35 Burst results for "Slater"

The Trial of Sacco and Vanzetti

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:25 min | 2 d ago

The Trial of Sacco and Vanzetti

"The crime itself took place on april fifteenth. Nineteen twenty a security guard named allesandro bernardini. And a paymaster named frederick param mentor were delivering the payroll for the slater. More shoe company factory in braintree massachusetts. The men were carrying two large steel boxes full of cash when they were approached by two men and shot dead in the street. The two men took the boxes of cash containing over fifteen thousand dollars and fled in a waiting car to make very long story short. The police suspected italian anarchist based on previous similar crimes. When running up a lead on the getaway car they found connections with people who had weapons that mashed the ones used in the crime. This led them to sako and vans. eddie when asked about guns. They said they never owned any yet. They were carrying firearms on their person at the time they were placed into custody and charged with murder on may fifth and the trial began june. Twenty second i'm vastly over simplifying the case at this point and how they were arrested but suffice to say they were arrested and this is where the real story starts. The trial was a mess on many different levels. The prosecution relied on ethnic differences between the italian defendants and the jurors. There were conflicting testimonies. The witnesses claimed that they saw different things and they had different stories for each defendant. There was conflicting ballistics testimony. The defendants politics were also brought into the trial to prejudice the jury against them. It was also brought forward that both men went to mexico. Nineteen seventeen to escape the draft for world war one. A defense committee was founded soon after their arrests. But they didn't really help during the trial vans eddie. At one point claim that their defense was so bad that they might as well have been working for the prosecutor's on september fourteenth. The jury took only three hours to find both men. Guilty of murder after the indictment. It's believed that the galliani organization began a bombing campaign in retribution in addition to a series of mail bombs sent to us embassies around the world. They were also responsible for the wall. Street bombing of september sixteenth. That bomb killed forty people and injured one hundred and forty three. It was the deadliest terrorist attack in american history up until that point at the same time of the trial. Most people in the country still hadn't heard of soko and vans eddie. The trial itself was really only reported on boston. It was only after the trial when the reports of how these men were treated were made public that the men became a cause celebre.

Allesandro Bernardini Frederick Param Braintree Eddie Massachusetts Galliani Organization Mexico United States Boston
Derek Chauvin's Murder Trial Heads to Jury Deliberations

What's On Your Mind - Encore

00:50 sec | Last month

Derek Chauvin's Murder Trial Heads to Jury Deliberations

"The murder case against former Minneapolis police officer Direct showman in the death of George Floyd has now gone to the jury and Ed Donahue has this report. In closing statements, Defense attorney Eric Nelson said It wasn't a lack of oxygen that killed Floyd Drug ingestion. Huh? A bad heart. Diseased heart. Hypertension. Prosecutor Steve Slater told the jury showman had to have known what he was doing to Floyd. He heard him but he just didn't listen. Continued to push him down. Slater also pointed out it's all on video that force for nine minutes and 29 seconds that killed George Ploy. He betrayed the badge tape from court TV show Bin showed little expression. He took off his mask as his attorney, presented his closing statement.

George Floyd Ed Donahue Steve Slater Eric Nelson Floyd Minneapolis George Ploy Slater BIN
Murder case against ex-cop in Floyd's death goes to the jury

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

Murder case against ex-cop in Floyd's death goes to the jury

"The murder case against former Minneapolis police officer Derek show open in the death of George Floyd has gone to the jury in closing statements defense attorney Eric Nelson said it wasn't a lack of oxygen that killed Floyd drug ingestion and the bad heart the diseased heart hypertension prosecutor Steve Slater told the jury Chauvin had to have known what he was doing to Floyd she heard him but he just didn't listen he continued to push him down Fletcher also pointed out it's all on video that forced for nine minutes and twenty nine seconds that killed George Floyd he betrayed the batch tape from court TV show been showed little expression he took off his mask as his attorney presented his closing statement I'm a Donahue

George Floyd Derek Show Heart Hypertension Steve Slater Chauvin Eric Nelson Floyd Minneapolis Fletcher Donahue
Dallas Cowboys Reach Multi-Year Deal With Star Quarterback Dak Prescott

Blogging the Boys

05:22 min | 3 months ago

Dallas Cowboys Reach Multi-Year Deal With Star Quarterback Dak Prescott

"Salary cabin number for two thousand and twenty one is going to be twenty two point two million dollars all right now. Head dak prescott. In franchise tag again this will happen in a procedural sense but had to cow tried to go at this with dak prescott on the franchise tag for the two thousand and twenty one season. We've talked about this a number of times. That value would have been thirty. Seven point seven million dollars so the fact that the cow is now have him onto the books. We're talking about the value that is on the books in the books. However you want to look at the books whether they're e books or physical books whatever the case may be that value is now twenty two point two million dollars now. I know that we have all said some things about the dallas cowboys but they are not complete dummies. They surely budgeted for the franchise tag value. Because let's be honest. They came about twenty four hours. We think you know. Close to having the actually placed the franchise tag and maybe carried out with that prescott. So the cowboys have room for the franchise tag at the very least so you look at that quake matt that adam schefter was kind enough to do for you. That is fifteen point. Five million dollars that the dallas cowboys suddenly have because they've got this long term deal with that prescott. This is something that we've been saying for two years now. If you do this you can. You can kick this down the road. You can prorate it you can extended you can whatever term you want to put on it. You can spread the impact of the deal out of the signing bonus of the overall guaranteed money out over the lives of the contract so it doesn't hit you all at once. That's the one killer about the franchise tag is that it is fully and completely guaranteed in franchise tag is a one year deal so the value of it last year and dak prescott was on the tag for thirty one point. Four million dollars. The two thousand twenty dallas cowboys had to absorb that value all at once and they would have had to have done it again. Here in two thousand and twenty one but because they have adjusted that they now have fifteen and a half million dollars that they were seemingly budgeting for dak prescott that now they can apply to different areas. Maybe it is a safety. Maybe it's a defensive end. Maybe it's a defensive tackle. Maybe it's you know an offensive tackle. But they want swing tackled death whatever the case may be. We know that the cowboys obviously hold the tenth overall. Pick in the draft. They could go a number of different directions there. They wanna cornerback kayla farther patrick's retain do wanna take one of the tackles and rashawn slater as all this is. This is setting up and this is an important thing. I want you to hear me here and watch me here. You cannot waste this money. If dallas cowboys the whole point and getting this done with thac prescott besides obviously establishing having the best player on your team for the foreseeable future the point in doing this is to alleviate the salary cap space now. And i don't like the term when now if you watch us often you know that but you look state of the nfc east. It is by sudha. I mean the philadelphia. Eagles are a disaster. The new york giants doping daniel jones is legitimate. The washington football team has a great team but is void of the most important position of the game and a quarterback. Maybe they'd get somebody this cycle as we all expect quarterbacks to change teams at a higher rate than usual but the case in point is at the dallas cowboys are now. We're going to see this all day on tuesday by the way and we'll talk about it of course but they're going to be overwhelming favorites to win the nfc streit and you think about the conference that they plan is really a contender in the nfc. And i mean that with all due respect to the reigning champion tampa bay buccaneers. But you've got the bucks you've got the green bay packers and then who scares you. May maybe the rams you believe in matthew stafford but the point is thinking about the afc. I mean the. Afc has the bills and the ravens and the chiefs and the titans and the steelers and the browns. I mean you could go. A number of different ways. Did the colts have carson. Wentz ends up getting his act together and so the cowboys play in the weakest division in the weaker conference and so now they have this opportunity to really kind of take their future in the here and now they have fifteen and a half million dollars that they weren't necessarily planning on having use it and if they don't use it it is all for not so i mean we are all imploring the dallas cowboys to ultimately use this salary cap space. This is a very very very luxurious gift. That they now have been afforded that they didn't previously have so shattered of course to the dallas cowboys. Let's see here let's move. I'm i wanna talk of course about the bonus the dak prescott because well. It's stupid large. I mean it's amazing. Dak prescott has now the largest signing bonus in the nfl. You look at joe flacco. Once upon a time. Got forty million. Dollars matt ryan forty six and a half. Remember if you're on the fence about this value. We've talked about this before as well. Matt ryan became the first quarterback in nfl history to average over. He had thirty but to average at least thirty million dollars per year with his new contract that he signed with the atlanta falcons in two thousand and eighteen. That was three years ago. Dak prescott signed a four six year. Deal whatever you wanna call it. That was three years ago. They matt ryan signed that he was the first quarterback to hit the thirty million dollars a year. Mark prescott just hit forty but the reality and we've been saying this forever is that there are so many deals coming around the bend. Josh allens gotta get paid. Lamar jackson's gotta get paid. Baker mayfield's got to get paid extra calories. He's going to get paid the year after that. It's going to be time for joe burrow to finally get paid and when all of those players get paid this forty million dollars a year. Mark the dak prescott got this one hundred twenty six million dollar. Total guaranteed is sixty six million dollar signing bonus all these things that are currently the top of the nfl. The most in nfl history. That's the verbiage in determining that you're hearing associated with this and it's all literally true but it's all going to get pushed down because all of these players on this list. Joe flacco matt ryan matthew stafford at fifty million signing bonus. Aaron rodgers fifty. Seven and a half russell wilson not going to be a dallas cowboy now by the way sixty five million dollars. Dak prescott topped that all of these quarterbacks in all likelihood we'll top that that's the reality of the nfl things are always moving in one direction. It is up

Dak Prescott Dallas Cowboys Cowboys Prescott NFC Rashawn Slater Thac Prescott Adam Schefter Matt Ryan AFC Daniel Jones Sudha Kayla Matt Matthew Stafford
Boston nurse among health workers headed to Super Bowl on Patriots plane

WBZ Afternoon News

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Boston nurse among health workers headed to Super Bowl on Patriots plane

"Path Path won't won't be be playing playing the the Super Super Bowl, Bowl, but but their their plane plane is is down down and and kick kick Tampa Tampa being being put put to to very very good good use use WBC's WBC's match match Shearer reports for the past year colorist Drapeau has been working tirelessly as a nurse at Mass General Hospital, but now she gets a much deserved break. What and are not to be invited with all these healthcare superheroes. Represent them. At the Super Bowl. 76 Frontline doctors and nurses got to fly like champions in the Patriots team plane. They even got to meet nine time pro bowler Matthew Slater. What you people represent is the best of us plain looked a bit different than when Matthew last got to ride in it. There's a new decal on the side that says, Get vaccinated a message. That means a lot to Paula. As Jennifer Lopez saying Good, Good love. I say Google fascinated everybody at Logan Airport Match your WBZ. Boston's news news radio. radio.

Super Super Bowl WBC Drapeau Tampa Mass General Hospital Shearer Matthew Slater Super Bowl Patriots Matthew Jennifer Lopez Paula Logan Airport Google Boston
Stocks jump as GameStop craters

San Diego's Morning News with Ted and LaDona

01:35 min | 4 months ago

Stocks jump as GameStop craters

"News about your money was Sully brought to you by bay Alarm, Putting the pro in protection hater selling God, Ted stocks poised to extend gains Yeah, I was gonna say guys, but with eyes on vacation, and that's good. We're extending gains for the second day of trading. So 100% of the days in February now have positive days. Uh, for first talks. Investors are encouraged by the news and the pace of the vaccines in the U. S. The prospect of more fiscal aid from Congress, we gotta decline in the frenzy. Of Reddit Gamestop am seeing such and also a big Slater earnings reports in focus. We saw good earnings from Fizer and Exxon Mobil before the bell. Today, we're gonna see some mega cap stocks like Amazon and Google parent company Alphabet Reporting after the close, it's a big day for earnings with the latest Q four numbers from alphabet in Amazon. After the close, all 30 stocks in the Dow are up led by Chevron and UnitedHealthcare, and we're having a smoking day on the Tao up 575 points. That's 2%. That's on the Dow boy. I sure hope you guys on the exchange traded fund DEA or what they call the diamond. That's a basket of Dow stocks. That trades is one exchange traded funds, so it's actually really cool. I don't own it, but I wish I had Dow Jones up 576 30,078. There's S and P up. 62. That's 1.6% at 38 36. NASDAQ Up 1.5% another Great day on NASDAQ. On 87 there and 13 5 91 on I'll tell you what gold sinking badly today down almost 1.5% dropping 24 bucks announced down to 18 39, so fingers crossed it does come out of these traders are gonna come out. Okay, coming up

Fizer Alphabet Reporting Sully TED Amazon Exxon Mobil Reddit U. Unitedhealthcare Congress Chevron DEA Google Dow Jones
Model-Based Offline Reinforcement Learning with Aravind Rajeswaran

