22 Burst results for "Sky Crane"

"sky crane" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:30 min | Last week

"sky crane" Discussed on KCRW

"Perseverance touched down on Mars as scheduled at 3 55 eastern time yesterday afternoon and then prior stole Palco was watching. Landing A rover on Mars is really, really hard. You only get one chance. Get it right the first time or else Perseverance reached Mars, traveling at 12,000 MPH at 3 48. The sequence known as entry descent and Landing began. They have confirmation has entry interface. Swati Mohammed narrated the landing from the control room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Spacecraft orbiting Mars relayed telemetry from the rover. So mission managers on Earth would know exactly what was going on. First, A heat shield slowed the rover. Then a parachute had to deploy a step engineers confessed they were a bit worried about because the perseverance parachute had a new design. So there was great relief. When Mohand made this announcement, Navigation has confirmed that the parachute has deployed and we're seeing significant deceleration. Then a jetpack took over bringing the rover essentially to a halt so it could be lowered to the surface on a tether. Move known as the Sky Crane has confirmed the rover was aiming for general Crater a place on Mars that scientists think was once home to a lake that dried up 3.5 billion years ago. But there's a chance that before it dried up, it was home to some form of Martian microbial life, And there's also a chance the rover instruments would be able to see a signature of that life in the rocks in the crater. So for scientists landing and Jez zero crater was very desirable for engineers. It was not. That's because the crater floor is filled with boulders that would end the mission if the rover came down on one So this Rover had a special navigation system that could look for a safe place to land and it found one We have landed about 35 M from the nearest rocks that we could identify from orbit by their shadows. Now, Mission managers will make sure that all the rover's systems survived the landing, and soon videos the rover took, as it landed, should be relayed back to Earth. Those should be stunning. Joe Palka NPR news This is NPR news. It's 7 42 on KCRW support comes from the U. C. I Health Digestive Health Institute, stopping at nothing to provide expertise and world class treatments and digestive health. For all of Southern California. You see eye health dot org.

Joe Palka U. C. I Health Digestive Healt Mars Earth Swati Mohammed Southern California Mohand NASA 12,000 MPH Pasadena one chance NPR First first time 3 55 eastern time Palco about 35 M 3.5 billion years ago KCRW yesterday afternoon
"sky crane" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:22 min | Last week

"sky crane" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Down on Mars as scheduled at 3 55 Eastern time yesterday afternoon, and NPR's Joe Palco was watching. Landing a rover on Mars is really, really hard. You only get one chance. Get it right the first time or else Perseverance reached Mars, traveling at 12,000 MPH at 3 48. The sequence known as entry descent and Landing began. They have confirmation has entry interface. Swati Mohammed narrated the landing from the control room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Spacecraft orbiting Mars relayed telemetry from the rover. So mission managers on Earth would know exactly what was going on. First, A heat shield slowed the rover. Then a parachute had to deploy a step engineers confessed they were a bit worried about because the perseverance parachute had a new design. So there was great relief. When Mohan made this announcement. Navigation has confirmed that the parachute has deployed and we're seeing significant deceleration. Then a jetpack took over bringing the rover essentially to a halt so it could be lowered to the surface on a tether. Move known as the Sky Crane to attack confirmed Rover was aiming for Jez zero Crater a place on Mars that scientists think was once home to a lake that dried up 3.5 billion years ago. But there's a chance that before it dried up, it was home to some form of Martian microbial life, And there's also a chance the rover instruments would be able to see a signature of that life in the rocks in the crater. So for scientists landing and J zero crater was very desirable for engineers. It was not. That's because the crater floor is filled with boulders that would end the mission if the rover came down on one So this Rover had a special navigation system that could look for a safe place to land and it found one We have landed about 35 M from the nearest rocks that we could identify from orbit by their shadows. Now, Mission managers will make sure that all the rover's systems survived the landing, and soon videos the rover took, as it landed, should be relayed back to Earth. Those should be stunning. Joe Palka NPR news This is NPR news. It's 7 42. The problem in San Francisco is increasing on the freeways one on one. Let's check in with Joe. It's now officially a sig alert. Which means look, Elaine's gonna be blocked.

Joe Joe Palka San Francisco Joe Palco Earth Swati Mohammed NASA 12,000 MPH Mars yesterday afternoon Mohan Pasadena one chance NPR first time First Sky Crane 3.5 billion years ago about 35 M 3
"sky crane" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:11 min | Last week

"sky crane" Discussed on KQED Radio

"On Mars as scheduled at 3 55 Eastern time yesterday afternoon, and NPR's Joe Palco was watching. Landing a rover on Mars is really, really hard. You only get one chance. Get it right the first time or else Perseverance reached Mars, traveling at 12,000 MPH at 3 48. The sequence known as entry descent and Landing began. They have confirmation has entry interface. Swati Mohammed narrated the landing from the control room at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena. Spacecraft orbiting Mars relay telemetry from the rover, so mission managers on Earth would know exactly what was going on. First, A heat shield slowed the rover. Then a parachute had to deploy a step Engineers confess they were a bit worried about because the perseverance parachute had a new design. So there was great relief. When Mohand made this announcement, Navigation has confirmed that the parachute has deployed and we're seeing significant deceleration. Then a jetpack took over bringing the rover essentially to a halt so it could be lowered to the surface on a tether. Move known as the Sky Crane Attack confirmed Rover was aiming for general Crater a place on Mars that scientists think was once home to a lake that dried up 3.5 billion years ago. But there's a chance that before it dried up, it was home to some form of Martian microbial life, And there's also a chance the rover instruments would be able to see a signature of that life in the rocks in the crater. So for scientists landing in Jez zero crater was very desirable for engineers. It was not. That's because the crater floor is filled with boulders that would end the mission if the rover came down on one So this Rover had a special navigation system that could look for a safe place to land and it found one We have landed about 35 M from the nearest rocks that we could identify from orbit by their shadows. Now, Mission managers will make sure that all the rover's systems survived the landing, and soon videos the rover took, as it landed, should be relayed back to Earth. Those should be stunning. Joe Palka NPR news This is NPR.

