very outspoken as to the fact that they didn't want to funding from from the Saudis, which I think is of cultural players are refusing Saudi money because of the human rights issues. The problem is that there is a touch of poker. See from Salvini from refusing this money when it comes from Saudi, and perhaps making an issue of not wanting international influence onto the Italian institutions when really there is a problem of funding with the Italian arts institutions and be a problem of double standards, in cases, it's incredibly difficult for a lot of places around the world to extricate themselves from the the web that Saudi Arabia has. Managed to cover the world in so many different ways. Here time is against as we should move onto your funnel story. I believe or to the cardiac delessio, we are indeed. And that kind of links to my point about Salvini. I do believe that Italy should know except Saudi money. Let's let's be clear about that. But here on the critical center, we have an exclusive piece actually written by Jesus Jing ping for the creditor because he's coming to Italy four for talks to discuss about an road initiative, which as we know is also hugely controversial, Europe wise, and what I think is very interesting in his piece that he's written. He talks about friendship. He talks about how China and Italy, respectively symbol of kind of eastern and western civilization in how their ties go back millennia, and obviously both the Chinese Andy Italians have been very I guess interested in calling the. Initiative and in referring to this initiative, not so much about them road. But as the new silk road because they they have interests and making it sound like it's very cultural and historical time between the two countries. So there's references to friendship as references to the fact that the Chinese customers love made in Italy fashion and design references to define that young Chinese customers love pizza interim sue so it's obviously a cozying up. A very soft approach to making to making this this these hawks sound like friendship agreements and giving them not kind of spin. It's a really interesting tone. Just finally on this Kierra tell me we apprised that it appeared in the Cutty outy della Serra because I looked at that and thought well, clearly he's trying to Xi Jinping trying to talk to people beyond his his typical audience, which I suppose would usually be done for a press release. We heard from Steve sang on this a little bit earlier in the program. It's it's interesting that he did choose to publish it in a newspaper. Can you give us an idea who is the typical Reto of this newspaper, Senator newspaper possibly attached to the center, right? But I think it's an informed. I it's I think the people who read the coulda are also the people who would read as as a counterpoint released to accompany the soil ventilator, also the financial newspaper, which okaying this is a broadsheet. It's one of the most respected in Italy. So it carries weight and no an extreme political leaning interesting way to get your message out there. Good to know that the Italians tool paying attention to the front page of the newspapers, though, Kiara Ramallah. Thank you very much for joining us here on the briefing. Just about to hit twenty seven minutes past the hour. Finally today, it's being revealed that the European Investment Bank has allocated nine hundred million euros with loans. Full huge infrastructure projects across Europe end. It includes funding for a border tunnel between Austria and Slovenia. So what should we know about it? Well, I'm joined on the line by Monaco's correspondent in Slovenia guide. Alana guy how big a difference will be making full the area. Well, it's pretty big. It's an eight kilometer long tunnel called caravan tunnel on. It's it's interesting because when be alone, then we do have a car of tunnel right now. But it's really been victim of pull forward planning because you might know about London's of sewage system one of his designed to the nineteenth century by Bazalgette. He had to look at what was needed the time doubled it on just for good measure doubled it again and London all to this day. Very grateful. His forward thinking we did. Didn't quite have the caravans tunnel which opened in nineteen Ninety-one. It was originally planned as a two tube tunnel. But then they thought out we haven't read the demand for it right now. Single tube will be enough with the wool nine each way. Guess what it's not enough especially not with the opening of the opening up of the Schengen area, that's increased traffic massively. There's also extra traffic coming from the second tube at the town tunnel as well so capacity, isn't that to meet the demand for the tunnel at the moment. So that's why you've got this expansion, the railway will very interesting as well goes back more than one hundred years, and I can tell you more of you like well is interested to know because in that area. The geography is not it's not straightforward is it it's going to be a fairly complex president. Who know it's up -solutely fiendish. And if you look at the passes, which go over the caravans Alps at the moment, they are. I mean, if you're a cyclist you'd love them. Now, I haven't been able to check my route maps of any of the grand tools to see whether they have covered them. But I wouldn't be surprised if they had the star. Does he got the label? And verts in the passes and these passes where the gradients are up to about eighteen percent at various points, though. The reveres challenge for for any cyclist or indeed any motivational tunnels through the kind of caravans are crucial as you can imagine to the smooth flow of traffic and the rapid flow of traffic through the region and the expansion of the