35 Burst results for "Skinner"

Interview With Michael Spedden of "Fowl Players Radio"

Too Many Podcasts!

06:49 min | 2 d ago

Interview With Michael Spedden of "Fowl Players Radio"

"Welcome to many podcasts. The podcast about podcasts. Now podcasting from the sherpa chalet on matt podcast era. He's your host jim. The podcast shah rebels in too. Many podcasts the podcast about podcasts. And so much more. You know who you're listening to right. Seen five me. Jim the podcast sherpa bringing you another wonderful interview. And i think you're really gonna like my guest today. Who's out guest today. show pa. He was a lot of fun to talk to. His name is michael sped. And many times that i get his name wrong in the interview. He told me what the name is that he uses for his podcast. And that is the name. Obviously us and i misheard him and hello sherpa. These name was right on the little zoom screen. I could've just read it right there but we were just talking and having so fun. I wasn't paying attention to the name on the little corner. Zoom screen play. It happens but michael is such a great guy. We're actually close in age. And he said it was fun talking to someone who was close in age because he was making references that i understood and to return the favor i actually appeared on his podcast called foul players radio. And you got to check that out. That's a lotta fun on that. Show mike a great guy had a super time on his show. And i think he had some fun over here to didn't even have to make him pay to come on it or anything like that. He did it absolutely free. Free didn't charge them a dime. If you want to listen to michael's free interview on this show how to listen. Hello rebels i send something foul. No it's mike stagnant from foul players. Radio is my guest. He's a musician. A podcast an actor and we're gonna be talking about his career so we can get to know him so you guys might want to check out his podcast you mike. Welcome to the sheriff. La it's great to be here with you tonight. greeting from maryland. All the way up to long island great to talk income. I appreciate you having me having pleasure to have you here sir. I always like to start off by asking. I guess to tell a little bit about themselves. So if you can k- Right now i'm the host of foul players radio. That's f o w l like the bird It's named after my murder. Mystery company called the foul players of perryville. Perryville is where. I live in maryland. Were about fifty miles northeast of baltimore. The reason why we make that ton or whatever you would say it would be for. Foul is because The town i live in is right on the susquehanna river which is known for its multiple species of waterfowl people. They have actual waterfowl museums ear to talk about that stuff so we figured it'd be a nice play on words for foul play my head. The murder mystery company for a couple of years. Now we perform on boats and on trains office parties and vineyards and whoever have us. I also am a musician. I right now have an acoustic duo. That i've had for about fifteen years and we're kind of comedy act sort of similar to the smothers brothers. It's two of us. We play acoustic guitars and the humor isn't as much when with the banter between us as it is with the humor's actually in songs so that's called. The uncle moldy show. And we perform a in the maryland area a wide knob sometimes in pennsylvania to most recently. You may know me as the viking. And the jim what worth commercials while riding around on the bus. I was the big viking. That came out of the back You've also seen me this year on kimmy versus the reverend if you haven't seen that movie it's based on the unbreakable kimmy schmidt and it's there's a scene where kimmy and tight us. The two main characters are way out in the country and they come into a bar. There's a leonard skinner ban. they're playing. And i'm the bartender in there. I won't give away the movie. But it's an interactive movie but no matter what choices you make in the movie. You always get to see me. So that's the good part about it. You know it's it's not like that movie revolved around me or anything like that We have been nominated nominated for a couple of emmys I believe it was for best special perhaps and then Titus burgess has been nominated for an emmy for male performance. I believe as well. I'm excited about that. I'm also appeared on gotham. I wish unseasoned. Five episode eight played one of the penguins henchman named dale. I was shot to death in the third scene. I was in. And i've also done a number of discovery. Id shows and some mom commercials down here in maryland. When i was starting out and everything. I'm also years ago. I was in the hair bands of the eighties. I had a big hairband back. In those days. I had a band that was kind of more like the call to little bit. After that when the hairband started going out we were called orange seed parade we played. Cbgb's in new york a number of times. And you know open for a couple of national acts over the years. So yes so. That's me in a nutshell so we can get a little more specific if you like Depending well you know the first thing that you said that caught my ear was the susquehanna river and i was thinking of that old. Avidan castillo routine about the susquehanna company. All right right squad at company there may have been years ago but the majority of there's only a couple of miles of the susquehanna bets in maryland and it actually goes all the way up to near upstate new york so there could be something on the way you know that river goes through lancaster and harrisburg and it goes quite a ways up. I believe almost up to upstate. New york if it doesn't start up there somewhere along the line. I'm sure there was and with your murder mystery troop you. You're an actor in the troupe. Right yes i am. Yeah okay so basically your book like for parties and stuff like that and there's someone who's been killed in they have to figure out if it's you or one of your co stars did it. Yeah yeah exactly. Exactly exac- i'm normally the detective and the host i'm normally the host and the narrator at the beginning and i have a row i have roster i would save about fifteen or twenty really good actors from this area here and we we kind of rotate. We were on trains. One of our biggest clients is the western maryland. Scenic railroad all. the way out and cumberland. That's all the way out. The panhandle of maryland out west year west virginia. But we also do the pride of or not the pride of the susquehanna we do. The black eyed susan riverboat. We do Slate form brewery. We do some microbreweries. Mount felix winery a lot of the tasting rooms where they have events and trains and boats and office parties corporate events. Whoever will have us

Maryland Michael Mike Kimmy Susquehanna River Kimmy Schmidt Leonard Skinner Perryville Titus Burgess PA JIM Baltimore Avidan Castillo LA The Susquehanna Company Emmys Pennsylvania Emmy
How to Be Patient in an Impatient World by Mark Manson

Optimal Living Daily

05:13 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Be Patient in an Impatient World by Mark Manson

"How to be patient in an impatient world part one by mark manson of mark manson don net every introductory psychology class talks about this thing called the skinner box. Sounds like something out of assam uvi. But it's actually a famous psychological methods from the golden days of research back when pregnant women still drank and torturing rats were signs was cool. A skinner box works like this. A rat or some other unsuspecting small animal is placed in this box which has a lever and a little feeding bowl. The rats sniffs around the box and not knowing what was going on on so many levels. It will eventually pushed the lever by chance. A sugary little treat is then delivered into the bowl. If you learn anything from pixar movies is that rats really love to feet. The skinner boxes no different the rats quickly figure out that pushing the lever equals getting delicious snack so they keep doing it over and over and over but then at some point of giving the rat to treat and this is off the rat. You'll hit the lever over and over and over frantically trying to get the treat it feels it desperately deserves until finally after exhausting itself it will give up and resigned itself to fate that life is the treats are everything is ally the right will then smoke cigarettes and right-back french philosophy about his terrible disappointment with its own existence. The skinner box demonstrated something fundamental and animal. Behavior is something feels good. We'll do it again and again and again and eventually grow a sense of entitlement to that pleasurable thing. We deserve to feel that pleasure. We deserve to be rewarded and when the reward is taken from us we throw a total hissy fit today. Life is full of skinner boxes. Your phone is a skinner box. Your television is a skinner box. Your wife's is a okay. I better stop there. The point is every day in the modern world. We to get little packets of pleasure delivered to us with a push of abundant and the more packets of pleasure. The more impatient we get when we don't get our desired reward. Next thing you know. Were complaining about. Dr irs taking a wrong turn and too many unwanted emails on monday morning. And what the. The pizza guy was supposed to be here. A minutes ago triggered. I think the last time was managed to shut up and be patient. I was young enough. That i pulled my pants all the way down and lifted my shirt to p parents are always wagging their finger at their children to practice patients to wait a little longer to delay gratification and focus on long-term consequences instead of short term rewards yet as adults. We celebrate impatience so busy. I don't have time for this. Everyone's doing things at the same time doing all things poorly why because he can't wait nothing can wait. We need results now. Patience is a virtue anniversary of the world is sorely lacking at the moment. Be more patient. In our daily lives can do wonders for our mental health. Our economic prosperity and can perhaps make the world seem like slightly less of a hemorrhoids riddled full versus waiting patiently. A lot people mystic patience for the ability to wait for something but this isn't quite true. Patience isn't simply being able to wait for a reward is our attitude towards waiting. For example i might be able to wait for the pizza or an hour and a half ago but i can do so in one of two ways number one patiently calmly working on this draft reading a book and just enjoying my time alone before my large jalapeno pepperoni pie with extra garlic sauce. Arise or number two impatiently piecing around my apartment calling the restaurants again and chewing on my t shirt to soothe my hunger pangs. Obviously one of these options is better than the other better for me. Better for the delivery guy better for my t shirt but the evidence suggests that were becoming worse at this. Were becoming more impatient you see. Modern society has become. Its own slightly more complicated skinner box. Instead of levers we push buttons some real many virtual others imagined and instead of those buttons delivering sugary pellets. With which to stuff are gullit's deliver endless streaming entertainment options digital proxies for social interaction. Same day shipping on yet. Another new bedroom sets oh and sugary over stimulating tasty food for repair just gullit's and has all literally at our fingertips twenty four seven in the name of convenience. The market continues to promise a world where we no longer have to. We patiently that whatever we want we should have it as quickly as possible. These services and devices than act on us as our own little virtual skinner box making us less patient and more irritable. When things don't quite go our way hashtag first world problems.

Mark Manson Dr Irs Pixar DON Skinner Gullit
"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

03:05 min | 2 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Now even if you don't have time to make your lighting, look a little bit better than flat lighting. Sure. As a big one I, now there's nothing that's okay too well, I'm not sure there's always people that are looking for the quick tip you know yeah I'm not really sure what the every situation is i. mean you basically just have to look at the situation you're Ed. Try to tell the story especially can I mean in some situations the flat light like Environmental the story and it's a comedy. You know something like that it works but You know you kind of want to stay true to the emotion of this story I know every cinematographer on the face of the says that. Common goal. Just match the story. Yeah absolutely I agree. Cool Okay and then I think I just WANNA get a couple of pickups and other than that. I think we're we're good to go. Bertha. Super Fun to go through these. Right on. The stories are really funny. You better not get around any cocktails I'll get myself in trouble. Some other time if you're in Los, Angeles easily have the people come here. But sometime after shooting, here's some stories because. Ninjas are so funny to me. I totally see it but the idea of it's really funny to think about. Yeah, you know what? Coming Really Handy I suggest. Purchase one like we've done apple commercials. When you're shooting cars, reflected services like the device. yeah, and Yeah. We've used them quite a bit actually. Thought about making your own. Company. Hills. Skinner skinner. Ingested. Into when I was in college I I showed painstakingly. Sewed my own Chamara bank and built a tent poles everything and I put it on a big. Ears. Yeah. I built my own para basically 'cause I didn't have enough money to buy. It wasn't it was horrible and like about a month. Later I put it on a ten K. and it basically burns up on reentry because I did it wasn't flame-proof fabric and wasn't radio interest. So I I was so mad frustrated I just sat there and watched the burn up. Okay next. Yeah. I think they they used these like these firefighter technology. Guys like he's a camper so they have that like outdoorsy firefighter like. Oh. Yeah. I know when I was young I didn't know any better. I just went to the fabric store and bought Black Nylon and I can do this. I can this bloody fingers and sewing machine needles breaking..