Joe Palco Joe Palka Earth Swati Mohammed Mars NASA Mohand 12,000 MPH yesterday afternoon Pasadena one chance NPR Sky Crane Attack first time First 3.5 billion years ago about 35 M Jet Propulsion Laboratory Jez zero crater 3
"sky crane" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | Last week

"sky crane" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Lisa Mullins at this very moment, and NASA spacecraft is about to go where No spacecraft has gone before the perseverance Rover is set to touch down in ancient crater on Mars. Scientists hope to find evidence of life beyond our planet Alexandria, which sea is correspondent for Nature magazine? She's watching along with us. And if you'd like to follow the mission's livestream, go to mars dot nasa dot gov. You can hear Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California in the background right now, acceleration. Alexandra, tell us what we're hearing right now in the background, and what's going on on Mars way are right in the middle of what's called the seven Minutes of terror, And what has just happened is the spacecraft that's been flying from Earth to Mars. Has entered the atmosphere slow down dramatically, and it is just deployed its parachute, which was a huge thing to get it to slow down and get it to land on the surface of Mars. Let's listen in to look at the surface car velocity. It's 145 M per second and an altitude of about And Klum, 9.5, kilometers above the surface. So you can hear it's coming in. It's it's on the way yes. It's on the way and you can see on the images on the Web site. Those who are in the banks at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are applauding. Is it still in the midst of this seven or now? Probably five minutes of terror, or does it look like we're free and clear? We've got about two minutes left to effort actually to go down. So what should be happening right now is that this spacecraft is being carried down beneath the parachute. It's slowing down. It's approaching the surface. Pretty soon it will detach. They'll be some thing called the Sky Crane will fire some rockets to slow it down and we should be on the ground, hopefully in

Lisa Mullins Earth NASA Alexandra Mars 9.5, kilometers five minutes Alexandria 145 M per second Pasadena, California less than a minute 2.6, kilometers more than 12,000 miles an hour earth billions of years ago Alexander Sky Crane about a minute and a half seven Minutes mars dot nasa dot gov.
Perseverance rover set to land on Mars

Here & Now

01:49 min | Last week

Perseverance rover set to land on Mars

"I'm Lisa Mullins at this very moment, and NASA spacecraft is about to go where No spacecraft has gone before the perseverance Rover is set to touch down in ancient crater on Mars. Scientists hope to find evidence of life beyond our planet Alexandria, which sea is correspondent for Nature magazine? She's watching along with us. And if you'd like to follow the mission's livestream, go to mars dot nasa dot gov. You can hear Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California in the background right now, acceleration. Alexandra, tell us what we're hearing right now in the background, and what's going on on Mars way are right in the middle of what's called the seven Minutes of terror, And what has just happened is the spacecraft that's been flying from Earth to Mars. Has entered the atmosphere slow down dramatically, and it is just deployed its parachute, which was a huge thing to get it to slow down and get it to land on the surface of Mars. Let's listen in to look at the surface car velocity. It's 145 M per second and an altitude of about And Klum, 9.5, kilometers above the surface. So you can hear it's coming in. It's it's on the way yes. It's on the way and you can see on the images on the Web site. Those who are in the banks at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are applauding. Is it still in the midst of this seven or now? Probably five minutes of terror, or does it look like we're free and clear? We've got about two minutes left to effort actually to go down. So what should be happening right now is that this spacecraft is being carried down beneath the parachute. It's slowing down. It's approaching the surface. Pretty soon it will detach. They'll be some thing called the Sky Crane will fire some rockets to slow it down and we should be on the ground, hopefully in

Lisa Mullins Nature Magazine Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Alexandria Pasadena Alexandra California
NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

Morning Edition

03:34 min | Last week

NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

"Good morning, Scientists from Planet Earth will land another mission on Mars today. NASA calls the rover perseverance. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka has been following this one. Good morning, Joe. Morning, Noel, Can we talk about the logistics of this? They have to get a hurtling projectile toe land safely on Mars. How is this done? Yeah. What's the big trick? It's going 12,000 MPH, and they have two landed it two MPH. No problem. Well, what happens is they're overs packed up into something called the Aero Shell, which hits the top of the atmosphere on Mars and Atmosphere slows the craft down and it's friction heats up. That's why there's a heat shield, but that does slow it down quite a bit. But then there's a giant. Parachute that slows it down further and then finally, there's something called the Sky Crane, which is a jet pack that flies over the landing site to the landing site, then lowers the rover down on a tether and then cuts the cord and flies away. But the interesting thing is, this is the same landing system that the last rover used called curiosity. But it's been made more up to date by the fact that it's got this smart landing system so that you can actually look for Ah, good place to land. If it doesn't like the first place it picks the confide to the next one. What is modern is all the computers and navigation systems are on this new rover. The design of the rocket engines on the sky Crane is actually 50 years old. Believe it or not, those engines all trace their way back to the Viking Landers. That's Joe Cassidy, He's executive director for space at Arrow Jet Rocket die in the company that makes the rocket engine. The Viking missions landed on Mars in the mid seventies, and Cassidy says the rocket designed depended on a special valve that made it possible to vary the Rockets thrust. Funny part is back in the seventies, We had a supplier that actually developed that forest with J. P L came back to us in the latter part of the first decade of the 21st century and said, We want you to do that again. That supplier was no longer in business. But luckily they were able to find an alternate supplier who would make the valve for them. Very luckily, what is perseverance looking for on Mars? Well, it's landing in a place called Jez zero Crater, which was they think a lake bed 3.5 or Lake 3.5 billion years ago, And the idea is there might might might have been microbes in the lake. So there'll be cameras on the rover that will study the appearance of rocks looking for things like stromatolites, which are structures left behind by mats of bacteria. They're also instruments on the rover that will measure the chemical and mineral composition of the rocks at the landing site, and Nina Lanza is a geologist at Los Alamos National Lab and the scientists on one of those instruments called super Camp. See, this is the kind of thing that a geologist needs right. We need both chemistry. What's in Iraq and mineralogy how it's arranged. So knowing those things tells a lot about the conditions under which the rock form then whether or not those conditions were conducive to life. I asked this excitedly. Could we be getting news soon, saying that there was life on Mars? Well, it's one of those news stories where people get very excited, but they will also say I'm from Missouri proof show me so that's actually the idea of this. They may see things that look like there might have been life there. But they say to confirm that they have to bring the rocks back to Earth. And in fact, that's what this mission is going to do. It's going to collect samples that a future mission will return to Earth. Okay. NPR Mars correspondent Joe Palka.

Joe Palka Joe Cassidy Arrow Jet Rocket NPR Noel Nasa JOE Cassidy Nina Lanza Los Alamos National Lab Rockets Iraq Missouri Npr Mars
"sky crane" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:16 min | 2 weeks ago