The TWIML AI Podcast

06:26 min | 5 months ago

Model-Based Offline Reinforcement Learning with Aravind Rajeswaran

"All right. everyone. I am on the line with arvin. Roger swaran arvind is a phd student in machine learning and robotics at the university of washington. Arvin welcome to the tuomo podcasts. Thanks famine federal pleasure. I'm really looking forward to our conversation. Motto based offline reinforcement learning is the topic of research papers called morrell motto based off. Find me enforcement learning. That topic has come up quite a bit over the past year or so It's getting quite popular. And i'm really looking forward to digging into your take but before we do. Tell us about your journey and how you came to work in our l. and robotics chip pretty interesting question my undergraduate background. Actually in something completely different. I was mostly doing big statistic and lucrative like chemical engineering as my formal degrees and i took a machine learning class by professor of in back in india and that kind of transformed my perspective on things that essentially had matt very similar to what is used in statistical it so i was able to pick up on it pretty quickly by the obligations. Seemed like really really cool. So i wanted to maybe fever debate and focus more on machine learning. And so that's how i moved into the bronx field of ai and when it started out i had more of a theoretical inclination ben. I started working with my adviser. Professor shawn kakabadze. Who's like an expert in machine learning theory on be discussing like what might be interesting projects topics to work on or we felt was start matz. If the research decide in machine learning deep learning was largely explanative nature so deep learning was already working really well and the gresh any hard. We understand explain. Why deep learning working enforcement learning. What was interesting is that we actually didn't have very good algorithms things. Were actually not working that ball. And there was a very interesting scope to have like an interplay between teary analogous from both develop new algorithms to break very well and also tried to explain why it is working than gain a more fundamental understanding and that sort of been might be at the joining us electric to show board they. Competitively goodra sauce ended the same time having a theoretical bench to my work. Nice nice and as the large focus of your work been on model base are l. in particular or have you explored a wide variety of topics within the space. I see interesting in model based in fort learning relatively recently the i'm i think about my research at least in the last couple of years has been the central question of. How do we make a. How do we create agents that can solve a diverse set of tasks with a modest amount of expedience but each individual dos and this is of course a very broad question that the number of different fields including multi task learning micro. Learning offline learning. And so on that constitutes space of problems that have been thinking about what you think is really cool approach algorithm to make progress on these domains model based startled so i view model based on. That's providing the mic toolkit to make progress on questions related to multitask turning meta learning offline. Learning got got so maybe the best way to go through this is to start from the beginning And have you kind of explain the. I'm curious the way you explain. Model based rl. And if it's you know the extent to which it'll be different from other explanations we've heard here on the show so let's start there. Yes so. I guess maybe i could try to merge some of from model based on offline learning on. What got me working on this project. I'm hopefully doing that. There may be an explanation for what is model based donal on. If you think about firmament a moment blake questions and computer vision are be the questions. There tend to be much more ambitious and interesting than in traditional reinforcement. Learning for example. The questions to be still asking learning are how can we solve a particular tastic pickup. A particular object with the robot solve a particular game with. Ask me more samples as possible. This is very different. From how people phrase digressions and computer vision for example offs kennedy chanukah detector with ten samples can attain got victor with twenty points. That's just not an interesting question. The questions are the how can i identify. What is the object. An image of thousand categories much more broader in scope and much more ambitious daily. Use a lot of will get to make that happen. Mine goal was to try to emulate that in reinforcement joining us. Now if he start thinking about how can an agent which flows in a very complex A kitchen for example. There are so many things that it can do the cabinets they clean bans the setup dishes and so on the dishwasher on the speed of things that the robot can do so much more diverse than what that means is we need to be able to use the data to extract as much information about the world as possible and i believe models are the we accomplish doctor just given a particular state of the wall some either league and explicit stately things that particular joined configurations of the robot throughout the different objects in the armour richard descriptions such as images and video slater scans of assets points to any potential action that the robot can take how would the world evolving change on if you are able to learn such a model it modern sculptures many of the details that want about the world on on the basis of what we learn. We can then downstream from finding and reasoning in order to accomplish necas of interest. So in my mind to go back to your question what is a model. I believe it is. How would the world respond to any changes be made potentially making the former factions

Roger Swaran Arvind Shawn Kakabadze Arvin Morrell University Of Washington Matz Matt India Donal Fort United States Kennedy Richard Necas
Three Patriots selected to the Pro Bowl

WBZ Afternoon News

00:48 sec | 6 months ago

Three Patriots selected to the Pro Bowl

"The Patriots were selected to the Pro Bowl stuff on Gilmore, Matthew Slater and Jake Bailey. Not on that list. Cornerback JC Jackson, who is second in the NFL with eight interceptions. Just one behind the league leader. Jackson not being voted in has some other players around the league, voicing their frustration on Twitter like Philadelphia Eagles corner, Darius Slay, who was a three time pro bowler himself. He made Jacoby Meyers tweeting in part eight picks and didn't make the Pro Bowl. Wow. Bill Belichick, meanwhile, says that Jackson is a very talented player that keeps on getting better, very double locate the ball when he turns around, and I'm gonna fax the ball and turns around confined in located. He's got very, very good skills in that area that he's done A good job of, you know, improving, you know, every year on I think he's still got a lot of good football problem and the

Matthew Slater Jake Bailey Jc Jackson Darius Slay Jacoby Meyers Gilmore Patriots Jackson Philadelphia Eagles NFL Bill Belichick Twitter Football
Original Third Eye Blind Bassist Jason Slater Dead at 49

Hammer and Nigel

00:23 sec | 6 months ago

Original Third Eye Blind Bassist Jason Slater Dead at 49

"And one of the original members of the rock band. Third Eye Blind has died. That's on there is never let you go. Jason Slater, who was the basis for the band died at the age 49 from liver failure. Slater was a part of third eye blind in the early days before he worked with other bands. Third eye Blind is sold around 12 Million records

Jason Slater Liver Failure Slater
Dallas Cowboys make handful of roster moves, activate Brown from IR

Blogging the Boys

03:00 min | 8 months ago

Dallas Cowboys make handful of roster moves, activate Brown from IR

"Tyron Smith is now gone for the year it was announced on Friday two days ago Mike. McCarthy confirmed the report from NFL networks. Mike Fellow and Jane Slater Day before Mike McCarthy confirmed the tarrant Smith will undergo season ending surgery next week the cowboys are hopeful that he'll be back in two thousand and twenty one the Dallas cowboys already down there other offensive tackle in Lyle Collins Who Unlike Tyran Smith did not play a down this season. Also, it's worth mentioning that Travis Frederick. Retired shortly after Mike McCarthy took over as head coach his replacement if you want to call them that in Joe Looney. A sprained MC l. he is scheduled or slated I should say to miss the next two to three weeks just depends how that's going to go tyler beyond the cowboys fourth round rookie out of Wisconsin. Same place they got Travis. Frederick. Of course, seemingly is a much more stable option than anybody that's going to replace tarrant Smith or Lyle Collins but I bring all of this up to say that when my McCarthy. Signed his contract to be the head coach of the Dallas cowboys he did. So with likely knowledge that at the very least tired smitten, Lyle Collins would be playing for his football team and quite possibly unless you knew at the time that Travis Frederick was going to retire the Travis. Frederick. would be playing as well. So he's now down sixty percent of the offensive line he thought that he. Would have their many defensive players that are out Joe McCoy. One of the teams biggest off season signings is gone because he got hurt on the first day of practice and so this this team and where they are a month into the season is very different than the one Mike McCarthy sat down implant. That's all I'm saying it is definitely true that you have to adjust in the NFL. That's life things happen injuries happen with stuff happens that sports that's life like I said and so Mike McCarthy ultimately has to be held responsible for that because he's the head coach that's the hat that he wears, but it is worth saying and that's why I said now let's talk about some of these injuries and some of the roster moves the Dallas cowboys made ahead of this game on. Saturday day before this that you and I are talking day before game. Day the. Dallas. Cowboys made a handful of roster adjustments. It had been rumored all week long that Anthony. Browne would be returning from injured reserve and remember that injured reserve operates differently due to cove nineteen protocols and now nfl players only have to be on injured reserve for three weeks before they are eligible to return Anthony Brown. Is Eligible to return. It was speculated all week long that he would rejoin the cowboys they are in massive need of help in their secondary. So they officially Anthony Brown bag he is the first player that the Dallas cowboys have brought back off of injured reserve so far this season other candidates for this potential obviously include Sean Lee late and vanish. We'll see about cam irving things like that. But Anthony Brown I one. So the cowboys activated Anthony Brown. He is now part of the fifty three man roster, of course. So is Francis Bernard a fan favourite linebacker, undrafted free agent linebacker out of Utah many people, Francis, Bernard in the training camp portion of the year. Obviously no preseason he is. Now on the fifty three man roster, the cowboys have needed massive help in the linebacker. Department So far this season

Dallas Cowboys Mike Mccarthy Travis Frederick Anthony Brown Lyle Collins Tarrant Smith NFL Cowboys Mike Mike Fellow Dallas Tyran Smith Offensive Tackle Joe Mccoy Francis Bernard Travis Frederick. Joe Looney Wisconsin Utah
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

