37 Burst results for "Slack"

Fresh update on "slack" discussed on Buck Sexton

Buck Sexton

01:35 min | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "slack" discussed on Buck Sexton

"Of Oscar to Silva. Zaire may take it upon himself to pick up the slack, and he has thus far 15 to 13 Stanford With eight points on a run by Zaire. Williams, Ethan Thompson bumped into and fouled. Max Moral in there for the cardinal. It's a non shooting foul, and it brings us to the second media time out. Stanford 15 the Beavers 13 Fever basketball out of bounds at Maples want action continues after this The Beaver Sports Network from Lear Field, I MG college in 1931, Oregon State football team compiled the 63 and one record playing their home games in Bellfield in Corvallis. That same year, unquote Bury began making ice cream to sell the passengers of the train station in Roseburg. Three generations later, they're still predict. We'll hear that, huh, Colin, you men, then you need to get something. Good money, says the place winner. Unit up whether begins, um can do to make a big cat sandwich. A Roy Rogers. We used big head. It's a youngling beer battered, cut fish Philly with cheese and Turner sauce on a Kaiser ruled down boys and have a cowboy kind of de door dashing Hubert seats are available at participating restaurants. Find unspeakable piece When I come to these grounds, Catholic cemeteries are sacred ground there times that we.

Zaire Ethan Thompson Colin Roseburg Silva 1931 Max Moral 63 Bellfield 15 Williams Stanford 13 The Beaver Sports Network Bury Eight Points Oscar Corvallis Roy Rogers Second Media Time
Fresh update on "slack" discussed on The Talk Show

The Talk Show

05:45 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "slack" discussed on The Talk Show

"The web apps have on irs which are enforced by apple which you can easily argue. Cynically is all about just maintaining the privacy of native apps that happened to go through the app store. Only the app store on ios. But talking about the mac here on this show. It's clear that the the primacy of true native mac apps not just a thing that you double clip like slack for example is not a native mac app. I mean it's an app and you run it. But it's not a mac app right not even close and you know just how many people do things. My son does all of his work. As far as i know he wouldn't even know how to use anything other than google. Docs to write a paper for school I don't think he. I don't even think he's ever launched pages. I bet if i launched pages on his mac it would give me the first run. Dialog like welcomed pages thinks this is part of the whole re framing of what a computer is for you from the age of you know when i was talking about using a computer didn't have a network connection iran applications and that was the whole. That was the whole deal right. And now it seems more like every part of the the software and hardware platform of the desktop. Computer is there to give you tools to manage the complexity. That is the internet. So everyone of these windows on your screen is again a parnell instead of a porthole but a portal into the internet and the operating systems. Job is to let you deal with that to have a web browsers they let your deal with web pages all those services like slack and discord or even message services or even skype or any of these things that are portals into the wider internet. Put a you know. Put some fancy chrome around it. which is what. I always thought the chrome web browser was. I don't know if this is the truth. The truth behind the name but i always thought it was such a clever way to acknowledge it. This is just the chrome around where the wheel reaction is happening. It's happening in the web through about right and so there will always be value in the operating system and all that machinery to let you deal with that. It's the reason why we many of us prefer working on max to ipads. We're doing the same thing you've ever all using just email and web browsing and things like slack and instant message and all. Those things are available. And i've had on the mac. What's the difference. Well the mac is letting us manage that complexity in a different way that some of us find more comfortable inflexible. So that's what we do and vice versa. Right and so you know for setting aside. How is that chrome built up. How is that functionality built up. I don't think anyone is arguing that the thing they're giving access to the internet and he really get into the weeds. And you say well. If we had a native slack application it would be receiving jason blobs or something through an api from the slack servers and it would be rendering that using internet's table view of who an app gap or whatever as opposed to receive those jason blobs through java script and rendering them into an html dom to make the scrolling view. And are you all over again about the differences are but like in the end. No one is arguing that slack as a service as an internet powered service of communication that happens elsewhere and that we were just merely giving a glimpse into through a user interface. No one says that's going away so it's that's that is a much bigger change much more important change than arguing about whether it's an html dom on this side or whether it's whether it's accurate. Yeah i think it's the deigned. The danger i see to apple in the mac is that it makes the mac far less sticky though like its its way it would be way easier for might in fact that's why he he has. My son has a mac book that he does most of his work stuff on and he has gaming but he switches back and forth between them in a way. Because you know he could. He can just do his work on the promise of web apps right like if he wants to use these gaming. Pc to write the homework paper. It's the same log into google. Docs i mean. That's that's the promise but the thing that would never appealed to me about it is. I'm so my fingers work the mac way. I expect the menus to work the way i could never enjoy using google docs to write a sentence. I mean i feel like that's what people on. I'm old and i'm i studied the mac and know it inside. I know the zen of the macintosh way of using applications. If you tell me standard menu command i can tell you what the the shortcut supposed to be and always bothers me when the shortcuts are different. You know like who wrote this app. Have you ever used a mac and it's It's not just a habit though like you said it's the philosophy of how this stuff works. It's kind of you know. Think of it in analogies of like physical world things of someone who's got a workshop and they're making tables and chairs out of wood and those all the tools that workbench and all their power tools and all their hand tools. And you know the how everything is arranged in their workshop like those are their tools of the trade. Everyone's making chairs and tables right. There got legs on them. There's basically a chair is chair tables the table and different degrees of business. But that's the job to be done but you can have a workshop with a cnc milling machine and all sorts of fancy stuff or you can have a workshop with only.

Macintosh Apple Ipads MAC Chrome First App Store IOS Java Skype Docs Jason Blobs Mac Book Jason Google Slack Discord
This startup is making customized sexual harassment training

Equity

03:07 min | 2 weeks ago

This startup is making customized sexual harassment training

"Is raising money. And i think this is a really cool company and i want you to tell us all about it. Athena raised money in june with two million round for anti harassment software that it would send to companies and companies basically. Install it for their employees. You'd get a nudge every month. Five minute training and it'd be kind of this idea of making a more flexible way of learning about how to deal with modern situations that might rise up better than the one hour lecture. This is a shift in its focus. Because before was doing kind of one thing and now it's doing a broader array of things when it raised in june was just doing anti harassment in zoom and slack world and now eight months later. It's another two million co led by the same firm. Gsp that let first round of it's and it's going into anything compliance related whether that's how to make sure you are not doing insider trading by mistake or or other bits like that and it's they leaned on big customers which was the impetus for this round including netflix's doom and send us and so for an early stage startup. Those are big names. They have twenty thousand active employees completing their monthly training which the co founder is a positive signal that it's at least getting engagement in some way. Are you currently caught up on your corporate training for verizon media group as managing editor one of my wonderful tasks at the company is to actually monitor our employees to make sure they follow all of the different trainings that they have to do. Because i am the one who gets. The e mails for a bunch of folks that says so and so is sixty days later on their annual compliance training. We will delete thirty male if they do not respond immediately. Did not know that was a state attorney question again dan. Natasha and i caught up on our vm. I think you're mostly caught up february's if you are not cut up would have been fired because most the recordings are due in december. So if you haven't done them you would be out nailed it tauscher. There's also some grows numbers and our notes here. Something like two hundred and fifty percent growth quarter over quarter. What is that metric tracking in the athena's since it was tracking basically the amount of people who are on the platform amount of learners. That are coming to athena. Obviously those big contracts and mentioned earlier help them be able to prove that like any startup. right now knock sharing revenue profitability et et cetera. They're just hoping to use this money to gain new customers and figure out that stuff. Later is spelled. E. t. h. e. n. a. Not of in ethene like it's like patina but it's not blockchain related. I usually ask founders for the story behind their name but recently i guess i have not been good enough to that curious enough about how that came together. I think the idea of little mini modules. Make sense. I mean some of the things i actually remember. From compliance training are like mini modules for instance detectors by verizon media and reisen media's owned by and say verizon because it has infrastructure works with government a lot and so in our corruption training which had to take. Oh yeah there's this great story of like you're working hard at work in the field and you have a city official with you. Can you offer them a bottle of water on a hot day. And i was like stir and there's like wrong committed bribery and corruption and a dig radiation to american society. You may not offer anything of value. Not even a penny. You can't offer free water bottle or kick cat.

Verizon Media Group Athena Netflix Tauscher Natasha DAN Verizon Media Reisen Media Verizon American Society
Finding the One (Therapist Who Gets You)

Airplane Mode

05:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Finding the One (Therapist Who Gets You)

"Hi my name is era. I am twenty four years old and am from texas a small town in texas. So i hadn't really talked about therapy danny body or heard about their p for the most part because it's not something that was discussed in my family or at my school with my peers. There's such a stigma around in the black community is not something that i thought i'd ever need until i got to college. And so once. I went to college and i started struggling a little bit especially since i went to. Ap w i primarily why institution. I felt pretty isolated. And eventually i decided i e. I need to do something about this. Some of the things that i wanted to talk about specifically dealt with me being a black woman. And that's something that's hard to talk about with people. Who don that experience directly. Czar barnes executive editor. Here itself has written a lot about mental health in general and mental health black people specifically so when care wrote to us i was like i have talked is are we work together but we've never actually interviewed each other before so this is a new milestone zarin. I talk basically all day every day. Not in this context though pretty much constantly slacking constantly getting on zooms. But i'm excited to do this. Which is a little different for us back in june. Sarah wrote this incredible article. Forty four mental health resources for black people trying to survive. In this country there are list of people and organizations to follow directories and her own words of encouragement and support. Let's tell the story from the beginning like what was happening that week. That made you decide. I have to write this. I mean it was just the constant flood of honestly traumatizing news about violence against black people. In this country this was right around the time. When the protests about george floyd stuff were really kicking off in earnest and in my role as the journalist over multiple years. I've had to cover news while also having a lot of feelings about the news but it has never been this intense for me as it was that week zara knew that if she was having a hard time finding mental health resources for herself and her friends after all her years of reporting on this. She probably wasn't alone. She wanted to do something to help. Change that. And to normalize the conversation. There still so much stigma when it comes to talking about health in our society in general. But there's also a very specific stigma that can come with talking about having a hard time with mental health black person we've talked about the strong black woman trope a lot at self. That was a big part of our cover story with trudgy p. Henson the idea that black women are kind of supernatural strong and we can handle anything and we don't suffer and we never have a hard time there is a corresponding trope for black men. And even though i feel like people have done a lot to break down those barriers culturally. There still is just this pervasive idea. That having a mental health issue as a black person is first of all not something that happens. And second of all if you're dealing with it it means you're abnormal or your weak or something's wrong with you and you need to hide what you're going through and i feel really proud when i even look at the headline of the story. Forty four mental health resources for black people trying to survive in this country. Because i feel like it sends a couple of messages it first of all says if you are just simply trying to survive day to day as a black person that's completely valid and that's a worthwhile goal and then it also says there are all these mental health resources so you cannot be the only person going through this. There are not forty four mental health resources just for you. it's for everyone. it's because there are so many of us also dealing with us in her reporting zara focuses a lot on barriers to accessing mental health. Care the things that get in the way of people getting the help that they need and one of those barriers is the stigma as she says but there are other major stomach barriers to being able to access. mental health. services is such a tremendous privilege. I mean first of all you have the cost even if you have insurance absolutely adds up. I've seen a lot of people talk about having to see their therapist once a month instead of once a week because even their co pay is simply not affordable for them and dot is a travesty. At the cost of it is especially the fact that so many therapists don't accept insurance so that adds an additional barrier.

Danny Body Czar Barnes Zarin George Floyd Texas Zara Sarah Henson
Strategies for Pivoting to Find Your Hyper Growth Solution With Nylas CEO, Gleb Polyakov

IT Visionaries

05:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Strategies for Pivoting to Find Your Hyper Growth Solution With Nylas CEO, Gleb Polyakov

"Glove. Welcome to the show great to be here. Thank you very much all right so right out the gate. What exactly is nihilist. Yeah nihilist developer platform for productivity infrastructure. If you have any Productivity collaboration customer engagement use gays we provide the back end date is and the front end components to quickly and easily build that integration bat and user experience that scheduling flow that intelligence layer that you need to parse your unstructured communications data and to build robust features either internally or externally that get. Get the job done whether it's figuring out how to schedule a meeting across multiple people whether it's figuring out having been sentiment analysis across all the different prospects that you're speaking with whether it's figuring out how to go in the invoice or our state out of pdf or build a knowledge graph of knows who and how strong that connection tranquil. We can help you get bad done with just lines the code. Okay so one of the things that we always talk with founders bound. Is you know a lot of times whether it's marketing talk. Whether it's the description of the product we always wanted to dive deeper because one of the things that we'll find out. I'll use we joke about it. And every episode people that say i is used a l. the most now for probably the most overused letters of all time right because no one knows when you say i. What does that mean talk to me about. What does it customer experience when they use the nautilus platform. So what's something they may be couldn't do before and after implementing you they can. Now do. yeah. I think for us. The interesting thing we found is our product has a lot of capability underneath or even just on off the shelf But folks really start off with just the basic table stakes in analogy. Now we offer and then build on top so for us. What that means is the basic cable. Six optionality is really just like exposing the customers calendars shirring have bidirectional sinking or email off for chats. Were whatever. The communication aspect is within your application. I we help you kind. We make sure that you're able to access the data that not just a huge block of tax that is actually in a readily usable form for both your end users and developers. We're going to be building that analogy so from there Folks ben go into the higher order functionality. Once they are. Crm customer that is able to connect the context of the mailbox into a sales conversation in their crm then you can add on higher order functionality around cinema or whatever else he might be doing this little bit fancier but at the very beginning always like the first building block the foundation which is getting access to the data in the first place. Making sure it's what you need and making sure it's automatically sinking in both directions so that you can receive messages and also send them out with guaranteed engagement. Gotcha so nonetheless. It primarily used by customer service sales organizations or who is who uses the product our product is used by developers so our core audience is the engineering community. Okay and the product community at software companies. So we're a company that focuses on bbc software companies primarily. I would say they're about seventy percent of our customer base. Gotcha so i didn't. I didn't quite understand that part because you had talked about a lot about is with in the communication side so i automatically you know by default assumed to the service organization or sales organization. So what is it that. I guess you one of the things. 'cause there's a stat on your company's website and says that your communication. Api's are currently used globally across more than twenty countries in you naval developers to build apps that integrate with one hundred percent of email calendar and contact providers in as little as four lines of code the value proposition so developers are using nonetheless to build communication tools across different platforms. Is that accurate. That's right. yeah so the distinction here is that there's sort of different layers layer cake that make up the communications. You have at the very top. Your apps is these are your your zooms and your slacks are the software tools that have a very defined very user experience and the company is just geared towards just people onto that set front end user experience against lack zoom they build the tool and they deliver distributor business themselves then where we are sitting beside year down the abstraction layer this is where companies like Like nine listed like We provide the picks and shovels the tools that those apps used the builder optionality. so for us we have a tremendous amount of customers In the space in the marketing space legal h. r. act but the list goes on not because a a lack of folks are part but more show because it's a functionality that's needed across industry got so we're not really a sales tool go. I would say in the first year of the business. We saw tremendous attraction. Crm

Service Organization Or Sales BEN BBC
Chang-rae Lee on His New Novel: Its Kind of a Crazy Book.