Angeles Skinner skinner Chamara bank Los apple
"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

03:05 min | 2 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Now even if you don't have time to make your lighting, look a little bit better than flat lighting. Sure. As a big one I. Now, there's nothing that's okay too well, I'm not sure there's always people that are looking for the quick tip. You know yeah, I'm not really sure what the cause every situation is I mean you basically just have to look at the situation you're Ed. Try to tell the story especially. Can I mean in some situations the flat light like? Environmental the story, and it's a comedy. You know something like that it works but You know you kind of want to stay true to the emotion of this story I know every cinematographer on the face of the says that. Common. Goal. Just match the story. Yeah absolutely I agree. Cool Okay and then I think I just WANNA get a couple of pickups and other than that I. Think we're we're good to go here Bertha. Super Fun to go through these. Right on. The stories are really funny. You better not get around any cocktails I'll get myself in trouble. Some other time if you're in Los, Angeles, easily have the people come here. But sometime after shooting, hear some stories because this Ninja stories are so funny to me. I totally get that the idea of it's really funny to think about. Yeah. You know what? Coming really. Handy. I suggest. Purchase one like we've done apple commercials. When you're shooting cars reflected services like the device. Yeah and Yeah. We've used them quite a bit actually. Thought about making your own. Company. Hills. Skinner skinner. Ingested. Into it when I was in college I I showed painstakingly. Sewed my own Chamara bank and built a tent poles everything and I put it on a big. Fires Yeah I built my own para basically 'cause I didn't have enough money to buy. It wasn't it was horrible and like about a month later I put it on a ten. K. and it basically up on reentry because I did it wasn't flame fabric and wasn't radio interest. So I I was so mad frustrated I just sat there and watched the burn up. Okay next. Yeah. I think they they used these like these firefighter technology. Guys like he's a camper. So they have that like outdoorsy firefighter like. Oh yeah I know when I was young I didn't know any better. I just went to the fabric store and bought Black Nylon I can do this. I can this bloody fingers and sewing machine needles breaking..

Bertha Skinner skinner Los Chamara bank apple Angeles
"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

03:05 min | 2 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Now even if you don't have time to make your lighting, look a little bit better than flat lighting. Sure. As a big one I now. There's nothing that's okay too. Well, I'm not sure there's always people that are looking for the quick tip. You know yeah I'm not really sure what the every situation is. I mean you basically just have to look at the situation you're Ed. Try, to tell the story especially can I mean in some situations the flat light like? Environmental, the story and it's a comedy you know something like that it works but You. Know you kind of want to stay true to the emotion of this story. I, know every cinematographer on the face of the says that. Common goal. Just match the story. Yeah. Absolutely I agree. Cool, okay and then I think I. Just WanNa get a couple of pickups and other than that I. Think we're we're good to go here Bertha. Super Fun to go through these. Right on. The stories are really funny. You. Better. Not Get around any cocktails. I'll get myself in trouble. Some other time if you're in Los Angeles easily have the people come here. But sometime after shooting, hear some stories because this Ninja stories are so funny to me. I totally get that the idea of it's really funny to think about. Yeah you know what? Coming Really Handy I suggest. Purchase one like we've done apple commercials. When you're shooting cars, reflected services like the device. Yeah and Yeah. We've used them quite a bit actually. Thought about making your own. Company. Hills. Skinner skinner ingested. into. It when I was in college I I showed painstakingly. Sewed my own Chamara bank and built a tent Poles. And I put it on a big. Ears. Yeah. I built my era basically 'cause I didn't have enough money to buy. It, wasn't it was horrible and like about a month later I put it on a ten K. and it basically up on reentry because I did it wasn't flame-proof fabric and wasn't radio interest. So I, I was so mad frustrated I just sat there and watched the burn up. Okay next. Yeah. I think they. They used these like these firefighter technology. Guys like he's a camper. So they have that like outdoorsy firefighter like. Oh. Yeah. I know when I was young I, didn't know any better. I just went to the fabric store and bought Black Nylon and I can do this. I can bill this bloody fingers and sewing machine needles breaking..

Bertha Skinner skinner Los Angeles Chamara bank apple
Expand it like a...thing - burst 03

The Indy Mogul Podcast

01:13 min | 2 months ago

Expand it like a...thing - burst 03

"Now I mean I mean a lot of the process is that I mean you try to you know you're basically go shot by shot you come in with a general plan like You know to make be. Natural we had translates on some of the deposition rooms the one with the big glass windows. At the very end that was on stage as well. That was a translate of Woodland Hills I believe was the background there. You know Sometimes, we add a single net of thin net in between the windows and the translate To give it. It makes it look like there's atmosphere Cisco to them that makes it more real instead of so Chris as far as the. The translated I'm sure you know what you know what it translate is Especially, the photo backing that you've. Actually back like basically back, quite a photograph. That's you know two hundred. EXT Thirty feet by thirty feet high by one hundred. And we rigged that outside the windows and we like we I had a rig of back lights on a trust to push the sun and

Cisco Chris
"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"Hey what's going on indie filmmakers by name is in welcome to the podcast episode fifty six. Now on this episode that we have a personal hero and I seriously mean that this time because we were talking about lighting, which is something nerd out about is already now and likewise we're talking about the best of the best today we were talking with Herald skinner, who is the chief leg technician of film such as like club films such as the. Social Network Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and interstellar, which if you haven't seen any of those movies, you must be living under a rock. If you have seen many of those movies, you already know that this guy is probably one of the best of the best when it comes to the craft lighting south in today's episode, we have the full unedited episodes, the actual interview that we did with. Herald this is a little bit different than he's podcast we. Talked about how people got into the industry this time the entire conversation was just so cool that as we were cutting it down, we decided that when he actually released the entire thing people that want to hear of the bits of advice and stories that went into the south if you are curious and seeing an abridged version of this has animations and graphics, and all this stuff that puts in their matters not have behind the camera doesn't amazing. Job, at this. They can find that over on the channel, but if you want to listen to the full unedited podcast, actually hear that here.

Herald skinner technician
"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

The Indy Mogul Podcast

02:48 min | 2 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on The Indy Mogul Podcast

"You know yeah, I'm not really sure what the cause every situation is i. mean you basically just have to look at the situation you're Ed. Try to tell the story especially can I mean in some situations? The flat light like? Environmental the story and it's a comedy you know something like that it works but You know you kind of want to stay true to the emotion of this story. I know every cinematographer on the face of the says that. Common goal. Just, match the story. Yeah absolutely I agree. Cool okay, and then I think I just WanNa. Get a couple of pickups and other than that I. Think we're we're good to go here Bertha. Super Fun to go through these. Right on. The stories are really funny. You better, not get around any cocktails I'll get myself in trouble. Some other time if you're in Los Angeles easily have the people come here. But sometime after shooting, hear some stories because. Ninjas. So. Funny to me. I totally see it but the idea of it's really funny to think about. Yeah you know what? Coming. Really. Handy. I suggest. Purchase one like we've done apple commercials. When you're shooting cars, reflected services like the device. yeah, and Yeah. We've used them quite a bit actually. Thought about making your own. Company. Hills. Skinner skinner ingested. Into it when I was in college I I showed painstakingly. Sewed my own Chamara bank and built a tent poles everything and I put it on a big. Ears. Yeah. I built my era basically 'cause I didn't have enough money to buy. It wasn't. It was horrible and like about a month later I, put it on a ten K. and it basically up on reentry because I did it wasn't flame-proof fabric and wasn't radio interest. So I I was so mad frustrated I just sat there and watched the burn up. Okay next. Yeah. I think they. They used these like these firefighter technology. Guys like he's a camper so they have that like outdoorsy firefighter like. Oh. Yeah. I know when I was young I didn't know any better. I just went to the fabric store and bought Black Nylon and I can do this. I. Can this bloody fingers and sewing machine needles breaking..

Bertha Skinner skinner WanNa Los Angeles Chamara bank apple
Biden's Agenda for the Latino Community with Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia

The Electorette Podcast

05:13 min | 2 months ago

Biden's Agenda for the Latino Community with Congresswoman Sylvia Garcia

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode I have a conversation with representatives, Sylvia Garcia of Texas twenty ninth congressional. District. Discussed Biden's agenda for the Latino community and what we can expect from Bein Harris Administration including their plans to address income and healthcare disparities and the disproportionate impact of Kobe purpose. Of course, also addresses those criticisms of the campaign around whether their outreach to the Latino community is enough. So here is my conversation with representative Sylvia Garcia. Purpose Garcia. Welcome to the PODCAST. Well. Thank you for having me. If I I want to talk about the Biden Campaign I. Guess these are criticisms not doing enough to connect with the Latino community, and if you think that that assessment is fair or do you think that there's more work to do there? Were you know I think people are just so excited about the Joe Vying Kamala Harris. Ticket that everybody wants some light right there now in their neighborhood at knocking at their door, I mean, they're that excited about this ticket that I think there's some folks who who just feel like until they go come to their neighborhood, it's just not happening but but I know I serve on the National Latino. Council. For by now early supporter I know that from day one joe by his been reaching out to Latinos but I know that we can always do better. Anything that we could do to make sure that we reach more. Latino voters. Not Just in Florida not just in Texas not just in California. New York Arizona. New Mexico but everywhere across the country because if you look at any state these days we have Latinos everywhere we have them in Hawaii. We have him in Alaska. So I think what matters is knowing that that he has started his spanish-language press he started making sure that we we air as much as possible. Eh, he's gotten. The Latino Leadership Councils now in several states, I know I'm working on building up in in Texas because he wants to make sure that he touches the Latino community in especially also is Dr. Biden I think Dr Binding early on recognized Latino vote was and more importantly how important Bill Latino vote was that I know that she had a virtual event with with the would we call the commoditised synagogue Nestle. Which is Debbie Powell from Florida. Veronica, grammar from from Texas and myself were all three Judiciary Committee and people here called on ESCO mothers did judiciary it stock and Jill heard about it and wanted to do an event with us and we did, and now we're going to launch a commodity to commodity campaign to make sure that we impress all our voters that we got to vote until one mother to another. To remind work in our own mother network to make sure that we come out and vote to make sure that we make the change that's needed at the White House. So I'm excited. So one of the things I've found really impressive about Biden's response to that specific criticism is that he wasn't defensive and I think you know right before he visited Florida reporter asked him about. Whether there wasn't enough outreach to the Latino community and buying said something like you know I'm going to work like the devil to make sure that I listen and their vote. So he was open to the idea that there was room for improvement and I think both by an Harris are both consistent in responding without being defensive you know and they bring people to the table. There's a lot of work to do and I think we can always do better and I can tell you Scott along with surrogate were willing to do that. He's he's got a lot of people on the ground. Excited to do that. I mean I can tell you a story Saturday I. Don't do too many in person events, but they wanted me to go to a phone bank and I was assured that were social distance everybody's a math. And I went and the minute I walked in it was about Sylvia Joe Sylvia Joe. Any they know the job blindness running. They're excited because. It hurts them to see a White House that is about hurting people for us in. Texas. It's about what we've seen him doing at the border, but it's also seeing that they're not getting more help and more relief on for everybody on unemployment. It's also about what he's doing to Medicare and social security because that hurts our relief does on our lead us. So people know and they know the to make the change that we need they're going to have to get there in those phones. And? Of, course, the member of Congress I've First Ladies First. So that became their chance. Soviet Joe and I told him I said well, it's not just a joe as it Soviet Joe more contests. So I left him with at Madeira. Very excited. You're making calls and Were Spanish language of phone calls to low propensity Latino voters in Harris County