rail tone. Well, it's actually a contraction of the rail tunnel it's going down from two lanes to one but again to increase the speed by turning the second track into a safety tunnel. And that will mean that can have faster speeds on the single track which remains which should make everything mature appeared. Oh, so as far as I understand it. We're looking at about four and a half kilometers of the tunnel being constructed by the Austrians three and a half had by these lenience is a done deal. We looking at mean have our our shovels in hand. Ben. It's going horribly wrong. Shovels just in hand in Australia, actually drill. In about seven hundred meters ready, but on the Slovenian side, they had water might be diplomatically called a procurement issue. They put it out to tender a deal. Agreed. And then the procurement authorities decided everything was not above board. And they're in a stage of the moment of repr- occurring. But also objections going in as well. So it could be quite a while before Slovenia gets it side sorted out. And this is one of those projects where you really have got to meet in the middle date. Hopefully, it will make things a lot easier than especially for opening markets in western reverse Lavinia, though guy. Well, it's always been a big big an important link this particular route through the caravans in the days of the Habsburg empire. They wanted to have Trieste open as the main port of trade said the directional raise on d'etre of the the passes and the initial rail tunnel in lighter days, it's not just for Slovenia. It's the main highway to European corridor. Ten. Which is known variously as e seventy or seventy five on European motorway network that stretch his down from Slovenia right through the Balkan peninsula up integrase, that's an absolutely crucial Lincoln, you can imagine what the traffic is like on that root all year round. But especially during the summer months when people from Turkey, especially commuting Tiven from the second homes in Germany and Austrial vice versa. I suppose going back to the place of the heritage in Dade. We'll have to keep an eye on when the tunnel finally gets up and running down and running as it might be a tunnel, but guide Launay, thank you very much for joining us here on the briefing and taking us through that big tunnel projected does tunnels through to the end of today's program things to allergies Reese James and our research Yulianto fan as well where we good rig and Nick money's also chipping in manager Christie Evans in charge of the button pushing today and don't don't forget to tell us how you listening to programming. Head over to our website, monocle dot com slash. Twenty four. So they would like to hear all about it. The briefing is back at the very same time tomorrow. I am Ben Ryland. Thanks for joining us.

European Union Europe Italy Brexit China Britain Slovenia London European Parliament Steve president United Kingdom Theresa May Soviet Union Kazakhstan Nossa Tom prime minister Xi Jinping Ben Ryland MP
#212 Continuous learning with Kate Rutter

UX Podcast

40:55 min | 1 year ago

#212 Continuous learning with Kate Rutter

"Before we start we just wanted to say up front. Thank you for listening if this or u._s. Podcast in general gives you joy them. Please visit you x. Podcast dot com slash support talk and say thank you by giving us little or as much as you'd like from just a few dollars to hundreds of corona by funding you x. podcasts together with james myself. We we can hopefully bring you eight more years of an independently curated you x. Podcast thank you for being wonderful you x. Podcast episode two hundred twelve yeah hello. I'm james lawson and i'm paddock's boom home. This is u._s. Podcast were in stockholm sweden and you're listening in one hundred eighty five countries from serbia to slovenia. Kate rudder is a a designer design educator and entrepreneur with twenty years building digital products. She's helped hundreds of petitioners. Bring customer empathy and collaborative design nine practices to their work case is an junked professor of interaction design at california college of the arts and co host the not safe for work podcast. What is wrong with you x. Along with line and like many of us kate has recognized that most professionals don't have time to continually expand their knowledge of new technologies and tools and yet our work relies on this very currency so we sat down to p kits brennan on how we can stay up to date in a world. That's constantly the influx. We told you on the topics of specialization the youth machine learning hybrid recruitment and we've got to hear about kits dream of becoming a truckdriver the three of us. We've been in industry a couple years now. <hes> <hes> something underway per before is just the the ship of change. We've we've kind of job before about you. Learn you learn a tool or technique in six months. It's gone and i know i can feel quite stressed by by the rapid rapid pace of change and it's stressful having to kind of keep on top of the outfielder. You need to keep them top do i. How do i yes that is i think when we signed up for this field and i think some people have explicitly signed up and joined this field other people have evolved with it. <hes> and i think it's interesting to see really the first cusp of practitioners hitting what i would call retirement age right like getting to the point where maybe their prime growth years might be behind them and yet our field doesn't really allow for that right so it's not an operational delivery delivery oriented field. It's about evolution and constantly adapting to what's possible and so yeah i i'm hearing more and more from practitioners owners within my network that the pace of change feels very different