The Book Review

06:43 min | 3 weeks ago

Chang-rae Lee on His New Novel: Its Kind of a Crazy Book.

"Chang. Rae lee joins us now. His new novel is called my year. Abroad chang thanks for being here by pebble. See you are joining us from hawaii. Which leads to an obvious question. What are you doing in hawaii. Other than carrying out. Perhaps every quarantined person. Who's not in hawaii corentin fantasy. Well there are plenty of those people here. Those ex-pats well. We try to come every year income last year because long ago i was the writer in residence at the punahou school barack obama's old school and a lot of other famous folks and we had a wonderful year friends on the faculty Miss seeing them so we do the usual things. Eat a lot of asian food like the body board. Wow yeah i think now any any or spiring authors like putting this on their list of aspirations onto like to be the writer in residence at obama's old school so my year abroad is your first novel since on such a full sea which came out in twenty fourteen. Did you start this book immediately. After on such a full sea do tend to start your novels before the new one comes out. I'm curious how you kind of work that well. I started probably about a nine months afterwards. Attended a waiting period as it were before. I start something in earnest because i don't write short fiction. Sometimes i write short on fictional Essays about me my family but but with a novel. The commitment is so great. And i know the road ahead will be difficult. So it's really hard for me to get to committing to a book. I'll sketch you know three or four different versions of a book on. Sometimes they're different books for the first six to nine months sort of a thing on doing right now and then. Finally i'll bland on one and decide yes. This is the one that i think. I can sustain that may be consistency. Well it was going to ask. What is your starting point with a new novel. But maybe i'll change to. What are your starting points like is it. The is at a premise. Or a challenge to yourself as a writer. It's actually a diverse range of things. Sometimes it's a character and right now. I'm working on like maybe three or four things. It's a premise. I like this idea about the summer camp. That went do that was for korean. Kids only green christian kids. Then sometimes it's atone a lotta times. I've i've felt as if starting a new novel. That's kind of a reaction or response to what i been doing before. And so i just wanna change of mood change of a certain kind of sound and maybe that's something that has followed me throughout my work especially at the inception stages a certain kind of sound overtakes me and either. That's personal voice for the character or the narrative voice or even just the kind of atmosphere mood of the piece of what i think the world of the novel be. And then i'll i'll just around with that for a while. I wanna talk about that certain kinds of sound and also the reaction to on such a full sea but i have to pause and ask you about that camp. What was that camp was that in the. Us it was. I grew up in in new york in the city and then in the suburbs so it was a camp that was run by an association of korean churches in the state area so for two weeks. Every summer from the time i was five years. Old to ice think was probably fourteen. Maybe thirteen fourteen. It definitely didn't go past there because they didn't want real teens at the camp because they didn't want to invite a different set of problems right because it was a church base camp so they all got together and i guess rented a camp for two weeks north of westchester. I think putnam county somewhere. I can't even remember where it was may be brewster and so for two weeks this place and it was a very low in camp. You know there. There were no jet skis or no horses. There was hardly any fields. Basically there was a volleyball net and just kind of a high grass in really spare unheated cabins with barely running water. But i tell you it was some of the best times i've ever had also has camps. Go they introduce you do all the problems of the world but on a scale that you know the kids kids can understand jealousy corruption out just all kinds of things that go on but but the funny thing about it was. It was my time for two weeks to to be with only korean kids. In american kids was out by your parents sent you like. Did they want to kind of help. You reinforce in an affirm. Your identity is a korean american. I think that was their hope and they weren't religious people so so even though there was a bible study element to the camp. That was the part that we all didn't want to Kind of slacked on but yeah. I think they were absolutely hoping that. I would connect with other kids not speak the language because we none of us really spoke korean because many of us didn't come from an ethnic enclave saying in queens or something and so as i did in westchester did not grow up with any other gets all so it was our time. We'll read about this summer camp. I hope in your next novel. Hopefully it'll be one of the threads that you're currently working on that wins out. 'cause i'm i find that fascinating but to get to the novel my year abroad. Tell us a little bit about it. And then i want to talk about in. What way is it was kind of a reaction to on such a full sea. Well it's a kind of a crazy book in particularly. I think for people who know my work. It was sort of a surprise. you know. i'm sure my editor was surprised by what she got in quite describe it the way it turned out but It's a book about twenty year old college kid who's at loose ends in every way in his life not very moored in his comfortable but drab suburban existence than he meets up with a local entrepreneur. A chinese fellow. who's not quite chinese-american. He's really just chinese but has made a big time life in the suburb in new jersey and has businesses all over the world than this young man named tiller gets taken up by him and they go travelling together and i guess they have what might fall business adventures but those adventures get quite intense. I would say

Hawaii Rae Lee Punahou School Barack Obama Association Of Korean Churches Chang Westchester Putnam County Brewster Volleyball New York Queens New Jersey Tiller
Pittsburgh Penguins GM Jim Rutherford Resigns for Personal Reasons

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

03:37 min | Last month

Pittsburgh Penguins GM Jim Rutherford Resigns for Personal Reasons

"Question today is who's going to be the next fulltime general manager of the pittsburgh penguins wednesday jer mother furred suddenly and abruptly. We understand resigned as gm of the pittsburgh penguins. Your wide brush thoughts when you first heard it shock. I think everybody was shocked. Someone told me that. An email came from rutherford a company wide. Email came from rutherford to everyone about an hour it was announced and people were just slack jawed. They couldn't believe it. And i think the other thing too is that the penguins signed yannick weber on wednesday morning. 'cause their defense just so battered and rutherford was involved in it he did the signing and then one hour and a half later. It was announced that he was out. So i think it caught a lot of people by surprise. You know. there's a couple of things here. Initially there was a concern that it was health related. If you've been familiar. Jim rutherford's in his seventies and he's been very careful during the time of corona virus. He's mainly stayed out of the public which is perfectly fine. There's nothing wrong with being safe. It's the smart and responsible thing to do for yourself and your family so there were concerns about health. But david morehouse the president and the ceo made sure to point out at the beginning of his. Call that you know. It was not health related. You know something happened monday night. Where rutherford are tuesday. Night where rutherford told the team and they check with them again on wednesday and he decided to do it. I do think there was some kind of philosophical difference about where the penguins were going or how they were like everybody wants the penguins in the organization to continue being in that win now mentality. I don't think anyone disagreed with that. But i think there might have been a professional disagreement on how to get there. The thing that is kind of interesting to me about it is that david. Morehouse his media availabilities. Said it wasn't anything there wasn't anything that you wouldn't normally think was unusual or different like a. Basically disagreements happen all the time and you don't necessarily think they're going to lead to that. And i just wonder if the organization saw one way and rutherford saad another way and he's been quoted as saying it was time and i just think that happened. I think he got to a point where he said. We don't see this the same way and times were challenging. I don't need to tell anybody that and it's just time. And i think that's kind of what happened now. His contract was up. I don't think the penguins and said to him. We're not bringing you back. I don't think there'd been any conversation really about. The contract is a lot of teams right now. And we see it with travis green and vancouver who are kind of saying like during this these financial times. We gotta be careful. So i don't think the penguins had said were not bringing you back. I just think they really kind of punted towards the end of the year and said they talk about dan. So that's kind of where i think it was. I think that there was a philosophical disagreement and about just where they were going. The penguins didn't think it was necessarily a big deal because these kinds of conversations happen all the time. And rutherford just said okay. We just disagree on the vision. It's time for me

Rutherford Pittsburgh Penguins Penguins Yannick Weber Jim Rutherford David Morehouse JER GM Morehouse Travis Green David Vancouver DAN
Major internet outage affecting users from Washington, D.C., to Boston

Anna Davlantes

00:26 sec | Last month

Major internet outage affecting users from Washington, D.C., to Boston

"Outage is being reported across several parts of northeastern Northeastern U. S. Customers have registered complaints over Verizon and Comcast services from his far as Boston to Washington. D C. Users have also had trouble accessing sites such as G e mails, Slack zoom YouTube and Amazon in a tweet. Verizon said one of its fibers was cut in Brooklyn, though it's not immediately clear if that's what caused the outage. A

Verizon Comcast Boston Washington Youtube Amazon Brooklyn
Major internet outage affecting users due to Verizon fiber cut reported in New York City

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | Last month

Major internet outage affecting users due to Verizon fiber cut reported in New York City

"A major Internet outage affecting users along the East Coast, including folks in our region. The problem we understand is with the Verizon Fi Oh, centered and service and Verizon says at fiber optic cable was cut in Brooklyn and that Maybe the reason behind the outage down detector, which tracks reports of allergies showed widespread issues with Verizon, Google Zoom YouTube, Slack Amazon Web services and others just before noon today. The outage also disrupted online teaching programs in school district's Prince William County Public schools in Virginia tweeted just after noon today that it was aware of Internet connection issues with Verizon files affecting both. Staff and students

Verizon East Coast Brooklyn Prince William County Public S Youtube Amazon Google Virginia
How the Virtual Office Could Replace the Physical One

WSJ Tech News Briefing

09:27 min | Last month

How the Virtual Office Could Replace the Physical One

"It's another monday in the world of remote work depending on. When you're listening to this you might be going up for another day of sitting in front of your computer in your zoom sweater. Trying to get stuff done by video conference. We're of course familiar with the challenges of remote work already. Big recalls can be awkward and inefficient in. Its part to replace the serendipity of running into someone in the break room but lately some new services have been trying to solve those issues with virtual office. Spaces are columnist. Christopher mims visited one himself and he joins me now to talk about what he saw. Hey christopher thanks for being here. Thank you for having me. So you've visited the virtual offices of id corporate. They were using space through a service called gather. Can you talk about what that experience like. I visited a number of corporate offices in my time so it was strange to visit of virtual office reminded me of real world ones. Which are you know. Kind of whimsical lake airbnb. They have all their conference rooms. Which are modeled after various apartments on airbnb so being in a virtual office where there were desks and conference rooms and you know stage for people to give talks and a cafeteria and a bar and the office is actually in a castle and there's a beach it was really funny. How even though. I'm walking around with my avatar. I felt in some sense. Like i was there. And maybe that's you know decades of playing video games. But i also think that there is a lot to be said for the way that video games. They're designed over. Decades has been refined to really tap into innate abilities that we have so for example in our brains we have place cells which are physical analogues. It's an individual neuron lights up when you go to a place and you can see this on the brain of a rat when it's traveling through maze for example or if you talk to people who win the annual world memory championship a lot of them. What called memory palaces. You imagine a house and you walk through and you place the object. You wanna memories in the house that works so well because we have this huge section of our brain which is devoted to place and geography and navigating in three dimensional space. We just don't use it with our existing interfaces communicating remotely. So when i went into a virtual tutti office and started walking around the thing that really struck me was like oh my god. I'm using more of brain and it feels more natural so when i'm in a virtual h. A hosted on for example gather. It's very easy. I just use my arrow keys. And i'm moving in two dimensions link in legend zelda and at the same time they have incorporated sort of the minimum requirements for communicating in that space as we would in a real one and one of the spatial audio of my avatar is next somebody else's avatar. We can talk freely in these little bubbles just like we went through video chat you know if we walk away from each other the sound fades and dies complete so you can create these clusters of conversation or you can walk up to somebody in the hallway and have chat with them. That's private or you go into a room. Only people in the room can hear each other. So this allows you know based on my interviews with the people who are working in this these types of spaces this kind of more spontaneous collaboration link. We're used to in an office at the same time because you can make yourself more or less available you can turn off your camera. You can say i'm away. You're not tethered to your desk. As he would be in a physical space going to this office it just it really struck me how quickly i was able to interview a lot of people just by walking up to them and that just doesn't work with the friction of you know. Zoom call words like. Oh where's the link. Okay here logging in. I'm waiting for you to log in. is everybody here. Oh you're muted just all of that. Extra friction really gets in the way of spontaneous communication. I think and gather is one of a number of companies offering similar services. Just how widespread are these types of platforms and how are companies using them. There are a lot of companies using them. I mean one of the biggest ones which is called remo remote dot co. they're used a lot for events. They told me that they have multiple hundreds of thousands of monthly active users. Spatial chat claims similar figures. You know they have people using them. From every big chunk of money you could imagine plus boeing and a bunch of other fortune five hundred companies. Not all of which are paying members because of course they all have a freemium tier so it is. Nasa sent hundreds of thousands of monthly active users. But if you're having a few big events that could only be a few dozens or hundreds of individual companies but has impressed me that the biggest ones by just traffic are bootstrapped. And they're like look. We already making revenue. We don't need investment because we are just were able to pay our server bills from people signing up that is of course a very powerful signal that something is sticky. And it's working if you can get to revenue if you can go from nothing to a product that is making money in nine months. That's a very compelling space generally sounds like a lot of users and how all these companies using these types of platforms. It sounds like it might just be more about special events than it is about you know putting in your full nine to five from the virtual office. I think rate now. The initial use case for most companies and organizations is events because partly that allows them to dip their toe. It's low commitment. I mean if you're going to have a holiday party. In one of these people have to adapt their work style to spend a couple of hours walking around some virtual space so companies using it to work in. I think are in the minority. I've also heard interesting. Use cases lake people holding scientific meetings. And the they build out this big hall. And then everybody's standing in front of their scientific poster and anybody who's ever been to a science meeting or a medical meeting knows that that is the central ritual for disseminating new data and information also just like meeting people in your field and it's the science fair for adults but it's really important in in academia so it's been interesting that so many universities and other institutions seem to be using it for those kind of events others are using it for parties summer using it just to replace what people the old the stuff that we all used to go to in convention centers. Where you'd go to a talk but the real substance of it is having coffee or drink with somebody over chris. I can put on my cynical hat for a second. During the pandemic i feel like workers are struggling with zoom fatigue and with the sort of always on mentality that comes with being full remote. These services seem to require more presents out of employees and and that seems like a potential challenge. I think as with zoom as with slack where we were promised. This is the future. Remember where it can then once you once you're kind of forced to use like really high doses of these things you really run into their limitations and you get zoom fatigue or slack on or whatever you wanna call it. I think that the same could be true for these on the other hand. I think that there is the potential for them to be the next evolution. That makes it a little bit more. Sustainable i remote work experts. I talked to cautioned against companies saying. Oh this tool is gonna solve our problem for us at base. I think the real challenge with remote work is companies need to establish a bunch of new norms in some ways. Very different from what we are used to in an in person office where norms can be established by as moses have to be more deliberate and you know whether or not you're using a virtual each q. Being forced to everyone share what they're working on in some kind of document that can be accessed a synchronous all those little nuances of what it takes to make a really functional. Remote workforce work. That doesn't go away. The tool doesn't solve for that automatically. But maybe it makes it a little bit easier so it sounds like you think this is something that might be here to stay as we move into at least a more heavily remote workforce in the future absolutely. I also think that ultimately we're building toward kind of a more complete fusion of the internet and real life through the mediums like augmented reality in some ways. I think we're laying the tracks now for that so the more we get used to collaborating remotely through all these tools the more natural it will seem to toggle between what we're doing in the real world what we're doing on the internet via other things like our glasses are vr. Headsets are ever more mobile. Devices are risk based whatever aren't. That's our tech columnist. Christopher mims thanks so much for joining me. Thank you for having me.