Sylvia Joe Sylvia Joe Dr. Biden Sylvia Garcia Texas Scott National Latino Latino Leadership Councils Florida Bein Harris Administration White House Harris County Jim Taylor Skinner Kamala Harris Harris Alaska Congress Representative Veronica Debbie Powell Arizona
Biden's Agenda for the Black Community with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

The Electorette Podcast

05:25 min | 2 months ago

Biden's Agenda for the Black Community with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode. A have a conversation with Mayor Stephanie, Rawlings Bleak Mayor Rawlings Blake served as the forty ninth mayor of Baltimore as she joins me to discuss Biden's agenda for the black community. Now, if you haven't taken a look at Biden's agenda for the black community, you WanNa hear this conversation we discuss this plans to close disparities in homeownership rates within the black community his plans to help close the wealth gap the expansion of the affordable care act and has extensive criminal justice reform plans including employing the Department of Justice to address police accountability, decriminalizing the use of canvas and the automatic expunge -ment of all cannabis use convictions. So. Here's my conversation with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings Blake Mayor Rawlings Blake. Welcome to the PODCAST. So I WANNA talk about Biden's agenda for the black community because I was reading through that and I don't think in my lifetime that I've seen or proposal that's this extensive and targeted towards the black community and I wanted to be fair. So I looked through some other past presidential platforms and a lot of them aren't really archived. You know how he crafted this or you know, did he have help from outside organization or WHO's influencing him on this? The vice principal former Vice President Biden has a theory broad group of. Individuals who have been advising him and who care a lot about making sure that the the Democratic Party is right by a black people as well as he does right by black people when he is very hopefully elected NFC among about. Today's that's right. It's like fifty days or something I think with just kind of makes me nervous nervous excited both at the same time. And he's got economists that have been advising him as well as advocates and I think when you take a look at the plan many aspects of the plan, you see their their fingerprints on it that this is not for show. This is not something that is decorative on a on a website. This is something then can be implemented and we'll have a real impact on our community. Absolutely. Right. I agree with that and when I was just looking at the wording and some of the things that he hits on. Pretty. Deep right in an isn't something I would expect it to see us on the democratic side. You wouldn't see it on the Republican side even on the Democratic side, you know five or ten years ago. So that's something. Yeah. I WANNA go really deeply into every policy proposal, but there are few that I want to hit on some pressings. Building Wealth no health care and criminal justice reform. But. I WANNA start with building wealth because one of the things that he proposes is doubling the funding for the State Small Business Credit Initiative which doubling that to three billion dollars to assist small businesses and targeting specifically people of Color. You don't WanNa talk about the fact that you know that that's great but you know black people I think in the group of people of Color by people are thinker are usually at the bottom in terms of getting capital access to capital for building small businesses because there are other bias and other limitations that we face, we try to start small business you know. So have you actually address that those unique barriers to black people getting capital in starting small businesses? The first thing you do to address the barrier is acknowledged I can't tell you optus pointed I've been to hear our current president deny ignore the disparities that exist or by people in our country as when you start off ahead in the game and you have someone's willing to name it. And to a work to address it in also wanted to bring to your attention. It's not just the the the money for small businesses Biden Harris. Focused on African American women business owners specifically because as you know a, we are the majority of the businesses offices that are being created in the NBA minority community are African American women see address s like I said at first by identifying them and second step by step I I know there's going to need to be mentors are business mentors that are working to help these these small businesses achieve and when you have an administration that is sensitive, you'll be able to do what was done under the Obama Administration where there was a lot of support event to two businesses. You know a lot of those sports have been ripped up by the current administration so A. Definitely identifying the issues and pudding supports in place to close some of those gaps are the essential you're right. So we have to recover from the damage has been done from the current administration, but then you know things like this policies like this have to account for the fact that we're pandemic. I'm a lot of the businesses that by people have owned have probably been hit in hurt quite. A bit. So that's another place to start. Definitely I. Mean I think one of the things you you will hear a line that I've heard a lot. It's not. We're not trying to go back to where we were. You know this is about ripping up be You know the race face inequities that impact the black community across the board and making sure that we are not ignoring you. Know, the problems you've seen,

Black Community Biden Harris Stephanie Rawlings Rawlings Blake Democratic Party Jim Taylor Skinner Baltimore Department Of Justice Cannabis Optus Broad Group NBA Obama Administration NFC Vice President Principal President Trump
"skinner" Discussed on Doughboys

Doughboys

09:12 min | 3 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on Doughboys

"Welcome back to dough boys our guest Elisa skinner talking about blaze pizza. Pizza founded in twenty eleven. By the WOETZEL'S I did not know this the release. Of the West it's pretzel adjacent this is recognize Wetzel of wessels pretzels. Came up with this new concept one of the original investors Lebron James, which is well known and over three hundred locations in North America and the Middle East. So Elisa before we went to break, we were talking about how you know you don't eat for. For Health Reasons A. I'm curious why? Blaze Pizza was the church was a chain you wanted to discuss. Well I they do have a lot of gluten free options. Also I'm generally not pizza fan I wrote an article once. Internet for this refinery twenty nine, talking about how I don't like pizza and honestly it's the most harassed ever gotten. Anything like there were people who are finding me on every social media account, I have going back commenting on things one woman I remember and they were saying things like I. Hope you don't reproduce. Because you don't like pizza like your, your bloodline should die with. One. Strap in because I'm about to roast you two fucking pissed. When One lady back and was commenting on all year old. INSTAGRAM's and then on one of them that Adam conover had commented also so she went from being like, Hey, look you idiot and it was like, oh. Hi, I'm a big Fan of yours and. When I finally engaged with her because I was like, no no, you don't get to do that. Shit all over me bryce posts and then try to be friends with my friend. She was like I'm sorry. I'm having a hard time getting pregnant I'm like well. Problem. Allowed places the moral of that story but. I like I was interested in plays because a lot of gluten free options and they'll sell you a half pizza. Yes one of my problems with pizza is, is this the amount of pizza that I as a single person need? What am I going to try to save it? Yeah, right. I mean because I was gonNA 'cause 'cause that's a whole thing of blazes that they are designed around personal pizzas which are meant to be just like a meal for one but they did recently at large pizzas to the menu. This is a new thing where yeah you can get a full size or you can get half if you like. And I guess this is them attempting to compete with the Domino's and Pizza Hut's of the world but. Let's I want to clarify this for for people who haven't. Seen your article like what specifically doesn't appeal to you about pizza? Why doesn't it was? One of America's favorite foods click for you in specifically well. It's a lot of stuff around the P, the culture pizza first of all the like. What's my personality? Like no, there's too much. It's become too much of a thing also in. Quickly say that. There was an eighties and nineties thing with that. That was kind of. Beautiful in that like we love pizza and it's pizza night but then when it became like. Like I was when it was for kids. Kid identity thing. But now it's like thirty year olds being like, Hey, here's my tinder profile. On Pizza Yes I. Carry Out Pizza yes. My personality is pizza that sort of stuff. Sucks, but there was there was a beautiful version of that where it was. Back in the day where it was very seemed very genuine and nice. But again, I would say it's a kid thing because I think a lot of the pizza love I'm like this is the kids food like it's fine if you. I mean not all of it. Yes. Of course, higher step but. For the most part, it's like. I'll eat chicken fingers but I'm not going to be like. I'm a chicken finger like whatever come on and what I really hate is when people attempt to pay in pizza or provide pizza to their adult employees as like we need to feed you here is pizza unlike let's terrible. That's not a good food for your employees. Especially you're in Hollywood? One of the first things that made me angry at pizza was I would be working on. Sets than we would hire actresses specifically who had come in and have even more of a pressure to look a certain way and then try to feed these ladies pizza. I'm like a work we're part of the guests leading problem Hollywood we're asking women to be tiny and then being like all right try to manage maintaining that figure, and here's what you get to eat for the day. Pass that's not it's all it's also say there is an aspect of this is a workplace and that's not like working food like that's like you know that's GonNa fuck in way you down and D- fucking. Shit, I mean that's not that's not what you want to be doing when you have I can work twelve hours. Your you're if you're work is providing food for you, it should be. The best food for your body I think really healthy and if on your own time, you want to treat yourself bang yourself around with some fucked up pizza do it great. But that's your choice. That's not yell that's what I have to do. I suppose. I it's funny that on on multiple levels. On the smallest production and then like the and then on like a two hundred, million dollar production. Everyone is ordering pizza. Like it's just is going to happen it's the easiest thing to GATT if feeds multiple people, I mean it's like it is. In their I in like producers is it is the for perfect. Like it's the perfect extra a penalty meal food. There is nothing that can there's nothing tops the only thing that's bad now. Is that the in these times of Corona virus? Pizza goes right out the window because it's a big ship. That's what it used to be. It used to be forty boxes of pizza. And cast and crew was just going add. was going at the boxes and ripping them apart but now. Communal. The mural aspect is gonNA probably go down right? I don't know mean I think families are still Yelling that stuff and I think if you've got a small set where you're you've got pods on it anyway, they'll probably do but. Also on on a personal level when I would be upset and they'd be like, Hey, don't worry guys. We got everybody pizza. I'd be like, Yo. Cool. Well, I guess allies is eating air for dinner as I e pizza so. Here's the thing I've noticed in workplace ordering situations both offices and on sets is that. If there is an effort to accommodate anyone's dietary restrictions. It's a catchall so it'll be like, hey, we got the vegan gluten free pizza for as well. Some people are Vegan some people are gluten free like like it's not like you should be isolated with this one like a you know a this one special pizza. Like. Try to accommodate people in the the for their specific specific issues. Yeah. You may have seen me snap over a gluten free beacon when day at where, where, because I get so tired we had really long hours on set on earth anad at the kind where like you you're just going and you don't realize how tired you're getting. You're going so hard all day, and then it would be time for a meal and it was like here's this thing that's partly what you Kinney and partly. Something would never choose to eat, but it's all right. We have for you and I was like, why why? that. Kind of break where you're we're I. Don't know your blood sugar whatever has just made your brain bad. Yes. You're like I can't. Priorities are now. Yeltsin anybody but I was definitely in a snitty little mood. About that. At the Simpsons we get we I would get dinner in. This is a show that's been on. Forever when I was wearing, there isn't twenty season and they were get pizza for dinner I would say at least two nights a week if not. Usually three nights a week. At the Simpsons, Mulberry Pizza Janis Pizza used to go in there and get. Basically a pizza per writer large pizza per writer. but but that's just it is. It is what it is. That's a pizzas. It pizza is the it's that weird thing I wonder if. People realize that. You know the catering or food trucks again when it goes into. Goes into the later hours but no, it is. Usually it is just usually pizza which I love. So I don't have an issue with it I kind of. I kind of I'm happy and that's a real thing about, oh, man I gotta eat like I have that. You Buy Pizza on your own Ariel I do buy Pizza I. Love Pizza I love Pizza..