now and i think we've had a few evolutional shifts in this first five seen a huge huge amount of specialization even amongst generalists so you might specialize the type of organization and working with or <hes> the type of are you more on the generative concept acting side or the detail optimizations designed system site depending so he thinks that we've got so much breadth of material that judicious practitioners have i needed to make choices about where they put their evolutional learning because it's it's effort and it can be stressful. I also hear that <hes> skills rules are aging out so when you talk about two practitioners who are newer in the field they just have a different set of practical tools that the us that are <hes> <hes> also evolving quite rapidly so you you know i can't think of the last time i really talked to someone who's doing wire frames and then decide sometimes via from all right but for so many the people that was bread and butter for so many years so i think it is exhausting but i also preferred. Look at it as invigorating. I mean maybe it's the youth machine right and maybe maybe it forces us to stay learning an open perhaps against our own instincts and i think that's interesting because only now do we really have the seasoning. Twenty years in the field could offer us for this x. practice. I i do think <hes> elder practitioners such a thing. I'm not quite sure i want to go there but but vintage you name the age old also yeah to be totally clear. I'm trying to also also produce some of the barriers about older women in the workplace but so fifty one it's been interesting to look back and think that in some ways i still feel like i'm not quite adulting and my professional career because i always ended up being curious about things that haven't yet fully been adopted right so <hes> but then go get can get tiring. Take a nice to you. When you're working in a in a rapidly maturing industry that we are the same time as you know you're you're going through the the primary career and into the the lotta of your career yes. That's that's an interesting <hes> well judaism of events and <hes> yeah. He's challenging a few principles that i adopted fairly early in my career glad in hindsight that i did. I didn't even know doing it. <hes> and one is never worked for so many wouldn't hire hire someone. You wouldn't work for and it turns out. I've i've worked for people. I've hired right like this is not. I don't think of it. Our field has worked very well. When it's like a hierarchy move up the move up that quote totem pole word through up through organization and then you get to this leadership role and then you retire with a gold watch that world was over what i entered my career but we just didn't recognize it yet and so i think vit- having people tenures elder infield and tenures less elder like younger and a field i. I think it's a really important ballast to kind of figure out. What should i be learning. What are some of the newer adoption beliefs. I mean i'll never be digital. Native this was important at the time to accommodate that and there are mindsets and thinking tools that that people who grew up with technology inherent in their everyday behavior they have that i don't have and if i can't get access yes to that. I can't help design products. I can't think the right way about technology today as you to hopefully in a good way to keep your network network young keeper network evolving and don't get balkanized into this elder hood. That's inappropriate and unhelpful for your learning capacity. That's interesting because a lot of people are now talking about how us who have been in industry for a while <hes> are becoming more and more coaches and facilitators <hes> for others but that could also been asked. We're sort of giving up. Learning the new tools were also <hes> <hes> saying that what we know is the truth. Yes <hes> <hes> what you're seeing here. Is that really we should be learning from the younger generation who are actually be being the ones who are using the tools. Yeah i i like to look at mentorship is almost a reverse mentorship that is this two way equitable exchange between <hes> for you know what can some life experience help us understand and what can new new challenges help us understand and that needs is to be this to be street. I've never been very successful in strongly hierarchical environments and i i still get like my my hackles up. When someone says pay your dues and then you can actually do the good stuff. I'm like well. That's bullshit right like to start the good stuff because the good stuff constantly evolving and if there's work that doesn't have value. That's redundant boring or menial. I welcome come robot overlords right like i actually think that's worth automating. I would like to see design. Systems help automate a lot of the production work that you x. Designers have been doing as part the outputs for many many years. I don't know who else has had ever had to deal with it again. This is the hey kids. Get off my lawn like i i would like to save every practitioner from creating static wire frame interface ideas for multiple states for dynamic products like oh please save yourself from that pain like interactive prototypes and design systems should wait accommodate for that world but i grew up world so it's interesting to try like i don't always go to that next level of thinking it's a default. Is i mean that's a that's one of the examples of work. <hes> people have jobs that are that thing and nothing stops being maybe the most <hes> relevant tool than the naturally going to try and defend our titles defend our our worlds <hes> <hes> when you've been using a few brin maybe for a number of years and you think about how much of our digital