Scientific Sense

44:57 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Mark Hoffman, Research Associate Professor at the University of Missouri, Kansas City - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new Ideas Affect Society? And, help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense. Dot? Net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense dot com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen Dot Info. Mike yesterday's Dr Mark Hoffman, who is a research associate professor in the University of Minnesota Against City. He is also chief research inflammation officer in the children's Mussa hospital in Kansas City. Kiss research interests include health data delayed indication sharing initialisation Boca Mark. Thank you for inviting me. Absolutely. So I start with one of your papers Kato you need the use by our system implementation in defy date data resource from hundred known athlete off my seasons. So Michio inflicted. Data aggregated for marketable sources provide an important resource for my medical research including digital feel typing. On. Like. Todd beat to from a single organization. Guitar data introduces a number of analysis challengers. So. So you've worked with some augmentation log and in almost all cases be used. Data coming from that single macy's listen primary care behavioral. Or specialty hospitals and I always wondered you know wouldn't be nice. Get a data set. That sort of abrogates data from the radio on-ice. Asians but a lot of different challenges around that. So you wanted to talk a bit about that. I'd be happy to the resource that we've worked with. Is primarily a called health fax data resource. It's been in operation for almost twenty years. And the the the model is that organizations who are. Using these Turner Electronic. Health. Record. Enter into an agreement was turner they agreed to provide data rights to sern are. The identifies the date of affords aggregated into this resource. And certner provides data mapping, which is really critical to this type of work. It also the aggregate the data. And for the past probably six years. Then, they provide the full data set to especially academic contributors who want to do research with that resource. And I've been on both sides of that equation Lead that group during my career there, and then now I have the opportunity to really focus research on that type of data. So before we get into the details smog so e Itar Systems. So this is. Essentially patient records. So he gets dated like demographics out family history, surgical history hats, medications, lab solves it could have physician nodes no snow. So it's it's a combination of a variety of different types of data, right? A couple of things on the examples you gave it includes demographics. Discreet Laboratory results Medication orders. Many vitals so If access the blood pressure and pulse data. It does not include text notes because those can't be. Automatically identified consistently. So. We don't have access currently to TEX notes. Out of an abundance of caution. That his Hobby Stephen, physician writes something down they could use names they could use inflammation that could then point back to their. Patients Makita Perspective been the data's aggregated, the primary issue shoe that date has completely the identified, right? Correct. So. So yeah. So the data that we receive there's eighteen identifiers. Hip requires be removed from data. And those include obvious things like name address email addresses are another example One of the. Things. That is also part of the benefit of working with this particular resource. The. Dates of clinical service are not allowed to be provided under hip. White is done with this resource that allows us to still have a longitudinal view is. For any given patient in the data set the dates are shifted by A. Consistent. Pattern that for any given patient it can be. One two three four five weeks forward or one, two, three, four or five weeks backward. But that preserves things like day of the week effect. So for example, you see -nificant increase in emergency department encounters over weekends and you don't WanNa lose. Visibility to that. but it also allows us to receive. Very, granular early time stamped events in so. We can gain visibility into the time that a blood specimen was collected, and then the time that the result was reported back. And so we're able to do very detailed analyses with this type of resource. Right right and I don't know the audience our market is fragmented. Tau himself e Amorebieta providers out there. and so two issues. One is sort of. Standardization as to how these databases are designed and structured and others even that standardization that the actual collection of the data. In itself is not standardized played. So vk CAV vk potentially lot inability coming from different systems. Correct and that's part of what the paper that you mentioned Evaluates so. Often, night you out in the field in conferences you hear. Comparisons kind of lumping all organizations using one. Vendor lumping all using another together but as you get closer to it, you quickly learn that. It's not even clear. It's within those. Vendor markets. There's variation from organization to organization in how they use the e Hr and so. Because the identities of the. Contributing organizations are blinded to those of us who work with the data. We have to be creative about how we. Infer those implementation details, and so with this paper, we describe a couple of methods that We think move things forward towards that goal. Yes. So I'm not really familiar with that. So you mentioned a couple of things here. One is the the merge network. So this initiative including electric medical records and genomics network and pc off net the national patient, centered clinical research network support. Decentralized analyses that goes disparate systems by distributing standardized quotas to site. So this is a situation where you have multiple systems sort of. Communicating with each other and this net folks at allowing to sort of quickly them In some standardized fashion. So In this type of technology, there's janitorial core models. One is the. Federated or distributed model, the other is a centralized data aggregation. So there are examples including those that are mentioned in the paper where. Queries are pushed to the organization and. They need to do significant work upfront to ensure that there are standardizing their terminologies the same way. And once they do that upfront work than they're able to perform the types of queries that are distributed through those. Federated Networks. With. Okay. So that just one click on so that the police have standardized. So all on the at Josh site, then they have like some sort of a plan slater from from Stan Day squatty do all the data structure. And in many cases, they work through an intermediate technology. that would be. In general, consider it like a data warehouse. And so the queries are running against the production electric. Health record. That has all kinds of implications on patient care where you don't want to slow down performance. By using these intermediaries They can receive queries and then Follow that mapping has occurred. Than, they're able to to run those distributed queries. Okay. And the other model is You know. You say the g through the medical quality, improvement consortium and sooner to the health facts initiative. So this says in Sodas case, for example, in swags. This is essentially picking up data from the right deals, clients and Dan standardizing and centralizing data in a single database is that that is correct. One benefit of that model is that Organizations who for example, may not be academic and don't have the. Resources to do that data mapping themselves by handing out over that task over to the vendor you get a broader diversity of the types of organizations so you can have. A safety net hospitals you can have. Critical access rural hospitals, and other venues of care that are probably under represented in some of those. More academically driven models. And clearly the focus on healthcare about I would imagine applications in pharmaceutical out indeed to right I. Don't know if it s use and bad direction there has been some were performed with these data resources to. Characterize different aspects of medications, and so it does have utility in value. In a variety of. Analytical contexts. I was thinking about you know a lot of randomized clinical trials going on into Kuwait context and One of the issues of dispatch seem development toils that are going on that one could argue the population there are not really well to percents. it may be number by Auditees, men, people that deputy existing conditions. and. So he will serve at my come out of facedly trial. granted might work for the population. Tried it minority have sufficient? more largely. So I wanted this type of well I guess we don't really have an ID there right. So clearly, you don't know who these people are but they could be some clustering type analysis that might be interesting weight from It's very useful for Health Services Research and for outcomes research for you know what I characterize digital phenotype being. they can then guide. More, more formal research. you know you can use this type of resource to. Make sure. You're asking a useful question and make sure that there's likely to be. Enough patients who qualify for given study. Maybe you're working on a clinical trial in your casting your net to narrow you can. Determine that with this type of data resource. And is the eight tiff date who has access to it typically. So for this data resource on, it's through the vendor so. You need to have some level of footprint with them. which is the case with our organization. They're definitely a broadening their strategies. So they're. Gaining access into health systems that aren't exclusively using their electronic health records so. It's exciting to be a part of that that process. and to again work with them to. Analyze the data. I think. To the example you gave a formal randomized trials. In key part of what were growing our research to focus on is because this is real world data. You learn what's happening in practice whether or not it's well aligned with guidelines or formal protocols. And doing that there's many opportunities for near-term interventions that can improve health outcomes simply by. Identifying where providers may be deviating more from. Best Practices in than taking steps through training and education to kind of get them back towards those best practices. This data is a fresh on a daily basis. It's not. It's because it's so large and bulky? Typically we've received it on a quarterly basis in since it's retrospective analysis that's not been a major barrier. But. mechanistically, on onto soon aside is data getting sort of picked up from this system that it's harvested every day and then it's aggregated bundled and distributed on A. On a different timescale. Okay okay. So. From again, going to the, it's our system designed issue and implementation You say many HR systems comprised of more news at specific clinical processes or unit such as Pharmacy Laboratory or surgery talked about that. But then then people implement them this of fashion right they they implement modules by that can be a factor or sometimes they may want. One vendor for their primary electronic health record, but another vendor for their laboratory system. and so that's where you don't see a hundred percent usage of every module and every organization. And detailed number of different you know sort of noise creating issues in data one. This is icy speech over from ICT denied ten. and I don't know history of this but this was supposed to be speech with sometime in twenty fifteen. That's correct. So there is A. You know. There's a date in October of Twenty fifteen where most organizations were expected to have completed that transition. When I see with researchers who aren't as familiar with the you know the whole policy landscape around `electronic health records that? you can imagine researchers who assumed that all data before that date in October is is nine and all data after that date would be icy the ten. While we demonstrate in this paper, is that that transition was not Nearly, that clean and it was a much more, you know there are some organizations who just It the bullet and completed in twenty fourteen, and there are other organizations that were still lagging. In. Two Thousand Sixteen. Potentially because they weren't as exposed to those incentives in other things that you know stipulated the transition so. Part of why were demonstrating with that particular part of that work was that. you know these transitions aren't always abrupt. Yeah and and and so that is one issue and then you know a lot of consistency inconsistency issues fade. So we see that in in single systems and one of the items note here as you know if you think about the disposition code for death. you could have a right your race supercenter, right? It's a death expire expedite at home hospice, and so on. if this is a problem for a single system, but then many think about aggregating data from multiple sources this this problem sort of increased exponentially. Absolutely. So one of the challenges with documenting and and finding where you know if a patient has A deceased that. There's just multiple places to put that documentation in the clinical record. The Location in the record that. We have found to be the most consistent is what's called discharge disposition. By as we show in that analysis, that field is not always used document that and so if you're doing outcomes research and one of your key. Outcome metrics is death. And there are organizations that. Aren't documenting death in a place that successful. You should filter those out of your analysis before moving forward. And so part of what we wanted to promote is the realization that. That's the type of consideration that needs to be made The four. Publishing. Your data about an outcome metrics like death that. You're not. If you're never gonNA see that outcome it doesn't mean that people are. Dying in that particular facility, it just means it's not documented in the place that successful. Right. Yeah. So you know you on your expedience. Unique Position Mark because you you look at it from the from the vendor's perspective you're in an academic setting you're also in practice in a hospital. What's your sense of these things improving the on a track of getting getting this more standardize or it's camping in the other direction I think in general there is improvement I think The. Over the past eleven years through various federal mandates, including meaningful use and so forth. Those of all incentive organizations to utilize. Standard terminologies more consistently than was the case beforehand. I think there's still plenty of room for improvement and You know it's it's a journey, not a destination, but I think things have improved substantially. I was wondering there could be some applications of artificial intelligence here to In a clearly TATECO systems and you'd like the most them pity human resource intensive Yvonne to get it completely right. So one question would be you know, could be actually used a Dick needs to get it maybe ninety nine percent white. And that the human deal with exceptions I definitely think that that's an exciting direction that You want those a algorithms to be trained with good data, and that's a big part of what's motivated us to. Put this focus on data quality and Understanding these strange nuances that are underpinning that date has so that. As we move towards a in machine learning and so forth. We have a high level of confidence in the data that's training those algorithms. Right. Yeah. I think that a huge opportunity here because it's not quite as broad as NFL, not natural language processing it is somewhat constrained. that is a good part of it. The back part of it is that is highly technical. and so. you know some of the techniques you know you can have a fault tolerance in certain dimensions such as you know, misspellings lack of gambling and things like that. But as you have Heidi technical data, you cannot apply those principles because he could have misspelling the system may not be able to. Get, sometimes, and that's where you know I think. It's totally feasible to use. Resources to you know when you're dealing with. Tens of millions of patients and billions of detailed records. Using a I'd even identify those patterns of either. Inconsistent data or missing data it's also very powerful just to. kind of flag in identified. Areas that need to be focused on to lead to a better analysis. Greg Wait Be Hefty. Use that information somehow did is a belt of information that you know and so it just filtering into decision processes that the are really losing it. So hopefully getting improving in that dimension I've jumping to another paper bittersweet interesting. So it's entitled rates and predictors of using opioids in the Emergency Department Katrina Treat Mike Dean in Young Otto's and so so this is sort of a machine learning exercise you have gone through to locate you know coup is getting prescribed. OPIOIDS water the conditions for the Democrat not Nestle demographics but different different maybe age and things like that gender. and and then ask the question desert has some effect on addiction. In the long term rights. So that project To great example of team science though. We. Assembled a team of subject matter experts in neurology pain management. And Data Science and. The neurologist and pain management experts. Identified an intriguing question that we decided to pursue with data. In their question was. Based on anecdotal observation and so we thought it'd be interesting to see how well the data supported that. Observation is that. for youth and young adults Treated or admitted into the emergency. Department. With a migraine headache that. All too often they were treated with an opioid. And so we Use the same day to resource that we were discussing earlier. To explore that. Question. And using data from a hundred and eighty distinct emergency departments. We found that on average twenty, three percent of those youth and young adults were treated with. An opioid medication while they were in the emergency department. In general, it should be almost zero percent in general. There's really Better medications to us, four people presenting with a migraine. and. So this fits into obviously the OPIOID crisis it. it demonstrates the. Scenario describing that. You know using real world data. You can identify patterns of clinical behavior that. Don't match guideline. And the good news is that the? correctable and so through. Training and communication there's great opportunity to. To, manage this. Really. Striking. So fifteen thousand or so inevitably the encounters. And nearly a quarter of this encounters you say involved inoculate. and these are not just Misha and Congress right. It is not filtered down to migraine encounters. Okay. Okay. So these fifteen thousand just might in encounters might vein being repeating disease So once you. If you make a statement and. This or not Easter conditioning issue here. So you get your pain, you go to an emergency department and you get treated with an opioid you get quick tactical relief. From pain. auditing condition expect that in the next episode. So you can say we didn't pursue that particular question, but that is Definitely key part of. Managing the OPIOID crisis is that drug seeking behavior and so Part of our goal was to quantify that and use this as an opportunity to educate providers that. You really shouldn't be treating migraines with an opioid in there are better alternatives and. So we we felt that this was an important contribution to that national dialogue, but we didn't specifically pursue the question of whether the patients we analyzed. Within. Encounter show up Subsequently. With the same symptoms. Right right. Yeah you it develop into period when problematic patterns of drug use comedy. FEST MERGE THE PREVALENCE RATE OF OPIOID misuse estimated to be two to four percent and debts in each goofy just young adult drew from overdoses are rising. and. You say that literally prescribe IOS has been slumping loose future opioid misuse by thirty three percent. Betas Mehta say really huge number. I think just validates the importance of this of this work. Interesting mark. I don't know you exploded on data. Last the question if you look at the aggregate data, it'd be flying opioid. Misuse. what percentage of the total number. Actually started from. You know some sort of medical encounter has mike or some sort of. related encounter that could be completed otherwise was three a bit opioid. in that encounter documented resulted in that misuse. So what so If you look at the active misuse problem that we have today. do you have a sense of what percentage of that goal is actually started I? Think the exciting thing about this type of research is for everyone questioned that you pursue you have. You have ten new that you can pursue. We haven't. Delved into that specific area, but it's It's very ripe for further analysis and A considerable part of where I end my colleagues and our time as. We do this type of work to get an initial analysis published. And then You know in my leadership role I just WANNA. support people like my colleagues on this paper Mark Connelly Jennifer Bickel. in in using data to. Support their research into identify those follow. I mean, he tests policy implications. So it's sweet important work. and. If you find it direct relationship here than you have to ask you know from from a medical perspective what is right intervention? maybe is not just added of care just best practice but clearly should be the bay You know things should be looked at you say you're American Academy of Neurology has included avoidance of using opioid to treat gain one of stop top flight choosing wisely recommendations. For high-value duck in this gives Really evidence to to support that. The other thing that's really intriguing is this level of variation from site to site in. Some Sun facilities are very much aligned with the guidelines. Others are at the you know well, above twenty three percent. And that gives an opportunity for a really precision. conversations about you know, where does our organization stand on that spectrum? Yeah that's a that's an interesting avenue to right. So you know one could ask he says some sort of push sliced Intervention if we can fly goal of patients who who had gone an opioid sexually don't have an addiction problem. that as you know Anna, the kofoed does. if you can fly those type of patterns than you can think about. A customized within electronic health record systems. There's. The ability to provide decisions poor. There's certainly phenomena called pop up fatigue were physicians. You know they don't like having so many pop up windows but at the same time. It's Within the capability of an e e Hr to do that if then logic if patient has. migraine medication order equals opioid. encourage the provider to pause and reconsider that. Right, right and so this is supervised machine learning type analysis where so you have. you have number features that comes directly from each else. So each sex race ethnicity. insurance type. Encounter prostate suggest duration. time of the year and so on. and you have labeled data in this case I guess you have able tater because you would know if op- inscribed on trade. Okay and so are the two questions here. One is to ask the question given a new patient and those features. you could assign a probability that that patient will be prescribed will. Definitely. Impress the data from that predictive Minds. Right and then can you so that data definitely tell you if the patient is going to progress into some sort of an addiction issue. So. Earn Predicting Substance Abuse. So. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. There's additional diagnosis codes that document. whether a patient has a history of substance abuse disorder. and. So it would be feasible to. Identify the with those diagnosis codes in than really look at their prior history. Of What other conditions were they treated for? What medications were they give in? to develop that model. One of the things in this case that helped with this study is that just in general, it's not advised get. So there are other things that are much more of a gray area. Or whether opioid is as useful, but in this case. The really not. Considered. To be helpful for migraines compared to other options and so that help us have a fairly clear cut scenario to do this work. Yeah. This this won't be the data like you say once you do something like this, you have been other things you could. You could stop asking. So unquestioned that that been to my mind as you know, how did they hugged the actually prescribing opioids? Is it the patient asking for it all so? Off that was another scoping thing with this project is focused on what happens within the emergency. Room. So it's it's. Really, medication order in administration that happens. In that emergency room setting. Whether or not the patient. was. Requesting that you know if they came in and said, this has worked for me before. Can I have it again? we don't have visibility to that. Right. Right. And so from a practical perspective So the the analysis that you did slightly ended up with the Family Clyde power we think it is. Compelling. Pretty compelling. So as as a new patient gets into e D either high. and what I mean by that probably is if there is a history of substance abuse property. the physician has really think twice about. The use of may be the well, and in this case, even without that history. Just because it's not considered to be an effective treatment. You know encouraging them to pause in that decision making. In this particular case is as effective as wall. Right. So looking forward. In if you think about both of these issues, one is the data quality data aggregation data standardized recent problem in the the right of Utah Systems have did that the talked about? And then if we can get to a level that we can look at cross a large data set. Beacon, ask. More. US specific questions, treatment. Optimum treatment type questions. subpoenaed. US The mark big think B be hunting. Certainly, the volume and variety of data that we're able to work with will be even greater I, think the. Opportunity To. Look, holistically at how upstream data capture. Effects Downstream data. Analysis. example I frequently give is if we have a Aggregate Data said we identify. Ten patients whose way in that data such shows up as being. Something that's completely infeasible. let's say they're documented is being. Fifty year old person who weighs two pounds. Clearly air. What's important is? Creating the process to communicate that back upstream. Because that clinical decision. Support. Many drug dosing things are evaluated using weight based logic and so. That same logic that's Evaluating the appropriateness of dosage. It's going to be running against an incorrect value in that may or may not always be visible. So I really am intrigued with that holistic opportunity. In it I am I remain just we have three or four additional papers coming out. About other examples where Provider behaviors not aligned with Best Practices and I'm just excited about you know when you compare that to how long it takes to develop a new drug or how long it takes to. To a really long term research. This research has the opportunity for a pretty quick turnaround on an effective intervention. A really that. Other so much that right. Providers. been taught in a no, but they're. Not always using that in practice and so to help them. Identify, those topics in just modifying behaviors is. In the scheme of things, it's a very straightforward way to improve. So. You know the entire spectrum from essentially getting the data. Right or cleaner like you know Missa mischaracterized or miss input data like wait or something like that. To to get. Better diagnosis better treatment modalities. policies there and from a femme perspective clearly inflammation therefore clinical trials. I was even thinking about drug interaction type. Inflammation. I haven't been involved in the former de for awhile but. Typically, this type of data doesn't get back into automatic processes that fast but I think that is all I know there's strong interest in Pharma in. Working with this type of data there a again looking at real world behavior. This is an excellent resource for off label medication use at. you know where Pharma's Always interested in repurposing existing medications the. Regulatory Processes, much more straightforward for that because the safety is already been. Evaluated and so. The. Significant Opportunity With this, there's also just exciting. Patterns of you know. What are those unrecognised correlations? That's where the machine learning opportunities are really exciting where. You know we're not always asking the right question. And the data can show us what we should be. Yeah exactly. So if the machine a sort of red flags something or create hypotheses. that Cubans have missed sometimes, those types of things are extremely powerful. because maybe that sometimes it's countering tutor. and so we all look at data with an Incan bias. The beauty of machines that at least on the surface began deploy Michigan. This volume of data. Techniques like machine deep learning can recognize those subtle but consistent associations. Wait quite. Excellent. Idea this has been great mark Thanks so much time with me. I enjoyed it very much. Thank you. But