Blaze Pizza Pizza Hut Elisa skinner Hollywood Lebron James Middle East North America INSTAGRAM Wetzel Simpsons bryce writer wessels America Adam conover Domino Kinney
Women's Equality Day with Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester

The Electorette Podcast

05:03 min | 3 months ago

Women's Equality Day with Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with representative Lisa Blunt Rochester, of Delaware. She joins me to discuss women's equality and the importance of empowering other women and in the context of commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the nineteen limit. We'll talk about how we can learn from our past and create inclusive movements that lift up all women. Representative Front. Rochester. Made History herself and her two thousand sixteen election to Congress as the first black woman and the first woman of color to be elected to represent the seat. She was also a member of Vice President Biden's victory vetting committee, and we discussed that process as well as the strengths that Kamala, Harris brings to the ticket. Lastly, we talk about what moved her to run for office herself and it's truly a moving powerful story and I'm so. Thankful that she shared it. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with representative Lisa Want Rochester, or a Flint Rochester. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much and I'm so excited to be here in. This is what I think about the ratification of the nineteenth amendment and women's Equality Day now that passage was so crucial to what women have today and where we are today, but I can't help but imagine where we might be today had that movement. been more inclusive you know. Yeah Yeah I think about that because we have record number of women running for Congress record number of women in Congress, right I wondered like what can we do now? As we move forward to make sure that that we don't repeat those mistakes you know Jen I. think that's a perfect place to start because I think by looking at the past if you if you learn from it you can grow. It's interesting. I've heard people talk about this centennial as not necessarily a celebration but more of a commemoration in and it was a feat in to itself. I mean when you think about the effort and the the marches and the efforts that folks may particularly women at that time. But we also think about the fact that for women many women of color that the opportunity to vote really didn't come. into the sixties and so you think about as you said, what what could we have achieved head we been more unified then and you can think about that and dwell on it, and then say what are the lessons learned and I think the fact I got elected in twenty sixteen I came in at the same time is Donald Trump and I had never run for anything in my entire life and. You know it was a Delaware had never elected a woman. Delaware had never elected a person of color to Congress. We only have one seat and so at the time that I decided to run I had served in state government had run our urban league here I had lived around the world and raise my children but it was really the unexpected tragic death of my husband who went on a business trip ruptured his Achilles Tendon, after playing a game of basketball before work meeting and then blood clots went to his heart and lungs and it just it just shook me to the. Core, and I had to find my purpose still on his planet and you know wasn't until like a year later I was I felt like I was numb just kind of going through the motions and I, started noticing other people that were you know having challenges like in my own city of Wilmington there was a lot of they were talking about the the the gun violence and then I saw a dad and three kids in a supermarket in front of me, and he had to put a bunch of grapes because they were nine dollars in that lake. Shook me out of my own. My own sadness and I think you know Donald Trump capitalized going people's anger or sadness or you know the challenges they were facing an inspired native run not knowing who was going to be president or what I was going to be facing and I think after he won and we had the women's March I think that was a watershed moment because it showed the possibility I mean the diversity of the crowd from you know black and Latino Latina in a trans in Muslim and Jewish like it was everybody there together and people haven't led up since then and so I went in two thousand sixteen by Twenty Eighteen Emily's list an organization that helps women candidates which helped me. They saw a thousand percent increase in women's interest to run for office. So I do think we can learn from the past. I. Think. We can still commemorate and celebrate but we gotta take that and turn it into action and that's what's happening right now, and that's what gets me excited about this hundredth anniversary is that it's not just about Jay, let's celebrate this moment it is about how do we do the work and how do we? How do we change the course of history and and in people's lives? So yeah, it's an exciting time

Lisa Blunt Rochester Congress Representative Delaware Donald Trump Kamala Jim Taylor Skinner Vice President Biden Lisa Want Rochester Flint Rochester Achilles Tendon Jen I. Basketball JAY Wilmington President Trump Harris
Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

The Electorette Podcast

05:47 min | 4 months ago

Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL Pro-Choice America, discusses new book "The Lie That Binds"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate on this episode, have a conversation with the hogue, the president of Nero Pro, choice America, and he joins me to discuss her new book. The lie that binds it's really an incredible book and it chronicles how abortion rights of all from being a non-partisan backburner issue to a central 'cause champion by conservatives in the radical, right. This is really one of those books that I have to read twice. It's that informative. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with Elise. Hogue. leasehold welcome to the cast. Thank you so much. You're. So before we jump into your book, I want us to talk about something because I recently learned that you were from Texas and that really my inches because I'm also from the South I'm from Memphis Tennessee, and I was reading one of your interviews where you'd said that you wanted to leave Texas because Uber afraid that you'd be bored and that was something like totally relate to. Manila it was sort of. Knew that there was a being rolled out there and I wanted to. It be challenged in You don't both my own horizons, but also different people different people think and act and. I am so privileged grateful to have been able to do that. You know I have to admit, and you may relate to this as being from a have A. Of defensiveness when it comes to people bashing Texas, they're such amazing people. They're they're such amazing within their and during such good work, and you can't judge inspired leaders. You have to judge us by Jordan Molly ivins in grammar yards and Janice Joplin for goodness. Sake. Now. There's just and that's true everywhere where there's adversity, there are amazing women trying to make a better future to Tennessee. It's true taxes in needs recognized. That is absolutely true. I FEEL DEFENSIVE ABOUT MEMPHIS TO MEMPHIS. Amazing. You know have Bill Street. Yeah. There's some things that I wanted to get to and that's where I connected with you because I was like, yes, I understand that needs to escape. But yet you know having these strong ties to my hometown It's. US You know and I always say at in calm from a reproductive rights background at came to it, and part of that is my experience in Texas in watching Texans in particularly poor people in taxes in rural people in Texas I'm being the canaries in coalmines of these rearrested policies that use reproductive oppression disenfranchise. So I really love this book because I've read some bit of this history in different books over time, and you just put it together into end. So well, right and I. I think one of the things about the Republican. Party. That happens I think we have these debates in the media when people talk about it as we just accept the Republican. Party. As is right without kind of thinking about how they got here or the illogic of their kind of overarching philosophy because a lot of it doesn't really make sense. Right. But you know when you read your book, the Republican Party today is not the way that it used to be like it's not recognisable from. Prior, to nineteen seventy right you at one Haley. How they kind of cobbled together this coalition of these disaffected smaller groups. You know these Democrats, who weren't happy with the passage of the Civil Rights Act and know some religious groups. So what were some of these initial groups in that coalition? Awkward it was a little bit. The opposite, right that every every political party has factions. There's no question about it, but you know as as the sort of book opens, you do see Jerry Falwell senior, who, subsequently passed and Paul and at small set a really fundamental as they call themselves dominion. It S, which means they believe God gave digging into white men over systems, elliptical, economic social systems, and. Our. Country, whereas before they had to do very much Mansi in short all the sudden is rich move mad. The Women's Liberation Movement is really challenging total control over power systems in the country and they mobilized to political action fighting school desegregation and. It's a long long story. You see throughout the book is that. An establishment GOP, which you still have any conservatives who still had social liberals in fiscal conservatives, they were not finding enough to hang together in related. People who hadn't been voting band goals were building over ten. Maybe we should add up and there was crew rate and they got more and more halt on a constituency within their electoral coalition that increasingly represented a small small action in the country in their views and they. Title, they were making deals with the devil and they. You know what? If anything can prince is that the artifice around abortion which seemed great to that at the time and I'm sure we'll discuss. Because one place where were toweling. Stream minority and they knew they didn't have public pain on their side. So it was a constant balancing act and what ended up happening is these radicals increasingly over to the party with each subsequent election, and trump is the ultimate manifestation of that.

Texas Memphis Tennessee Republican Party Hogue Jim Taylor Skinner Jordan Molly Ivins Elise Manila Nero Pro Janice Joplin Hogue. President Trump Jerry Falwell America GOP Haley Women's Liberation Movement Coalmines
Wendy Osefo on the Black Lives Matter protests, and the 2020 election

The Electorette Podcast

04:32 min | 4 months ago

Wendy Osefo on the Black Lives Matter protests, and the 2020 election

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode. A have a conversation with Wendy Osafo when he is a political commentator and a professor of education at Johns. Hopkins. University, she also served on the Obama Administration's anti-poverty initiative when he joins me to talk about everything from the current political climate to the recent black lives matter protests. We also discussed recent polling of the twenty twenty presidential election, and of course, many many failings of the trump administration. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with Wendy Assefa. Welcome to the broadcast. Thank you for having me. I really wanted to talk to you about this moment in history because I saw a tweet, the other day that really got my attention I think it was from Congresswoman Anna Presley and she said that the civil rights movement didn't in it didn't end and that we're living right now it's ongoing and I think that that's pretty you know accurate what's happening in the streets with black lives matter protests you know what do you think this moment actually means I think this moment right now is a defining moment in our country. And our nation I think that what we have to realize is that without cameras, this has been the backdrop of the lives of black people for years is just so happens that the death of George Floyd was videotaped but this has happened so many times in enough is enough I was told people you know I'm so happy that black lives matter has become a battle cry that people more aware about now in twenty twenty but I remember marching when black lives matters started before was even Hashtag with the death of Trayvon Martin it was the death and killing trayvon Martin that. Ignited the hash black lives matter and so I say all that to say, you know the civil rights movement was a time that we look to as a historic time society and we came through that as a nation but it hasn't ended because just evolved in different ways, and that's what people have to understand and I'm just so excited to see different faces, different races, different backgrounds really fighting now because it's going to take our nation to come together as one in order for us to end systemic racism. Now you're absolutely right it has evolved right? That's the perfect word. For it and when I think about you know what you just said marching when Trayvon Martin was murdered a movement was kind of in its infancy. But what I think is really interesting now is the reaction from conservatives now that people are marching around the world for black lives matter they their reactions were really extreme Ryan, I mean it's like splashed holy water on them like what do you think that they think black lives matter actually means what does it mean to them? You hear people saying like not in my town you're not gonNA bring black lives matter into Maya. Town. Yeah I think is really interesting in the way I. Answer. This question may actually be controversial I think that they are very clear what black lives matter means I think they are very clear but black lives matter stands for, but they don't want to accept what black lives matters means because if they do that means that they are accepting that this country's inherently racist and that's the truth and as uncomfortable truth we are saying black lives matter because black lives are the ones that are under attack were saying black lives matter because the statistics show that black and Brown children in schools are treated differently. That's why we're seeing black. Lives matter but you see it's not just black lives. Matter is black lives matter because black lives have been treated as less than for so many years in this country. So I think that conservatives are fully aware of what this means I think that is willful ignorance for them to say, no black lives with not only to accept that is not the Hashtag that the issue is the premise of the Hashtag doesn't issue and I think that when we're having these conversations with people, these are people who are elected Congress people they're pretty smart. You know they're pretty erudite nature, and so you know these are the same. Individuals who say because they're conservatives that a baby's life matters at the beginning of Jess station. You don't have to come out of the womb for your life to matter but soon as your created your life matters and therefore they're against abortion. So if they're able to understand that a baby's life matters at the beginning of creation than I'm pretty sure that they're competent enough to understand that black lives matter because black lives are the ones under