"sky crane" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"For your buck. When you're throwing a rock it up in the sky, So we may see some contenders emerging there. How strange that we're gonna have Three countries land hopefully Three probes on Mars all within a few weeks of each other. Yes, so the U. S. A is an orbiter. It's it's and it's you know when you're doing your first mission, Li, like India was the most recent country to 16 being the third after the Soviet Union, the United States. To get an orbiter going around Mars that much less expensive than that cost us. Of course, of course, their labors much left, Um and and now here comes the U. S. S. So these early missions for most these countries are kind of technology demonstrators, but they were smart and they said Okay. You know what can we do? This sort of fills the gaps here, So they're going to be taking daily weather reports from orbit, which helps us understand more about the mark damage to the Martian atmosphere and also why so much of it's been scrubbed away over the Over the millions of years because we think at one time was a fairly not exactly a tropical environment, but it was much more. It was much bomb here and denser air and possibly large bodies of standing water many many billions of years ago. So It makes sense to try and figure out why that atmosphere got scrubbed away. T o make sure that we don't have the same thing happened to us, Frankly, so that's what they're doing. Then China comes in with this five ton beast, which is called Tan. When one It's a very lyrical name in Chinese. It means questions to heaven. Had to snap the photo A couple of days ago. Black and white shot of Mars just toe to prove it was on its way. And the Chinese are a little more coy about announcing women What they're gonna do a little bit like the Soviet Union used to be, but we expected to arrive on February 10th. The day after the orbiter and the Chinese machine is going to be in orbit for a couple of years, and it's going to be there. There's gonna be a couple of months of orbiting before they're released their Landers, so it's an orbiter. Lander and Rover. Which is interesting because this is something that JPL looked at very, very heavily for curiosity two years ago in 2012, and they felt, you know, having a big heavy rover draft drive off the lander just introduces too many possible points of failure. That's why they have that crazy look in sky Crane thing with rocket pack and the tethers that lowered their that scared the hell out of us rest of a sudden in the civilian world. But the Chinese are gonna Land Rover and they're going to do that. They'll have the rover investigating the terrain in particular looking for subsurface water. Then finally on February 18 curious the perseverance. Rober NASA's Probe goes slinging in the atmosphere and we haven't had an American Mars lander go into orbit since the Vikings. The land is just go straight in like a bullet from a hunting rifle. Everything is so exact and time to name so perfectly the skin the atmosphere to slow down a bit. Then they just stand fire. Parachutes do that wacky landing thing. The sky crane does and sat down the rover. This is the first astrobiology mission looking for life on the Red planet since the Vikings in 1976 really excited insurers. What are the odds that China has strapped.

China Lander Vikings Soviet Union Land Rover sky Crane Um United States Li NASA India
"sky crane" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

06:04 min | 2 weeks ago

"sky crane" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Oh, alright. I see you. I see on your boat in San Diego. John. Is he on the Z on Skype one Uh, because I wanted to hear how your, uh, conference went this week. The, uh, space society put there Your conference on me now I hear you know Whatever you do, sing my Mac. Speak, right. That's fine. You can use that. So how did you NSS National Space Society event go. It's good. We got many thousands of attendees and we're going to is popular enough. We're going to do it again next Saturday at 8 A.m.. You're gonna do it again. Same link? Yeah. What's the link again? Space settlement, 2021 dot nss dot or g'kar. Is it going to be a rerun or you're gonna do a whole new one? No. From God, No. A rematch. It'll it'll be a rerun rerun. Okay, We're gonna do it asynchronous stream for India and China because we got a lot of interest there, and they don't want to stay up all night writing rebroadcast on Saturday and Sunday. Next week. That's wonderful. So what have we learned? Are we moving to Mars? Some day. We're gonna go to the moon first, but this week we've got some some really cool news coming up in the next couple of weeks. We have three Mars probes. Arriving at the Red Planet in the next 10 days or so, three of them why we send so many Well, we didn't so the U. S. NASA's sent Mars 2020. That's landing. Fingers crossed on February 18th. And that's that. Very Harry. Sky Crane. Manu Ruse, you know, but well, that's the one wait a minute, so they This is the funniest thing. When NASA's tried different ways to land on Mars. There was one where they were the bouncy they had the bounce bouncy house. Right that the thing landed and bounced for awhile. That worked. Okay, now the space crane they've used before, haven't they? Yeah, that was for curiosity, And the problem is curiosity and perseverance are too big and too complicated to bounce around that way. So they had a longer to be with Rob Manning. Who's this delightful guy at J. P. L. He's the chief engineer. Now who Designed this stuff along with his team, and he said, You know, we tried everything we could think of. And believe it or not hovering and lower than that thing on those tethers is the simplest way to get out there. Because when most of us her saw it, we went. It looks complicated. It is in April 1st. Well, I thought the bouncy thing was kind of a joke, too. So good good. Yeah. So that's gonna be the first tell me about this Rover. Though This is a Big rover this time, right? It's just actually the same chassis and design as curiosity. It's just got a very different instrument load. Everything's out On the end of the armed this time there is in the laboratory in the main chassis, but what is there? Is a system for drilling and cash and core samples. So they're going to be able to, uh, leave course. And they're going to take your samples as they go. They look at some of what they got. And then leaving behind for another rover to pick up and bring back to Earth. We hope in about five years s. Oh, that would be the first sample return. But this this particular mission pure perseverance is actually In astrobiology mission. We haven't tried that since Viking where we kind of didn't really know very much about exit. Extreme life forms right? So this one is going to be looking for fossils or possibly live microbes if they happen to spot those, and that's pretty exciting. And but you know when, when the Americans Shoot Mars probes Now we don't go into orbit and then dally Dolly and look around and try and figure out where to go anymore. We just go straight in like a bullet from a hunting rifle, So everything's gotta be perfect. Given that this thing has a five mile wide landing zone, which is about a quarter of what it was last time. That's so small. That's amazing is, but it's got a thing called Range trigger, which actually looks down where it's going and says, Okay, there's a rock over there. There's a crater over. They can go here. Kind of like Neil Armstrong did when he avoided the rock when he's landed in Apollo, 11. Don't go there. Yeah. So perseverance lands in theory on the 18th. Right, right? Okay, but that's not the only one. That's not the only one. The United Arab Emirates has a mission called Hope that was launched on Japanese right last year. You a is going to Mars. Yes, And it's It's a fairly simple mission is kind of a technology demonstrator. But they you know that part of the world realizes oil isn't gonna last forever, and they're trying very hard developed the technology sector, so they put together a mission they wanted on Japanese rocket. It's primarily a weather tracker, so it's gonna be looking at the Martian atmosphere. But that's arriving on the ninth and then China has this five ton beast of a spacecraft, which is a little bit more like Viking. It zits already set back one photo, so we know it's working. That's arriving February 10th That's called Tian. When one which translates as you probably know, cause you know Chinese Questions to heaven and it's an orbiter. I love the lander. And a rover. Wow. Wow! Wow works. I'll be only the second country in history to successfully land spacecraft on Mars that works. The Soviets had one that worked for about 30 seconds, but so far We've been the lone record holders. They're so that's It's gonna be a traffic jam on Mars. That's a photo. Well, don't forget. We got like 58 orbiters going around the planet already, So it's starting to look like the Holy 1 10 Freeway rush hour Now is this is this perseverance? Is this the one with your name on it? Well, it doesn't have my name on sadly but yes, there's a way for on it. Silicon wafer that has I think a million names. Million 10.9 million names. One of yours on there. No. Oh, plus 155 essays on their NASA's name The rover contest. Yeah. Wow. And you get a souvenir boarding pass if you did it, That's the only thing I'd like, but those were pretty cool..