Gill Eappen Mike Yesterday Dr Mark Hoffman Children's Mussa Hospital Turner Electronic Certner Migraine Inflammation Federated Networks Stan Day Squatty Michio Kato University Of Minnesota Makita GIL Federated Kansas City
In Depth With Carlo Rovelli

After The Fact

06:41 min | 9 months ago

In Depth With Carlo Rovelli

"Carlo Ravelli thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you for having me you. are a physicist who I must say writes like a poet and your book the seven brief lessons on physics has has sold Is If something like forty languages around the world and it ends with this most amazing line that I would like to to start our conversation with if you don't mind you say on the edge of what we know in contact with the oceans of the unknown. Shines the mystery and beauty of the world. Is that science is that the pursuit of science for you? Yes. Definitely. because science. Starts I think both historically and in the life of each scientists a with a wonder and with the mystery. And in fact, I think the nature of science is to realize that we do not know things and therefore we're curious to go and try to. Find out and the nature of of scientists also the based on the discovery that we can find out things. We can discover things that we did not know there is a methodology to to science, but the scientific method is both something that leads us forward but also makes I. Pause makes us go take two steps back, reevaluate its science it seems despite methodology. Is Not Linear people talk about the scientific method. But I would say those less of a scientific method. Than what one usually think? It's like painting. Of course, there is a method painting you go to school and they teach you how to paint. But then the painter is the guy who does does not follow what is being taught to invent something else. and. In fact, in science, it has happened all over again. In the in the history of science that what was considered the the good mattered before it turned out to be insufficient and new things were found found out. Of course, there are many aspect of science which are. Pretty stable and that give it strength. Checking. Not Trusting ideas unless you find a way to confirm them. Try To base your information on actual data and and looking at the world observing measuring checking. Putting in doubt not believing the things you you believe him there's a beautiful line in by actor Galileo in the play in which a at the end in which in the play there's Galileo the one of the inventors of science so to say. With one of his young assistant and they got an idea in the assistant says. Now. Let's do everything possible to show. That is right and Galileo says, no, no no, let's do it. Everything possible to show that it is wrong. And if it is survives, we start believing it. fascinate yes. So you know. We are speaking at a time when the world of course is facing this terrible pandemic. And scientific research about this unfolding before our eyes are there lessons for us all in in what we're learning how this is unfolding as you say We we have learned things that we think are right about the virus and then something changes in our we have to we have to adjust our thinking how we can counteract it. It gets it gets up again to the point of Galileo right how do we prove ourselves? Wrong? We sued you tried of where find out where we were right I. Think Yeah. I. Think there are lessons and then and in fact it's it's it's an opportunity seeing how science works the first thing we all notice is that we don't know anything we are in the dark and that's a that's often the starting point of science. The second thing is we're not completely dark. The reason we are. Searching for a way to heal this. Virus and for a vaccines is because we have wasted ill illnesses that are extraordinary effective on the one hand we see the limits of science on the other hand we see the power of signs. Let me put in this way. Few generations ago not many maybe two centuries ago the average expected live the life expectancy of people where several decades decades shorter than today this is because there was a scientific method or some sort to that helped us learn how to deal with with illness and that's what is being used. The second point is that we see that scientists look in different directions, right one search, one methods, another search, another methods, and of course, each scientists of tries to believe or sort of believe be confident in the way he's going, but we don't know a priori who is right. However those convergence and that's the point. There are always being convergence in scientific. Debates in uncertainty so after the debate after the searcher. The knowledge that is acquired is definitely knowledge so it will take time, but it will come out. Perhaps. The last comment is that we all see how science is crucial I. Mean if there's anything that can save us for a lot of pain, the situation is knowledge. I chose science as my. As, the field where I hope I can in my in my info humidity and in my little. Being small contribute to the overall discussion but I have not chosen signs as the only prisoner from which to look at the world I. Think we should. We should use problems. We should look at the world through literature through our to politics too our leaves. So I think it's a coming together of perspectives. I went into sign slater in my life to come directly question only at some point. I stumbled innocence upon science and I fell in love with. It was a non rational choice. It was an emotional choice I started to study at school. Modern physics. Relativity quantum mechanics. All that and I said, wow, this is incredibly beautiful I. WanNa I. WanNa work this and then I realized that I was good in it and so I said okay this is this is what I do in my life.

Galileo Carlo Ravelli Physicist Slater
At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:49 min | 9 months ago

At a Crossroads? China-India Nuclear Relations After the Border Clash

"We start the program tracking one of the most potentially SA- serious spot points globally the ongoing hostilities between the nuclear-armed countries, India and China earlier this week they discharged weapons that each other for the first time in forty five years as a four month standoff between their armed forces escalated into warning shots in the western Himalayas. The skirmishes worryingly reminiscent of the circumstances surrounding the beginning of a war between the two in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, two. Yesterday. The foreign ministers of the two countries met in Russia in a bid to defuse the military standoff Jonah Slater New Delhi Bureau chief for The Washington Post and Isabel Hilton China dialogue join me on the line now. Thanks both for for joining us is about what was behind this most recent exchange of shots. That rather depends who you believe I mean one. Of the meeting that has taken place in Moscow, which has been some extent. Calming is that neither side will acknowledge any wrongdoing and indeed continue to blame the other. There is a very in general terms there isn't defined line of actual, control? The seem to be signs that the past three or four months across quite a a a length of it. So not just in one sector, China has been a pushing the actual you know situation on the ground by crossing the line of Control China, accuse his India doing the same thing in this most recent incidents and says that it had to fire shots in the ad to deter what was Indian aggression India has said over the repeated incidents over the past few months that China has advanced and then has not on a promises to retreat. So we now have quite an extended standoff which began in the in the West and sector. But has now extended to the eastern sector to what in your Natural Pradesh which to southern. Tibet. So it's a sustained standoff still during the what more do we know about the outcome of the meeting between the two men yesterday Well we know that they met for two and a half hours a lengthy meeting their first in person meetings since the crisis began Jason Curve India's foreign minister is a is a former ambassador to China. He has deep experience there. But in terms of outcomes, what we basically have is an agreement to continue talking it's not nothing but it's definitely not a breakthrough I mean Isabel do you think there's any real appetite for compromise and given China's current aggressive stance globally will one be trying to dial it down I think that I don't see very much appetite for compromise on either side we all you have is highly nationals governments which both. Set great store on territorial integrity and and then of course, you come to the sensitive point where the territories real defined and then you have a you know constant potential for confrontation. But if you add to that I mean what one thing that is very different from in in this border confrontation with other areas of conflict China like the South China Sea for example, where were you have because it's accessible and and territory marine territory that's used by lots of different kinds of people in people from from different countries, you can enact a conflict at a lower level if you like using fishing boats or or customs boats, and you don't actually have to use your main forces. But this is highly inaccessible territory. The only people who are out there really are our armed forces and they have increased. Both sides have increased the presence of their forces really dramatically in the last few months, and in the last few years, they have increased access to the border by building infrastructure building roads and railway building roads rather So you have the potential to mobilize both heavy weaponry and larger numbers of troops When you have a moment like this, do strategically, I would say that China is trying to discourage India from. Joining in a mall full blooded way any anti-chinese coalition organized by the United States so the has been quite a warm relationship between Modiin trump as we know, and and the question is how far India will take this because that could be a Catholic. And during this meeting, come about because the to happened to be in Moscow anyway or is Russia playing the piece Burqa. Well. Both of them would have been at this meeting, but it does seem that Russia is playing a little bit of a role of convener here as a country that. Ostensibly would like to see tensions reduce. It has constructive relationships with both countries there have been reports in the Indian media suggesting that I'm sorry that Russia was doing some quiet diplomacy behind the scenes earlier in this crisis but I think the these these two men obviously would have been there anyway just comes at a very. Sensitive, sensitive, and important time. It's about what's in it for? Would I guess it's less less difficulty in the neighborhood they do as we've heard have rush the Russians do have constructive relations Russia likes to be seen as a broker these days I mean the whole trajectory of Putin's kind of outward posture has been to assert Russia's important so to be able to mediate between a traditional friend India and. country. Rival with whom relations little complicate it China would greatly enhanced prestige. One of the difficulties is that what we know from the reorganization, for example, the Chinese military which is put sheeting. Very firmly, inconspicuously in command, we need to assume I think that decision is made about deployment of troops and our posture go very much to the top So you know without a signal from the tall, the foreign ministers of my decide couldn't actually resolve this. Yeah. How do you think this fits in with the the general foreign policy aims of India. I don't think expected crisis with China I. think that was not part of its. Foreign Policy Goals as Isabelle was speaking about no, India is. Wary of China's rise, it has been drawing closer to the United States and also to this grouping called the Quad, which includes the United States Japan and Australia this one of the interesting aspects about this crisis with China along the line of actual control is that India says at least that it's at a loss to understand why China is doing this it repeated that again today that. Shot, the tiny side has not provided a credible explanation for this deployment. Jay Shankar, the foreign minister a few days ago said repeated that India's is a little bit flummoxed here, and so if China is sending a message that it doesn't want India to draw closer to the United States, India's not really getting the message quite clearly So I think that's one of the strange parts about this entire episode, which is we don't India claims at least not really understand what China's motivations are for this. Quite significant deployment along the line of actual control which began in April and then Burst into actual skirmishes, skirmishes in May, and then the deadliest violence between the two countries and more than fifty years in June. I mean Isabel attorneys right WH- one can't really see what's in it for China I. Mean as you say, this is an area where there's really not very much. It's inaccessible the only people there are the soldiers. What's the point? I think the point is is partly to shore up she gene pins reputation at home is a vigorous defender of China's global position and Chinese sovereignty, and you might well argue that that sovereignty over a few miles of inaccessible mountain compass matter but they matter symbolically domestically in China. It also might be I mean, we've seen a passion of a very assertive behavior. Put it no more strongly from China pretty much since the coronavirus outbreak and a lot of you know if you look across the piece it what's been going on there had been provocations in around Taiwan with you with Chinese. Military flights crossing into Taiwanese airspace very recently and and we have you know I, think for the first time that I can recall in. Since the sixties we have on this board, we have confrontations in both the important western sector and the equally important eastern sector. Now, that's that's kind of unusual that does signal a much more firm intent to send a message even if it's not a message that India understand. So it may be a message that's being directed to the Chinese public that you know we can do this because we are bigger and stronger than India and we will continue to defend. China's position in the world.