tools have sidelined people for whom good earning careers ears for their customer support and now we have automated tools and really help with that or a printing and delivery or onsite sales folks. I mean a lot of retail. If you take look what's happening with the retail and some of the smaller shops not being able to compete in in this more digital delivery environment and and i think earlier later in in the evolution of digital services there is a lot of shoulder shrugging thing well too bad about them now it might. I don't want it to feel that different. One is us us like we should trigger shoulders too bad time to retool you know and i know that sounds really flip and i don't mean it that way but it's a serious shot across the bow you gotta retool so and with more and more you know we talked about the coming of the grade a. over the words but it's true a lot of the knowledge tolls are starting to be augmented the point so this is a secret. I won't tell anyone else just podcast listeners in here. One of my aspirations growing up was to be a truck driver and i told myself when i turned forty i would quit whatever is doing go to professional truck driving school. Try and save up and get rid. I would see the country. It's the the united states from you know from big and i didn't do it because like is interesting and you know didn't seem like a plan and now i realize i'll probably never get to drive a truck because no one will be driving trucks and so i'm like i didn't expect that job wouldn't exist always be there and <hes> and i miss that but i also am excited about the new opportunities that we don't know exist yet was one of those generations where we've we've actually seen not in the industries or occupations end. We're actually seeing commissions. Come and go. That's the eh. I guess there's not many generations of experienced can a full spectrum of things coming in and going out again. <hes> very very first ginger scenario in a <hes> navigational program. It's california college of the arts and i teach and i've been in the undergraduate program. So these are traditionally college nited states college age folks so so eighteen to twenty two th quite a few older students as well with more life experience and then there's a masters drew carey program so i get access to people who are in their height explicit learning years there's right and there's a lot about that system than they think is under flex but we don't need to go into but i was invited to address the graduating class for the master's astor's program and one of the things that i hadn't realized until i wrote the talk was held true for me and i would strongly predict would hold true for them as most the jobs they have don't even exist yet. So how do you train or getting educational background for something that doesn't exist and i think that's an interesting challenge and that's why i'm exploring these topics of ongoing continuous learning environments. It's really meaningful to me so so what is the challenge down because i will make you presume that you can't keep up because you can't predict what's going to be next <hes>. What are we trying to solve do we. Are we trying to find a way of working. That doesn't require the tools that keep renewing. That's a really good point about the practical tools. I think the tools had become reflected and easier learn much less specialized. <hes> i think consumer electronics listen consumer software has really helped specialized software. Just be more accessible so that's good but i think we need a hybrid between an explicit learning learning environment. What usually happens in an institutional can a big batch way like i'm going back to school or i'm going to school to do something and on the job learning which isn't gonna watch someone. I'm going to have someone who could maybe show me the ropes etc and learn things within the environment of the organization. I don't think organizations adapt very very well but they because you only learn with the organization knows how to do in schools. They tend now. I think to be more teaching the things that are happening now and then maybe a little on the cusp but not without a good kind of solid liberal arts is because of the state's liberal arts degree thinking how to learning how to think learning how to reason etc like any of the training already is perishable goods so i think somewhere between that explicit learning environment for an institution and the organizational learning environment which is very on the job and directed towards immediate benefit. There's gotta gotta be this hybrid between them and i'd like to think that we that are organizations can find more thoughtful ways to carve out time through about explicit learning and bring new ideas into the organization in a way that's not about an innovation lab or one evangelist that goes around and tries to cross populate <hes> and the institutions that we have become less classroom based more studio based and more partnership based with organizations that are doing interesting work so the concert to plan those worlds. We don't exactly know what that looks like yet. I think it's different for every company but three characteristics that i do you see in highly learning environments spiff specifically around companies are there is a real breakdown between who's a teacher who's a student so it's more learning partners earners because people bring different things can referencing our earlier topic about mentorship that people bring different mindsets when they learned together. They learn better. It'd be knowledge exchange evenings bearings exchange exactly <hes> i think being directed an intentional about where we put our learning efforts so it's not about less about tools else perhaps and more about here's