Christopher Mims Remo Remote Dot Co Christopher Boeing Nasa Academia Chris
Reboot Your Brain and Boost Your Productivity

Gadget Lab Podcast

07:08 min | Last month

Reboot Your Brain and Boost Your Productivity

"Well. It's twenty twenty one but chances are that you are in the same boat as you were in twenty twenty still stuck at your house still waiting for the current pandemic to slow slowdown as it's devastating communities around the country at least now. There's a glimmer of hope as vaccine. Rollouts move forward. We've given advice in the show before about how to work sweat play and just exist at home during the lockdown without going insane but this episode will be more holistic. We're going to be sharing advice and tips about how to maintain your sanity stay productive and stay healthy while we all stick this out. Maybe you even have some new year's resolutions along these lines that we can help you realize later in the show. We're going to have some recommendations for specific gear. That can help you find peace of mind. But first let's talk about some practical lifestyle tweaks that can get you there. So alan you have this interesting title of service editor and here it wired that means that you edit oliver coverage that we tag as reader service which is usually like stories that you help people navigate their lives in the digital era. So you are our expert in this Topic so please tell us what are some of the ways that you found that you can pass along to help people focus. So you're in trouble. If i am your expert but that said one of the best tips. One of the first tips. That i give to anybody. When they're trying to get things done is to find the best time of day for you to be productive. Find your best working hours. So there are a lot of people who get up early by nature of their job and they're really not a morning person. They're more productive in the afternoon so they're just kind of muddling along and struggling in the morning. Don't force yourself to do that. Like give it a good try right to try and get up early and get stuff done. But like i work best in the middle of the night when the sun is down i am just power through work so in the morning i will just work on emails. And i'll drink a lotta coffee and just kinda struggle through until the sun starts to wane closer to the horizon and then suddenly get a burst of energy and i start getting things done. So if you're one of those kinds of people definitely try to find a way to make the time of day. That's best for you the time that you do the most work I would also tell people to set little rituals for yourself little things kind of get your brain in the head space that okay. Now is the time that i'm going to transition from doing something or something else to getting stuff done. I have a book that i am supposed to be writing. And it's going. It's not a surly going well but it's going and i like to brew a cup of tea before my writing sessions because there's there's something about the steam rising from the cop and it's all pretty and it's floating through the air and everything it just kind of chills me out and puts me in the head space of okay now. It's time to right now. It's time to be creative now. It's time to float like steam off of the water like it's time to get busy so those little rituals help out a lot alan before we go onto your next steps. Tell us what your book is about. The book is a productivity book about productivity. It's a book. Productivity advice for people for whom traditional productivity advise Doesn't always work so. Yeah the story. I like to tell is. There are a lot of people for whom. I used to work with a guy who would block off every tuesday as no meeting tuesdays. And if somebody including his boss or our boss's boss would try to schedule him for a meeting on tuesdays he'd reply and say no tuesday's is my no meeting day. I'm focusing on work. He could get away with that I don't think i could have gotten away with that. And i think there are a lot of people they would hear that tip and be like. I can't do that. My boss would have my head if i did that. If that's you then. Hopefully this book will help you. I'm not going to tell you how to get away with no meeting day of just going to tell you how to work around it so you can still get stuff done right right. That's a great point. A lot of the tips. We here make the assumption that you have ultimate control of your schedule when in reality and a lot of work places You don't have as much control over things you have to go with the flow and respond to your bosses needs. Okay so what are some of your other say breaks. What are some of the other tips. Alex breaks take breaks. It seems counterintuitive. Right because i i have given given. I gave a seminar about this at the times where i used to work and people were like. What do you mean taking breaks makes you more productive. And i'm gonna listen if you have ever struggled to work for hours. Upon hours upon hours straight you'll understand that at the start like when you really find your flow and you're really into it. You really productive but by the end of that work session. You're tired you're dragging your barely progressing if you had taken a break to recharge earlier before you feel like you would rather do anything but what you're doing now. You could come back recharged and ready to go back to that. Highpoint so by all means take breaks. It actually does help you be more productive in the long run and also i just tell people take naps like. I'm a huge advocate of the workday nap if i vanish on slack guys probably should assume i'm napping and and i mean but then the thing is i. I'll take an app. i'll just like does offer like an hour or something and then come back. And i'll power through and people be like alan. You're working really late. And that's exactly what i want you to think but really i just took a nap for two hours. I'm working late and that's also be my book by the way. So i wish i had the i wish i had that superpower and the ability to just fall asleep in the middle of the day. I just i can't do it. Yeah it's it's tough. it is so lauren. I know that. I know that you have a pretty good tip that relates to calendering and sleep hours. Why don't you tell us about it. Okay so i really hate to be this person and every so often you'll see a cacophony of voices on twitter who are actively fighting against this tip saying you don't need to wake up early to be productive but my my thing is i. I liked wake up early early in the morning has been a great time for me to take care of personal administrative stuff or talk to people. I need to talk to you in different time zones or try to get exercise out of the way or even maybe to journal little bit or just. Write down some stuff that i've been thinking about. That's not related to being technology journalist. i like that because then it's not hanging over my head. The rest of the day is i have to focus on other other work tasks i was going to say more onerous work tasks working for wired is not onerous caveat to data to point is that just may not work for some people so for example. If you have small kids you may have childcare responsibilities in the mornings that make this impossible but then my advice would be just to carve out that time night. Carve out an hour for yourself to do this Something that just gets you sort of out of the flow in such way that when you do have to be in the workflow you can focus more fully on

Alan Alex Lauren Twitter
What Went Wrong With Cyberpunk 2077?

Kinda Funny Games Daily

08:46 min | Last month

What Went Wrong With Cyberpunk 2077?

"Sarah twenty. Seventy seven was twenty. Twenty s hottest. Game in shaping up to be a good enough launch when reviews for the pc version began trickling out a few days before december. Twelve release date but once players got their hands on syrup. Twenty seventy seven especially the. Ps four and xbox one versions excitement turned into frustration as players encountered bugs glitches in more in a report from bloomberg's jason schreier developers. That city project red knew the game was not ready for launch in two thousand twenty according developer quote. They expected the game to you. Ready in twenty twenty. Two based on the progress team was making back in two thousand nineteen beyond just bugs and glitches. Sarah sarah overall performance in playability on consoles like the base. Ps four and xbox one reviled. I gave the concert versions of cyberpunk twenty seventy seven specifically a four in its review. One hurdle was that the developers tried to develop the engine and game simultaneously decision. One developer cyberpunk says was like quote trying to drive a train while the tracks are being laid in front of you at the same time. According to bloomberg. Sarah punk twenty-seven versions not the version have been hammered by players for for glitches and bugs. Some bugs which are game raking and ended up crashing the entire game or sometimes the system is being played on and we'll put a pause there because also acknowledge the pc version does have its fisher. Bugs also but the conservation is definitely have way more issues in the pc version back to the article developers seemingly pushed through challenges by believing they could overcome these obstacles themselves. Similar to the infamous. By where magic but sarah punk twenty seventy seven was developed through periods of intense crunch and a follow up to follow a tweet shire claims that despite promises from management that crunch would not be required. Some managers guilty employees into working more hours by saying other employees will work longer to pick up the slack. Salaries were also reportedly low with one junior programmer. Making around seven hundred dollars a month as for why early previews of cyberpunk twenty seventy seven demo to the public at events like e. three twenty nineteen look better than the final product. That's because the demo was entirely fake. According to the report neither code nor the gameplay was finalized when the demo was made in months spent working on a fake demo took away from developing the full game schrafft's report also references things like cultural challenges caused by language barriers There's this whole double dip release strategy that the studio wanted to go for where The game officers meant to come out in spring The reason why one reason why they wanted to come out. Spring was so that they could release on current. I guess now last gen consoles and then released again on next gen consoles and have that double dip having both those console versions out obviously game got delayed and so that didn't happen happen. The exact way they wanted to even though we still have next inversions coming scheduled later this year and then another thing that stri- report references and the fact that the game was announced in two thousand twelve but apparently full development didn't start until late two thousand sixteen. Tim where do you stand with all this. I mean look at this point. where do i stand with. Like one of the most complicated. Just like there's so many different facets that go into this right like at the end of the day. I stand against the project red and how this all went down like we. How many times do we need to say like this game should not have been released the way that it was just period outing times. Do we need to say that. Like crunch is bad and we need to fix all this stuff. All this is to me. Is we being now in. Twenty twenty one firmly in twenty twenty one developers. Publishers media outlets. Everybody they need to open their eyes to start paying a little bit more attention. Because if you make these mistakes constantly you do not change. You do not fix. Despite the countless flags that have went up for the last decade specifically the last couple of years. Jason is gonna get you. Jason tries to get in there and exposed the living. Fuck out of you and your the entire team and that it hits a point where there is no recovering from that. So it's like that fear alone should probably motivate you to make some changes on top of the you know human decency side of the whole thing right but this is inevitable. Of course shire was going to get in there and of course he was going to talk to people and of course that's going to crap narrative that is extremely not favorable to cd project red. For good reason. They made a lot of very very very poor choices. Yeah now reading this report like a lot of it is not surprising just given the context of how everything's gone down right like seeing the the game delayed multiple times like from this bring into september from september and november and then from november into december. I think that paints a clear picture of okay. Yeah like we know. This thing isn't ready yet but we think we can get there. Okay no like. It's not ready but we we think we can get there with the next delay and that combined with the idea of okay. Yeah no we want to release twice so that we can double dip on consoles And them having to delay into basically the next generation was still have the current gen versions only available. I think that speaks to the fact that they they understood that they weren't ready And it's very much seems like a shit or get off the pot situation for them. All right yeah. We got to put this thing because if we don't like we're not gonna make the money on it and we can't keep people waiting we'll this game everybody be ready. I feel like those questions get asked overall. This feels like a tale of a studio thinking that because they put out a successful project that means that they can't have a fail and that is very evident that specific quote from Jason's article where he talks about. How like people were challenging the timeframe of sarah pumpkin whether or not they could get on time and somebody basically answered back. We'll figure it out along the way because he made the winter three and that is not an acceptable answer right like that shouldn't be cause for complacency. Because you put out incredible project. Five years ago i forget if i mentioned this in the actual article but like there was also the reference of how quickly the team grew after the witcher. Three like basically. The team doubled in size between the wichita. Three and cd project red and they didn't necessarily account for that. And so when you have a team that grows like that. And you don't your your company culture and your pipelines and your processes don't grow alongside that to allow for that For for that ease of growth. Then yeah you're gonna have issues like you can't you can't you can't operate like a big company but also still behave like the small indie company in that. Seems like a lot of what they're what they're doing. Which is unfortunate. Because that's result in sarah twenty seventy seven. Yeah absolutely you know the. I think most shocking thing to come from this are the implications. That three was fake. Like that to be something that i struggled to fully believe or fully. Get behind this on so much. Believe as budgets. Get behind that statement. Because it's like all demos or fake demos to some extent. And i feel like that's this to me is a perfect example of when it rains it pours and it's like when you make dire mistakes you're going to get called out and then you get exposed for every single thing To levels that you wouldn't necessarily be criticized and everything else right you know But anyways like yeah the the each. I definitely want to know more about of him implying. It's fake or not. We do have more context on that. Because adam consider not consistent adam oh no it. Is adam barsky. Yeah from cd project. Red actually responded on twitter. Quote tweeted jason with a whole response. I'm gonna pull from adam. Bankers with adam. Bankers did a good write up on it. From aegean the response goes like this. Adebayo adebayo the steam ahead of cd project. Red has responded to a recent report regarding cyberpunk twenty seventy seven alleged fake three demo and development issues while it's hard for a trade show game demo not to be a test of vision or vertical slice two years before the game ships. But that doesn't mean it's fake but ask you wrote. Compare the demo with the game. Look at the at the other side. They're dum dum dum dum. I'm not sure how that's pronounced. But look at the dumdum seen or the car chase or the many other things with the people reading your article may not know is that games are not made in a linear fashion and start looking like the final product. Only a few months after launch or a few months before launched if you look at that demo now is different. Yes but that's what the work in progress watermark is for. Our final game looks implies way better than than what the demo ever was as for missing features that's part of the creation process features features. Come and go as we see if they worker not also car bush's exist in the final game almost verbatim to what we showed in the in the demo.