China India Isabel Hilton China South China Sea United States Russia Jason Curve India Moscow Isabel Delhi Bureau Jonah Slater Natural Pradesh The Washington Post Tibet Taiwan
India Surpasses Brazil, Moves Into 2nd Place For COVID-19 Cases

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:49 min | 10 months ago

India Surpasses Brazil, Moves Into 2nd Place For COVID-19 Cases

"The United States still has more corona virus cases than any other nation on Earth but India is catching up the US for the record has more than six point two million cases. India is now second in the world with four point two, million Joanna slater is the India Bureau chief for The Washington Post and is on the line from New Delhi. Welcome to the program. Punky what's going wrong in India Well India is in a very difficult predicament. At the moment it has a situation where the number of infections is large and accelerating and the economy is hobbled and there's no sign that infections have peaked. So it's really just it's just a very, very tough situation although I'm thinking about four point two million is an appalling number of cases but we are talking about a country of more than a billion people were I suppose it it might be possible for this to be happening and you don't even realize it. Do you do you? Do you sense it as you walk along the streets of New Delhi that something is happening here You certainly sense it into a far as you see people wearing masks most of the people here are wearing masks but not all of them, and once again there traffic jams in Delhi, for example, where I live. And things have basically reopened after a very severe lockdown earlier earlier this spring. So you don't necessarily see it in the streets, but there is, of course, a growing sense of concerned at at the number of cases and how quickly they're rising our hospitals doing. Hospitals at the moment are holding up. There was a moment earlier in the outbreak in May and June when it really did look like the healthcare system was going to buckle in places like Mumbai and Delhi meter, we spoke to a number of families who had just desperate searches for hospital beds for their loved ones only to be turned away again and again. And told that the hospitals were full in those two big cities, the situation ease a little bit over the summer. But now it is it is getting worse again, and one of the other worrisome things that's happening now is the virus is moving or has moved from India cities to its vast hinterland where the health system is is even less equipped to cope. Joiner, you've mentioned a few elements that can affect the spread of the corona virus talked about lockdown and a reopening. You talked about people wearing masks. Does the government have a clear strategy and clear set of priorities here and if so what are they? The government has had different priorities different points in time it tried implementing severe lockdown with about four hours. Notice it shut down this entire country of one point, three billion people but the result was economic devastation. So it had to relax those restrictions. It had to reverse course, and that is the strategy it has adopted now, and that's the direction in which India is going toward progressive reopening. The only major thing that remains closed in India now is is schools. Whether the government is going to reassess that strategy or second-guessed that that strategy we don't now know now at the moment, but there is no no sign of it. I'm thinking about the current world leader in cases the United States the President President Trump's administration just as a statement of fact has had chaotic messaging. The president's often endorsed conspiracy theories contradicted his own public health officials, and of course, you have state officials going their own ways and attempting their own strategies. How does the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi Compares Prime Minister Modi. Threat and spoken about it clearly. Yes he has. That is a major difference between India and the United States and Brazil as well. So unlike president trump or president bolsonaro prime minister Modi has downplayed the virus or told Indian citizens to go about their normal lives. He has consistently talked about the virus as a very dangerous threat and from the beginning has appeared in public with either Moscow or face covering. Is it possible that that the speed of this virus is going to cause a lockdown whether the government does it or not people are just not going to be willing to go about their lives As of now, I don't think so because the silver lining if I can use that term is that the number of deaths in India according to official statistics it's still relatively low. So there's not that same public pressure that you might see. Elsewhere. The slater, thanks for the update. Really appreciate it. Having. Joanna's slater is the India Bureau chief for The Washington Post and she's a New Delhi.

India Government Joanna Slater Prime Minister Modi New Delhi United States President Trump Prime Minister Narendra Modi Delhi Meter The Washington Post Mumbai Prime Minister Moscow Official Brazil
Bayern, PSG Set for UCL Final Clash

ESPN FC

07:31 min | 10 months ago

Bayern, PSG Set for UCL Final Clash

"We'll start though in the champions they it's the final will wanted PSG will take on by Munich. Be Leon by three goals. So now hey, it's a disgust, the Game Alley Moreno Frank Leboeuf and Craig Burley crank. This was buying far from their swashbuckling best but they got the job done. But you've gotta you know Leon. Shown the the the main street. One of the mainstream is making it difficult for fully opposition. Something really gusty overlooking aid to improve on next year F-. where, they're going to finish league on. But that's what the stall out particularly in as competition the on the counter-attack, the super organized, the aggressive and so I think. Never expected it to be this crazy open game. That Barcelona fine with. So. In that respect, it was understandable but also Leon as you know follows it was no they created chances in the game and and after finishing had been clinical. More interesting. I thought it was professional from bio Munich brought some big boys on from the bench as well. But yeah, they deserve and Leon I'm sure front will agree on. From from a Frenchman can hold the head high for what they've done in this competition. Right. Yeah I'm not disappointed by the result because we all were expecting that to buy in, will win and go and go to the final, but we can be able to be frustrated as a French fans said. About the fact that yacht some chances I think there are more and more chances to school than they had against Manchester. City where they scored three goals but before that magnificent goal from Niagara. I think he. Took A. Big Chance. Said hit the post but well because of the fantastic Noyer Bienne Wearing. Punished where they opened up a little bit too much defensively especially behind the defense. But I agree with with Craig. Is Very. Well organized did everything to to annoy. By Munich, their resume and The physical aspect of their games. And played them in contract that was the only solution for them to be hopeful for better better school. By Munich manage to do everything well for them and and ensured that. They definitely for me the the favorite now and we've talked about maybe after the other segment, it's. Something to to. Four four. Fulbari. Essential. In. The in the perspective of that final, because by monique was very weak at some point defensively, it's really open started this game and it's fair to say, isn't it Ali before mabry scored? It could could've been to. It could've been any this should have been and so really got to see US putting together a game plan for Leon coming into this game and to match you think okay if we can force a turnover an intimate sale and then with one past week in getting behind, we can get the pine behind Doku accompanied by then maybe we get ourselves goal and we make this game a whole lot different a lot more complicated for buying Munich and that's exactly what Happened it's a turnover by the gun, but now it's a through ball in the pie gets around among annoy open goal unable to score and thinking. Okay. Maybe that was a chance. Maybe that was their opportunity. This is what could have changed the game for Leon, but it wasn't just that chance is tall can be had couple more himself where the one in which he somehow goes through the talented gets up left-footed everything to shoot at hits at the post. And its second slater than that. You see every kind of say. All right. Well, you guys miss your chance. We're not gonNA Miss Hours, and here we go. It's all about our talent and what we can do in the attack in half by immunity took over from there but I agree with frank in the sense that you look at via Munich and how vulnerable and file they look sometimes defensively that in that very transition I think Leon looked at it and Say Wait a minute. If we attack the steam, we're GONNA, create chances and in doing so they got themselves a little bit straight down when they got stretch. Then all of a sudden transition going the other way average scores one, and then things just of opened up, and then of course, the second one again on transition down the left hand side, and then from there, it was all over for Leon and by Mimic what were underway how good was that go from? Craig. Yeah I mean he's a special player now isn't it? I mean let's be quite Frank Burrup. You know three or four years ago he wasn't and his career looked zeph it wasn't really happening anywhere an unfair play. You know he's the guy that tell them to around. You know we can take people on and field you can change your core cheese, you can do ever played himself. has turned on his head and and he's just a huge threat. No. Way that it took the goal in terms of the touch how he inside. There was always two or three defenders around him, and then he just made half nothing more halfway yard. Rifle and the top corner is you started so much. These gave confidence. Experience and played such good players around him and he's he's you know as. You ask the coach he's when he was playing back in. England you know ask no online at West Brom really was a player going nowhere not. Far From Levin Dolph Ski who has the first name on the Bion team sheet this guy is not far behind. That's an amazing. At how does this happen? How does he change around so quickly? While I think Sarandon's have to do a lot with it and I am the expectations that are generated by the people around you and when you have a train environment or by Munich where everybody's expected to perform at a high level at all times and when the only expectation for you individually NFC group is you're GonNa win everything that you participate in. Then you'd better show up I think it demanded the best navarine. We have seen the very best of him. Now, this could have gone horribly wrong for him, and then whenever he was asked to give his best well, maybe that wasn't going to be good enough I by Munich and his career was gonna come to an end somewhere out without having achieved the things and now he has opened himself in terms of the chances that he has in front of the things that he can achieve. I think he got to a point in which he needed to answer the call he needed to be the player that. We all thought that he could have been on at, but we didn't see enough of it now that we see the full potential well, then it's it's it. You just have to SORTA asked the question asked to not only the individual players such whenever he had the you get to this point but to the training environment that he was part of before, that couldn't get this side of him. So yes, it is fair to go and ask the world's going on back there and I think you also have to recognize that via Munich have done a wonderful job of putting him in a position in which he can truly showcase his talent and you can. You also have to say to the player. He was a chance. Here's your opportunity take advantage of it and he has gone so such a good job of really showcasing what he is player this year of

Munich Leon Craig Burley Frank Leboeuf Noyer Bienne Manchester Levin Dolph Ski Frank Burrup Barcelona Niagara United States Slater Frank Monique West Brom Sarandon Doku England ALI Mabry
The State vs. Slowed + Reverb

On Shuffle

05:20 min | 10 months ago

The State vs. Slowed + Reverb

"Welcome listeners sound only I'm just in charity and I'm Mike Peters Square your sound only co-host here to record our deepest darkest thoughts about the twenty first century. In the millennial lifestyle we're talking about music video games, anime, Youtube Social Media and the wider Internet. This week, we're talking about slavery and reverse the controversial DIY remixing smile that snowballed into a large youtube subculture in recent years. This is what it sounds like. Always. Want to go back to our beautiful. Until I goes away. Mega. Mega. Kinda millier to me stylistically speaking not entirely unprecedented, not entirely new as far as musical subcultures of the twenty first century ago. Yeah. I mean like you just go ahead and come out and say you come out I mean I'm just saying. Well. Well, it is. It sounds a lot like chops screw music. Right Air. Oh, right right yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So the the architects of slow to revert mixes is probably a piece on pitchfork by Andy. Crush where he interviewed slater, who made the song that we just listened to, which is a homemade remix of Lucy verse twenty minutes, which was on love his rate to. Anyway surfaced on youtube in two thousand, seventeen with a looped animation of. Pink skeleton and then it racked up according to slater about four million views before it was taken down since it's been re uploaded, it's racked up seven billion. But. Basically. The entire slowed in reverse John followed after that. Mike. You mentioned a pink skeleton I want to say that the. Song? Choice right. Lose Ebert. Twenty minutes the pink. Skeleton. On Youtube on a otherwise, very bare YouTube channel the paint skeleton is a very specific aesthetic. Millennial vary. I looked at it and immediately thought vapor wave. and May I'm biased because I say I immediately thought V wave because I'm literally currently wearing. A brave T. With with sailor Saturn Holding A. I was like in the background I S I spy. Blue poster. So yeah, I know that you're you're up on vapor away. But that's the thing is that it's that it's that family of millennial aesthetics right or now I guess you know Zumur adjacent millennial aesthetics. Sure. Call it that it is. It is. It is a very distinct vibe right but despite the fact that visually it feels very modern very post. Internet. Very very teen. I'm a team. That's right. Musically it is drawing from something older. Yeah. It is drawn for something older in that same interview that I was talking about slater talks about he's from Houston and grew up listening to music and watch anime seem except but otherwise they. Will Yeah that'd be. Same except Baton Rouge so but anyway. The The piece also mentions that he doesn't like explicitly mentioned screw on his own channels and he talks about slowed in reverse as a way to bring like screw Buzek to a wider audience like he's talks about being happy when he sees the Youtube comments that people are like. Screwed. Music the spirit of screw lives on and so to revert music but I mean you know Then there are the people on the other side that just kind of like this ginger fraud script music right. Though came out like three years ago. The remakes came out a couple of years. You know slater's Remix a couple years old at this point. Why are we talking about this song this week Well, because we need a foothold and a point of reference to talk about. Why people were mad on the Internet this past weekend Okay. So there is a tiktok account called Song, Psych and song. Sake is a music analysis outlets that you breaks down sundry. Songs, videos what have you? Anyway, there was a video talking about and revert music that made the rounds on the Internet this past weekend and credited. Slater's twenty minutes as the cornerstone of the slow down remixing style. Now, when that rose to the attention of Houston's and then the larger arap Internet. You could imagine there are some static.