Jim Taylor Skinner Trayvon Martin Wendy Assefa Wendy Osafo Obama Administration Professor Of Education George Floyd Anna Presley Jess Station Ryan Congress
Andrea Freeman discusses her book "Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice"

The Electorette Podcast

05:57 min | 4 months ago

Andrea Freeman discusses her book "Skimmed: Breastfeeding, Race, and Injustice"

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate I'm this episode? A have a conversation with Andrea Freeman. She's a professor at the University of Hawaii and author of the book skimmed. Skimmed, this book, which chronicles allies of America's first reviving set of identical quadruplets, the false sisters, the quadruple tra, born in nineteen, forty, six to any faults of Bratcher woman who had lost her ability to hear in seek as child. Pulling the birth of her quadruplets, the white doctor who delivered them saw an opportunity he sold the to use the sisters for marketing purposes to the highest bidding formula company. There was an exploitative relationship that fall quadruplets for the rest of their lives. GIVES US A book about Race Poverty Exploitation and food policy. Answer and I opened our conversation with her, describing the story of Anti foles and the birth of her quadruplets Foltz was a block and Cherokee woman she lived in reads Phil North Carolina and was married to a tenant farmer. Everybody called P. to his twenty years older than her. She lost the ability to hear and speak in childhood, and she had six kids already when she learned that she was going to have triplets, so because of the high risk of the multiple she went early to the hospital spent a few weeks there, and on the night of their birth she found out there was another little girl hiding behind her sisters, and she had the first recorded. Recorded surviving identical black quadruplets, and so the girls who were very adorable, became instant celebrities. There was reporting about them all over the country. Universal Studios sent a camera person the New York. Times reported it and suddenly Andy May, who was not used to the spotlight became famous. Yes, she had the unfortunate luck of having a really terrible doctor. Right to just put simply he was unethical. In every possible way to premises, was Dr Kleiner, yeah Dr Fred Cleaner he loved to speak vocally about his support of Hitler. He maintained segregated waiting rooms, and he took advantage of the fact that he delivered the quadruplets to begin experimenting on them on the day of their birth. He had theories about the healing powers of vitamin C, and he injected them all with. A fairly large dose on the day they were born then he decided that he would name the girls. Even though anime had picked out her own set of names, and he gave them all the first name Mary, and then the names of his wife, sister, aunt and great aunt, the next thing he did was auction the girls off to the highest bidding Formula Company to Become Their Corporate Godfather. So what was anti doing all of the time? Did she have any say as to what he was doing, so I know about the naming things with the naming she was. was trying to think of names and I think she was going over names with our sister or someone on our family, and they couldn't decide, so he took it upon himself to come up with a name. The name Mary like you mentioned, but all the other decisions are being made. Did he even consult with her I? Know this was nineteen forty-six, so she probably felt that with this white doctor, you know she was black and Cherokee the. She didn't have a lot of choices. Exactly so there's race and class wrapped up in there and no doubt gender and. You know every kind of oppressive element there is that he basically felt that he could do whatever he wanted, and she didn't have the power to stop him, and also her her abilities, and you know she could not speak or here, and he just completely took advantage of her. So do you know about the deal? He made with the with the Formula Company in relation to I mean. was there any justification as to why formula was needed? Because she actually breast feed, she could, but in those days it was not encouraged. Really for anybody is not like now, but especially for. Black Women and poor black woman. There would be no expectation that she would do that, so it's just one of the distinctions so like back then pet milk, the milk which you would, you talked earlier and formula. They were one in the same, okay, so. You talked about this earlier. This was basically just sugar and milk, so it wasn't very healthy. No, it wasn't very. It should have been given to two babies I. Mean Right, yeah, so so the deal that he cut with a formula company. It basically change the trajectory of their lives, so not only was marketing deal, but they were kind of entangled in this for their entire lives. There was something about him, not only did. He cut a deal with the companies, but there's something about the land. They had a house built on land that I think he owned yeah the way that he had the deal made, and he had his sister-in-law, who was also the first woman to ever be a state chief justice. She was the trustee of this deal and he organized it. It so that he and his family would benefit so pet milk purchased some land from his father in law, but the land was just you know Barron and hilly and impossible to actually get anything out of but he had a house built on that land with a nursery with a very large window, and then put an ad in the newspaper, so people could come and pay to look at the girls on the weekends, very reminiscent of human zoos and then he had pet milk pay for nurses, and the nurses were his nurses, and through them he was able to maintain access to the girls throughout their childhood and continue his experiments

Formula Company Jim Taylor Skinner University Of Hawaii Andrea Freeman Cherokee America Bratcher Professor Universal Studios Mary Andy May Foltz Barron Dr Kleiner Trustee Phil North Carolina Hitler
Finding Mastery

Good Life Project

06:32 min | 5 months ago

Finding Mastery

"Work that you do is fascinating to me on so many different levels, not the least of which is. That I came really close to following a really similar path. And then ended up backing away for reasons that still are not entirely clear to me. Lifelong fascination with sort of a not just the human condition, but for why people do what they do, and how they go to the extremes of their potential wondering, if if this touches down at an early age for you, if this was sort of like a a later fascination, cool The first exposure I had to this is. Was In high school and I realized that the thing that I wanted to do. It was a surfing experience, so I grew up surfing. and. I could do what I wanted to do. As a fifteen year old kid, you don't Infre- surfing, but then when it came time to compete. He was completely different for me and it wasn't that my physical skills went away. It wasn't that my technical skills went away. It was that my mind by mental skills like the way that I was thinking about things was choking off access. To buy abilities and I didn't know there was a discipline called psychology as the first person to go to school my family, so we didn't come from. Condition where was like sophistication in structure in theory? We're just trying to figure it out as we along. And, so I bumped into it at an early age and I, said Oh. My goodness thing inside me. It's my mind like what is this and so it started there at an early age and I didn't know until it was like my first year in college. That there was even a discipline in a study of psychology, really because in high is exposed to it at a class action. I had a class and. It didn't make any sense. It was like Freud skinner. All the kind of classics which I came to appreciate later. I didn't understand it, so then it was through a pain is how I came exposed to it in sent me down a path. It pain in the context of you seeing something that you to do, but somehow couldn't figure out how to get there does exactly right. Yeah, I had something inside may wanted to express is the way I think about it like I had a physical thing i. I wanted to do a wave, and every time that there's a competition with the people were judging, and there was people on the beach, watching I became a shell of myself, and I couldn't express. It wasn't so much about I couldn't do the thing I mean. That's part of it, but I couldn't express what I was wanting to be able to express I, mean changing their own lapping, but really two distinct things like one is really tapping into the fullness of what you perceive to be your potential, but. The other is sort of it. It's it's a stifled expression. It's it's like I have a sense for who I am on an identity level, and how I want that to be put out into the world and I can't get it. It's like when you hear when you play Guitar, and you hear the dream ref. In your head. But your fingers can actually make it happen on guitar. Yes, so that's close to what happened to me. Is that I knew I could do it? Though because I had done it in free surfing plenty of times, and so it was actually there, it was just stage. Friday was performance anxiety. So it wasn't, it wasn't the mechanical part of it was the psychological part, so you mentioned that you were the first to go to college your family. Curious about that also, what was the background in your family? That sort of said okay, world good without going the route of higher education. And then what was it that happen in your mind? That said that's actually not good enough for me. Co question is so set. The context here is that I grew up in on a farm in Virginia, and I should say I grew up with nature, not necessary on. It is a big distinction you know in that way, and so I grew up with it until the age of about. Ten. In my parents were very lazy fair, they had very little structure if I was out late, and it got dark, not eat until very late. You know like it was super. Figuring, out kid, you know, and they let me just kind of play with nature. And my parents pretty much dropped out so I'm forty eight ends. They were young parents and they this was during the Vietnam revolt. So they're like okay. We're dropping out some more of the hippie life, but it wasn't. It wasn't an angry approach. It was like hey, let's go find a little sanctuary that we could build you build a family, so it was very myopic in that sense. In My dad came from a large family, he was had his first job fourteen, supporting his family in some respects, so they came blue-collar hard-working. Christian valued family, and they instilled inside of me strong values, and then this kind of freedom to explore. But there was no formal structure to any of it. But saying well, my mom's side, you know, and so her father came over to America at the age of fifteen by himself from Italy and so it's just a blue-collar, hard-working approach life and I, it was I was. Surfing a lot as I mentioned, and then due north, the PSAT's are of course also. I got a zero on those and then on the sat. With those are I got zero on those. I went surfing on both of them. And My parents pulled me aside my senior year and they're like Hey Mike. We tried a lot of your friends are going to college. We didn't know really to help you, but at this point. Get a job and get out. Or Mrs my senior year in high school or you could go to community college and you can stay here. Thought I'm not moving out like I'm I'm not done surfing like. How can I go? How can I have a job? Nine to five and surf so still real young in my church life, and so I said okay. Let me. Do the school thing so? I knew that the school that I was going to go to. Was I. don't know two miles away from a close to world class surf break. It sounds like I know how to do this. So! I love the decision. Making criteria has like perfect perfect, and so I really thought that I was going to extend my high school experience for a couple more years I was not interested in academic academia or becoming an academician in any respect. So a second semester and there was three professors who are really good friends now. This is the junior college right? So this was this isn't. I didn't have to get in I just had to apply. I just had to show up.