a field or domain of that. I think our company could take advantage of or that. We see coming right and of course there's artificial intelligence machine learning right now very hot now deciding role because we don't know necessarily had to deal with it as practical tools so i think of defining field demand that you want to learn and making explicit steps intentional steps to it is a second one and i think the third one is finding a way to have that growth mindset recognizes witnesses little buzzword but like that growth mindset recognizing that that learning processes isn't an outcome. You're not like teaching to a test right. This is about about feedback and getting better and creating mastery in a different way where there is no in result and i think when that cycle of collaborative learning partners intentional <hes> domain pursuit and then looking at it. It's not done but intentional kind of ongoing doing that. You start to get a cycle of learning that can really benefit personal practitioners as well as organizations and that's what i would like to see more of. I think there's a lot of it out there but i don't i think we've codified the language enough to be able to point to it and say those people. That's that's a model that we can start using in our company until you see that clarity around d'amato. I don't see adoption happening and that's again coming from our twenty years in the field. You've seen it come up and down and up down which which point is best for us to dive in and start making a change. I'm just thinking here. Now we see so many jobs that list <hes> skills and some of the skills are maybe specific take pieces of of software or or tools and so on <hes> i mean would we help break the cycle by making sure we recruit differently. Currently we don't mention tools recruitment is that good place to start making it interesting places that breaking a because the most of the listing sting for tools and years on job and things almost always our criteria for reducing the number of candidates not for increasing them right so they're not those those specified skill sets are not about bringing new things into the company there about getting people who are immediately spun up exactly. It's very so you can just click into place yeah and it'd be more more interesting but also more complex is do you have is is questions like how how do you communicate interactive prototypes and so there's a variety of tools that are effective and what what might be a learning tempo for those for some people they enjoy playing around with new tools others. Don't as much wanna know the optimization of how to be productive with it. I think those learning behavior mindsets might be interesting about it. If you want someone who who is in a fairly operational and stable for the company raw and there is a tool set that's already been decided decided that the company is already productive with then whoever's coming in either probably should know it or be very open to learning it very quickly right. If it's someone who's he's not as open to learning something very quickly and they don't know it then maybe they're not the the best fit anyway but these like for companies to be more open about this is the set head of tools. We habitual use so that people can be tool up on something on their own. I mean so many of those skill sets her. Are i think a artifact of before you could learn shit on youtube right. I mean my gosh like you go to these. Lynda dot com was one of the only video really good sources of of of solid tools based learning before that you had to take workshops and trainings and things like that and now you don't you can go and you can get the platform. They're almost always subscriptions. You can subscribe during in your learning time you can learn the key pieces that you might need that were based on that job and then you can go on real think are hiring practices have reflected that it yet don't even get me started on hiring practices shitty wave krugman like eliminating. The people don't know adobe just just now in twenty nine to adobe. I don't think that should matter actually are adobe probably train them up to to be good at berkeley even if they're not sure will be but you even want companies that have are set up like that. This is the way we worked this. They are the tools that we always use because that means you always build the same type of thing if you have the same tool i think it'd continuous learning world the world the word it always is tricky right because right now currently might be helpful terms for that as well put. I would love to see what i've heard. Some people that are going in for interviews as the hiring team or individual is asking like what do you use and why. What does it help you do. That's different because that's an opportunity. I think that's the beginning of a mindset for we're bringing in new skills expertise instead of like using it as a barrier against hiring because then there's a potential for actually improving the way we work. Thanks for this person. We're bringing new said kit with the understanding you mentioned earlier about the the tools understand attend the why behind the tool is the is the most important knowledge effectively because the totally selfish transient. It's going to go but but the why why did you apply about tool in that situation is is your knowledge that's you. That's your rooms craftsmanship and that's where the master is really. Here's here's a tricky caveat that i think i hear tenths of from people who are in leadership roles hiring and that is there is so much thinki- you and there's so much possibility and opportunistic thinking and conceptual thinking that i think there's concern that people who who are hired cannot make stuff cannot make billable