NASA China National Space Society San Diego John Sky Crane Manu Ruse United Arab Emirates Neil Armstrong Rob Manning chief engineer J. P. L. India
Python at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

Talk Python To Me

06:27 min | 4 months ago

Python at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)

"Angles especially around some of the remote stuff. A lot of things you guys do work with like Rovers. You talked about spirit just to have a conversation with those things is like we complain about late and senior website was slow or I was playing this game and it was hard because there was. Two hundred milliseconds of latency. There's different kinds of latency out in space. Right? Wouldn't the speed light is not enough. So he can some of the smart and putting it on rovers and other stuff. Some of this ai work that you're doing. It sounds like it might have some lakes Ai I. Hope. So and we think it does too. So Michael, basically the work that. We're doing for your listeners. We have a project that we've been investigating now. So let's fast forward the clock rovers nowadays the last one that landed on the planet. I won't say that we shipped because we just shipped one, which we'll talk about called does a couple of weeks. The right we did pandemic shipping and launching of rockets, Rovers, new fad but yes, for pre. That pre pandemic in two thousand, twelve, we ship the the Mars Science Laboratory or the Curiosity Rover, and that one is about. So spirited opportunity just the size them ver- you know your listeners it's about the size if you have kids of one of those cars that you push maybe or something like that or maybe like a power wheel big wheel type of thing that size. Of Spirit and opportunity the MSL rover is about the size of a small car like Volkswagen bug and if you came to jpl and it was open to have these some day and things like that, you could walk into our building agency a full scale model of to really get the feel of it but that's the size rover over that we're talking about now that's. Sort of the modern class at them and so twenty, twenty s the perseverance, the launched it's the same size. So we've got MSL still operating spirit and opportunity arts anymore because they were solar-powered MSL is powered basically by nuclear fission uses an rtd power source and things like that. So it doesn't have to worry about solar panels so it can go for quite a while and. Has Been. So it's a great test basically as long as it mechanically is still functioning right? Absolutely and so challenges with mechanical functioning are like, Hey, we learned a lot about the wheels for a car sized thing as we drove over walks in it toward the wheels up, you know and things, and so we did we learned a lot about them if you look at one. Quick Update and twenty twenty as the wheels have little homer simpson speed holes are not speed old but holes to prevent having just track and tread that dies catching on everything and that's just one thing we learned amongst other things. We've got smart engineers JPL. MSL's agree platform to test stuff out on. However let's talk about AIML L. I'm going to dispel some missing rumor so. MSL and space assets and others they all need right we gotta do computing we need a processor and A. And things like that they are running off of an old the what is that the latest? GP probably like a Invidia like twenty eighty something like that. Yeah. Everybody thinks that and I know you're being facetious and I liked the snark it's awesome. But yes, no, and that's the challenge. Everybody thinks that and it's not it's running off of a rats fifty, which is a be a h that's as bad as powerful as a POWERPC chip and process or in so and why real quick y right when we crash something in the government, we've got a congressional inquiry that we have to respond to. This virtual companies do it and we love the commercial companies where partner with them. Now, they don't right they I mean not to say that it doesn't ruin their value stream or their reputation or things like that. But they've got a little bit more flexibility to do testing and stuff like that than we do and so we are risk averse by profile definition, and so because of that, we were only use things that are what we. Call radiation hardened, which means that when it gets up there in space, a space does and cosmic radiation do weird things to your hardware they flip the bids amongst that's the easy stuff they do. They do a lot of other nasty stuff and so you gotta make sure that the hardware works in space and so because of that the technology, the Gartner life cycle for what we could use for that is real behind and so this big. Smart this big. Potentially smart you know and it is smart. They did great things on MSL and they're going to do even greater on twenty twenty is writing off of an old processor. So the I is human in the loop even more. So coupled with the fact that you alluded to, Hey, you know bandwidth latency you think that's an issue the lifetime from Earth to Mars eight minutes round trip. So anything you send to Mars you, gotTa. Weigh eight minutes to figure out what the heck happened or even what happened for your report back. Then you know that's not it doesn't all have to be synchronised. They're asynchronous ways. There are ways to kind of achieved some advantages and key things up, but it's still it's eight minutes basically, and so because of that, there's a video on youtube by the way for your listeners. If you haven't seen it, it's called the seven minutes of terror. Closer to eight. Yeah. Yeah. That's a great one. Yeah. Yeah. That's for the entry descent and landing. When they landed MSL curiosity, they had to use a big sky crane instead of the typical big balloon rap the rover to balloon it let it balance which was the way they did it before it was so big they had to have this elaborate sky crane thing and in that seven minutes when you go into entry descent and landing there seven minutes before you knew, Hey, what the heck happened and all this stuff had to happen autonomously and things like that, which is great. But yeah, normally eight minutes and so if I told you today that the Mars surface operations people use about two. Hundred images a day that are taken from the rover from its NAVC cans, which are camps by the wheels, and it's Mass Cam, which is the big head that take selfies and other things that you see what it's arm. If I told you that today, they only use two hundred images to plan what to do for rover operations. The next day you'd understand why we're bandwidth limited or Ltd what we can process on the reverse sucking them down to the ground and making decisions. What if I told you tomorrow? We'll get close to that nvidia chip maybe not exactly but there's efforts called high-performance space like computing to build a multi-core. GP. Like chip that is radiation hardened. It's a big government project. That has an emulator already that they're making and that we also today have Mars helicopter I'm perseverance, which is a little drone that went along with it that if successful is running a qualcomm snapdragon, which is gp like chip and why are we not fully radiation hardened and all this? It does we've tested in whatever but it's not like has the years and years of testing. Why are we doing that? Because it's a technology demonstration and we have a bigger like the mission is still successful even if Mars Halley you know is not successful with that what you call ingenuity right and I. Suspect that the risk to a little drone helicopter thing

Rovers JPL Nvidia Qualcomm Twenty Twenty Michael Gartner Volkswagen Partner
"sky crane" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:29 min | 8 months ago