Sarah Twenty Jason Schreier Sarah Sarah Sarah Punk Bloomberg Schrafft Jason Fisher Sarah Pumpkin TIM Adam Adam Barsky Wichita Adebayo Adebayo Sarah Twitter Bush
2020 to 2021: Looking Back, Looking Ahead

Conversations with KidsPeace

05:28 min | Last month

2020 to 2021: Looking Back, Looking Ahead

"Hello and welcome to our podcast series conversations with kids piece. I'm bob martin. The start of this new year comes as we conclude our third season of the podcasts and so given both those milestones we thought it would be good to get an update on what's happening with kidspeace now and what we can expect to see going forward in twenty twenty one and to do that. We're extremely pleased to have with us once again. It's visas president and ceo mike slack. Mike great to have you Back on the podcast and happy new year. Happy new year. Bob really good to be with you. This has been a remarkably challenging year for our entire society. Certainly kidspeace is not immune unintended From the consequences of the pandemic of cove nineteen and. I'm wondering if you could take a moment. Just looking back. what do you feel worthy. Most significant challenges the organization faced. And what's your assessment on how we've responded well. I think first and foremost. I'm very proud of our response. I think Kids pieces responded. Well you know. I think like every organization there was so much unknown about this pandemic None of us had ever gone through this So so all of that obviously was very challenging to deal with but In in our case in our particular case with kids piece. I think what made it even more profoundly challenging. Is that you know. We're dealing with children adults with significant mental health issues and now we were forced into a situation where we also had to deal with their medical issues and the medical issues of potentially our associates and And so really. I think understanding what those implications were Adapting to them putting the safety protocols that we had to put in place which Were very important and And actually i think worked very effectively but trying to develop them in a way that worked in the settings. We're we're providing services was Probably the most challenging thing that i certainly have dealt with in my career in in one that i am just really grateful that we had on board a kids piece the medical expertise to help. Guide us in that You know from our you know our entire medical team to our nurses and all of the professionals that we have in our organizational leadership team. You know trying to really ask the right questions get the right answers and then get those things implemented in a way that worked with children that are dealing with mental health issues challenging but. I'm proud of the job that we did. It does seem that one thing that has come out of the pandemic has been agreed or recognition in the society of the need to pay attention to mental. Health needs obviously amid such a crisis. And and beyond. What do you think will be the long term impact of this greater awareness. Yes so i think This pandemic has has certainly a silver lining of the pandemic is the fact that Mental health mental health needs the impact on one's social. Emotional situation have certainly been front and center and that's a great thing for kids. Be something that we've been trying to get Our communities our society to understand recognized for for many many years so The downside is that the need for our services is is increased and will likely Significantly increase over the the coming years months because people have been hurt through this pandemic So what that means for kids piece is we need to stay focused on what we have been focused on but accelerate our ability to Create access services That's been very challenged in the pandemic. Because of quarantine and social distancing all of these things all these safety measures that have been put in place have limited the the resources that we have to serve this growing need and so i'm looking forward to getting to the other side of this so that we get our Our workforce fully back in and productive and able to start to services need because access to service is going to be critical. We did adapt to that. We we We continued to operate all of our services during this pandemic. Make them available. We did that in unique ways through telehealth through certain walkin services that we provided By going to people's homes may be instead of them actually coming to clinic setting So we've had to adapt. And i think many of those things we will be able to continue to do long after this Endemic subsides and excited about about continuing those efforts.

Mike Slack Bob Martin BOB Mike
Cyber Security Headlines 15th January 2021

Cyber Security Headlines

03:09 min | Last month

Cyber Security Headlines 15th January 2021

"Packers waltzed past mfa used by seesaw. On cloud. Accounts multi factor. Authentication is one of the strongest security protocols. We have but it's not infallible on wednesday. The us cyber security infrastructure security agency revealed that malicious actors bypassed mfa to get into its cloud service accounts cease said that the threat actors had tried multiple times to breaches systems by various tactics including fishing brute force logging attempts and possibly a pass the cookie attack which involves the theft of authentication cookies from browsers and related processes. That's how the attackers were able to hijack an authenticated session by using stolen session cookies to access ceases online services social media convulses after capital attack. A widespread shakeup is underway facebook's yanking posts of flyers promoting events leading up to biden's inauguration as terrorism and cyber experts helped the platform to ferret out images calling for harm the walkie talkie app zillow which hasn't proactively moderated content has deleted over two thousand militia related channels after finding it was used by insurrectionists and parlor the social media app favored by trump supporters. May never come back for having been scraped off the app. Stores kicked out by slack and cut by amazon. Ceo john matzec told reuters parlor filed charges on wednesday asking for amazon to be forced to restore its service. Google fixes bug that delayed kovic contact tracing apps. The api bug affected contact. Tracing apps worldwide delaying notifications sent to android users. The apps are built on top of the exposure notification system an api that google released jointly with apple to help health services develop contact tracing apps it looks like the problem only manifested on android devices. Not on ios the api. Let's developers create contact tracing tools that protect privacy by relying on bluetooth to exchange anonymous keys between smartphones an easy way to warn users if they've been in contact with someone who later tested positive apple yanks feature that lets apps bypass mac. Os firewalls and vpn's has removed the content filter exclusion list from mac. Os eleven point. Two beta to k known as big sur. The controversial feature had allowed fifty three of apple's own apps to bypass third party firewalls security tools and vpn apps that users themselves had installed for their own protection. The list included some of apple's biggest apps such as the app store maps and i cloud security researchers had discovered the problem this past october and had called it a security nightmare waiting to happen

Us Cyber Security Infrastructu Ceo John Matzec Packers Amazon Biden Apple Google Facebook Reuters App Store
How Netskope is Refining Edge Security

IT Visionaries

05:09 min | Last month

How Netskope is Refining Edge Security

"Today we have sanjay beri. He is the ceo and co founder of netscape sanjay. Welcome to the show. Thank you great to be here all right so we always give all of our guests an opportunity to tell us exactly what their company does. Your the ceo and founder of netscape. What do you guys do absolutely so. Our focus is making sure that organizations enterprises across the world can leverage the new way people work remote for example and do it securely star focuses protecting enterprises from threats theft of data while enabling them to work the way they want to liberty in cloud leveraging the internet working remote in so on and so our category as making would call. It is something called secure access services edge. It's a redefinition of the market of data security to a new cloud security edge. All right so. Explain that to me without using the your industry buzzwords. Because i think this because i'll i'll let me frames up my perspective on this. I've worked at different companies. Or let's say remote i so or maybe they're even cloud native i so we didn't really depend too much on too much. Enterprise security everyone just kind of logged into public cloud. If they were developers they would have me. Vpn are asa access. So that would get them to their development instances so there's a lot of audience that doesn't quite understand exactly why enterprises needs connectivity. Security solutions like netscape kind of framing for me like what's happening in the marketplace. What's happening with your customers. And why products and services like yours are needed to begin with totally totally so just if you step back. The single biggest market insecurity people spend close to thirty billion dollars a year on. Is this market call data network security and what is that. It's the stuff that you heard of like wham. Gateways firewalls data. Loss systems proxies. They're all boxes Somewhere near network so biggest. market insecurity. the problem. There's problems with that market. The world has moved on meaning one sixty seven percent of people work remote and people don't want to go back and bp another corporate network anymore they want to go straight to the internet straight to cloud and so one. The location of those boxes wrong It's forcing inefficiencies performance problems too much expense and so people are saying. Wait a minute. I don't want these boxes. Mike perimeter. I want this edge in the cloud. Where no matter where i am. I have great fast access to my resources in. I have this security on ramp right that is everywhere in the world and you know with us. Fifty milliseconds away from anybody in the world doesn't matter what country would city and is this virtual clouded so one the change in the way that people are working remote partners accessing things assessing the change in location if your security in this market to the language has changed and so important point every ten years maybe fifteen. The language of the internet changes so reality is remember way back when paolo to networks came out and and they said hey we're going to beat cisco juniper and all these folks and it's because the language internet has changed it's all about application identification. The reality is that that has happened again. Ten years later and now the world and the language and internet is. Api's it's j. It's you that's how applications are built. The internet is built and so as a result all those systems that you spend thirty billion on that. Sit in the wrong location. They don't understand the language. And so i'll give you this great example. Send with his so and she said to me. Hey sanjay Okay is about four years ago. she goes I got these systems. I got these proxies. I got this firewall. In what more do i need. And i said what are they telling you. And she goes water all their bill. You know five or cave data amazon. And i go to her will. What are you gonna do with that. I mean i don't know a quarter of the internet goes goes to actually. I don't know what to do that. And i go well. It speaks the wrong language stickers in sticks his in and i our system tells her actually that guys on slack gonna public channel sending credit card by the way it is fighting. Mccabe data amazon. They're both right and i go. What do you want which one she goes. I want the second one data this point. The language internet changed and so this concept of mexico is put your security where you want in the virtual edge no matter where people work there and speak the language that the internet speaks so you can set in protect your data in a much better way to. That's a short summary for you.

Sanjay Beri Netscape Sanjay Netscape Mike Perimeter Sanjay Okay Paolo Cisco Amazon Mccabe Mexico
Best apps for keeping New Year's resolutions

Talking Tech

03:00 min | Last month

Best apps for keeping New Year's resolutions

"At dot com slash talking. If you listen to talking tech yesterday then you likely heard us discuss our tech resolutions. So how do you keep up with resolutions for the new year. What are some apps or devices that you can use to stay on track and to fulfill those goals. Whether it's you want to balance your budget for you want to eat healthier the new year. That's what we're here to talk about. Mike what are some of your new year's resolutions that aren't tech related. Well that was brett. Molina co host of talking tech and the other co host. Mike schneider and bread. It sounds like you're trying to make me better myself. And i thought i was pretty good already but anyway so one thing i i've already done. I did it in twenty twenty. Was i opened robinhood account. I've been put a little bits of money in there to try to have to try to learn how to invest on my own versus other investing. That i do like the 401k plan but there are some things on. I'm going to work on. I'm going to check out amazon halo. Which is a wristband at measures and tracks body composition tone of voice analysis your sleep and other activity I've read some stories about this. I'm a little bit scared about letting this try to take over my life. So we'll see how that comes out. We'll be talking about that in the days to come. I also make commit to my fitness pal which sends me a bunch of messages that i pretty much ignore right now as i've let my workout at eating behaviors slack off during the stay at home period. You know it's not. I used to walk like four miles every day. Because i couldn't go to the gym but the weather's changing such that are not able to walk Cold or by the time. I get off at stark or whatever so i'm gonna see if that might help me out a bit now. Now what are you gonna do with twenty twenty one any anything. You're gonna use app technology. I know you're already have your apple watch. Which probably has something she helps you. Dave what else will definitely one at. The top of my list is managing money. And i'm sure a lot of people have that as a goal they want to set for twenty twenty one. One app that i have used pretty consistently is fudge it. It is a budgeting app. It's free to use. And the thing i love about it. Besides being free is it's really straightforward and simple You plug in a budget you plug in your expenses you plug in how much income you have. And then that's it. It's really easy. It's a really quick way to track. You know how much money you're bringing in and how much you're spending month to month and it's a real simple view of everything that you have going on within a particular time period like i'll set mind from monthly and i'll go month to month and set budgets and what's great about it is you can save certain Budget items in star them. So that when you create a new budget those items carry over and so

Molina Co Mike Schneider Brett Mike Amazon Dave Apple
Slack service goes down for more than three hours

Mornings on Maine Street

00:12 sec | Last month

Slack service goes down for more than three hours

"Service. Slack says service was mostly back to normal within five hours after yesterday's global outage. The disruption hit just as most people were returning to work and school after the New Year's holiday. Some

Slack
Microsoft Solar Winds Breach, Slack Outage, Assange Denied Extradition, Singapore Police Use Contact Tracing Data

Cyber Security Headlines

02:18 min | Last month

Microsoft Solar Winds Breach, Slack Outage, Assange Denied Extradition, Singapore Police Use Contact Tracing Data

"Microsoft source code accessed by solarmax attackers as part of its ongoing investigation into the solar wind supply chain attack. Microsoft discovered it systems were infiltrated beyond just the presence of militia code with the attackers able to view source code in a number of repositories while able to view the code. The attackers did not gain permission to modify any code or systems. The company said it did not see any production systems or customer data access or found any indication. It systems were used to attack. Other organizations slack suffers a massive outage. Looks like slack head a case of the mondays because the team messaging service was down for several hours on january. Fourth uses began reporting issues around ten am eastern with slack. Managing the issues on its support page around ten fourteen. Am saying the issues connecting to the service and messaging but classifying it as a full blown outage around eleven. Twenty am by one pm slack. Support advise that users should be able to reconnect with degraded performance but that counter integrations and email notifications for. Dm's we're still having issues. Slack did not specify the reason for the outage. uk judge denies assange extradition to the us. The judge ruled that wikileaks founder. Julian assange cannot be extradited to the united states to face trial on charges for violating the espionage act. the judge ruled that extradition would be unjust and oppressive. Setting assange is mental. Health would put them at extreme risk of suicide if extradited to the us the judge rejected assange s defence however that the charges weren't attack on press freedom and politically motivated saying the. Us brought the case in good faith in two thousand nineteen asandra charged with seventeen counts of violating the espionage act resulting from the publication of documents provided by former us army intelligence analyst chelsea manning. Singapore police can use contact tracing data in criminal investigations. Singapore's minister of state for home affairs desmond tan confirmed that law enforcement can use data from the country's trace together contact tracing app and wearable token as part of the country criminal procedure code. When the app token were introduced the government said data would never be accessed unless there was a positive test insisting token was not a tracking device and that all data would be encrypted for twenty five days before being automatically deleted tan also said that misuse of contact tracing data by unauthorized users was still subject to fines and up to two years in jail

Microsoft United States Asandra Julian Assange Chelsea Manning Wikileaks Desmond Tan Singapore UK Us Army Government
Slack suffers global outage