Freud Skinner Virginia Psat Vietnam America Christian Italy
Ian Holm, 'Lord of the Rings' star, dead at 88

WBZ Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 5 months ago

Ian Holm, 'Lord of the Rings' star, dead at 88

"Actor Ian home has died from an illness related to Parkinson's CBS is Peter king takes a look back at his extraordinary career he was Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit and lord of the rings I still have an ending for my book Ian Holm also had memorable roles in alien time bandits chariots of fire and as Skinner in the animated routed to a satellite calm dogs only smaller he's a really unpleasant looking little and I don't think he looks like me home was a stage actor it hard he won the Olivier award for his portrayal of King Lear he also won a Tony at the British Academy Awards night in nineteen ninety eight in the home was a Peter king CBS

Ian Home Parkinson CBS Bilbo Baggins Ian Holm Skinner King Lear Peter King British Academy
'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 5 months ago

'Chariots of Fire,' 'Lord of the Rings' actor Ian Holm dies

"British actor Ian Holm has died after an illness related to Parkinson's disease he was Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit and lord of the rings I thought of an ending for my book and he lived happily ever after Ian Holm also had memorable roles in alien time bandits chariots of fire and as Skinner in the animated right to do it it's not like Cologne dogs only smaller he's a really unpleasant looking little and I don't think he looks like me home was a stage actor at heart he won the Olivier award for his portrayal of King Lear he also won a Tony at the British Academy award was knighted in nineteen ninety eight in the home was a Peter king CBS news

Ian Holm Bilbo Baggins Skinner King Lear Peter King British Academy CBS
"skinner" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

05:48 min | 6 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"And I'm actually coming to you from Ohio. The first time I've been more than a mile from my house in ninety days. Four hundred miles away, so it's pretty exciting. And joining us today we are super excited to have with us Jen Taylor skinner, who is the host of electorate and is a fellow mom of young kids? So Hi Jan! Hi, great to be here. Yeah, I'm excited, so we met briefly in person way back in February. The last time I had been more than a mile from my house when we were both. In DC as so, but it's awesome to have you on the podcast. Yeah I was just thinking that I. I think the last time it was really far away from home was when we met in DC so I think shortly after that because I'm in Seattle. In Washington state and we were one of the first virus outbreak epicenters I think before even New York, so it was only a couple of weeks when I. after I returned from DC where governor Jay, inslee declared a state of emergency, as I didn't have any time to like socialized doing before I was thinking the House I've been. Very very very long time. Yeah, and you're in the house with a very little one. A little one in a medium win big ones. Husband the medium when my eight year old the baby. Yeah, so there's tons of stuff to talk about right now, and we'll see what all we got to but the immediate impetus for inviting you to to come on the podcast now although I've wanted to talk to you for a while, is a twitter thread that you posted a just think a couple of days ago now talking about the experience of racism talking about you know non. Non Black people who are thinking and talking about being better allies, but that that one of the harmful things for you has been experiencing racism, and then having people say oh, that probably wasn't racism, so I wonder if you could just sort of start by talking through a little bit that threaten what you were thinking, and maybe we can unpack a little bit of a about those experiences in ways that can help all of us be better allies. Sure. I mean I was just I think when I was thinking about that, I was actually just cooking lunch. You're just making Lynch rate and I was you know watching in the background? The News and all of the protests were happening lots of bit protests happening in Seattle and you know I was thinking about this moment. And the gravity of the moment in the grief that role in especially back, Americans, you know full for agent and fear, and I was thinking like you know. You know, have this pain somewhere my body, but I've never experienced with George Floyd experience, but yet I still have this ache in this moments, and I was just trying to pinpoint where that was coming from right and one of the things that I've noticed when I've been talking to people about this moment, you know people talk about being enraged and people talking about you know being afraid. Of course you know for our country and you know there's lots of rage in the streets, but one of the things has been really surprising for me that I've heard repeatedly from I. Guess a few people is that there's also a sense of hope in somewhere way in the back of. Of My conscious way in the back of my heart there was a little piece of hope to write and didn't want to reveal it or talk about it because it's in a hoop is one of those things that when you have it, it's great a win when it's at risk, you know it's really heartbreaking in. If things pan out the way you want them to but I was just trying to to hone in on what that feeling was. Ends you know for me? I think it. was you know seeing so many people in the streets for this 'cause that was only really important to a small segment of the population before rate, and I was thinking like you know. What are the harms that that I've had with racism over the years that this moment gives me hope for right and I just thought you know I've never obviously have never been a victim of police violence in the way, the George Floyd was never had anything truly traumatic, but it doesn't even have had haven't had trauma, and so I was thinking through like what? What's the most common experience I've had? Had Right so most black. Americans experience almost all of them experience these you know daily microaggressions right which harmful enough this traumatic enough, but just like anything that that's harmful. That happens to us. You know you look for people in your life. You know who care about you. Who will have empathy for you and if you go to them? And they and they denied that experience. That's an additional trauma. Thinking through that and I thought this moment is hopeful for me. Because now we have an entire nation of people who are willing to listen an entire nation of people who are willing to hear the small panes. I go through every day. When before prior to this moment I always had to gauge whether the moment was right right. If the moment is right, what would typically happen to someone would say well. It wasn't really what you do you think it is. And, that's that's an. That's an additional trauma on top of the trump. You've already experienced. I mean I think the one thing that I want people to get from. The thread. Was that you know If you have know, people colored black people in your life in. One of the things that that adds to the daily harm is the denial of their experience right? You know it isn't always the big things. In life like what have George Floyd? progressions and you know like I, said in the thread. You know you could go into work and by noon the person who I call person sitting next to you in a cubicle me have had like a half dozen or a dozen of those already you know it kind of surrounds us. You know maybe they were stopped by the police sale unfairly on the way to work, you know. Maybe someone was read them at starbucks. You just never know right anything about like these kind of innocent experiences that people have no with Amy Cooper the woman who was in the park in new your can..

George Floyd DC Seattle Jen Taylor skinner Ohio twitter starbucks governor Jay Lynch Amy Cooper Washington New York inslee
"skinner" Discussed on Jesse, Jordan, GO!

Jesse, Jordan, GO!

01:57 min | 6 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on Jesse, Jordan, GO!

"Forgot my nickname from less time. You do the same one the new and all the time. Mad Ok allies it you go you go first and then I'll I'll run. The. Germ. Journalist boards have. Skinner. No, I'm on the spot. I'm going to retreat to the old ones. Skinner coined goody colleague David Guez. Skinner clank any car. And I'm crystal Alonzo the golden plated girl. Every week on the show, we like to reach deep into our phone. Call bag and pull out some delicious phone calls. Given to us by you the listener. Yummy! I never go. More. My is empty. Put some phone calls in their. People who call us at two, zero, six, nine, eight four four fund and leave us a message. Let's hear our first one. And just go. This is Josh Klein from Wisconsin. I went to a wildlife. Zoo today. A year right now. Oh hope you guys had a good day bye-bye. I'm fucking angry now. Who is this mother fighters? That's shit. That's like Colin up and being like Dick Sucked right now I'm. Like. Great where's my dear? I don't understand how like he's holding a deer. In the first thing he thought was man Jordan Jesse Nita. Hear about this. I get. He's called a bunch of different podcasts at, but he was like dunking on everybody. Here's like hey, Mark Maron. What's up I got.

Skinner Jordan Jesse Nita Mark Maron crystal Alonzo Josh Klein David Guez Wisconsin Colin Dick
Kathy Hochul, Lt Governor of New York State

The Electorette Podcast

07:10 min | 6 months ago

Kathy Hochul, Lt Governor of New York State

"I'm Jim. Taylor skinner and this is the electorate on this episode. A have a conversation with Lieutenant Governor. Kathy focal of New York, state. Lieutenant, Governor huckle joins me. To Discuss New York response to the coronavirus outbreak, specifically the recovery in rebuilding process. We discussed. The unique ways plumbing have been impacted by Kobe nineteen and what can be done to help women recover, so please enjoy my conversation with Lieutenant Governor Kathy Cocoa. Thank you. Bradley back look I enjoyed our conversation last time. We're going to have this great. Yes, I just into welcome back. The last time you spoke of course that was of course before the pandemic and I know that you hit the ground running. You've been connecting with constituents and you've been working really hard to get the state New York state back on its feet. So I just WanNa know you know. How are you doing? Thank you for asking and I am doing fine. My normal life would've been going from my home. In the western part of New York Buffalo catching as three a M wakeup call and getting out of flight, five to go, New York City, and then maybe try out to Long Island for. For a few hours, and then up to our state capital, and maybe you know, cover the whole state by midnight, so to made parsley in his less travel and wars, zooming moving around the state is what I'm doing, so I have been able to actually touch. More constituencies speak to more elected officials I host meetings with physicist WBZ conference statewide yesterday that I would not have been able to probably pull off with the other schedule half, and so you whether it's talking to chambers women on businesses, faith based community I'm out there just talking about what our objectives are in. In terms of meeting the healthcare crisis, but now we're in the more desirable phase, which is talking about how reopened in a smart way based on the metric, so it is all consuming, but still very fascinating and We're GONNA come out of this with much more knowledge, understanding appreciation for people from all walks of life that were sort of quietly behind the scenes, and never got the recognition they deserve, and I also think this gives us an opportunity to state to really redefine ourselves and launched into the future, and sees on some of the best practices that have emerged out of. Of this crisis. Yeah, I'm glad you're doing well, and you've been working really hard to move the state into the next phase of a lockdown. Honestly I have to say it does make me a bit nervous. Given what's at stake? States begin to reopen too soon. So as are you in right now new. York state depends on the corner of the state of Western. New York upstate to just much that moved into phase to my way of buffalo buffets too early next week. Face to opens up a lot more of the businesses that he will been anxious to go to hair salons and. Retail with many limitations May. There's no nails being done his facials. It is just get a quick haircut with someone who's wearing literally a face shield and has had tested the taken test for Kobe before. They could. Even I'll serve you, so we have very tight restrictions to deal with just what you're talking about. The fear that people are going to have about. Emerging from his deep slumber. Being people have been doing everything they could to sacrifice, but to keep themselves and their families safe, and now they want. They have to be able to trust us in government that followed the doctors who followed the experts, and then we on the metrics that we feel it's safer to go out taking the same precautions we've talking about for. For three months now and so that's why we have the ability to open up slowly. We're not. We're not talking about restaurants. We'll be theaters or larger gatherings, just slowly opening up society and the economy, but nationally we passed this really grim milestone. We have now over a hundred thousand deaths from Colbert nineteen. You know it's still very scary to me on the. The other hand lots of businesses, especially small businesses. They're really hurting financially. There seems to always be this pushing pull. You know we're state. You're caught between which takes priority. Yes, and we are priority all throughout. This has been public health. We wouldn't be talking about reopening. Despite understanding deeply how extraordinarily painful this is for our small businesses and all the employers and I. I come out of a small business family I know the suffering that goes on, and you put your livestream into a low shopper, little of business and almost sign. You don't know if you're GONNA. Make it to the next month or not, so so what we've always said. Public Health comes I mean we can always bring back our economy. He'll be painful tough. Excruciating for our state, revenues are states in your body, sixty five billion dollar whole over the next couple of years already, so we're GONNA have to make some tough decisions, probably some cuts, but if people aren't alive, not protecting public health than what are we therefore so that is what has driven US early talking about reopening. Because we've seen the numbers decline really quite well now, it took a long time to reach the plateau. And if you follow along in New York state has a very transparent way to see what's going on at four dot ny dot. Gov You can really see our hostels ation rate, and it's really going downhill. The number of people use as down number of new cases. Way Down and we didn't see that we wouldn't be talking about reopening if we had stronger broader social safety nets. Nets here in the US what would be ideal in terms of a reopening schedule right in I'm thinking about New Zealand. You know I knew there are comedy is a lot smaller than ours you know, but they had a really strict walked down early on. You know, accommodate suffer bid. They're able to really crush the curve really quickly, so I guess the question is, how would we? We operate if our social safety nets were such that you know, we didn't have to worry as much about the economy, you know what would are reopening process. Look like well probably operate very differently, and what troubles me the most is that women have been hit so hard by this wing. Women were women than men are filing for unemployment. They're. They're not in the industries that are. Are being called back the earliest like construction manufacturing, those are very male, dominated field, so women will be going without their paycheck, and you longer period of time, and on the other hand, those who are working are in the most at risk jobs made therein the ones. They're the ones that are out there on the front line, a seventy eight percent of healthcare workers, the nurses and People that are working in the cafeterias and the Kitchens and and places where they exposed. Those are all women, and so women are really. Really caught in a bad squeeze here at this pandemic either unemployed, and if you're single head of household, you're having trouble. Put Food on the table. A hope and your unemployment checks come in, but let him have been anomaly delayed because of the overwhelming. The system or you're out there exposing yourself every day because you need that paycheck you going and working in a kitchen making someone's. Someone's food that they can pick up curbside and positive. Free back the virus your house, so the Connie's important, and it'd be nice if people knew that they didn't have to risk themselves. We also have to keep some basics functions going and we. We need people to still going to the grocery stores and sell our food and go into the pharmacies of make sure we have prescription. Prescription so those tend to be women, which is just a fascinating study, and whether or not society properly recognizes and appreciation to end compensates women the way they should.