"sky crane" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Were able to avoid train that we can't get to. In the past. The email system operates you go in seventeen about seventeen thousand miles an hour when you get the top of the atmosphere and seven minutes later, you've got to be going zero miles an hour. you? There's a great video online of describing this call. Seven minutes of terror that describes the. Deal system and it's all automated and it happens. All we turn it on and we. We let it go. And we find out whether or not we landed or not. But it's the sky, Crane Sky Crane configuration. We hit the top of the atmosphere going seventeen thousand miles an hour, and there's heat shield that heat shield dissipate in the atmosphere. It slows down to Sure. What the miles an hour is, but we then lose the heat shield and we opened up the parachute. That's a supersonic parachute has a very large parachute, which then dumps more energy. We slow down even further, but we get to about a couple of kilometers above the surface, and then we're on retro rockets landing system itself takes over this active landing system in the sky crane itself. What it's kind of like a the landing system is all over the rover, and the basically where we lower to the ground by a rope, and then rover hits the ground and moves off on its own power It's really cool to watch really cool video to To see how it all works I loved that video seven minutes of terror, especially back in two thousand twelve, when I was following curiosity, I watched that over and over and over it was fascinating. Is this is this landing system when you're describing perseverance, are there elements of this because I know? When I was reading the description of perseverance and some of its objectives, one of the things was improving the techniques for landing. Is this one of those things that might actually help us? The landing of perseverance might actually help us understand how eventually to land humans on Mars. That question is I? Don't really know I do know what it what it does. Do is completely instrumented, and so understands the nature of the Martian atmosphere better, and by that we can design better landing systems. I think there's probably an upper limit to how much this manning system can land in fact I know there is 'cause I've read. Some of the mission architectures for potential humans to tomorrow's, and so they all have different landing systems associated with the giving this gives us information. Information on like that. Atmosphere is like in the higher in the higher above the surface, and so we can get take that information and design better systems, and that's that's the important part of the system for for eventual humans to Mars I don't know whether or not the skills to to four human activities, and it's a lot more mass. Yeah, no, yes, sure not necessarily designed by understanding what the environment is that you're dealing with? That's got. That's got to help for sure. Does and that basically slows all into that and and we every time we land. We learned something new. It's it's. Perfect you. You mentioned some supersonic parachute. There's a lot of crazy engineering that's going into the landing here and I know just from from curiosity. A lot of it is familiar to me, but for perseverance, specifically, some of the development of testing of some of those things to make sure perseverance is going to survive the journey. Yeah testing is is We joke all the time that. Testing is always nerve wracking because you've. Spent four years building something, and then all of a sudden you go into tested, and you just hope that it works the way everything is supposed to work, because it's really puts the. You Put the needle to the the needles in the test. This better actors better description not. So, what happens is that we had to test everything and so If you remember back to. When I was talking about what's the Mars exploration rovers, everybody talks about the fact that we're only supposed to exist for ninety days, but really what that means is that all of the instruments and all of the hardware was or or tested out about three times life, so we test, we test retest and we test for three times what the eventual life is going to be! We don't testing till they die testings to make sure that they work for three times. The nominal lifetime is. And what that means is that Mars is a very difficult place Mars every day on Mars temperature swings about one hundred degrees. Centigrade, which is about two hundred degrees Fahrenheit, so imagine going from..

Crane Sky Crane
"sky crane" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

Science Rules! with Bill Nye

04:46 min | 8 months ago

"sky crane" Discussed on Science Rules! with Bill Nye

"Give it a give it a good throw. And I was thinking. Of course you can't do that because any any package or letter that you threw out of the space station would burn up on reentry. And that's mostly true, but it turns out that if you have something that's very kind of been flat like something in Manila envelope. If it can survive up to just a couple of hundred degrees Fahrenheit like sort of typical like baking paper temperatures. It looks like there's some calculations that suggest that as it enters the atmosphere, it'll slow down up high where the air is thin enough and won't ever really reach those super high burning temperatures. It'll just kinda come to arrest in gently drifts down and so there it doesn't need a parachute or anything. It's just sort of its drag limited. It's only for things that are really thin, really thin and lightweight, and this led to another proposal which again sadly. They didn't go through with, but it was. The pros. Buy some Japanese researchers to take a bunch of paper airplanes up to the International Space Station and then, and then chuck them out and let them enter the atmosphere, and in inferior. According to all these calculations, they should survive the trip down. how how? Could we not. The right kind of seems very low budget. Experiment also does it also seems like the sort of thing we're even if it's not funded. They probably got some paper up there, right? You could just start a sneak out a pay. Sneak out a couple of pages of the emergency manual on your spacewalk. We're talking about these crazy things from space, but you also talk about the NASA Sky Crane which honestly if you did not know, it was a real thing, you would think that was a classic absurd. Ban I love this the way that they landed the rover on Mars I always. That's one of my favorite examples of idea that it sounded ridiculous even to the people who were working on it you know. They came up with it and it's like well. This this sounds this sounds ridiculous but it. We can't think of any better idea, and we also can't find a specific problem with this one the way to get the. Complex, yeah, exactly, but but then then all of the ideas that seem better turn out to be more complex have more unsolvable problems. Do you want explain that asked? Crane for those who are already familiar. Sure shirt the. Will. The general problem was getting they when Nestle wanted to land the curiosity rover on Mars. They have landed other rovers by. Surrounding them with air bags, so the parachute that slows them down partway, but Mars's atmosphere is really thin so to slow them down at the very end, Del inflate these airbags that they bounce. Let them bounce. Enroll and come to a stop. But the curiosity rover was much bigger than any of the other rovers that the US has sent, and the a problem was. They found that the parachutes couldn't be big enough to slow it down enough in Mars thin atmosphere for the air bags to be able to absorb the impact. And so what they had to do, instead the they were thinking. We have to figure out a way to slow it down more than the air bags and parachutes slow it down, so they thought okay well. Can we do some kind of user rocket to to make it land itself, and they found that the auto land system. If you put a rocket on the bottom of the rover as it gets near the ground, it'll start kicking up dust and the dust interfere with its ability to see the ground and to Orient itself. And that would interfere with its ability land, and so they tried a bunch of other sensible sounding things. You know bigger airbags bigger parachutes that are but. Eventually! Someone came up with this idea that they called the sky crane. which was to dangle the robot? From a hovering vehicle that would hover high up on rockets high up enough that it wouldn't. Kick up any dust. And then it would lower the robot on a winch, like on a downward toward the ground, just dangling there, and then when it made contact with the ground, the sky crane would cut itself free. The road detach the rover would detached from the sky crane in the sky crane. Could it sounds kind of insane? Yeah, I mean. It worked so well and I really liked how NASA. When they you know, they talked about this. They kind of played that up the fact that no one has ever done this before. And the fact that it did sound kind of ridiculous, because so often with space stuff. Everyone you know is trying so hard to look you know. Make sure that they seem everything. Everyone understands they're doing their best. They're very serious in a very competent. It can make it seem sort of routine. And I really enjoy when the kind of acknowledged like. This is a really wild thing were attempting here. Stick around for more science rules after this..

Sky Crane NASA rovers International Space Station Manila Nestle US
"sky crane" Discussed on If I Were You

If I Were You

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"sky crane" Discussed on If I Were You

"To anything for these two orphans so you guys take off in that your slave ship and fly towards the city of Frost Win as you make your way over the ocean you feel the weather changing. There's a bit of a nip in the air. And you see the first snowflake falling from the Sky Crane holiday too. I tried to catch it in this cup. Go ahead and give me a dexterity check. Okay in the nineteen Yeah you catch a snowflake. It's very cold. Can I create food and water so that it starts snowing more and maybe also some gingerbread cookies you start using magic to make gingerbread cookies off from this guy. Baking cookies fall from the sky complete insanity tearing up the rigging yourself from falling down super heartfelt worship starts rotting. The rudder is going. We're going down we'll lived. These cookies are hard as shit. And so eventually you guys. are in a consistent snowfall as you get close to where you know frustrating to be you guys see islands below you of ice as you approach the northern continent. Finally I you can see. The plane are rift in the sky atop mount forge giving the snow below a purple glow. Guess this time of year really really is. Can you eat purple snow eat some purple snow. You think it tastes fine. Think it's fun Do you have a rash. Yes snow or the US okay. Good good have reached wins going away gashed Mirage. Got Gas everyone lined up for chapstick right now. So you guys have.