stuff cannot deliver stuff cannot deliver stuff on time so there are some basic working practices <hes> of a designer so three think are concerning for people the number of times. I've read like we don't need anymore. Design strategist suggest because the perception is that those people are thinking hand waving and kind of their way to a future possibility but it's not practical. It's not implementable bullet's not ship abol. It's not measurable some of those things that make businesses run really from nuts and bolts way so that's why one of the things i recommend for practitioners owners who approached me about like how will i make take my existing skills and move into you x ray because it's a growing field still etcetera and i work on personal projects and go through through them and i know that there's not a real client piece but how how close or can you get shipping software and managing it in the face of customer use because that experience experience is very very hard to get outside of a company you know and that's where you really encounter the thing that that that visual tool tool you know whether it's sketch or whether it's photoshop even i've seen illustrator when you design an interface if you're looking at kind of creating a mock in that and then you try and implement it like you learn a lot right. You'd better have your grid systems down because or have a platform kind of thing that you can use because implementing from one kind of tool to another kind of tools known challenge so make stuff build it c- fail break your heart you know inspire your vision and actually show how you get around those really nasty problems and then talk about that in a way maybe maybe not a visual portfolio and dribble talk about that in a process place on medium or on a blog where you grappling accept the challenge you had and the reflections and how you tell <unk> how you were going to solve them. I think that's the mindset that's really meaningful for companies to hire. There's there's always a story there. I had i had the chance to look at for folios <hes> <hes> some months ago and they were basically as as you know showing me screen dumps and sketches and i was asking them well what happened when you show this users what happened when you showed it clients. What were you doing beforehand. What how much did you learn and the the always hugely interesting stories but they weren't in the portfolio uh-huh so that was the easiest recommendation. That's fantastic. Put it in there. You're done yeah. Tell the story because people aren't hiring what oh you did. They're hiring for what you can do next for them. Yes beautifully said follow up with you on that. This is the argument paraphrase so easily. Do we have any kind of like take home advice for in the team of they can keep on <hes> being adjourned on just the way of producing software in the weather. They're thinking about the why that doing stuff. We have retrospectives uh-huh else. We can say to help them reflects and keep on keeping evolving. I wish i wasn't hesitant about saying thing this. I don't know why so i think there's lots of practices around mindfulness and personal reflection that are now appropriate within a company <hes> so beyond feedback and assessments which i think is how we measured success in companies. I'm curious about journaling applications. It's and real intention and the <hes> the openness of getting feedback even if it's very hard to hear <hes> from teammates and then think about what behavior changes would help me help a practitioner better adapt and being very reflective about that in a personal venue so i i love a written journal. I know that that there's digital journals. <hes> i think for sketch motors i've seen an interesting trend for personal reflection through visual taking as well. <hes> journals and diaries are just for offline use you know they're they're really tools for self growth and self reflection and so i think that's that's the fodder by which then you can go back and look at it. You've made it explicit. It's not floating around your head. More which i also think is a huge deal like w s. t. like steph down and then go back to it. Pull out the things you think are true or not true or meaningful and important priority to work on and then make those intentional in the neck kickstarts that part of that cycle so i have a variety of organizational behaviors that are bizarre and get very excited about things. Sometimes i ignore good feedback and insightful directive help. I'm trying to of course change over time but i'll never forget that when when i was the company that after the path we had a very rigorous i think the one of the best learning environments i've been in and very intentional very congenial <hes> but also very directed and so i got some distressing feedback at the time is so meaningful though that i was freaking people out because i was like way agitated cycling pretty very high stressed you know all the things that happened in this kind of pressure cooker environment and <hes> as basically told the chill the heck out right probably good advice vice psycho high one of the things that was advice given to me by the c._e._o. At the time who was my advocate we had kind of an interesting organizational structure for that we we didn't have managers advocates and their job is to help you be successful in the environment because it was hard and you didn't report to them but other other people can talk to them and then there would be an intervention if you needed your advocate because they were committed to you being successful that was a very personal relationship that was meaningful and so i was given the advice to chill out and he said why don't you come up with a phrase that you can use the owned that you