Lynda Lopez

00:30 sec | Last month

Slack suffers global outage

"Slack is back. But there was a global slack outage today, affecting tens of millions of users. Scene at editor at large. The insurer says slack dependent users had to make some quick adjustments. The whole event underscores how tenuous relying on these types of APS can be. Well, it's convenient to have an APP where you can message between people like text messages before your business At the same time, you become reliant on the system that can fall apart. Service was restored. Just a few hours later,

Slack
Slack kicks off 2021 with a global outage

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | Last month

Slack kicks off 2021 with a global outage

"New Today. Some schools and businesses were off to a slow start because of a global slack outage. Millions of people around the world used the messaging service for keeping in touch and sharing content and during the pandemic that has become a crucial way to communicate. Service is now back. But slack says it's still investigating. The trouble started about 10, A.m. Eastern time and Slack was telling customers who couldn't get access to the platform or get an error to try

Slack
"slack" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

07:43 min | 3 months ago

"slack" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Years from now when we look back at the small details that symbolize twenty twenty and the year quarantine. What will stick out for you. What object or sound will send you back into the in reverie for me. It's the sound along with zoom. This year slack became our office and yet despite the pandemic making a workplace tulich slack and essential part of our lives the company kind of stalled out. We just look at their stocks. Zooms almost quadrupled during the pandemic slack. He's been pretty flat. That was until last week reports. I came out that salesforce was going to buy it this week. The deal was announced and it was big twenty seven billion dollars. Big the wild. That's a nice outcome and you could argue one way or the other about whether salesforce overpaid feels. I don't know like a little bit of a disappointment. Slack could have been the next microsoft of played. Its cards right. Not just another notch and benny offs belt. This is tom dotan. And on this week of the information for one one corey. Weinberg talk to kevin mclaughlin our enterprise reporter about the deal. Kevin deserves kudos a year ago for predicting that in two thousand twenty slack could be acquired so kudos but he also breaks down corey why this deal represents a culmination of dream of doing away with email then in the second segment i talked to. Paris martineau about zuma's and amazon. Why those woke tiktok in rose emoji gen xeres love to hate on amazon and yet they remain some of their most loyal and liable customers as our official gen. z correspondent harris. Spoke to people like isabel tolan. Are this duality of man. There is more of a concerted effort to buy from small on small businesses. Black owned businesses stuff like that we at the end of the day. We still need these random like household supplies. that are just so much cheaper on their. You know so much quicker to get especially with the pandemic. it's there's no desire to go out to the store Kids they'll never be able to homes. Anyway that segment. I slack force salesforce. The enterprise software giant pulled off a massive acquisition. This week it bought slack the beloved and maligned workshop that had gone public just over a year ago. Joining me to discuss this. Megadeal is kevin mclaughlin. My colleague at the information who has been covering the pants off of this slack. Sales for story kevin. Thanks for joining us. Thanks corey i wanted to start a little bit chronologically. You've really interesting story last week. Documenting tales for ceo. co-ceo mark. benny offs kind of decade-long fascination with this idea of consumer enterprise which slack embodies and. I'm curious if you could read. Tell us the origin story of how many off became interested in this idea. Yes yes so former salesforce executives and people have worked at the company have told me that sort of genesis for what salesforce initially was calling. The social enterprise happened around. Two thousand eight win Benny off was the judge at a time crunch conference at which yarmur a very hot start up at the time presenting. Yeah everyone remembered hammer. That was one of the hot companies at the at the time. Well that kind of puts the seed in beni offs. Mind that maybe salesforce should do something similar. And so in two thousand nine. They launched a product called chatter which was basically the same thing where individuals and groups within companies could post messages to their colleagues Basically to replace the company wide email and the group email Not a real time. Collaboration but sort of a synchronous type of collaboration that you see on facebook that was the big theme at salesforce from about two thousand nine until about two thousand fourteen when the company stopped talking about it as much and sort of move onto the next thing. Nothing grand strategy hasn't fully come to fruition yet right. Th the social enterprise actually chatter did get an enormous amount of interest and adoption. Early on So much so that a former of salesforce executive told me The company was actually having trouble for keeping up with The customer interest in inquiries in the product but eventually the interest kind of tailed off sales forces company. That tends to I don't want to say chase. The latest hotness but certainly is interested in part of trends that are important to a large number of its customers and now and one of the trends that was absolutely becoming more important was embodied by flak essentially right like. Can you explain their rise a little bit. What made them. Unique within sort of the enterprise software fear salesforce and mark. benef- were very interested in sort of slacks approach to Workplace collaboration so where yarmur was an asynchronous type of collaboration and communication slack was all about connecting individuals and teams in real time and another unique and interesting thing about slack at the time was that its product was. There's a term in the enterprise. Software industry called land expand. And what that means is groups of employees within companies departments within companies will Download product and start trying it out and sometimes they like it so much that they'll start recommending it to their colleagues and other departments and so this ability slacks ability to become popular to spread via word of mouth definitely caught mark. Benny offs attention and sales forces attention. So it wasn't you know super surprising to see slack be acquired by salesforce in fact I heard after we filed a report. Last week i heard from another former salesforce executive that salesforce talked about acquiring slack before their ipo last june and then use it in the price for a company like salesforce. Which is it's been acquisitive over. Its tenure is was linked years ago to potential acquisition of twitter. Like you said mark. Benny off likes to chase the hot thing as soon as the deal was announced. Twenty seven point seven billion dollars of cash and stock the med with some skepticism and investors. Don't seem to like the deal necessarily. Could you explain sort of some of that that skepticism. I think that Obviously part of the reason is the price tag Twenty seven point. Seven billion is somewhere around. Fifty percent premium from where slack was trading before the reports of the acquisition. I broke And i think that Another reason is slack despite being very popular with the companies that use. It has had trouble capturing that buzz in turn into revenue growth. Their revenue growth hasn't been bad. I mean they've grown at least forty nine percent in each of the three quarters so not too shabby but certainly nowhere near the three hundred. Sixty seven percent. Growth zoomed us reporter for its recent quarter going back to the point about you. Know the investor reaction. I think it just comes down to Slack wasn't exactly hitting it out of the park financially before the deal happened. And you know it's going to take some convincing. I think over time for salesforce to to show the value from the steel. I mean five years probably would be the timeframe.

salesforce kevin mclaughlin corey tom dotan Paris martineau isabel tolan amazon Weinberg zuma Benny yarmur harris benny Kevin microsoft kevin hammer facebook
"slack" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"slack" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Mentioned yesterday that salesforce had agreed to acquire slack which pits salesforce more directly against microsoft teams. That is the big competitor at this point. Microsoft and salesforce compete in a few other areas as well but they also partner up a lot. Salesforce is slowly building a business software. Stack that replicates what already offers and salesforce has a twenty percent market share in crm back in two thousand eighteen at bought mule soft which connects legacy it systems to the cloud and twenty nine thousand nine about tableau data analytics platform which up until now was one of its most direct competitor to microsoft and now salesforce also has slack slacks big advantages integrating with enterprise software. Does it already tech crunch suspects that plus slack spots which also integrate well depending on what you're doing make it the central place for salesforce customers to work. Since all of sales forces product various products can integrate into slack. Already for instance quip that salesforce way of socially sharing documents slots right into slack. That integration is a risk for salesforce. If they can't pull it off probably think that they can. The other risk is slack. Not being worth the money. It was a big aquisition. Slack has not benefited as much from work from home as say zoom teams and others slack reported a net loss of one hundred forty seven point six million dollars in the two quarters ending july thirty first year. Salesforce thanks. it can rejuvenate slack. Both with develop me development resources and selling the heck out of it. Which if you're not familiar with salesforce is what the company does quite well. Yeah i'm kinda taken by this idea. That slack becomes your salesforce hub. They haven't integrated everything in there and it might not all integrate well. Which would be the risk that you're talking about but if they did that's pretty compelling to be like. Hey we've got this. We've got slack. Y'all know slack. Right we've got slack. You just use that and it integrates everything all your crm all your back and stuff. It's just all right there. You can communicate with everybody. I get why this makes a lot of sense for salesforce. And i get when microsoft passed on buying slack microsoft good about slack when it was much cheaper but they looked at the tools they had and said i think we can just build it ourselves and have it do what we wanted to do because it does a tiny. Does things a little differently than slack. It's a little more video focused a little more office. Three sixty five focus than slack would have been had they just bought it so this i guess that's the challenge for salesforce is making sure that salesforce focused but this makes sense to me. Yeah me too. I what i hope so. This is a tiny little thing that only affects me. And i use slack lot with a lot of people including you guys My biggest complaint about the services some of its more basic things that we sort of relied on relying on it for like sharing files in particular image files which.

salesforce microsoft Slack
"slack" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

02:13 min | 3 months ago

"slack" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"If this deal is probably going to be somewhere the twenty five billion dollar range give or take in the nice thing for salesforce. It sounds like it's going to be half shares half cash and they're able to use their share price When when when when when it's been doing very well so it's going to be a cheap form of currency in and i think that's that helps keep their their balance sheet. I think in order. They're to me again. I mean it it. I think the thing that made this made me immediately. Think of a couple of years ago. Remember when the room was going around that salesforce might acquire twitter. Just kind of at each other quizzically ra like why really why why. We're all one word question. Why i don't this doesn't make me ask that question. Why necessarily as much i mean. I understand exactly interstate. Basically kind of what. What slack could do in sales forces universe to be to be a better valley creator but this. This does remind me a lot of that period of time and slack reminds me a lot of twitter. It just reminds me of a management team that has been very slow to it rate a service. That is more or less the same thing. It's always been since we've been using it. And i it's losing share to a much larger competitor. Trying to reframe what success looks like all along the way so to me. This was kind of like a twitter. Two point oh slack was it. It does make a little bit more sense the acquisition than salesforce buying twitter for sure But i slack. I think is not a business that that comes without its challenges. In salesforce is going to have its work. Cut out for rap. 'cause i gotta do some cyber monday shopping. There's another thanks for being here as always people on the program interest in stocks. They talk about a lot of goldman who formal recommendations for against virus stocks based solely ensure. That's gonna do it for this edition. Artillery shows mixed by dan boy. I'm chris thanks for listening you tomorrow..

salesforce twitter goldman dan boy chris
"slack" Discussed on MarketFoolery

MarketFoolery

05:58 min | 3 months ago

"slack" Discussed on MarketFoolery

"I don't think it's going to be one or the other. I think we've talked about this before really when we talk about target and walmart i mean it really is becoming about omni channel right. It's just meeting. The consumer wherever the consumer wants to be met in the more that companies the more that retailers are able to do this They're going to be able to take advantage of the digital economy. They're going to be able to take advantage of people wanting to actually physically go to stores In so i. I think the future is going to be a little bit of both but certainly shop. A fi is keying in on their specialty. In and i think more growth is going to be coming in. Obviously bad digital space shop is is absolutely one of the companies dictating the development of that space so even even next year. When i think it's probably safe to assume that that we get a little bit more back to normal in and the the the in person shopping experiences a little bit less risky. We'll see people wanting to get out. We'll see people wanting to go to stores and have fun with that experience But but that that. I don't think it's going to really Deter people from shopping online. I mean hopefully. I think ultimately what i'd love to see just this whole black friday cyber monday thing. I really like the fact that we're stretching and just this whole month so it's not really about fewer sales. It's just about timing right. We're just stretching over the course of a month as opposed to really isolating on on individual days. I liked to see that. Continue to wear these concepts. These retailers are not just leveraged to a couple of particular days toward the end of the year. Just real quick before we move onto our next story on that point. Are you seeing this in your own personal life. Because i have in. The last week noticed that the promotional emails i get from different retailers are basically saying. Hey our black. Friday sale is gonna last for the next ten days. It's like the subject line in the email is black friday sale..

omni channel walmart target
"slack" Discussed on Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