New York Lieutenant Governor Kathy Coco Governor Huckle United States New York City York Kobe Taylor Skinner Long Island WBZ Physicist Bradley New Zealand Connie Colbert
Fatima Gross Graves, CEO & President of the National Women's Law Center

The Electorette Podcast

05:59 min | 6 months ago

Fatima Gross Graves, CEO & President of the National Women's Law Center

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner and this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Fatima. Goss graves the president and CEO of the national. Women's law center. She joins to discuss the coronavirus outbreak, and how the pandemic will uniquely affect women women who are of course on the frontlines as essential workers. We also discuss the childcare crisis, and we talk about a recent report published by the National Women's Law Center I'm the investment needed to adequately fund the country's childcare knees? So here's my conversation with Pajama. Gos- graves. Screens welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you. So we are about. Three months. I think into pandemic now. That sounds surreal to say. But you know. The economic fallout has been really swift. It's been head-spinning. There have been millions of people out of work. You know overnight. But we're just starting to parse through which groups specifically will be the hardest economically when I was specifically talk about women. Can you give me a quick summary of what the picture looks like for women right now economically. Crisis like the line we are in is gonNA always reveal inequalities that exist before one of the things that we know is bad about one in three women who are working are considered essential worker is in. That's in part because women are disproportionately in the healthcare system, both as nurses doctors in also in nursing homes sped. It is also because women work in retail and in manufacturing jobs like at Amazon, so they are disproportionately. Cashier is in big stores that have stayed open in on the front lines. You'll see them on the street doing things like delivering nail, and and so as a result, it's about one in three of women who are working right now are are right now front line. In working without hazard, pay working without protective equipment to ensure that they can work with safety and at the same time when we look at who lost their jobs quickly that women disproportionately have lost their jobs over the last two months in. That's especially to black and Brown women. And part of the reason that is again is job segregation. It's where women worked. So women make up a disproportionate number of people who work in restaurants that had to close in close quickly proportionate number of people who work as. Housekeepers in hotels who who work in small retail who work as domestic workers in and we're talking about jobs where people aren't working in sitting on a huge safety net to begin with these are all jobs that were already in the lowest paid fields. and. Were women were working in many many states just for seven twenty five an hour, trying to scrape by enough. So wait, you have. Is that about forty percent of the people who were working in those jobs about forty percent women who were working in those fields were already basically working fulltime making poverty wages. For the ten domecq incident you if you're picturing frontline workers. If you're lucky, enough and I'm probably have lucky in quotes. You can't see me on a podcast to work. And deep in sharp unemployment at the same time, women are more likely to be caregivers, and Co or sole breadwinners, and we're in a time where that care crisis that we have right now around people who have either been forced to work in this period outside the home or who have been working from home, but also parenting in home. Schooling is largely being ignored. As states race to reopen without a plan, a big part of the problem with having no plan as you haven't figured out. What are people going to do about having to go back to work without schools without summer camps without child-care? Exactly, that's a huge piece because when you look at the stories about people who are rushing to get out in these states that have open or starting to open early. Early you know what are the pictures of their of people who are sitting in restaurants and bars, and who are the people were on the front lines serving them primarily women and those women have children at home in their responsible for child care, and they don't. They don't have the childcare safety net there to help them. I was GONNA. Say I can tell you we're going to say on the. Interstate period, but Came in I, don't care and safety net. Yeah but one of the numbers you mentioned. It's one third of the essential workers are women right now? The positions that have been deemed to be essential one those are women well. It's one in three women who work are essential workers who it's in the in in some ways, it's an even larger percentage, so it's not that women are spread in so many many different occupations, one third of them are actually frontline workers right now. I think we have this image in her head that there's some tiny percentage of people who are out there on the front lines and. Everyone else is not for women. That's very much. Not The case may are on the frontlines right now in really large proportions, and those are just the ones that were talking about who are working frontline out there right now. We're not even talking about the many people who are also working from home. Everyone struggling with care crisis

National Women's Law Center President And Ceo Jim Taylor Skinner Fatima Goss Amazon Brown
"skinner" Discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

Can I Pet Your Dog?

05:39 min | 6 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on Can I Pet Your Dog?

"Is there a dull anna car out of BAR ON THE STREET? Yay Dog that we really want to me. Hey can I get your your with Rene and welcome to. Can I pet your dog? I'm Ernie covert aid. Talented dog owner. I'm like especially in eight short dog owner. And this is the podcast for unapologetic doglovers. Now you look down it as if you hadn't thought of it in I truly. It felt like we got a pop quiz suddenly sure and I was like I really was not I had no already at all. And as well what is he he's short. And here's what's Nice though same as a pop quiz when you take a guess when you take a stab and you get it right now. Get to parade around with victory of smart study getting practice. I just got it right. You need to study for this podcast. Which is nice. Finally for once a podcast. You don't how does ninety four? That's the biggest hurdle with them all usually just take. I would listen to more if there were less studying on the on the potty people would agree with me live studying. You're always hearing on podcast of people just kind of pages looking up articles. It's like man. I wish they would have done that before they recorded. But and no one's done a tell all peace about it but I think it eventually someone will get brave enough to say I would listen to more podcast if I didn't have to study so much so I didn't have to study so much now. I'm coming to YOU WITH OBVIOUSLY ARROGANCE. About HOW SMART. My friend is a pop quiz. Obviously that just now but also I got a bit of a conspiracy theory on on my brain and let me tell you about it. Okay so as summer is upon us we just had Memorial Day here. We go hip hip. Hooray time for summer. It's a little bit different this year at least here in Los Angeles. The pools are closed. Now I think many people tried to tell you that. That's covert related. But do you want to hear my conspiracy theory absolutely? Do you remember when the pools were closed last Labor Day for the dogs. Yes well here's the thing. The dogs were supposed to be allowed in bitter ver- refresher for our listeners. Break before they drain the pools they say come one come all bring your dogs have them have them splash about in the pool. A little bit What they say at the very very very bottom of the page in in highlighted that is easy to see yes sure I shall be hard to miss. Some say I mean did it again. We're not prepared for the pop quizzes of life. So right exactly it says You must have your dog registered now. I did have my dog registered in forgot about it so I didn't have the proper paperwork and homeless. Just weren't able to have creme registered. My point is. Here's where the theory comes in. You didn't let the dogs in the pool and the consequences. They don't get to you think they've been staying close ever since that exactly. I think that they've thought about what they did. You know what if the dogs can't swim? The nobody can swim. How about that? I because here's the thing when you said I gotTa Conspiracy Theory for you. I got a little nervous because in this day and age. I don't know but I think you're right. I can't think of any that I haven't seen anyone swimming in a pool since then. It begs the question. Could they be related and I think they could and I also appreciate you agreeing with me because this cut gone south real fast like no. That's not a horrible certainly the other thing. It's most certainly the other thing I appreciate you going along with my idea. Always I like yours better anyway. We let the dogs in the pool. The pool stay open. Let that be a lesson to us all and moving onto non conspiracy theories I'm Alexis. We've gotten this week. This little reviews over there on Apple podcast people being so nice to us and we appreciate it so much. If you find that school's out and now you got time on your hands. You WanNa you WANNA take yourself to apple podcasts. Route Review and subscribe boy. Oh boy would we appreciate it? We want to see him social media or at C. D. PODCASTS. To their too much too much honestly honestly. No one has the balls to say it but I will talk. What's instagram off the rails? It's far too much at this point. I don't think so. I love that video you posted. It was it today yesterday of him. Just running full force into a Bush to get a ball. I love that absolutely takes after his mother. He's quite the catch. Is it on the eighth stray throw ball and it bounces on the Eighth Bounds. And well we've got. We've got a real promised athlete on our hands and is that is that all the housework that we have to get out of the so yeah Okay Yeah. Is it housework housekeeping? Well never going to get the difference you know. Thank you. Thank you What shall I tell her? Sweet sweet listeners. What they have gotten themselves into this episode. I would love to have all star gas. She's a comedian. She's a podcast her. She's a singer. Elisa. Skinner is here to talk about her new. We have a minute minute from and her imaginary dog apple and we have some humble updates That I get I tear about. We've talked about what they are really. So let's find out. Let's let's.