feel comfortable with that. You can tell other people when you're doing this behavior. They can self check you by saying that safe phrase. It was like a safe route and mine was calm and simple. Keep a calm <hes> make it basic and i actually had a fellow colleague cross stitch that for me on my desk eh this artifact at you know it was really meaningful to have her investment in that but to this day i'm like when i start freaking out and you'll feel it you just say hey hey common simple and it's a phrase that i accepted so i'm not going to be like relax. If someone tells you like calm down oak guaranteed. That's not helpful. I'm not it didn't come down especially if there's a power dynamic identify gender dynamic man. That's a very inflammatory but if you've said when i need to calm down please tell me this and they know that then it makes it a better self adaptive behavior as long story for ken very little release except that that kind kind of reflection happened through a lot of journaling through a lot of thinking about it so that i could be calmer and simpler conversations about it. I think that's a beautiful sword because it comes back to we know no and should acknowledge of course that we are not perfect and we have these weaknesses and if we can acknowledge the weaknesses and beach spared about them to our colleagues and the people we work with an and even provide them with tools to give feedback to us. I mean that's beautiful and and opening the door to them. Yes you give them the phrase. You <music> gave permission even able them to help you help you. My agreement was not to freak out angry when i heard it right which was easier yeah because it's like i felt like it was on terms that i could understand so it's excellent now. I need to find my face off as let's see yeah. Fortunately i hate to say this but you probably can't find your phrase but i'll bet other can tell good point. That's such a good point. It's a co creation asian moments. We'll find each other's sweets. I'm asking thank you very much for joining us so thinking reflecting about everything kit said <hes> also you meet me me you anne kit part of what we're forty forty five forty six and fifty one we all three of us have our twenty plus years in the business <hes> so you know we're we're. We're in a particular group. We're all from the sim-. Ish group group called different spans different countries but we're not we're not millennials who are not people coming up in the beginning of their careers but sam reflecting a saw. I came across <hes> report by deloitte called the twenty. Why so twenty seventeen global human capital trends hugely relevant hugely relevant reading. I think on the this episode so click on the link on this show us and and look at this at the beginning of the report says employees now enjoy the prospect of sixty year careers yet at the same time. The half life of skills is rapidly falling and then they have a little <hes> graphic to help support this so the length of career sixty seventy twenty years average tenure in job four point five years half life of a learned skill five years yeah so that's half of learned skill. Let me after five years something you learn. You probably don't move it them. That makes sense to me but also i think that what you were saying about the three of us being having been doing this for so long. I think also what we have in common. Is this this desire to keep learning to always be learning so we are part of that crowd. We've always been doing this and and now it seems that yes this is the way that everybody has to be doing it in the future yeah well. I think i think our branch our industry does have the as one of its i mean we talk about the definition and what can be and so on but that kind of endless curiosity acidity is one of those <hes> call skills. I think of the people i mean a lot of people we know. We talked to that more willingness. Uh willingness to let want to learn and accuracy about things around us is what makes us the people. I think what's draws us into this branch. In many ways early agree nova another staff from the report forty. Two percents of millennials said they were likely to leave the organization because they were not learning fast enough. I love that it makes you realize how important of course it is to actually have a workforce that keeps it's learning and it to even keep them but it also makes you realize that we're no longer about climbing a ladder with an coming up to manager opposition. It's people are more interested in and evolving themselves becoming better at what they're doing or doing something completely different or doing a hybrid of things. It's just you don't know yet which in many ways is so positive because a lot of us. Don't want to end up doing the manager role because we want to be. We want to be practicing our skills so we want to be doing doing the stuff rather than managing the stuff so so that that we don't have kind of a formal hierarchical career ladder anymore is very positive thing for many individuals and we people now expect such a long career ahead of us we expect employees employers to help us continually rian reinvent ourselves they could be part of that journey <hes> to to move move move from roll to roll and and find that true calling on all on new calling to be true collins was new calling if if we're having having to reinvent ourselves so so regularly the camp because you don't know what that next job is going to be because dodd job doesn't and exist yet they like kate was saying yeah exactly actually what i was thinking about when i was listening back to our chat with kate was the whole recruitment thing we didn't get a whole lot into it but when i think about is we map out the competences we have in an organization and