14:28 min | 11 months ago

"slack" Discussed on Microsoft Cloud IT Pro Podcast

"It that's cloud it C. L. O. U. D. it all one word at checkout sperry software work in email not on email. That was that and this was my other soapbox item. Was I pull slack into this too because you keep hearing so you keep hearing to? That team's wants to slack right. They keep this is the new slack. This is better than slack or growth rate is better than slack. So let's throw that out there. That is one hundred percent like pure marketing. It is that is all that is so if you look at slack from a functionality. Perspective versus teams becomes a nice place to put the comparison box up and say well we do this and they don't do that but they're fundamentally different things and they're on totally different scales right. You've got four to five x number of like daily. Active users in teams teams is built on this whole other platform with. Azur SHARE POYNTON EXCHANGE. And all this stuff like I hate the teams or a slack comparison because they are like very muchly teams zoom or not same teams and slack are not the same like the things that I do in slack and the slack communities that I'm a part of we get so much more done in slack and I fundamentally believe we could not transitions some of those conversations and processes and just the way those conversations naturally occur over to something like teams without having be just like an absolute poop show whether the whether that's driven from like the U. I like. Don't get me started on. How have you ever met a person? Let's talk about you. I in teams. Have you ever met somebody who's actually figured out the way to do a reply the right way and a thread like I've been using teams for years and I still need to think about where I'm clicking but if you're on the mobile client you know it's all good and it just works? It's like I can walk in my wife's a teacher and so she's at home now as they do remote learning and the school system she works for. They're using teams for all their remote learning for their kids right. And that's that's really cool to see all that stuff used I can go in and like look over her shoulder on the kitchen and the threads are horrible right. I mean I work with business of like twenty people you know is the core company I work for and I dread going into team sometimes just because I cringe every time I see somebody can't reply to something the right way and that's just one thing that like teams does horribly. That slack does perfectly right because it's just a big stream chats and everybody can figure it out like I never felt lost in slack before they added threatening. Yeah no I absolutely agree and I do the same thing like the threads in to be fair. I do run across the same problem in slack. Is that sometimes? I forget to start a thread and I just keep replying instead of starting threads but for whatever reason teams is significantly harder. I do the same thing where I go in and I reply them like all. That should have been a reply under that message. Not Reply with a new a new chat instead of a reply. I don't even know how to describe the difference between the two. But that's been that other comparison is I keep seeing teams versus zooming teams versus black. And they can like you said they fall into the same boat for me. It's not comparing apples and apples. Comparing either one of those. They are one hundred percent different tools for different jobs. I could. I could see some organizations out there hopping into lake office three sixty five m three sixty five and never having the US teams for chat so the security thing out the window and go back to like ease of use and getting in there they might just use like office three sixty groups and planner and then they're all set and they they're still chatting over in slack or whatever they used to use before they came to teams because they don't WanNa drag a user community with them you know kicking and screaming and bleeding from banging their head against the wall so hard for trying to figure out like how we got there and then got like slack adding functionality join a Microsoft teams call and things like that. It's all over the place now right and I totally get that. So because I'm a Mac I had to suffer with skype for business. Whatever their client was was still two thousand eleven. The whole scape for business thing has always been weird. Unimak until teams came to fruition. So I would say up until probably six or eight months ago. I was in that boat of office. Three sixty five for everything unless I have to have a meeting with you. In which case we're GONNA use zoom because it works and it's easy and we're not gonNA spend the first fifteen minutes of our meeting banging your head against the wall trying to figure out. Why can't hear each other trying to figure out how to share screens? It was very much the use case because I'm a solo independent contractor. Everybody that was coming to. The meeting was external. Nobody was in my teams client or I was using skype. Which was horrendous on the Mac and zoom worked in. I needed something for meetings that worked so I was in that boat of amusing office. Three sixty five skype have teams the great but work. So I'm GONNA use them and same thing with slack. I am in slack in teams daily. I'm probably a part fifteen different. Slat groups I've guest in ten or twelve different teams tenants. I use them all. And it's based on the client's needs and where they are and based on the type of people that are in the group and like you said the interaction are we collaborating around projects and are we using planner and share point and all of those and the chat and teams is candidate benefits core driver great. We use teams it works. There are definitely things that are fundamentally more confusing. That are a little bit more of a challenge but at the end of the day when you look at all the requirements teams fits it best other ones. All we really need to do is chat. We don't care so much about files. Were not having regular meetings. It's a big group. I mean one of the slack groups I'm in is I forgot how people are in it. Twenty thousand twenty thousand people in a slight group that we never meet. Everybody just needs a place to chat charity as talk in for that slack is great. I cannot imagine having a team with twenty thousand people all from different organizations her. I could bring you in December communities. There's semester ones but that brings any hammer. So are we gonNA teams now to that? Now you know the other interesting thing or one of the things that I would say. Slack does a lot better even in their free tears like let's not get into a whole free versus paid and all that but slack is arguably more staple when it comes to change so for examples. One of the things I do in slack like one of the groups that participate in is built around like product and product feedback so simple things like AAC monitoring like an RSS feed for twitter search or heck just like native twitter integrations for searching for monitoring twitter searches were for watching like individual hashtags or even users things like that like that stuff is just rock-solid those plug ins don't really change they just get better over time right all those integrations that you can add verses teams you know same thing over and teams. I would like to monitor like at mentions back to my company. That connector has changed two or three times in the last couple of years every single time. It's gotten worse. And it's been deprecated to the point where they've even like just taking it out of teams and now they want to use flow to do everything or power automated with a flow rather. Let's started right. There and the functionality is not the same as it continues to the only constant with something like teams is that. It's always changing underneath you. So I can look like zoom back to how we started this conversation with okay. The settings changed for how you join a meeting but the fundamentals of how we performed. The meeting did not change right. Once we were in it was still easy to get our audio going. We could still do the recording like it was all just right there and it was front and Center slack does a big redesign but fundamentally like the core things that you know about it to be true and that you've learned about it are still true. Teams comes through and does it change and it's like who moved my fricken cheese again. It's just gone and that stuff is like that's the killer thing and that's what drives you to teams. Is You have to have this whole adoption program. It can't be just training. It needs to be more holistic versus these other tools. That just do what they mean to do. They don't have to be everything to everybody. Like zoom does not need to be the best chat messaging platform across multiple meetings at the same time. All you have to do is Click Link. Join immediate right. That's pretty easy slack. Same kind of thing like yeah you can do meetings and all that stuff in there. But what do we need to do? We need to be a great like organizational cross team chat platform. Can we do that? Yes done exactly and then going back to teams you have. We need enterprise collaboration. We need it to be secure. Because that's the other thing like one thing teams does really well is because it's in that whole ecosystem your data's going to be secure you can do. Dlp on chats. You can do the Microsoft information protection to protect sensitive content. Fundamentally teams is probably going to be more secure than any of the other platforms because that's Microsoft's target. They're targeting enterprise. They are targeting companies. That make care more about security than they do ease of use and users are maybe not going to be able to do things quite as easily or again they just need the integration. They need everything to tie together seamlessly without going installing all these integrations and going in buying five different products. That you all cobbled together to get worse because everything's built right in so well don't give me sorry. I think I think teams feels very cobbled togethers. Sometimes when you when you go to do things are so cobbled together. Well it's a private channels here. It's got speaking of cobbled together. In general it's it's not clear right. You have too much. I mean I sit there and I listened to my wife talk in the kitchen. I'll leave the door open to the office and you know still like three weeks into this. They're still talking about like well. A student clicked on planner. And what does that mean? And how did they add a planner plan to this channel? And what's going on and what's happening right the issue. I see with my wife's organization wake from a school perspective. They had to get into these tools so quick that because it's not easy to use. They haven't gone through the adoption thing. They've barely gone through. The training thing teachers are creating custom training videos for their students for how to do things and they don't know the native features of something was one this morning. Oh teacher wanted to call out like good job to a bunch of students in a particular class on their homework the night before but they just did that in just a single post in a channel. They didn't mention anybody so the students will never see it because the teacher posted at six. Am by the time those students come into school at like eleven. Am for their first conference. All the other chats are going to have pushed that way up the screen right so the notification and even if they had at mention them was that enough for the students like potentially you got to think about the kids there right like how is the kid gonNA react better. They're going to react better to seeing a red exclamation around a number when they log into teams or would they react better if when they click the exclamation like. Oh what's wrong? Maybe they saw something like appraise post with a Nice Big Banner. That says here you go. You've done something nice but if I never told you about at mentions and the type ahead stuff like yeah. I know it's there but it's Janke and it's been throttled up down left right as this whole thing kicks off so barely works now not that it ever really worked before you go ahead and combine something like that and you don't know that hey like praises there or not even like animated juicer. Things like that but you know being able to do custom memes and all that like that would all be great stuff for kids and they just don't know about it's air that's like one little feature right that could change a kids day right. Although to be fair some of that exists in slack to like slack is the same thing. If you don't mention somebody they may never see it. You still need to know about the APP mansions and some of the Plug Ins and slack some of those shifts. They have the button ready underneath. Message Click the button. Do Jeff's we're in slack. You actually have to know to go install the Jif immigration and then you have to know about the slash commands to do Jiffy or Jeff. Whatever it is. There's a few different ones there so I think some of it too at the fundamental level. Well some of the things are definitely a lot easier. One platform versus the other. At the end of the day still comes down to training. There are a lot of people got thrown into a lot of stuff without just having adequate training in any event regardless of the platform. And what it is slack. Maybe easier to find stuff because it tends to be a little bit. It's not as enterprise so I think the training tends to be a little bit simpler. It's easier to figure out how to do stuff by just googling it versus teams. You tend to dive into some of that. Enterprise eat training type stuff and not just the basic how to..

Slack Microsoft skype Mac twitter Jeff US C. L. O. U. sperry Jiffy
"slack" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"slack" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"An individual's Reebok's store updates about ten times a second ten times a second. We're updating that Reebok. Steroids is like a crazy amount. Of course we've tried optimizing that as much as possible. We throw Andy Bounce. Do things like that but there are some things where you can't do that or you don't want to do that. So that's been an interesting edge case for us in adopting these technologies. We've had to develop very strict like es lent plug INS to try and detect performance regressions. Espn PLUG INS to detect performance regressions. That's usually done through end to end testing. But there's specific things where if you don't right rear components in the most optimized way or your allowing it to update more frequently than it should do that could introduce performance issues on the on the desktop client that a user is using. So we've had to be very thoughtful about about how that all works and how that's implemented slack is so data driven that reduction being a single source of data again can produce issues like that we also use readouts a slightly different way than what other people might use. So we actually. The common use case reeboks is to create a single reebok store. And then put all of your data into that store. And there's like a big warning message at the top of the Reebok stocks which says don't ever create multiple stores because you're going to have a bad time as THAC. We have created multiple reebok stores. We're not having a bad time but there's a good reason for it. It's because of security. You know when you load slack application you might be signed into your work workspaces and you might be signed into personal workspaces. And we don't necessarily want that data to cross we don't want to store all of the channels together or all of the users together things like that so we have individual stores for security reasons. Stock is extremely security conscious. And so when you actually switch between different workspaces and slack. What's actually happening? Is we just switch out the underlying reebok store with the new workspace that you're switching to? And then we allow react to render everything because react is data driven and suddenly finds itself with a whole load of new data says. Oh I should be looking at this specific channel and I should be showing this specific message. Let's re render to show those things so that's another interesting thing of how we use. We'd exit slack. There's lots of little things like that where we've tried being clever and there's good business reasons for doing things like that as well overall. We've had a great experience with you know reacting Reebok's I think the biggest power for us from those two pieces of technology is how standardized made our code base like I mentioned before one of the most powerful things that we've done for all front end. Developers AT SLACK IS STANDARDIZE. How they writing coat because it means everyone understands all of the different repos implicitly and contribute and can debugging anywhere. It's amazing that is thanks to react and read. Let's zoom in and give it a little bit more context for what you've actually standardized there because again there are these clients like android and Iowa S. That are not using react right so but it sounds like even those client. Networking flows have been impacted. By the fact that you've read factored the web front end or the electron front end to have a certain data flow. So can you just give a little bit more context to like now that we've talked through a lot of things? Just tell me a little bit more. About what you mean. In terms of this standardization yes standardization. I'm specifically talking about web technologies. Okay that is the electron APP essentially on Mac Windows. Lennox things like that. We have standardized how to access data how to store data and how that data is then rendered on the screens react disc versus cdn versus server. It's more the developer up. What flows I guess or the programming principles so like ten years ago. Let's say if you wanted to store state about a specific component. How would you do that? There's hundreds of ways you could do that you could you know if let's say you're talking about toggle for a for a side by take on opens closes. You could apply a close to that component which says it's open. You could store that state in global object and you know. Read it from that. Global. Object to checklist Edson. You could store in local storage. You could store in a cookie. There's like so many different ways that you could have stored data and if you don't have a fourth standardization across your code base. All of us do. Different developers are going to store that data in different locations but since we have implemented redux and Redux has become a source of truth. There's only one way to get data and store data now and that's through Redux and so that standardization has been extremely helpful for us saying that though we have actually Standardi- something's across the mobile clients as well so the IRS and the Android and the web infra teams meet on a regular cadence to talk about different optimizations. That they've they've figured out and how to load things better and so a lot of cheap programming print suppose and the kind of way that things have been designed have been implemented in Web and mobile plants. But of course they've been done in their own native languages. It's the kind of the tech SPEC which is shed but the implementation is different. What are the outstanding front end? Performance issues that you'd still like to make to the slack front end great question that I mean. There's always more that we can do so one of our goals for when we rewrote that Web application was to get slack to boot in a specific amount of time previously unlocked workspaces stock took a good ten seconds. To load or something like that. You might remember there. Were those kind of cutesy messages like welcoming you to slap things. You can configure with the rewrite. We actually had to remove those because slack boots so fast now that you don't have time to read those S.'s. Which is nice right but we know that we can get it faster even faster still. That's kind of an interesting thing to think about because you know. How often do you really open slack? You open at once and then it's open for an average of eight hours a day on someone's machine but you could introduce interesting concepts if you can do really fast boots of slack for instance slack open for eight hours a day or Slack Releases Code Twenty Times a day and that might be bug fixes and there there might be new features in there. How do we get onto a uses machine if they consistently have slack open without reloading refreshing the page? Well if you can guarantee that a reload can happen within a second or a couple of seconds. You could do it in the background. When you know that slack isn't being used or is hidden behind different windows you could really quickly reload the client for them so they pick up the new code and get the latest and greatest features and bug fixes that so you can almost see performances of feature as well when you think about things like that other things are always you know. We tend to concentrate a lot on the actual typing experience and the switching between different messages. And how fast you can interact with with. So because that's it's insane power. You can connect with your colleagues at an instantaneous rate. And so if there's any lack typing channel switching lagging anything like that that's going to affect your your experience of using slack. There's a really interesting concept and performance in that you don't notice good performance. You only noticed bad performance right you never notice when a website has gotten faster always more snappy or whatever but you always notice when it's taking the extra few seconds to load or something like that so that's kind of how we think about performance slack. Is that the work that we do. Should just make everything more simple more productive. You know a more pleasant experience to us if you ever notice something performance wise and slack. We need to fix that. And that's you know we've done a bad job so that's how we tend to think about a news. Thanks for coming on the show. It's been great talking really appreciate your time. Jeff thank you. Being on call is hard but having the right tools for the job can make it easier when you wake up in the middle of the night to troubleshoot the database. You should be able to have the database monitoring information right in front of you when you're out to dinner. And your phone buzzes. Because your entire application is down you should be able to easily find out who pushed code most recently so that you can contact them and find out to troubleshoot the issue. Victor ops is a collaborative incident. Response Tool Victor. Ops Brings Your Monitoring Data and your collaboration tools into one place so that you can fix issues. More quickly and reduce.