Sky Crane gashed Mirage mount forge US
Mars 2020 Rover Assembled and Tested for Launch Next Year

SPACE NEWS POD

07:21 min | 2 years ago

Mars 2020 Rover Assembled and Tested for Launch Next Year

"No minimum listenership to start making money with anchor. So if you wanna make a little bit of money while having a cool podcast while download the crap or go to anchored up f m to get started. So the Mars twenty twenty Rover is still there's more things that's gonna go on with this stack. They have to stack it up. They have to put the things in order in order to make sure that everything fits properly, and then they have to unstuck it. So the Rovers in their while va dummy Rovers in there, and they have to take it out. They have to unassembled everything. And then they have to put the regular Rover back in there. The real Rover back in there to make sure that everything works with the real Rover as well. They'll do some testing. And then and only then once it pass those tests it'll be ready to launch to Mars in twenty twenty. A NASA spokesperson said until the hold down bolts on the atlas rocket blow in a Rover is headed to Mars in July of twenty twenty. There is almost always something being assembled tested or modified. Now, let's get into the brains of the operation the brings of the Rover the Rover compute element the RC. E? There's two of these things on the Rover. Now, that's for redundancy of one bringing goes down somehow doesn't work. There's always going to be a spare brain in the remote compute element interfaces with engineering functions of the Rover over two networks which follow an aerospace industry standard designed especially for the high reliability requirements of airplanes and space crafts and this thing will directly interface with Rover instruments for exchange of commands and science data. So without these two brains. None of the science would be happening in this Rover assembly for the March twenty twenty mission while they have cameras that are going to film, everything the entry descent in lane. Ding cameras will capture better than ever recordings of the events that deliver the Rover to the surface of Mars. They have up look camera to record. The parachute. They have a descent stage, which looks down that will view the Rover from above. It has an uplift camera another one that see the descent stage in operation as lowers the Rover from the crazy sky crane, and they also have down look camera that will be viewing the ground underneath everything. These cameras will be recording. What happens when the Rover actually lands how much sand and rock is blown into the atmosphere by the retro rockets. How does the landing system move is the Rover nears the surface, and how do the wheels and legs respond when the Rover finally puts all its weight down on the surface of the red

Mars Twenty Twenty Rover Twenty Twenty Nasa
"sky crane" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sky crane" Discussed on Still Untitled: The Adam Savage Project

"Yeah. And that's next one right next to another another sky crane. Yeah. Twenty I don't know if they're going to the sky crane again, I thought that I heard that. But it could I mean, I feel like I feel like the plan the thing that they pitched was we're gonna do curiosity just with some difference mutation and like what we've learned is going to change. But I mean, it's guy crane worked once why not try it again it so so amazing. I I loved being in the room, I met lots of amazing people from museums and science institutions from all over the country. It was a fantastic date. Thank you Allen. That was a tremendous tremendous day. Do you think we'll get to a point where we're doing that for a person landing on Mars in our lifetime in our lifetime? Yes. Kid all the time. Because she wants to go. She's like ready. She wants we do planet books, and she's like I want to go to Mars, Dan. I'm like, well, you know, I just look I appreciate what he does. But I hope that person isn't Elon Musk seventy percents. Imagine him landing on Mars and going sunk in haters. Hey, four twenty seven plays all up in your planet. I. Yeah. Feel I hope that he doesn't succeed. I it's not the first one. I just hope he sent the first one. That's all you want some great steps for mankind. Is that notion rather? Yeah. It's gotta be on behalf of humanity. The best of us the best of us before we continue with this episode. I want to let you know that this episode was also made possible by linked in because the right hire can make a huge impact on your business. One of the reasons that we love working at tested is. Because of all the great people we've hired and work with and makes a huge impact on our day to day, but finding the right person can be hard. So instead of just posting on a job board, which most people don't check post your job to a place where people.

Elon Musk crane Allen
"sky crane" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

This Is Only A Test

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sky crane" Discussed on This Is Only A Test

"Yeah. And that's next one right next to another another sky crane. Yeah. Twenty I don't know if they're going to the sky crane again, I thought that I heard that. But it could I mean, I feel like I feel like the plan the thing that they pitched was we're gonna do curiosity just with some difference mutation and like what we've learned is going to change. But I mean, it's guy crane worked once why not try it again it so so amazing. I I loved being in the room, I met lots of amazing people from museums and science institutions from all over the country. It was a fantastic date. Thank you Allen. That was a tremendous tremendous day. Do you think we'll get to a point where we're doing that for a person landing on Mars in our lifetime in our lifetime? Yes. Kid all the time. Because she wants to go. She's like ready. She wants we do planet books, and she's like I want to go to Mars, Dan. I'm like, well, you know, I just look I appreciate what he does. But I hope that person isn't Elon Musk seventy percents. Imagine him landing on Mars and going sunk in haters. Hey, four twenty seven plays all up in your planet. I. Yeah. Feel I hope that he doesn't succeed. I it's not the first one. I just hope he sent the first one. That's all you want some great steps for mankind. Is that notion rather? Yeah. It's gotta be on behalf of humanity. The best of us the best of us before we continue with this episode. I want to let you know that this episode was also made possible by linked in because the right hire can make a huge impact on your business. One of the reasons that we love working at tested is. Because of all the great people we've hired and work with and makes a huge impact on our day to day, but finding the right person can be hard. So instead of just posting on a job board, which most people don't check post your job to a place where people.

Elon Musk crane Allen
Orangutans can 'talk' about the past and the future, study suggests

Live From Here with Chris Thile

02:20 min | 2 years ago

Orangutans can 'talk' about the past and the future, study suggests

"Greenland and the. Thing. That's super interesting is this is one of the twenty five biggest impact craters on the planet, and we can tell that it came and hit win the ice sheet was still in place, which means it had to have been during the Pleistocene. So it was two point five million years ago or younger so this is relatively recent. And it would have been such an enormous impact that it would have melted. A huge part of the glaciers probably resulting in sea level rise and probably at perturbing climates around the planet, certainly in the northern hemisphere. So this was a huge hit really recently in earth's history. So, you know, this gives us a lot of insight into how often giant rocks from space hit the planet, but it wasn't big enough to wipe out earth. Like, it certainly wasn't. I'm to give you a comparison. You know, the the meteorite that wiped out the dinosaurs. That impact crater is about one hundred and fifty kilometers across. So it's significantly larger. Let's go to some other is Spacey. Kind of news. There's another Martian landing coming up. Right. I know this is so exciting. So insight, which is going to be exploring Mars is landing on November twenty six in the afternoon. East coast time around three PM, and this is going to be a relatively easy landing. There's no sky crane like when curiosity landed. It's just a parachute landing, and it's going to be sitting in place. It's not gonna be driving around. And it's learning about the interior of Mars, which means it has a giant drill, and it's going to drill five meters into the Martian crust, and that's going to tell us about the planet's composition. It's gonna tell us about heat levels inside the planet and give us just more information about how rocky worlds are formed a second data point that we have on that earth is Orion body. We've studied that. Now, we're going to study it on Mars, and it's also going to learn more about seismic activity on Mars. So we might actually learn about Mars quakes. So what date should we circle on our? Calendar for this one. So number twenty six and if you go to NASA website, there's going to be watching parties all across the United States. So you can get together with friends and watch the landing and like I said it's happening in the afternoon. So it's actually a reasonable time. So get out and watch our space program. Go I