then we look at so what are we lacking and then we recruit to fill that gap breath but that means that we assume that we're aware of the full spectrum of what that complete team mean so even if we instead we are open to bringing in people who breath who could do things that we couldn't predict we could create an opportunity for quickly growing our potential for innovation and growing as a team that you just be open to the fact that you may not know what you need yeah that makes it more interesting to recruit well. Yeah i mean if <hes> again another thing from the report pau. I'm gonna keep going back to this. It was saying software engineers and other professionals reports similar figures need to redevelop skills every twelve to eighteen mums abs half-life of skills five years we. We feel that we're having to learn news. Every six months. People are moving jobs every four and a half years years and learning redeveloping their skills every year. You're in off then that means that you don't know what's coming. It's a lot this of isn't invented yet every year. There's going to be something new so your recruitment hoster has to reflect that you need to get people on board <hes> who who can collaborate <hes> develop and pick up new things and unlike oval all things so the primary skill or what you should be asking is not. What do you know award. You know. This thing is how fast you learn. How willing are you to learn her house. It's just different how fast you fast. I don't want to get into a situation where eh realized. That question sounded odd as well but yeah it. It's it's it's shifting. We can agree on that. It's it's something else that you don't want to focus on. What people know now now you want to focus on creating the people can thrive and learn new things yeah too much folks on the speed and then i'm gonna get stressed again about like i said the very very first i opening line of an interview with that doesn't make makes your heart race when you realize you've got to learn yet another thing in in no time at all certain but he always learning stuff becomes maybe less stressful because it becomes learning becomes best line what is baseline for us exactly but but i mean one one one positive i mean now. We're kind of talking about all this. These long careers and having to relearn new skills is that we don't know what they are yet and change jobs all these things but i think a positive thing a real positive thing for for those in our branch is i think we're at the center of the stage in all this reading like this. This report recommends <hes> what he talks about especially in in relation to design it saying that the the design the collaboration that design thinking iteration in a bit of business understanding those are the things things are people need to be learning whereas that's actually that's exactly what we do so we are where everyone else. He's hitting so what we tend to call design. Thinking is really a process a way of thinking learning how to think learning how to reason and learning how to analyze how to make sense sense of thing yes that is what everybody's learning and they teach that in business schools now as well yeah. I don't think this is this is really exciting to feel that you may be the center. Serve all or or you kind of the crest of the wave your your leading but are you fool as well. I don't really like to put ourselves up. They're like we're so sort of leading the way in that sense either because it's important again to keep learning like like kate was talking about <hes> how she's learning from younger people who've always always been immersed in technology and that they bring something else to the table. I mean i'm not i'm not saying that those being the center of the stage or kind of groundbreaking breaking isn't gonna make it easier. The journey is going to be you know. It's still going to be difficult. Maybe or other. It's definitely going to be different. <hes> and i think he's probably healthy to be aware of the fact that the the other industries out there are looking at our industry and pointing out a bit of a role a little yes. We're in a good place and go plus. I think we've we've you know it's good to remember that. We're some of the triple teething eating troubles that we're having our because we're doing this in an possibly. I mentioned this in interview that we we go people. Oh now who've who've kind of seen seen in an industry be invented or come up here and seeing similar things vanish do not full spectrum from birth birth to death. We've in our careers and this is. This is something not so. Many of them are live through so exactly and we're always open the learning new things like we've talked about and because if we weren't open to learning through we were protective or not over gnarliest and we would just be creating barriers to to growing so we we know that by sharing our knowledge we actually learn more by the feedback we get. Yes exactly so <hes> links to read. You'll find those on u._s. Podcast dot com in our show notes and we'll also send them out as part of our backstage email which you can sign up to at u. X. wchs podcast dot com slash backstage. If you were <hes> you want suggestion listen to next and i know you do then we're going to recommend episodes one hundred thirty eight and one hundred and thirty nine which is a two part chat. We had a couple of years ago <hes> with jenny yep green blue and melissa perry about education and leadership. Remember to keep moving. See you on the other side. The knock knock who's four eggs for eggs who for for example like half a sentence. Was that work really stupid.

Kate rudder california college adobe james lawson stockholm professor united states serbia youtube slovenia sweden d'amato krugman melissa perry