Reebok slack developer Andy Bounce Espn Victor ops Edson Lennox IRS Jeff Iowa S. Mac
"slack" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

Daily Tech News Show

11:03 min | 1 year ago

"slack" Discussed on Daily Tech News Show

"Ten with eight gigabytes of memory and one hundred twenty eight gigs of storage available. Now Yeah and this of course was done in Beijing instead of Barcelona. They were originally going to do it. A Mobile World Congress. They they made a big deal on stage about you know the fact that yes the Krona viruses. Certainly affecting things but won't stop them. They're plowing ahead. What I've found notable is that this is only China release. They said it will be coming to other markets. They talked about you know really getting going in Europe in the future but India is in fact Janis bigger market. It's bigger than China four Xiaomi. And they did not give Indian release date. I don't know if that's because the worried about manufacturing yields Because of the shutdown of plants in China but I Jami has plans outside of China to So I'd be very curious what this looks like an India because that's super important as a market for Jamie absolutely. These are some fairly high in phones and when when you compare them to the prices of phones that we generally see here in the US. They are a third to half as much so. I wonder if you're GONNA start seeing a lot of Americans foregoing Samson foregoing Motorola or Sony and actually seen if they can't get their hands on one of these are no. It's a little bit more difficult now than it used to be a couple of years ago but these are fairly high quality phones. They're putting together. Yeah one one plus Xiaomi both I get a lot of attention from the US market but one plus has done a pretty good job of getting into the US market. Jami keeps saying they're going to get into the US market and then it just gets tougher and tougher all the time for them. So I think that's why they've they've changed to focusing on Europe for the time being because I that could be a stepping stone for them. But you're right. You know they they make some pretty compelling hardware at an affordable price not say. They couldn't increase the price though if they bring into another market folks if you want to get all the tech headlines each day in about five minutes be sure to subscribe to daily Tech Headlines. Dot Com Slash. Talk Slash Doc. I mean stock for the company slack. That makes you know. The team building messaging surged on Monday when they reported that IBM would become its biggest customer and then after hours trading fell when they clarified that. Ibm already was their biggest customer Because IBM had a contract to use slack in a trial mode but the actual news. Is that the rollout across. Ibm's entire digital workplace will be an all their geographies all over the world after the launch of its Enterprise Grid Service last year slack reported. It had one hundred sixty five thousand IBM users and the official launch will push up quite a bit three hundred fifty thousand That'll doubled the number of users but it it it did bring some snickers. Didn't it rob when people really did? I thought that was. I thought that was pretty funny. It's like wait a minute isn't. Ibm You know. This is like something that I knew. Now as you said they did. Add a whopping or boatload of new users but it really did Surge that's not to the point. They actually had to halt Trading I think about ten fifteen minutes before the market closed during regular session and then came back on after. They made their announcement an after hours on Monday. But that's that's interesting because You know I in a in a different life. I have spent a lot of time. A lot of time working With slack. And I've been working with teams since Before Microsoft even officially announced it and all I can say is that Microsoft is absolutely coming after slack. you know so fervently that. I'm I'm wondering is slack on ultimately be a takeover target for some larger company. Could a company like Google or Amazon? Or maybe salesforce. Actually you know. Take a slack attitude their portfolio Because you know the thing was slack. You know the issues that I see with them is that slack. You know it's it's real nice for you know for free but you only get like ten thousand messages and it's it's fairly hamstring for the free version but corporations are using the paid version. The paid version is more expensive than Microsoft teams or significantly more expensive than Microsoft teams. And the thing that Microsoft teams has going for is that it probably gives you seventy percent of what slack gives you but it gives you a one hundred percent of what Microsoft Office gives you that that's included in your team subscription. So what slack is having the issue with his is just slack. They integrate with everything else. But you know when when you're looking at you know a business. It was like wait a minute. We're already using office and I'm already paying for teams. Do I pay additional money to get over and and you slack? Even if there are some features and slack the currently don't exist in teams. Will they be here soon enough by the time? I rolled this out to my sixty seventy thousand users in my workplace and that's why slack is trying to make the IBM deal sound. Big is to say like look. We know that Microsoft has built an advantage of already being there for office three sixty five customers but we're still a good choice for IBM IBM decided to pay for US anyway. So they're trying to make that argument. I think it interesting to think about slack. Getting acquired my guess is slack. Doesn't want to get acquired. They see themselves becoming a big enough company that they just start branching out and they don't have to compete But they they are in the position to to branch out and expand at this point. Google's not probably going to buy them because they're developing their own in house thing would complicate things to buy slack. But it's not impossible. Amazon doesn't really have an enterprise. Software level offering them might be a good way for them to get into it and it kind of fits that acquisition profile salesforce is another interesting one where they could just slot it in and start making it part of their their offerings. I and maybe I don't know on the outside. Maybe a work or somebody like that might be interested. Who knows in the meantime though? If you're making this decision for yourself you know you have to also think in my keep in mind do I want either one of these Because research from the University of California and Humble University found that workers can lose up to twenty three minutes on a task every time they are interrupted. And the both teams and slack. Both they interrupt you Quite frequently science and that was the go ahead. Scientists found no difference in distraction between slack and email. Just so you know. A lot of people have their alerts turned on for slacker. Maybe not for email one of the researchers involved. Gloria Mark said the true cost is not so much productivity but stress. People are still getting work done but they have to take longer to do it because they keep getting interrupted. I think that I think that's really important. I when we were talking about this earlier I was like I mean. It's a little bit more productive than email but it depends on where you work right and it depends on the structure of which your organization might have a few channels. Or maybe say okay. This team only needs to be in these few channels because we want everyone to be focused. That isn't always the case. Sometimes it can be you know forty channels that you have to manage and be pinged on and get notifications from all day long the whole idea behind slack and teams and anything that's going to become a competitor in the future is this is more efficient than email. You can have more categories you can keep conversations more focused and I think that that is true for me I am. I'm a slack user. I'm in several different slack. Teams one of them is purely just friends and we have. We've made channels just to keep ourselves on topic on a variety of things. That's the sort of thing where I have to mute it. Sometimes when I'm working because it is just a time waster and it definitely is. I mean it's a time waster the same way. Any group text chat would be but But for for work we use slack for a lot of our pre show stuff and I find it very organized in helpful but if we had many more channels it would start to derail me probably many more users. I mean we use it in the TAT exist to the show and we rarely use it outside of that time grain. I recently did some consulting for a company that had probably thirty five. Forty users They they were geographically dispersed throughout the Midwest And I think the biggest location may be had nine or ten people in it so slack kind of made sense because it did allow everyone who is working remotely. Kinda feel like they were being included in everything but there were for thirty five people. I think we have sixty or seventy channels so it got really really chatty and one of the things that the The CEO of that company. He was really into the pomodoro method. Where you you spend twenty five to thirty minutes without any interruption working on a task so he just implemented a pop implemented a policy where each team member had to do He called him sprints six per day. You had six times where you had an uninterrupted thirty minutes where you weren't checking email you weren't having any conversations you were simply just You know hunkered down and developing or you know or drawing or doing whatever you did you know for the stickler organization and this is very anecdotal. We didn't actually measure this with tools. But it seemed like You know the actual productivity went up so much so that I actually still implement hormone. Oral polio method. Now something. I wasn't doing before but it's it is you know it's very easy all turn it you know. I I like to work when I have the TV on. But when I find that I turn it off and I go for twenty five to thirty minutes without any interruption. The amount of work I can get done in that time frame sometimes stack them and do an hour but the amount of work I can get done. Uninterrupted is really impressive compared to constantly being bothered by SMS or slack as in this case teams. Whatever you know whatever APP you're using for For Messaging and presence. That's a really smart thing to to experiment with. I think I almost WANNA pomodoro button on my computer. I could just be like you did all going under for the whatever twenty five minutes thirty minutes. That's great because it keeps you out of meetings and keeps you out of distractions and then something like teams are slack. Doesn't end up being counterproductive. Right it ends up being productive. Because it's still helping you get the advantages of staying in touch. I think what happened with slack. And this is true of teams or facebook workplace or whatever is that it didn't actually reduce email. It just added more communications. Exactly it's it's yeah it just kind of morphed into something else but then email. It didn't go away either. I'm I'm a big fan of shedding things off especially like if I'm editing video or something I will. It helps me hold myself accountable if I'm just like Wifi off because everything's local right now and if I can't get this done in the time that I thought I could get it done. Then that's on me because nobody nobody interrupted me. He thinks everybody who participates in.

IBM Microsoft slack US Europe salesforce China Jami Google Amazon Beijing India Motorola Jamie Barcelona University of California Gloria Mark official
"slack" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

12:16 min | 1 year ago

"slack" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Have cashing layers. You had to create on top of that search system or was it. was there a best practice for dealing with the caching stuff with you know slack. Black search doesn't cash. I guess would be. The search doesn't cash beyond like the very minimal sort of lake you know like the Os doing SSD level caching for segments. That can hit very often. There are teams that search a lot more than others. And like you can use this kind of again. You can use off the shelf like solar cloud cashing we can use off the shelf. Kind of like message. CACHING infrastructure for pulling fully hydrated messages from my sequel and sticking them in a cash like all that stuff was not. But there's we experimented with a number of different kind of cashing approaches generally speaking beyond the fact that knowing that some teams query a lot more than others so basically the tr of this was that the thing we got right from building the offset the index offline. The map reduce was fundamentally the ability to restructure the index. So that things would cash better putting all of the documents documents from the same team together in this sort of historical index was the single biggest performance in really got just by a wide margin again. We're doing writes. The messages are coming in from every team coming in so fast. You just stick them wherever you can as fast as you can. But when you're doing historical index You actually have the opportunity to restructure structure things to make the reads vastly more efficient INDAC- more cash friendly way and so that was that was a massive. It was like to the tune of life. Three hundred four hundred milliseconds off of eighteen ninety five. That was a really big one. Yeah but no no additional custom cashing just being smart in a highly structured index. Yeah taking the context your experience at Google and also cloudera. You're both those companies for four years respectively you've been at other companies and then you're you're four years at slack. What is distinctive about the slack culture? Both from May product perspective from a long-term Perspective and from an engineering perspective. What makes the company Distinct Culture Wise Slack is by far the most product oriented company I've ever worked at? I've generally really worked at engineering. Driven engineering led companies. A Google is engineering driven to a fault cloudera. I don't know I don't you know what Qatar is anymore. But when unclutter their clutter it was very engineering driven very what's up slack product driven in in a way that was. Let's go with jarring for me was very. I was very surprised. It was very different than like the way I worked and stuff like that product driven main like top down. WE'RE GONNA design a product and we're an engineer round that. Yeah very much so very much so yeah in a way that like apple is product driven in the way like lots of very successful companies are product driven but again coming from my limited experience and limited perspective. I assume that all successful companies were fundamentally engineering companies. And that's not slack. It's it's just not it's not who they are and it was painful but again educational I think to work in a product driven environments where it just really like design and end-product are really first class citizens and not again. I can't speak for Google now but after thoughts in the way that I felt like they were in a Lotta ways. Ah laughter thoughts not the right way but like fundamentally it was engineering. Yeah well they have so much money. They're they're now company in an engineering company. Yeah absolutely ended design company. They and they can absolutely throw enough money at any problem. They want to be anything. They want new question about whatever version of a company. You like working Google got something for you. I would say probably being okay. Slack is not that selects a product Comey slack was by far the nicest company I've ever worked at people were genuinely kind. I was by far. I think outside of the few people I know who got fired for bad behaviour. I was the worst person at slack. Like really I was the least biggest asshole. Least it kind person at slack and I generally think of myself as a kind person which I think reflects them amount of like obviously self-delusion and also the fact that I'm probably not that bad of the person in the grand scheme of things but I was by far the worst person at slack. Everyone there's very very kind very very nice culture the nine to five culture. The nine nine to five is is a real thing I I did too I do too. I have a four year old. He was born a month before us are working at slack. which again for you listeners? Starting a job a new the job like one month after you have a child is a terrible idea. You should absolutely not do that but yes nine to five. I got to put my son to bed every night. I got to make them breakfast just every morning. I walk in Preschool. All that kind of stuff. It's great absolutely fantastic. Yeah I love that. Let's take a step back and think about things in terms of the quota broader industry. Okay you'll alluded to this earlier that we have in twenty nineteen eighteen this robust buffet of different technology. We can work with whether they're coming. From cloud providers or for companies that are very narrowly focused on some problem domain. Like five Tran or snowflake or data bricks or whatever and it's a great time to be building a company company because really if you are a quote product person if you have an idea for a product and you know something about software engineering you can build it. It's it's just not that hard and it's only getting easier. What are the shortcomings of modern data warehousing tools and data infrastructure tools? Um How does it great great question. What are the shortcomings of them? So I think I had an answer for a long sometimes base. My experience slack the greatest source of irritation for us was having to use hive or spark sparks sequel whatever ever right for et L. or heavy duty and intensive machine learning and Presto for interactive query that hive and spark we just were not really great as good as Presto was interactive and Presto. Really wasn't as good at. ETL sort of stuff as high was and the fact that the query languages across the three or not the close. They're not exactly compatible with one. Another was like the single greatest source of frustration that there was not one system that can handle all of our sequel and all of our interactive sequel on top of what was to be fair since the an infinitely scalable data lake ish thing built on US three three with one centralized hyphen minister. I think snowflake has done phenomenally good job of largely solving this problem. I've been tremendously impressed. With what snowflake because built so that to be able to handle both of these things. I don't know how they do it. I kind of tempted to work there just so I could find out maybe I could swing by and they would just you know maybe I could just ask them and they would tell me. I was listening to episode. That'd be fantastic interesting. It can do both in one query language and that is that is an amazing superpower. Ah just removed so much friction and makes it so much easier to move back and forth from exploration to productions -ation all kinds of stuff. That's that's huge. That is absolutely phenomenal. So yeah I'm a big fan of that and that's that's phenomenal exciting to me. I have to give a kind of a long pontificating answer to this question even I find it a little a little a little tedious. So I just edit out as much as you can analytics value chain okay. There's ingest data into my analytical system. I need to store or it. I need to do computation on it. Many to visualize process the results in some way and there are companies that exist like every sort of layer of the stack. Back right there's like on the side you can stream sets. Conflict is a lot of the stuff. There's a lot of companies like classic informatica classic kind of ETL like loading loading the loading aspect of getting data around right for storage as three offices. Lots recommended at redshift. If you're so inclined Blah Blah Blah Blah I mean sniff like basically think of s three base storage more or less for compute spark snowflake Presto hive bunch of other stuff. I can't even think of all and then on on this sort of visuals Asian like do stuff with it. I mean everything. Everything tableau mode periscope like the full set of the Jupiter notebooks rights and then you have like solution providers that provide any level of abstraction ever this value chain. You want so you can buy like science. And they'll just do everything you big query. And they'll do storage and compute but not visualization right. Like whatever sort of subset of this you WanNa have. You can have. And that's amazing. That's also like deeply confusing being in scary. I think it's like overwhelming. Broadly speaking for a long time and I was still say to a large extent the vastly SA- Clay Christiansen. So I wear a Hoodie. And I dress like this. But I'm basically like an MBA student in the skies again Clayton Christianson read the innovators dilemma. Early innovator solution is this great thing. I'm also a big strategic. Arregui like Ben talks a little bit like Ben. Maybe say my wife is from Taiwan to you so I I should I should go like move over there and hang out with them like I said we've visit relatives there some time and I'm like always kind of vaguely tempted to see sentimen email and see if you want to hang out with me. Get away from me stupid. Dirty soft offer engineer but anyway so yeah law of Conservation of attractive prophets modular and integration across the value. Chain like that kind of stuff. I am as you would imagine after hearing me pontificate about the history of logging and Google. I'm a student of history and a lot of different things in the value chain for really really long long-time all of the money was really at that stores compute interface. What I mean by that is like Teradata? We going back to the nineties. When teradata was dominant and it was all about how like Teradata teradata built the very system and they build the very best system because they integrated the ever living? Fuck out of storage and compute. They were accustomed drivers right. They used custom hardware on the teaser operated in the same model tight tight integration between storage of data and query data to get the absolute best performance. You could over large volumes claims data. It's amazing bobby. Worked Cloudera so quite are involved. Kind of commoditisation. TERADATA was my great enemy for like four years. I Guess Gordon Gordon Works was also tediously migrate enemy for a number of years believing that aside kind of breaking down this like very tight storage compute immigration to a Hoodoo curled where yes there were source computer integration but it was loosely coupled and you could do sort of more. You have more flexibility and more control over and all that kind of stuff when I got to slack. We had bought in pretty hard to the netflix style. System where like S.. Three is the source of truth because of course the problem with do intimidate in the teas and all these systems is there. Great including actually redshift. Now I think about. They're great until you exceed the storage capacity of the system and you have to upgrade to the next biggest not instance of the next biggest teradata instance redshift his great when you have a pedophile data an absolute nightmare when you have to bytes of data like just falls off a cliff and you can ask anybody so they have rich of spectrum now to help alleviate this problem home anyway so we built everything three and when you're building on S. Two S.. Three obviously although I think they've started adding effectively query capability as three over time estuaries threes religious storage. It's dumb storage storage. This like disaggregated. Modular is if you will across the query interface. So those why it's like we could use hive live and we could use spark and we could use presto and everyone could write data s. three and everyone else could query it and that was like super cool. We had modulating and flexibility across these interfaces. And I kind of thought that was like the future. But then snowflake came along and I think things like did really well is. They built a compute engine that is optimized and born and designed for S. three in a way that spark and Presto and hive or not they've made adaptations to deal with us three and object storage but fundamentally they were born of..