Youtube Slater Mike Peters Houston Buzek Andy Ebert Baton Rouge Zumur John Fraud
Tibetan Yoga for Health and Wellbeing

Hay House Meditations

06:20 min | 11 months ago

Tibetan Yoga for Health and Wellbeing

"Hi, Allie welcome to the PODCAST. I'm Madeo. Thank you very much for having me. I'm really excited to talk about we haven't had anybody on the podcast that is speaking directly to yoga and breath work in the way that you teach install very excited to have you today. Thank you I. You know excited and I, Love Hey House and. That last book of Tibet. The newer for health and wellbeing. This is my passion. So yes, excellent. Excellent. There's a there's a number of things I'd like to talk about with you today including your. Your advice on integrating meditation and Yoga into our everyday life and are busy schedule as well as your work with Yoga and breath work in a clinical medical sending including with your with cancer patients. But I, I like to ask you about how you got here how we got here with you, and maybe we can start with your own yoga and meditation training under your revered teachers in Nepal and India. So can you give us a brief version of of how you began your studies to help us situate where you're learning has is coming from Sure sure. Emmy see how brief I can. So really when with the Tibetan tradition, it really started when I in my first trip to India in nineteen, eighty nine. And I was really looking for teacher. I wasn't sure if it was going to be an Indian teacher Tibetan teacher I was more familiar with the teachers I did get to meet with Yuji Christian motifs of not the famous one JD. Wonderful Yuji Chris for more and more. And then some g my analogy, and then actually when I met the two BETTON SAT in La. It really started inspiring me and particularly the way that. They had this devotion to the picture of its own is a Lama and I have to admit I didn't know too much about His Holiness yet. But then doing the trip. It was when he was. Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize I was actually cashier at that time I remember reading that in the US favor now it's like Wow so happy a give my mom. My Dad had been awarded the prize and and and I said, I need to meet this man. In fact that evening they showed on the Indian TV. Heart of Tibet. That I la that was actually the forward or was by pressing Carter. And I. So I went from touch me to down silos where the Delilah was. It was. During that time, he was the fortieth anniversary of the children village. That's the first time I saw him talk. Then I went for you know a public interview and I kind of. was trying to be there as much as I could and at the same time I got my first. Personal teacher, which was you should origin. Bodies, Yogi. And he was particularly into the tradition of true and. Whether he was the Weatherman for the Dalai Lama. and. I started training with them I. Did my longer with him or started the non right ended up seventy slater finishing That really led me to come back towards t Tina where I'm originally from. And really start devoting a lot of time to practice and then was in ninety one that. I, I met a number no group chain that he came to Argentina I nine, hundred ninety and I am Alejandra can I can I just mention here that that sort of what you're talking about a little bit is that when the Tibet you mentioned that you met the Delami in in in northern India in Dharamsala. And this is after for our listeners who don't know the when the Dalai Lama a came into exile when he left Bet in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, he and about two, hundred thousand. Refugees settled in the northern regions of India and where the Dalai Lama lived was Dharmsala, and so that was one of the first places that you went to in. That is sort of this hub of the Tibetan diaspora that is sort of surrounds the Dalai Lama, and then eventually Tibetans have gone of course throughout the world and there's two. Betton. Buddhist. Centers throughout the world and so you were kind of a beneficiary. You came along in nineteen, eighty, nine, nineteen ninety and started studying with some of these teachers who weren't only in India around the dilemma. But who had gone elsewhere you mentioned non-pwi Norbu Rhumba Jay who had gone to to Italy, and then there were other centers where you were living in Argentina. Yes, and so I. I did consider you know for for some time Don, Sala my second home I spend many months there. And that's where actually ish adorned pitches monastery wall. So. As, you said Dharamsala was this hub and I really considered my second home. I spent many months there intermittently going from there to other places and back, and that is really were you had his monastery and and. So meeting the Dalai Lama and trying to be as much as possible with them. But also really having a personal teacher like you should was really important to me so that when I came back to Argentina that I felt there was no one there in luckily I was wrong was a small. Karma Kagyu Center. And also kind of a unique center the first teacher I met when when I go towards. Metering And then Nunca Norman as I mentioned the Nunca over pitcher was a big change for me. In the way he taught. So the Tony Brooke he brought the teachings. Into everyday

India Dharamsala Tibet Argentina Carter Yuji Chris Allie Emmy Yuji Christian LA Karma Kagyu Center United States Cancer Nunca Norman Nepal Tony Brooke Norbu Rhumba Jay Tina DON
"slater" Discussed on Blogging the Boys

Blogging the Boys

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"slater" Discussed on Blogging the Boys

"Oh you know. Of course myself are Joel. Tony Casillas two time superbowl champion by the one the only the Gulf Queen herself from NFL. Network Jane Slater Jane. Thanks for taking the time to join us. Well let's be careful with golf queen. That's like saying that I'm as good as Tom Brady. I will say that after watching the goat of football play golf I actually feel like I would have a decent round with him he I make you made all of us feel better about our golf game and I think that's the great beauty of that is that people are out of their element. Anyone is plays golf knows that it's totally different. Once you get on a tee box always say on the best player on the rain but when I get when it's legit and I'm on the golf course. I'm horrible but yeah that was to watch all that whole dynamic and unlike human they couldn't find the fairway what I loved about it was just the authenticity of the struggle. Because who among US especially when Some of the covid restrictions lifted and I was able to go out there and play in my mind. I've been watching a lot of golf videos in quarantine and I thought you know. I've given myself some downtime with. I'm ready to go out there. And it's IT'S. You're always a better golfer in your mind and then you go out there and you play and then you're reminded that you know this is in fact. I am a novice and this is a fun little hobby but I'm never going to be able to monetize chain a few months ago. Were on good morning football for a whole week right and you were out in the streets of New York. Renan routes kind of a makeshift combine. Was that you think harder for you than the match was for Tom. Brady great question.

Tom Brady Jane Slater Jane golf Joel Tony Casillas US Gulf Queen football superbowl NFL New York
"slater" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"slater" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Slater by the way congratulations one I have a one eighty awards from the show other award you got to put it out there yeah you put the good at good good do you do out there and eventually will get awards list at so you're a good friend of mine you work here at the station at the cluster in Orlando for **** media group right your cover I came ninety two three and you had your in a tower right now this is your tower you're making it your own right yeah yeah yeah I mean is that the short story is last year I got in trouble for something that I did I tried microwaving a Turkey and a a room in the budget studios remembers the spell gives the survey thing only in this power last year to collect ten thousand toys it took three days I wasn't able to come down it is a six foot by six foot power and only six feet tall and I'm six foot four and I stayed here for three days in the broader storm there was all for it was cold and da I when I got down it was euphoric and I said this year we're going to double that goal and I'm going to make the decision to go up so I'm in the tower right now look at that and it's it's great you know on the go without this morning Joe Kelly I talked to Tony Marino I never heard solid you got no idea who these are these people Hey listen so the tent so ten thousand toys last year you raise their right want to clarify you races toward awful double date two twenty to twenty thousand and wait yeah he's delusional he's up in the tower did you raise the ten thousand last year though we got the support team thousand torso you black suit so all my goodness so you weren't even close to twenty so this year you said Hey logical next step let's try to get fifty percent more than what we got last year that's insane yeah same about until you're up there three days or four honestly I know I'm going to be up here until we get twenty thousand anti life is to guarantee I'm not actually going to be going to bed so we get seventy two hundred oh my goodness so I I might be up all night until we actually get that we're still about three hundred short of that total three hundred to I think we can do it tonight because you're there the it's the winter garden village it's the clock tower and it is it's not like it's closed you're there and I remember last year I came to visit at what was at four in the morning you're there the whole time this isn't a joke right yeah I know on there the whole time aid we actually have a great day thanks technology so I'm communicating with every down below we're also on livestream so this isn't like the old radio gimmicks that you didn't really do it yeah yeah yeah however I talking about we're we're actually doing a hand it in the families of the round the doll houses of central Florida are benefiting from that so so that's it it's a season giving and hopefully people can give with their hearts and their wallets what's the honest I love it and has all of the listeners here for the show includes her show now I am currently dangling from my legs I'm upside down I'm over at the the I the big guy dangling arm until you reach twenty thousand twice so that is a big right you know we're we're both doing these these little stuff like you're trying to one up me the O. okay I'm doing the old radio not real thing that I'm sorry you're really there I actually was just there right before I came here and it's really cool because somebody will be down there it's not like you won't know what to do it's this things people are there things are happening and once you get there there's a camera where you can see Slater and he can see you and you can say hello and I can tell you it's probably a minded mass first later up there so just going to visit saying hello drop off one present and he'll be at two ninety nine that's all I'm looking for and another to create you know that that would be nice that would be that would be a beautiful thing all rights was later listen keep in touch let's chat toward the end of the hour to see where you're out with this all right and if you're listening right now I really urge you if you're in the winter garden area or your your twenty minutes twenty one minutes don't go over there twenty minutes or less do some good this is going to the Ronald McDonald house which is a great organization so work we're happy to support you Slater and we'll hear from you in about half hour or so down to get that chance all right love you say back say back lot bloodier thank you yeah thank you we got some more callers if you want to get in on it happy holidays other or merry Christmas give me a call eight four four two two zero zero nine six five right now merry Christmas is winning seventy three percent John.

Slater
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"At least a decade away now here's news it's heather Myers with your micro climate forecasts nice mild comfortable day across San Diego county temperatures at the seasonal averages for this time of year mid sixties at the beaches upper sixties are right at seventy four inland valley communities no rain in the forecast for today with more clouds by Tuesday we do have rain expected to hit the county most of the day on Wednesday drive by Thursday on aim seven sixty I'm news it's heather Myers announced partly cloudy in seventy one in Escondido there's more Mike Slater next AM seven sixty talkin breaking is the like Slater show you A. M. seventy six GFM the America's great thanksgiving break coming up on Friday we got the big warrior foundation for your station radiothon the show of the year most important show of the year so I hope you can join us you can get right now and seven sixty KFMB dot com because you know you're gonna you know Eric you know you can do it just do it do it now but you gotta do it kind of right I mean I thank god but part of the job okay I think it's one of those things right so you can give right now seven sixty KFMB dot com or you can you can wait to Friday or give twice you've now straight she got it done and then on Friday or ceremonial giving on the actual day probably support by west automotive group bill how plumbing heating air National City model cars and Walter Anderson nursery seven sixty KFMB dot com so it's really interesting about Duncan hunter stepping down now he officially step down like to be crap when you make a plea you don't you don't have it I have to step down but he was asked what's gonna happen next and he said about this season a confident that their transitional be a good one my office is gonna remain open we're gonna pass it off to ever takes a backseat I think it's a port to keep the seat a Republican seat so that's pretty clear he's done but they did say it and same thing ice up when I select the fifty second heat and they they do this thing like hard you're always worded I wish I was like I've decided to no longer represent I'm I'm not going to run again in the fifty second.

heather Myers Escondido Mike Slater America Eric Duncan hunter San Diego A. M. west automotive group National City Walter Anderson fifty second
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

07:43 min | 2 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Slater got coming up in a little bit really said to share the story leads to groom to groom more stressful is going to be something that will happen in I'm not sure when it's going to be before the election or after probably before because everything's moving at lightning speed we got a hint of it a couple years ago there is some California college Democrats convention and it turned into a oppression Olympics because all the different minority groups kept arguing about who was the most oppressed and different groups walked out of the conference and ultimately the holding was canceled the Muslims that were in the most deprived usually if the elections in the muscles I got one of the most depressing the black student groups I know we're the most oppressed I know we are we're out here and the whole thing class they did they cancel but I there's a couple years ago so I think we're seeing that now in the real world as leaked out of the college bubble so drop of course made a see in the fresh faces the face of the Democratic Party and anytime anyone criticizes them they all okay see they all claim that you or Nancy Pelosi are attacking women of color you keep hearing this term women of color people of color so Kim Davis was a black woman sure this article she said hello you panic person they see can you person from Somalia she says you don't have the same claim the victim of a as black people in America this is usually done writes this part of the oppression Olympics talk water just as a woman of Indian or Mexican heritage may possibly find herself coming up against some kind of discrimination here and there but it is not nor will it ever be the same thing as what black women have faced in this nation historically and to this day not even close why should I Jana Presley that's the the woman for the congressman from Massachusetts she's if you saw the press coverage is the first person to get up and talk she's she's black why should I on a Presley be forced to share the national stage with three other woman whose communities ancestors have absolutely zero ties to the struggles of black Americans this is what god knows I know where the most depressed I just don't think black Americans want or deserve to be tied to their a sees watered down version of the struggle because that's what this is a naked attempt to hijack the unique civil rights struggle of black America in order to hitch a ride to victim down when people like Presley the black congressmen are forced to lump her heritage in American experience even with those who are not African American or black she is being forced to pour water into her ancestral soup she is forced to be brown instead of black how dare anyone try to pretend that being brown is the only thing you need to be able to tell gate on the black experience is is an offense of the highest order wow this this you thought you thought this would die down we haven't even begun so now you're gonna have progressive blackened progressive Hispanic people going at each other over who's more oppressed who has the true claim of oppressed minority in America meanwhile over here trump is gonna be talking I unity at America one hundred seven sixty KFMB let me give me to J. do we have the vehicle but just as if to share this club we should the story earlier and someone sent over a little video of it which is pretty awesome so we were gonna more about the Apollo eleven at at two o'clock but we talked about victimhood a bit earlier they will need to Bedford Forrest recap stuff like that and sure the story of Ronald McNair who I don't think in this video it says who what happened so he was born in South Carolina this is the story of what happened when he was nine years old I'll give you the end of the story he grew up went to BK valedictorian of his high school went to historically black college North Carolina then went to MIT and became an astronaut and he was killed on the space shuttle challenger so this is a Ronald McNair's brother telling this pivotal moment in his brother's life when he was nine years old Ron without my parents are myself knowing his whereabouts decided take a mile walk from our home down to the library which was course public library but not so public for black folks when you're talking about nineteen fifty nine so as he was walking in there all these folks were staring at him because the white folk only and they will look at him so you know who's this Negro so he politely positioned himself in line to check out his books well this old library and she says this libraries not for colors he said well I would like to check out these books she says young man if you don't leave this library right now I'm going to call the police so he just popped the stuff up on the counter and there and said I'll wait so she called the police and subsequently call my mother police came down two burly guys come then say well where's the disturbance she pointed to the little nine year old boy sitting up on the counter he says man what's the problem so my mother to me well she was call she comes down and pray in a hallway their luggage is believed to let them put my challenge jail and my mother asked Liber what's the problem he wanted check out the books a you know your son should be down here the police officer said you don't want to just give the kid the books in my mother said he'll take good care of them and reluctantly the librarian gave Rhonda books and L. mother say what you say he said thank you ma'am later on as youngsters I show came on TV call Star Trek now Star Trek show the future where there were black folks and white folks working together and I just looked at it as science fiction because that was going to happen really but Ronald sort of science possibility you know he came up during a time when there was Neil Armstrong and all those guys so how is it a colored boy from South Carolina wearing glasses never flew a plane how was he going to become an astronaut but Ron was the one who did accept societal norms as being his normal.