Greenland Nasa United States Five Million Years Fifty Kilometers Five Meters
"sky crane" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"sky crane" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"And let's say the ash is getting a little bit on the fixed side, well era, web the other day, and I had this thing. Washington D odorized right now, smells, like an ashtray or a very bad cigar. And now you hear what happened fifteen seconds ago. We couldn't see anything. Now. All of a sudden you've got wins and thirty miles an hour coming through here blowing the smoke away and clearing out the air. And all of a sudden, you can actually see the sun overhead where you couldn't forty seconds ago. As shows you what kind of variability endanger and happens on these fire lines and with these type of fire conditions that looks for now like some of the active flame from on. The freeway is gone. I would merely advise as far as traffic is concerned. If you're within five miles of rocky peak, and you're coming eastbound of the one eighteen freeway get off the freeway, you're gonna get caught in the jam the same thing for those coming west don't even get within two miles of rocky peak. Leave the road clear for the emergency personnel. Leave the road clear for the strike teams. That are still going to be coming in here to deal. Oh with us. Because even though the vast majority of the flames from our perspective here looks like the burn through and consume most of the fuel. There's an awful lot of embers out there. The winds can pick up and then start spot. Fires extending two three four five hundred yards down the hill into homes here in Simi valley. Yeah, pete. I take it. There's an awful lot of vegetation in that area. Yeah. Both light flashy fuel and denser, ladder fuels. You're talking. Suma? Commands Anita Bush's that are about all I'd say seven to ten feet high. So those here we go. We got a sky crane coming in. Whoa. How the heck he made that drop have not a clue in hell he was less than one hundred feet over.

rocky peak Anita Bush Washington two three four five hundred ya one hundred feet fifteen seconds forty seconds ten feet Simi valley
"sky crane" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"sky crane" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"The neighborhoods here in Westlake village where I was reporting live yesterday where there was the active firefight. I mean, when I say active, I mean, flames burning right up to the edges of people's homes. And in some cases, destroying those homes in the background. You hear a sky crane? They're picking up water, and it'll be delivered to get another very active area. This Wolsey firefights. There was one woman named Christine and she's on a street up there in Westlake village in this neighborhood. This is rich Ford drive, and I talked about it a lot yesterday. She defied the evacuation order like so many people. Did she stayed behind shields? Only felt like she was in the way came back today after eventually leaving. But she says she hopes that what she learned is a lesson to others. We stay too long. We really should have listened to the firefighters. And we just thought we knew what we were doing an guy to close. It just got too close, but we had hoses. Out. And we saw it coming over the hillside, and we just thought, oh, we can help you know, by getting the hoses. And and maybe we did because the house right next door burns in our students. So maybe we did help it. But at what at what cost, you know, the risk was high in the firefighters know what they're doing. We hear from people all the time. I talked to him. I was up here in this neighborhood all day yesterday. And you know, they were like, hey, I'll know when I need to leave because I'll feel it. I'll see the fire with my own eyes. And you probably thought the same thing. Absolutely one hundred percent. We saw it coming and it started coming quickly, and we thought okay, it's time to go. It's time to go. And when we got out the front door, the they were here, and they were on the bullhorns, and they were, you know, get out get out we've been under mandatory active accusation, and we didn't go. And so, you know, you just feel like you're putting everybody's life in danger. They're trying to save your property, and you should take care of saving yourself. It's about to take it to ticket, and these are only material things, but you know, they were. For my material things, and it doesn't hurt any last. But I'm I feel very lucky if a very blessed Christine feeling blessed because her home mostly.

Christine Westlake village Wolsey Ford one hundred percent
"sky crane" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

Dear Hank and John

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"sky crane" Discussed on Dear Hank and John

"So it's a very it's about the size of a house. So it goes from the size of like a like a log of wood to that. You would throw on a fire to the size of a house in a fourth of a second. So that's a lot of pressure. And it is a sudden and tremendous amount of weight that is yanking on all of these nylon fibers and all of the stitching and of the fabric. So the the parachute opened perfectly at supersonic speeds with a load of sixty seven thousand pounds the heaviest payload for a parachute ever any parachute and eighty five percent heavier than the payload that Mars twenty twenty. Parachute. We'll have to slow during its two sent toward Mars. So, you know, as they do at NASA, this is planned to succeed way beyond where it will have to succeed, and it is succeeded quite well. So that's great news from ours. Twenty twenty the parachute is functional. The Rover body is getting painted right now, the chassis is is complete and they're all the the holes drilled in it and all the instruments are still under construction for the most part, and but we'll be being finished up soon and shipped over to start being assembled into the final Rover. It's just amazing. Didn't the first Mars Rover didn't curiosity? Not use a parachute. Or did it? Use a parachute. It used a parachute. So it's a combination of multiple slowing system. So users air shooters. There's there's the rockets that fire toward the surface of Mars. Yeah. I mean, technically the first slowdown is just the capsule hitting the atmosphere. And so that was down a lot. And then the parachute opens to slow don't even further because if the parachute opened at like at the like when it first hit the atmosphere, the parachute would totally rip off because it'd be fast. So it's on a lot just by going through the atmosphere. Then the parachute opens, then it drops the parachute. And it gets lowered by this ridiculous sky crane thing placed carefully on the surface of Mars, which is I can't frigging believe it worked even now. Wait, a sky crane will land on Mars I and then lower the Rover down. No. The sky crane is is a crane that is suspended in the sky by retro rockets. So it oh, wow. That is cool. Yeah. It's pretty cool. It's just completely boggles. My mind how much engineering brilliance goes into this? They just there was just a problem on the international space station where there was this like pinprick sized hole. And they had to patch it or whatever. I don't really remember the details. What I remember is. They were like what probably caused this is human error when doing the stitching, and I was like, oh, right. All of this stuff. That is going into space is made by people somehow. I had not internal. Yeah. Yeah. It's pretty amazing like with they're talking about building the chassis from us twenty twenty. They're talking about like drilling the holes that the instruments will connect to and they drill each one by hand. And they they do a pilot hole. And then they do a second pilot hole to make sure that they're in the exact right spot. And then they do the final trip. Bill because like every hole, of course, needs to be like perfectly and exactly the right spot. But it's done by a person there's person with a drill. Yeah. Like, we are not a species of artificial intelligence, or whatever we are a biological phenomenon. Like, turning cloth and metal into space stations. Yeah. Anyway, that's what you should tell your interviewer when they're tell them a bit about you. And every one of those people came out of a person. It's humans all the way down Hanky for ponding with me..