Google Slack Teradata Presto cloudera engineer Teradata teradata apple netflix US informatica Clay Christiansen Qatar Gordon Gordon Ben Tran Comey Clayton Christianson
"slack" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

Relevant Podcast

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"slack" Discussed on Relevant Podcast

"Slack. Kiss him. Stone. The in lake in sing song. Vado make. Oh, they can climb mountains high into the sky. Naked take. Love that. When they came through. We not only did the performances the we didn't interview. And you know, they obviously ended up on the cover of recent issues of the magazine. I definitely want to read it. It's an amazing piece on Johnny swim. And if you wanna see those performances, which you do head over to relevance YouTube channel and check them out. Are they not to the most romantic you and beings on earth? Like, they just they seem like they have this crazy dismantle towards each. They do they're an amazing couple now, admittedly, we hung out, you know, the rest day that night whatever, and they are also real people to with little kids and Toews nagging, and they're real people. I mean, it's and it's not a personas. There's absolutely genuine. But you know, you don't want to set people up like, well, my life will never my relationship will never be like, Johnny swim. So no, no, they're real people. But it is awesome. The connection they have. And you end up see it yet. And. I will say this. Your relationship will never be like Johnny swims because it is magic it is pure magic. What's in the water in Waco? I mean, they don't live in Waco anymore. But like they're connected with chip in. Joe exactly on exactly there's something about their some so quaint. I you know, it is. I think he gets something when you peel back and old layer of drywall, and there's just, you know, some untouched ship latte that's collecting some sort of mold. That's like an aphrodisiac or something. All I can think of that ship lack has some sort of aphrodisiac moult that is the only make sense. Well, even hard joined us this year as well in his movie, I performed which is when the most acclaimed films of twenty eight teen he plays a priest suffering a crisis of faith. We spoke with him about how his faith journey and formed his decades. Spanning career gear is either hog. I was raised a Christian. He knows that piscotty Lian confirmed in a piscotty alien, my stepfather was Catholic. My father is pinned either a fiscal or church of Christ his whole life. And so I've been raised in around dialogue about faith. Mine tire adult life time. I can remember I've had a lot of dairy sincere people in my life who were seeking in. I've always been trying to figure out how to integrate that aspects of my life into my creative vice into balanced on, you know, access to that. Routine and culture of people caring about ethics inequality in. In a really safe environment. To learn is a wonderful way to grow up. You know? My mother and father taught the youth group on Sunday. It's part of my life. I don't know what it's like grow up without it. But I know it had a big impact on. No way. I I see the world actually think it gave me a great framework for survive, the pitfalls of early celebrity you hit it teaches it's fundamental humility one of the problems with kind of making it in the movie or making our to the fan, the flames of your ego and situa- that it's really easy for young people to lose a sense of context in to have a sense of humility to keep learning to keep growing, you know, that's one of the fundamental problems. But one of the great things about. Churches you see yourself as a member of a community. And you also see that things like face is a so pool in moving things because you see lots of dole, but different points of view. You know, he have a one prefix deal way, a different different than what your mother feels which is different your father seals. And I think I grew up with a lot of different..

Johnny swim Waco Joe Vado YouTube piscotty Lian Toews Slack.
"slack" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"slack" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Adams. You are the chief architect at slack. Welcome back to software engineering daily. Thank you so much great to be back. Yes. The last time we talked. We spoke mostly about the overall architecture. We talked about PHP we talked about your time at Facebook. It was a great overview today, I'd like to go deeper into the concept of messaging, and particularly how to scale a messaging system and how you've done this at at slack. If we started a high level, and we're looking at your time in the past couple years, what has stood out as the biggest challenge in adapting the architecture to the scale that you have reached at slack. That's a Greek western I'm going to weasel out of the initially and sort of say, it's been a million little things. But I think I have an insight into the shape of the million little things, and what thread unites them, but took me a while to form, but it's gonna take a little bit of background to kind of zoom in. So starting way out and sort of classical. Academic distributed systems. One of the first things that you wanna do when you string to computers together is builder liable messaging service between them right as soon as you've got a computer talking to some other computer with a wire between them you want them to share log rent, you realize right away that if I could just have a persistent log that they both could share and agree on the contents of I can do all kinds of things that could build a full tolerant database out of that. I could build products lockout of that. I could build a product bitcoin out of that. And it occurs to you. When you sit down and start coding and trying to make this happen. We find out pretty soon. The fact that these are physical objects in the physical world with failures and delays and possibly even mangled messages makes this really difficult. And so you you kind of bang your head against the wall for a while move onto something else. But early distributed systems academics realized pretty quickly that there was actually an impossibility result heading out in here. So around the same time as consensus for shown to be impossible. They also proved that the problem that slack is sort of approximating solution to which is called the Tomic broadcast is also impossible. So let me try and describe sort of in terms of slack user refund. Familiar the requirements of the channel, right? What's the channel supposed to do? Well, we have this understanding that when I send a message in a channel everybody's gonna eventually see that message who subscribed to the channel. Right. And we have this understanding to that they're on mobile devices, their laptops, their online they're offline, but we have a sense that eventually they'll get back online. And then they'll see all the messages that have been sent. And they'll see them in the same order. We also have an intuition that if I receive a message everybody else will eventually receive it as well. The channel sort of keeps the channel abstraction the basic product channels, traction guarantees the channel hallucinate messages or the only place the messages, come from the fact that people send them and finally we got a total order every agrees on the order of the messages arrived in and turns out those four things are actually the definition of atomic broadcast. So there's a very strong kind of. Impossibility result at the core of the kind of product that slack is trying to be that doesn't mean we lay down and die, of course. Right. Slack exists. It's useful. We strive to make it more useful. But it does mean that there are going to be some corner cases, and some federal cases and some contingencies. We'll have some hard decisions to make and those decisions are going to be informed. Partly by product choices rents to the way that you want to handle the fact that messages can get lost or reordered is going to be different when you're dealing with something like user presence aren't the little green dot next to names.

slack Facebook chief architect Adams.
"slack" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

Product Hunt Radio

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"slack" Discussed on Product Hunt Radio

"It was slack chats so is yes, you can around the internet. Funny, all these. Kind of public interest like AOL chat room, still slack groups, but there wasn't a directory and slack didn't want that to this because there were so focused on enterprise. So actually release slack chats. Crazy success slack sent me a season desist. Did they? And when you know you're doing something right? Yeah. So they sent me the letter lawyers were telling me I was I was having a little fun with it because I thought it was interesting. I built like that's the coolest thing ever so they may be shut down the site and I sent me a pair of socks. It was product on those those the kind of origins for me. Yeah, slacks. I remember that now there it's interesting trend because there's so many companies and people who are trying to build communities and using slack vehicle for doing so. But obviously slack is not built for mass scale communities like they're building communication for teams in companies. So it's like a really interesting Trenton. How have you seen other people other companies building similar types of communities? I mean, we see it also in discord, another other ways, but I just find an fastening space, discord telegrams at grit exemption. I'm in probably five or six different crypto groups until Graham alone. Some of them are insane with twenty thousand plus people. I don't know how people even use it. Exactly. And then actually, Greg Eisenberg. He has both know how to great quote were his in. I messages is just the next killer app like then Hon of group chats in, you know, do you need to join a new platform to have that type of interaction. For me personally, like a lot of it just happens on on I message. I think the interesting thing is this is not a new phenomenon. You follow the traffic anywhere, things happen. Bunch of people aggregate you find ways to give them unique value. You reduce the friction because they're already there. This has been going on since essentially for a couple of hundred years since the newspaper business. So slack is a great tool as a lot of fishing. It's not a surprise that all of these micro communities are emerging..

slack Greg Eisenberg AOL Trenton Graham hundred years
"slack" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"slack" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Slack Sean Some Shawn Mendez, hey do we have Sydney's mom on the? Line we check in a, second can't believe what she's trying to do with. You, Tanya I know Rosie says he's mom next kiss FM here's the car on your own. Kid Make the motions at say But homes, look Get See the, end is it it'll.

Shawn Mendez Sean Tanya Sydney Rosie
"slack" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"slack" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Slack come to play sans bitter cold too now we so at all got a feeling good i know that guarding you hugh candy greg dead online watchman.

Slack
"slack" Discussed on WREK

WREK

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"slack" Discussed on WREK

"It was a slack filled starwood as such things go partly because the rain so much much to do but hide out with your level well starrewards of this outdoor festival run by crazy people and crazy people perform and it's just insanity in the mud late at night you see these neon giant stalking the campground that we're actually not hallucinations but giant puppets rod puppets twice the size of a person kind of tied like waldo machines to a human didn't even see the human because they've been the darkness puppet the giant puff is lit up to freak out those on ketamine which was going around that campground that particular legal or illegal substance ketamine is legal if you're a horse that needs to be if you're fat who needs to administer the triangle is if if now yeah i didn't saw that movie altered states it turns you into a caveman and you run to the zoo and rip rip up the taper throats i anchors were their coffee crop reverend circle maker is at my house i just send him off back home to wales the other day.

starwood ketamine stalking
"slack" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"slack" Discussed on The Changelog

"Of slack so i did get hub continuous integration patriot duty we also you send us for our customer support tickets and so we have a really really active and vibrant developer community that builds on top of the api's and so we've got something like a thousand aps in our app directory and the app directory was actually the first big lunch that i was part of it slack which was super cool because you had to go like search for apps and that's how i like in my early slack days how i found apso would go searching you know google search and now you can search the app directory and there's something like one hundred this is this is i think just so cool because i built apps before i even joined the company like i built integrations so i could send data pipe data from our systems into slack so that i wouldn't like if something was going wrong i hooked up our air servers to slack so that i could see the channel light up versus like waiting for the email or waiting for the page because i was like inside all the time there's something like one hundred fifty five thousand of these weekly active developers building on slack so that's like that's a lot of people building on flack and i think that's so cool because they're building things that like we never could have imagined in in the wonderful way with interesting is that you've got i think you said two million ish paying users but roughly nine million on a week in a week right.

developer google
"slack" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"slack" Discussed on The Changelog

"But the point is is like if we were that we really bad yeah confession right there right away we're not paying you surprise i'm not beating down your door demanding it from you but you know we talk about up timer downtime or reliability you know i've never really seen slack down but i've seen to be slow or i've seen to be delayed and you're right i don't think like hey dns isn't working properly here in houston texas i just think slack is not working right you know i blame you not that this you know or the other problems in the internet backbone when s three went down or yeah or s three went down or something changed to make things not work right so we we definitely have had a we we run our business on slack like we're we're we're slapped on flack all day and when it when we do have service interruptions when things are slow it really heavily impact our ability to do work and when you build software you know we we do everything we can to ensure we have unit testing and load testing and we have limiting we have tooling but i mean we're all engineers here we make mistakes like we all wish that we could write perfect code and like never deployed blogs but like of course we do and so the the like the challenge becomes so like so we absolutely have had situations where you know slack has gone down for for periods of time and so what we've done is ensure that we when things happen because they do that were able to recover and detect those problems instantaneously in so in the ideal world we release.

slack houston texas
"slack" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"slack" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Slack martorana to a flame incense bitter cold to say now i'm gonna so i'm lessee inbred tall got a feeling that i'm galena good i know that guarding you hugh please got it dead big sure watch me.

hugh