Slater nine years nine year
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"After homeowners complained about strange cars and people parking in their neighborhoods. Now, here's news as Carrie lane with your micro-climate. Forecasts are going to see another band of some light showers possibly late this afternoon into your. Evening commute. We are going to see that search dissipate as we get into the latter part of tonight, and then things will dry out and actually start to warm up nicely tomorrow along the coast your highs today, we're in the low sixties same for the inland. Bally's frame seven sixty. I'm news aids. Carry lane right now, it's cloudy and sixty five in power officials of the outer sh say the outer shell of the Rams and chargers new stadium in Inglewood is now complete more than two thirds of the stadium is complete in unscheduled open in the summer of twenty twenty. There's more Mike Slater next AM, seven sixty talk and breaking news. This is the Mike Slater show, a better, Hugh for better AM, seven sixty K FM. Exactly. Mega-guys? San Diego's mega city. Cleo's just then we'll be done with.

Mike Slater Carrie lane Bally San Diego Cleo Rams Inglewood Hugh seven sixty K
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

07:25 min | 2 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"To mike slater food so it's a real quick are quebecer so when you hear that jordan peterson naked can you wrap your head around it because i need to hear it a couple of times i was totally in that when i hear jordan peterson i need to hear it i need to listen to her a couple times that clip makes sense that clip made sense to me only because i know something about the bible right and so he otherwise if he's talking about basically anything that i have no idea carl young said he'll he'll start talking about psychology and so he he speaks in a way that kind of assumes you're at a certain level very good okay lost a lot of the time every once in a while if he's talking about certain term in psychology i'll have to stop look it up to really understand what he's saying okay and even then it's only like i'm not a psychologist but did but that clip dot com okay well this one is a lot easier so again he's at liberty university at the complication christian school and spoke for like an hour and a half or so and the question last question was how can we pray for you and i think this is the perfect answer to that question there's lots of things about your life that you know aren't right ironically perhaps this is something that could be transformed into a prayer is that the the that mistakes that i let me give you one quick point background about twenty minutes into the convocation those queuing it at a man came up to the microphone a student at immediately broke down sobbing he said my name is david i need help i need help i just wanted to meet you i'm on well i wanna be well and he's broke die fell on the ground started crying security guards show up he's on his knees the camera cuts away but you can hear it all and one of the pastors jumps off the stage and comes down and brace for him it was twenty minutes into the q._n._a. so the entire next hour this one moment hung over it all and then the guy's name was david david the person and david the metaphor for people was brought up throughout the entire next hour and i think it really affected jordan peterson because he's become this really influential voice on youtube and across the country and it's too much it's too much for one man and this huge burden is put on them that's way too much for a person to have and i think he feels the weight of that so i think that's the root of this answer that he gives and it's why he's holding back tears when he says so sorry can we start over thirty perhaps this is something that could be transformed into a prayer is that the the mistakes that i am inevitably going to make well i'm pursuing that i don't pay an undue price for the mistakes that i am inevitably according to make pursue what i'm pursuing that's my fervent hope and it has been since all of this is broken around me that i would be careful enough in my speech and that's the logos that i would be careful enough in my speech so that i would stay on the right track on the straight and narrow path and and fulfil whatever obligations are my privilege to fulfil and what i hope from the people that are supporting me is that if they wish to pray for me is that i'm careful enough i remain careful enough and fortunate enough so that my inevitable don't interfere to catastrophically with whatever good i might be able to do so perfect perfect request an answer to that question that is maximum genuine numberless the recognition that i'm not perfect i'm going to make mistakes and i hope they don't take me out so bad that i can't move on to fulfil my mission and purpose that's unbelievable because history is riddled with people who have righteous missions yet are taken out and most of the time most of the time as a consequence of their own behavior but even sometimes just an unjust ways to no fault of their own just by bus or whatever right most of the time as a consequence of their own decisions but i have no idea why there's examples popping in my brain this is a bad example but let me just say it so get out of my brain and other examples will come but you know with the joe biden accusations are coming out oh the new york times that's such a good headline about it i'll find in the next time air can you remind me to for the new york times story about joe biden they had a great euphemism for joe biden inappropriately touching with perfect okay i'll find a here anyway so joe biden all these accusations coming up and with the governor of virginia and the lieutenant governor still in office remember the lieutenant governor was accused of rape but all that went away the governor all the people in virginia are still in power all throughout all of this i think of al franken franken the comedian senator of minnesota remember the whole thing like a year ago he was on a u._s._o. tour years before that he was on a u._s._o. tour and a woman was sleeping on the plane and he came up to her when she was sleeping and pretended to grab her breasts and someone took a picture of it and it was finally revealed and and he resigned a couple of weeks later after trying to let it pass over i disagree with al franken literally every single thing ever and he probably won the election all different story so to go out prematurely maybe some poetic justice for him but let's say that al franken was on a righteous mission for good at truth let's just let's a huge assumption here but let's say he was on a true righteous mission for good and truth put he did one stupid thing that's it it's over dover mission over you could be someone on a true wonderful mazing bureau powerful position a president of influence and importance and you're doing amazing and then you one stupid thing and it's gone and that's life and i don't want that to be you don't want a stupid mistake to be your undoing.

jordan peterson mike slater twenty minutes
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Slater's coming up AM, seven sixty talk and breaking news. Little bit. Brees was to load. Oh on Friday. Yeah. Yeah. He's miles loud. Yeah. I wish I was over the words what you said over the. Here we go. Here we go again. But it's fun. You portray that last hours total free fall. This is funnier for some reason last time it was like you always expected it. Right. Underreaction and I don't care. Yes. That's right. Okay. Which is a much funnier way to go the overreaction. It's funny too because the dump button which should be right next to you is across the room. Yeah. You'd slide dramatic. Relic. I got to my chair has wheels. And I think that was why the engineers set it up that way. Just wheel across. Yeah. Well, we don't need to put it any closer. Like people are Cussing on air. We'll just let them use the wheelchair. It's my phone. Just let them up. Them up. Remember a while back. I this is coming from me. I had a segment that I had prepared some thoughts I had prepared. And I said it's all it's too depressing for me to even talk about. I don't remember this too depressing for me to talk about it's about man's capacity for evil it had a positive spin at the end. But it was a very depressing thought to.

Brees Slater Underreaction
"slater" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"slater" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"York City recruiting my interview with pro surfer Kelly Slater. And I asked him about surviving a wipe out on a humongous wave. Let's check it out. One of my friends who's one of the craziest big wave world now string Ross Clarke Jones. Of course, he's strategy. He he he had this interview where they asked him about, you know, falling what happened in this one wave, and and in for about fifty sixty foot faces this day and somebody said something to like, you know, what happens when you phone wave or whatever he goes. Oh, well, you know, he is your it's kinda like you're just enjoying the ride, and then you have a whole different kind of ride, and you got enjoyed that one too. So, you know, the idea being that it's all in the attitude. Well, it is because you got to keep your heart rate down. And so the more calm. You are more confident you are in not only your own abilities physically. You're you're trained up and ready for that even for bad situation where you may get knocked out of you. And you understand you still oxygen in your red blood cells, and you're not gonna die. You know, you just gotta relax and keep your heartbeat down as much can you kinda gotta go to happy place. And but there's dissipation of energy, you know, the wave breaks into soon as it does it spreading that energy out. And it kind of keeps it almost sort of keeps breaking. In this circular fashion until smaller Smalls mortar. And then so you're just kind of waiting that energy is very rarely gonna keep you with it going at the speed of the wave because you. The water slowing you down or whatever. So that energy is moving away from you and your hoping you're not trapped in sort of a void tax of energy. And if you are you still got just kind of wait it out. It's never good to be trapped in a vortex of energy. Oh. Energy positive energy, whether or not it's an ocean wave spiritual in.

Ross Clarke Jones Kelly Slater York City fifty sixty foot
"slater" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

StarTalk Radio

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"slater" Discussed on StarTalk Radio

"Nets your toes all over the edge of Lord. Okay. Hang eleven hang eleven eight. Oh, oh, hang eleven dude surfing new cook. Guessing wanted. Well, surfing champ Kelly Slater told me about another physics phenomenon that goes on when he served big waves. Check it out. Another thing that happens, maybe footage of this. You know, when a wave breaks sometimes it will spit all this water out the end like air pressure. It's kind of like a fire extinguisher, whatever. So in a tube. You have all this air expanse. But then when that collapses that airs gotta go somewhere, and so it will create this pressure high pressure and just shoot you up in the way. You're dealing with high and low pressure. So if you have a wave all this is going on all this is going on. So sometimes you have to sometimes guys will be in in a in a tube. And they'll say it spit back in my face or breathed on me is what happens if you have a wave that kind of starts not real hollow it just kind of feathering too. And then it barrels into two gets bigger. Like, this it pulls air back into it. 'cause it's open suction. Yeah. It creates a low pressure back there. It needs to fill that. And so it creates a backdraft, and sometimes we'll just knock you off your board or it'll sweets eight spits back at you. Because it'll bring water with it hit you in the face, and it can kind of sting your face or whatever. And then all that water. When the when the when the to sort of all breaks at once just collapse on itself shoots all of that era out and shoot you out of the end of a barrel. So there's a lot of things that are kind of happening at once. That is. So Bill you thinking about all these things when you're surfing, not really. You're just reacting you you sort of think about it later discuss it over beer. And Travis and how about you. 'cause you're also a surfer you have some awareness of this. But it doesn't happen on every wave, right? So so when you model this stuff, you have all that factored in I agree with Bill when you're actually on a wave your minds kind of going with that moment, and you're focused on that. But when I'm in the water the rest of the time, I'm thinking about commuter computer, models, one after the other I'm thinking about big twelve forecasting, and how waves are coming from you, the Southern Ocean or north Pacific in how observations are taking in and how they're reacting to the computer models, and she was the most important sort of physics factor in surfing in surfing. And if you're actually talking about catching the waves, I think it's actually speed of a wave and speed of a surfer. If you can't wave a wave comes in. But you're not surfing in your surfing sideways..