Mars twenty twenty Twenty twenty NASA Hanky Bill sixty seven thousand pounds eighty five percent
"sky crane" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"sky crane" Discussed on TechStuff

"Oh, yeah. So you can actually see the parachute. You can see the capsule that contained the Rover, you can if you look really carefully, you can even see the heat shield that was jettisoned off the bottom of the the Rover. We'll talk more about that whole procedure in just a minute. So one of the things you can do is you use rockets to slow yourself down further from the parachute. So the picture gets you down to a certain speed. The rockets can slow you down a little bit more. And then as you get closer to the surface, you need to find a way of lowering the Rover itself so that the rockets don't disturb the dust too much. One way of doing that is to lower the Rover. To essentially drop it with all these airbags around it, which cushioned the blow when it lands, and then it retrieves the airbags or or emerges from the air bags and continues on its mission. That's how the smaller Rovers landed, FRA, the smaller ones being things like the spirit and the opportunity, the Phoenix, Lander things like that, used those sort of approaches because. They were. They were small enough where it wasn't that it wasn't as huge challenge. With the curiosity Rover, you're talking about a one ton vehicle at that size, the size of the air bags you would need are so huge that you would really run the risk of the even if everything worked properly. You would run the risk of fouling the drive system of the curiosity Rover because it has to get out of this enormous airbag. So that was considered too risky. Another approaches to put these pretty much like stilt landing still so that when the the rockets lower the the descent vehicle down the the still touched ground and keep the rockets and elevation high enough so that they aren't disturbing the dust too much and the Rover can drop down from there. Again, with a curiosity Rover, it was so large and heavy. The stilts would have had to have been way too tall. To do this in a way that would have been easy to do. And also it would have really made it difficult to ensure that the curiosity would be undamaged as it came down. So they had to come up with a different way to get the curiosity Rover onto the surface of earth, and it was insane. A sky crane guy grain. Yeah. So I've found that sounds like some kind of strange other worldly company as we'll walk you through how how this unfolded. And it's still incredible to me that this worked, I think, and I don't mean this in any way to be slight to the scientists behind this. I think they were a little astonished work well, the the, the reaction that we saw at the and as we learned that the curiosity had in fact landed successfully by the way. By the time we knew that the curiosity was successful in its landing. It'd been on the surface of Mars for several minutes. Yeah, because again, the Mars is further away at the point of the curiosity landing from earth than the earth is to the sun. It takes it takes about eight minutes for light from the sun to get earth. It takes fourteen minutes for magnetic communication to get from Mars to the earth. Slow internet now, fourteen minutes for that information to get to us. It takes seven minutes from the time. The landing capsule enters the Martian atmosphere to the point where curiosity would touchdown. That means there's a seven-minute gap where things have already happened if we do not know what they were. Yes. So the name seven minutes of terror, which is I think brilliant. There was a wonderful video. NASA put out that was very dramatic, almost almost comedic Lee. So because it was like a, it was like a thriller movie, right? But it was all about the seven minutes of terror. The fact that you have to build a vehicle that's operating autonomously for for, you know, there's nothing you can do. You can't make any adjustments because it's going to take fourteen minutes for that information to get to you and then any information Houston back. It's gonna take fourteen minutes for it to get there. So by the time you send any sort of information by the time you react to a change in condition. It doesn't matter. Things have changed too much for that to have any effect. So. The the capsule enters the Martian atmosphere..

rockets Rovers NASA Phoenix Lee Houston fourteen minutes seven minutes eight minutes seven-minute one ton
"sky crane" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"sky crane" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"The only natural disaster parts of the country are dealing with record heat in california making it difficult for firefighters battling a wild fire north of downtown los angeles mayor eric garcetti he says the nearly eight square mile fire has brought more land than any other in the city's history at one point i counted eleven water drop a helicopters from the city county of los angeles and measure hearing in the back row as an eriksson sky crane making use one of these hella swabs do the command center in less than twenty minutes saint of the round only long enough to load of their water tanks that have right back at the firefront when traditions of picked up was smoke for the final moving to the northeast allowing the aircrews to actually give a good look at the firefront at target most dangerous parts of the blaze while they move toward evacuated homes and fresh patches of dense dr rush that's reporter pt i'm a trail recovering from c a covering the story from the scene he says more than seven hundred homes in the area are under evacuation including three hundred in burbank 250 and glendale and one hundred in la as the trump administration continues to monitor the situation in california and the devastation from hurricane harvey mexico's president seems to have a message for the white house it was made during the state of the union address in mexico city without naming president trump or the border wall mexico's president envy opinion yet all said his country will not accept any attacks on its dignity the mark's earned him a standing ovation during his state of the union one of the few topics most mexicans agree on adrienne bard cbs news mexico's so sad news to report about a pop icon walter becker the cofounder of the rock group steely dan has died he was sixty seven who is that the big group have big hits in the 1970s including ricky don't lose that number heard here the group disbanding a nineteen eighty one but they came back in the 1990s and produced a several big albums tmz recording becker had been ill and underwent surgery last month w wjr news.

california eric garcetti los angeles burbank mexico president mexico city reporter glendale hurricane harvey walter becker dan ricky eight square mile twenty minutes
"sky crane" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"sky crane" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Look for a cooling center san francisco's always so cool any way we don't usually have heat emergencies one local meteorologist says this is only the third time since 1874 than san francisco has had backtoback days of tripledigit temperatures general aim cbs news san francisco and north of downtown los angeles firefighters continue to battle a wildfire mayor eric garcetti says the fire has burned more land than any other in the city's history it's nearly eight square miles cbs's p dmitro is there at one point i counted eleven water drop a helicopter from the city county of los angeles and as you're hearing in the background as an eriksson sky crane making use one of these helo sponsor the command center in less than twenty minutes saint on the ground only long enough a load of their water tanks and have right back at the firefront when traditions of picked up was smoke for the final moving to the east northeast allow new york ruth actually give a good look at the firefront a target the most dangerous parts of the blazers while they move toward evacuated homes and fresh patches of dense stride rush in oregon about one hundred forty hikers were forced to shelter overnight on a trail after they got caught between two wildfires they were stuck about ninety miles east of portland firefighters track of hikers getting them to safety search and rescue crews plant to help the hikers evacuated today three other hikers in a different area nearby were rescued by helicopter last night after fifteen people died of hepatitis a san diego county officials declared a local public health emergency four hundred others were hospitalized the homeless population being the hardest.

san francisco eric garcetti los angeles blazers oregon cbs new york portland san diego public health eight square miles twenty minutes