Kelly Slater Bill Southern Ocean Travis
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Slater. From one hundred candidates seven. Sorry, everyone on hold. But we gotta roll. And I highly recommend the IM big bird documentary about Carroll Spinney because baby was news. No joke. Why documentary? It's fantastic. I don't know maybe you'll cry. I if you do not judging. Eric you're looking at me. No problem. It's great. You're chopping onions. All someone Tom killing noise here. He's running for San Diego unified school board you need to vote for him, Tom. How are you? Grace. How's it going? My really good. Tom, San Diego union Tribune. I'm sure you read their endorsement of are you running against Kevin visor. I'm running against Kevin buzzer. Yes. I'm the one that read the center union Tribune. There you go and I love their endorsement of Kevin visor after three paragraphs of talking about how current schoolboy is a disaster and terrible it ends with. So having an independent thoughtful new voice in the board would be of great value nonetheless, we endorse Kevin buys and Mike McGuire guys what so all day on the school board all the time. What's your biggest problem with them? Wow. How much time? Do we have by the way, Eric I'm going to need more time? Visit following by the way, following big Bergen big bird and Oscar the grass retiring come on stuff. Tom. The union Tribune union should even got it wrong. I mean, they said it was a well intentioned novice. I was an executive at Qualcomm that started in early eighty nine and within ten years everybody. In fact, the technology. We're using today with something that I was part of a new executive team that helped deliver. It's changed the world. And I started a a local public charter school for our military community. I thought we could do better and in four years Mike in four years, we doubled the state average and testing and became a California distinguished school became the top academic performing elementary school in San Diego and one of the top five percent in four years. Well, thomas. What what what are, you know, about the ins and outs of education compared to? Wow, that's amazing. Top had no idea. What's the school? That started the charter school elementary. I'm proud of our school and love that we serve our enlisted families. They deserve it. Really cool. All right, Tom. I would talk much longer. Maybe we can set up another time to chat. But the good news. Is you got the Mike Slater show endorses? You got it. Okay. We're gonna talk later because this is the most important race eleven seniors not six figures nineteen billion dollars for our kids. And that's great. But I'm not I'm not sure if you've heard. Yeah. Just do it again. You got the Mike. Thanks, man..

Eric I San Diego Kevin visor union Tribune union Mike union Tribune Kevin buzzer Carroll Spinney executive Tom Mike Slater Kevin Qualcomm Slater. Bergen Mike McGuire California four years nineteen billion dollars five percent
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Mike Slater show it's? A perfect book Alexander sticking? Around and tell us about the Google talk that you did at Google, headquarters how. Did. That happen and how did that go Yeah so we're gonna watch it on YouTube search Alex. Epstein if you're probably, Google Google I'll probably there are certainly if you put that. On YouTube yes at. Least one person who was a fan of mine just proposed it and actually at least. At that stage which? Was in two thousand seventeen He, said he didn't have that much trouble getting it through and. I know that some a bunch of people boycotted it used to go but the people who did go that receives it really well. And. A lot of them. Even said in a culinary that I had affected their thinking just an hour and I. Think a lot of it was affected about it and what's important about the moral, case for fossil fuels, is, that I don't start off with the idea that I like? Fossil fuels right don't like also people's I started with the idea that, I really like is is for human beings to four I want human, beings to really live and succeed now and in the long term. And then I ask well what sources of energy are necessary for human beings to flourish if we look at both potential positives and negatives of all of them and I find that when. You, look carefully at those pros and cons you, find that fossil fuels are immensely more, valuable than people think and then you also find that some. Of, these other sources that people wanna mandate have crippling negative aspects to them that if, we try to rely on them such as solar and wind On a large scale given their. Current state we're gonna do a tremendous amount of damage but what about the planet because, he talked about, human flourishing right and everyone wants to maybe balance this idea. Of human flourishing and the health of the planet whatever that concept of yeah so well I mean human flourishing part of that means. Having. A good relationship with. Our environment and so we need to look at with any given for energy okay how. Does it affect our environmental quality but to do that we can't just assume that, any way in which, we, change our environment is going to be a disaster afterward carefully? On how does this actually work and say with fossil fuels what I've, found is that the CO two that we emit seems to have some, impact on climate but it's pretty mild warming influence it also has. A big greening influence because CO two contributes to plant growth but the biggest thing fossil fuels due to the liveability of our climate to our ability to flourish on this planet is they Able, us to make ourselves safe from climate because they allow us to build a very resilient infrastructure that makes them naturally dangerous climate very safe so if you're in India then the. Temperature is naturally going to be one nineteen you're better off if you use fossil fuels and somehow, the temperature gets to one twenty..

Google YouTube Mike Slater Epstein Alexander India
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"On AM seven sixty I'm Jim. Sharpe at that's one of the stories we're following let's begin by checking on traffic you want to watch. Out for an accident on the south side of the five th Cesar Chavez Parkway it's tying up the. Far. Right lane and things are pretty heavy and slow coming down from the ninety four the rest of our roadways are looking pretty. Good though. The fifteen in no problems. To report and the eight and the eight oh five also in really. Good shape this report is being brought to you by. The hotel. Del Coronado hotel Coronado is San Diego's choice for. Grand American beach experiences come enjoy. Live music on the sun deck, every, Sunday experience, the legend hotel del dot com We're learning that. The. Colorado family reportedly murdered by the husband visited San Diego just a couple of weeks ago social media post show a happy family. Taking in. The sights here last week. Christopher watch was arrested for the murder of his pregnant wife and two. Daughters we'll follow the story throughout the day plus others. But right, now it's time for the Mike, Slater show on. AM seven sixty talk and breaking This is the Mike Slater show a better you better AM seven sixty k. FM b Doc Off America's finest city. Miles I feel that I feel like you're not as good bonding this morning Tom could chat we laugh hug it out who saved the dog Eric.

Coronado hotel Coronado Mike Slater San Diego Cesar Chavez Parkway Sharpe Colorado America Tom murder Christopher Eric seven sixty k
"slater" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"slater" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And he's going into chorus field and i know the guys were talking about that today but you got slater seven panic eight and the pitcher nine and then turn it over again all of a sudden and i'll tell you this against right handed pitching this theme is is doing a job i like slater panic seven and eight he could he could lead off if you needed elite off hitter as well but i see what you're saying he he's driving and run kind of a guy that you know other teams may not be aware of how good of a hitter is in and pitch to him and so you know i think you could put them in a lot of places he he's he's just a flat out good hitter yep yeah he does as he's not overwhelmed it looks like he belongs up here so that that's worked out well how about hanson you know hanson i know boat she wants to get him in there all the time in the longoria injury i still say is a very very big injury for this team because it's gonna it affects their right handed lineup against lefty pitching and they're gonna see freeland tomorrow who's been nothing but trouble for them and this anderson they've hit around i think on wednesday i don't know who's gonna pitch tuesday but you know hanson's been very important sandoval probably be out for a dare two but how do you like hanson do you think it's real or just ride him as hard as you can what do you do with them you know just let him go see what he can do i mean he's got a lot of skills hopefully they'll produce you know in the long run but he definitely has skills he has a little power a lot of speed his fielding kind of to me is the question that i have but as far as hitting and being a good run of to be on the basis yeah he feels that role so he he's still doing admirably yeah he's he's he's explosive he has an explosive player you know marty i did do a little research that trees that we made with boston last year to get anderson we also got another pitcher another young pitcher from boston who they say has a lot of potential as well so it looks like that might be a good one us down the road well nunez wasn't going anywhere they weren't going to be signed him so the sean anderson you're talking about when allie does our minority report on the the podcast mid inning relief on tuesday i'm going to ask her about sean anderson see we'll see what he's doing because he was highly regarded and university of florida so we have an interest in them there was also young pitcher that we received in that trade initially they say he's good too i think it santos is his name he's very young about eighteen but they're saying that he looks good as well so in the long run trade just might be some big dividends well it may i mean let's as i say nunez wasn't going anywhere so with the giants so you know at least they got something for before you know just letting them go as a free agent hey appreciate the call mark all right gary up in vacaville gary on kmby are six eighty go ahead yeah thank you party was the last caller last night at midnight we talked about sacrificing the runners over and it came up today and i thought about you because i said i don't care if it's babe ruth they need to bunch but there was a hit today and there was no sacrifice and so i wanna give you some props on that marty because you mentioned that it could kill a rally and sometimes it's not always smart and it did happen today so wanted to call back until you that yes indeed it did come through a couple other things go ahead quick and then i'll hear your comments we talked about strickland i did last night about how he didn't have it and how he just doesn't have it and i i heard you talking about hanson today i just got on the road but i would say of hansen batted a whole the whole season he probably be a two sixty hitter come up with some clutch hits but.

slater
"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Is the mike slater show you for better is a m seventy sixty k fm exactly so are you hearing people talk about this thing at the so it just happened right so there's this comedian guy sort of comedian stuttering john the our stern guy i think thanks claims to have plays the phone call with the president while he was on air force one eric yeah i heard it acting as bob menendez yes so he pretended he was senator bob menendez democratic senator calling up the president and my first thought was oh i wanna hear it because i want to hear how bad their trump impersonator is compared to eric yeah good this guy's by bad i wanna get take on it and that's not i mean eric four vows this guy had to be three so i was gonna apparently seriously that was my intent and then i heard i was like oh i think i think he did i think that worked i got on air force one he got to talk to the president on the phone somehow which someone's getting fired for that but then i'm like oh jeez what did the president say do you have an eric i haven't reviewed any of the it's fine is play like a minute okay well we need to stall for time here because i've got let's yeah let's really talk you can't be silent what do you mean it doesn't it only queue up when you stop talking no i thought you stay so we're pulling up the video here okay i've heard of this actually happening i remember somebody called the milwaukee bucks the nba team and posed as a player said hey i need to speak to coach it was it was not the player that's pretty good let's take a minute.

guy president bob menendez milwaukee mike slater john eric nba seventy sixty k
"slater" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"slater" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Know what happened there and what is correct i don't know what indie slater's press credential situation was before i do know with this meet with these media causes that this serves andy slater band journalists andy slater this serves him and it's that he's not talking about it right well that he's trying to get the credential back behavior i would be making a big stink about it if i'm slater there are there are no bad theories here considering that it's been some time since i report and we're just finding about it now i think though that jeeter would be more press savvy than that i think the jeeter's pr people who are from the yankees would be more savvy no i used to and then he got here but in all seriousness though like it's gone so well but in all seriousness the reason that they can get away with stuff like this because it's a team that's largely ignored down here so that's why you know the criticism that we do fair on fair is important because if not they'd be doing whatever they wanted and no one's talking about elliot's right we need to keep fighting the good fight here because they're doing things okay like not signing this kid's hat at a baseball game jeeter making them take it up and taking andy slater's credential and listen they know no one's gonna talk about it okay we have to report all this stuff we have to be the watchguard for the media and the fences then this is the time that you're going to partake in journalism yeah this today is the day i didn't say me i was existing you however you wanna do this day is the day that that's god's takes on a journalism per se it's an interesting time about andy slater end up four kid we've reached out to andy slater it's a it's a big complicated because andy slater's on a competitor here locally who cares about that well.

andy slater yankees elliot baseball
"slater" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"slater" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"After that andy slater now infamous video where he flew to the british version aisles right their headquarters their headquarters so they're getting mad they revote in these slater's credential because he had the audacity to fly to their headquarters yes so so he says team got ticked and slater had his press credentials yanked after that report so it seems as though there there's not other stuff going on here it was specifically that report if it happened after that report right which is kind of either were finding about it now did ain't i don't know if andy slater's actually gone to the air revealing this it's been some time since he flew to the british version islands and gave that report because you think he'd be making a big a deal about well i would think any state of who breaks a lot of news would have broken that but i don't know i'm i don't know why i'm finding out for me from doug hangs on this but that's a credible source not that andy slater isn't but that's you know a writer for the miami herald i don't know how to feel about this well i think i didn't know how to feel about this that's bogus that's bogus if they don't like the coverage stuff that dana white does and watch a pro wrestling cartoon what happened they had to talk it out yeah no that's that's not the way major league baseball roles that's not the way derek jeeter i there jeeter's class personified their jeeter's had a lot of bad coverage here and lord knows he's had the opportunity to get sort of snippy he has been a little petty with marlins man will admit that but this is not what i envisioned when i envisioned derek jeter taking over his petty with that kid or dodger hat to the to the ballpark.

andy slater doug writer the miami herald jeeter lord marlins derek jeter dana white
"slater" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"slater" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Slater to be expelled from office in california and more than a century in his resignation letter mendoza called the senate's harassment investigation farcical and a violation of senate rules and his own due process and constitutional rights the la county sheriff has some advice for parents who are worried about their children's safety at school what can parents do to protect their kids in light of the recent school seedings and threats la county sheriff jim mcdonnell the big thing is just have in a sense of awareness no what the it is involved in who their friends are changes in behaviour over time at their kids are used in uh drugs or alcohol we've got to be able to work together to create youth programs for kids so they have a place to go after school they have an adult role model they have somebody who's interested in what they're doing encourages them things that growing up we often too look for granted cherif mcdonald was a guest on mcintyre in the morning on lianne tweeting kabc news president trump threaten today day to pull all immigration agents out of the golden state well commenting on school safety the president began talking about kids walking home from school possibly running into a gang member like from ms thirteen and the dangers kids face in that regard then he began railing against california they are due a lousy management joann the threat of a punishment i mean frankly if i wanted to pull our people from california you would have the crime nesslike you've never seen in california is that in two months california would be begging for those agencies to return he said to you know what i'm thinking about doing it jim roope los angeles also hawthorn bay spacex successfully launched a tree of satellites this morning two of them will be part of lied musk space based internet access is damon jim rupe also has the latest on that the launched from vandenberg air force base in southern california lit up the early morning skies headed for a low earth orbit similar to the international space station's orbit to what space x from were engineer thomforde aero explains is a son synchronous polar orbits let it passes over the north and south poles certain types of polar orbits like this one a son synchronous orbit keeps the orbits claim directly online at the sun which enables it to.

Slater california mendoza senate jim mcdonnell cherif mcdonald mcintyre president damon jim rupe harassment la county los angeles engineer two months