Apple Rene Los Angeles Skinner Bush
Page Gardner, Founder & President of the Voter Participation Center

The Electorette Podcast

05:12 min | 6 months ago

Page Gardner, Founder & President of the Voter Participation Center

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with page Gardner. The founder and president of the voter participation center the Voter Participation Center has helped over four point. Six million voters register and get to the polls and page card was a pioneer and identifying key voting bloc. She was one of the first to recognize unmarried. Women as a key political population one with significant and impactful political power. He's Gardner and I discussed what's called the marriage gap. That's the gap between unmarried women and married women in relation to their registration habits and voting behaviors. We also discussed this in the context of the corona virus outbreak. Given that unmarried women generally have less financial stability when compared to married women so without further. Ado here's my conversation with page partner Gardiner. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you very much great to be here so I was looking at your numbers. And since two thousand and three voter participation center you've helped around four and a half million voters registered to vote and get to the polls which is a massive amount of people millions and millions of people. And that's that's really incredibly impressive. But I'm just curious you know two thousand three. It feels like a lifetime ago and it wasn't but it feels like a lifetime ago and I don't think that voter suppression or voter issues for mainstream. Then what encouraged you to get into those costs to become interested in you know registering voters? So it's interesting that you bring that up. We have helped over point. Six million people applied to be registered to vote and hundreds of millions of people. Turn out but just sort of tripping down memory lane in two thousand I looked at the election of Gore versus Bush and noticed the difference between married and unmarried women in terms of how they voted and their share of the electorate and unmarried women. Married women voted very very differently with unmarried women voting for Gore in married women voting for Bush and I wondered about that and the share of the electorate of unmarried women was really really small in terms of their strength in numbers in terms of the voting eligible population. So that leads to lots and lots of research and the key question was was this sort of a just an observation or was there causality in marital status in other words does marital status determine whether or not you register and whether or not you vote. And after years of research and looking at things like articles from Census Bureau scholars to doing our own research it turns out that marital status along with age and race are key determinants of whether or not you register and whether or not you vote so then. The question became if unmarried. Women are unregistered and higher numbers than they should be. How do you reach them? So then what we did at the voter. Participation Center was pioneer mail based voter registration targeting particular demographic all across the country and that was really a revolutionary. We created for the first time the first list of unregistered people in this country. Because as you know no state keeps a list of its unregistered citizens so we had to create a list of unregistered unmarried women. Nail THEM VOTER REGISTRATION APPLICATION. And then make sure that voter registration application got sent to the appropriate elections official. We did that after a number of years. And then it turned out that this process was successful with other underrepresented demographics persons of Color and young people. So that is how our program's evolved to include what we call the rising American electric which is unmarried women persons of Color and young people who are now sixty four percent of the entire voting eligible population in the country today. More than a hundred and fifty million people yet. They're underrepresented in terms of their registration rates. And they do not vote and they are not as large as share in. The electorate would suggest that they could be while. That's incredible actually had no idea that before voter participation that there was no way or no one was tracking unregistered voters. And now I'm curious. How did you do that? How did you track now? Who was not registered? Well after many many years and what we have done is refined a system where we match a voter file from state to a list of commercial data and then we delete the names of people or addresses that do not appear on the voter file and then we go through about twenty five other steps to insure the quality of the data. And after having done that we then mail out a voter registration application form that then. The person fills out and sends back to the appropriate election. Official

Voter Participation Center Founder And President Gardner Jim Taylor Skinner Official Participation Center Gore Bush Census Bureau Partner Gardiner
How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

The Electorette Podcast

10:03 min | 7 months ago

How Local Governments Can Reduce the Spread of COVID-19 in Prisons & Jails

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. Have A conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco is the Vice Dean and a professor at New York University School of law and she joins me to discuss. How state governors can use their authority to help slow the spread of Kobe. Nineteen in prison and jail populations around the country. Many local governments have responded to the corona virus outbreak with stay at home orders or by enforcing social distancing practices but very few had a comparable response to reducing the spread of Corona virus in the incarcerated population as well as to the jail and prison staff and to their families. Rachel Barco and I discussed a recent report that was published by data for progress which provides a detailed outline for exactly how local governments can act. Now slow the spread of covert nineteen in prisons and jails so without further ado. Here's my conversation with Rachel. Barco Barco welcome to the PODCAST. Thanks for having me so I think it's become increasingly obvious that you know while the current virus outbreak is dire generally for the rest of the population that it's even more dire in the incarcerated population people who are in prisons and jails and one of the obvious reasons as to why that is is that you can't socially descends properly in prison or in jail. But what are some other factors? You're certainly right at environment in. These facilities is such that people can't distance themselves but they also don't have access to some of the key things that health officials have told us. We need to try to stop the spread so people who were incarcerated often. Don't have access to soap. They charge in many facilities for soap. And people don't have it. They don't have hand sanitizer They don't have access to easily easy access to water to even wash their hands. So you know the kind of basic hygiene practices that we think of as necessary for prevention aren't things that are accessible there And then you you add that to the fact that the population of people who are inside these facilities leans toward people with preexisting health conditions and very older people. Who are there as well so you have a particularly vulnerable population should this spread within the facility? they're more likely to get serious cases in death as a result right. That's another factor that I hadn't actually considered that. The percentage of older people in the prison population is. It's actually grown quite a bit in the past decade or decade and a half. I think there's something like a tough percent of people who are over aged fifty five exactly and many even much older than fifty five past sixty past seventy. The populations that were were most concerned about. Yeah and and also they aged faster. I think just generally medical professionals tell us that people who are in car serrated kind of a person who is chronologically aged forty five is really more like a fifty five year old based on just the harsh conditions of living inside prisons. One of the things we aren't really talking about are the peripheral people who are involved with the population right like the prison guards or even the doctors and therapists that come in and out of prison then of course the families who are also kind of a risk. Yeah and if you look at New York which is where I'm located right now. There are almost nine hundred employees of the corrections department who are infected with Kovic. Nineteen so staff. The people who work in these facilities are the. It's not as if the virus is going to distinguish between the people who are there because they were convicted of a crime and the people who work there. It's going to spread to everybody and when we're talking about people who work there getting it they in turn we're gonNA take it outside. The prison walls back to their homes back into their communities. And so it's GonNa be a source of spread to the community at large when we're talking about it's spreading within these facilities and in addition to that thinking about the people within prison facilities who work specifically on medical issues the medical staff. You know these are not large numbers of people who do that and so if you get high rates of infection among the staff who are designated to treat people with inside these facilities. You're really looking at a looming crisis. Because if they get sick you know there aren't people to replace them. And now we don't have people to take care of the people inside who get this and you can just see how it very critically conspire onto a crisis. President NGO population. I don't think that they're being counted in the current projections for infections and deaths right And those projections are kind of scary already. Yes I've seen a couple projections. I believe it's the. Aclu has tried to do one to figure out if we did bring into the projections. What is happening now in prisons in jails in what it looks like going forward you know we we see exponential growth in terms of the number of people dying in infected when we factor that in. Because I don't think the existing models are properly accounting for how much more rapidly the spread of this virus would be inside prison facilities. You know it would be as if we had an unaccounted for. Really large proportion of people on cruise ships and because it spreads so much more rapidly in an environment like that. If your model wasn't accounting for that you would be under counting and I think that is the problem with most of the existing models that are out there is. They're not accounting for the much more rapid spread inside prison in jail right. So so what? We've seen generally in relation to the responses response. That kind of been working and I live in one of the states that that's had a really good response. I live in Washington. State where governor Jay Inslee is in charge. We've seen responses on the local level to the outbreak specifically on gubernatorial level. Like I said Jay Inslee. You know governor Cuomo Gretchen. Whitmer you know all democratic governors. I should run out but have any of them responded in a significant way to prevent the spread in prison and jail populations no and it's really disappointing. You know. I think that this isn't one of these left right. Republican Democratic Issues Savelly. It's it's basically both failing to address what's going on. You know there are. There are at most playing. You know at at at at best what we've seen them do is maybe some small numbers of releases but nothing that is commensurate with the problem in the risk. You know so here in New York. Governor Cuomo has done nothing to address the fact that we now have more than a thousand people who have covert nineteen inside our correctional facilities staff and people incarcerated both and he hasn't released anybody you know it's just I. I'm not sure what accounts for it. But it's an enormous blind spot and and it's true You know across the states you know. I should say there are some governors who have done some things and you know some of it may may surprise people that you know for example Oklahoma. The governor there has has granted a fair number of commutations letting people out earlier from their sentence in light of what's happening and you know that's a Republican Governor. And you know we've seen a few others who are trying to make an effort to have at least said that they would have releases places like. Vania a New Jersey but unfortunately the announcements that they made haven't yet been followed by actual releases that match what they promised. So what we see when we look around. The country is essentially really small numbers of people being released from these facilities and so in what ends up happening is they're crowded and the fire starts to spread and it starts to spread to the staff and it goes into the communities and so it's really the situation that we would hope that we'd have governors getting ahead of it but there are efforts thus far have been really disappointing is the nicest way. I could put it sure and you said that you know. This isn't partisan or shouldn't be partisan but of course in this climate everything. Everything's partisan just about right so we can talk about that later. So one of the solution that's being proposed as just what you hinted at is clemency or early releases. So how would that work exactly? Well there's a couple options for governors so a commutation would be a sentence reduction that's permanent basically saying look we know we gave you ten years but the is the Governor Im- going to say The eight years you've currently served as enough and released. You're done the other option that a governor has and sometimes with commutations. Governor could just do that with the stroke of a pen and other times. They need to go through a board or some kind of process so so. That's actually a mixed set of options for governors in

Rachel Barco Barco New York Jay Inslee Governor Cuomo Gretchen Governor Cuomo New York University School Of Jim Taylor Skinner Washington Vice Dean New Jersey Oklahoma President Trump Whitmer Professor
Chicago Mayor Lightfoot Announces New COVID-19 Recovery Taskforce

Ben Shapiro

00:22 sec | 8 months ago

Chicago Mayor Lightfoot Announces New COVID-19 Recovery Taskforce

"Mayor Lightfoot launching an economic recovery task force to help the city respond to the pandemic and the financial hit on Chicago the co chairman of the task force will be Republican Sam Skinner he was the White House chief of staff under George H. W. bush he will co chair the task force along with mayor

Mayor Lightfoot Chicago Chairman George H. W. Bush Sam Skinner White House Chief Of Staff
"skinner" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

02:21 min | 8 months ago

"skinner" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Specific to Kobe nineteen one of the things I would do is audit our response. You know. What did we do. Well what can we do better next time because we do know that whatever be at a natural disaster some kind of crisis others will come up and so we need to be prepared for them but also how are we spending our limited resources Are we making sure that they're being spent as intended are? Are we using an equity lens when we think about how we spend resources? Are we incorporated the needs of our full community? That's the kind of perspective that we need going forward to make sure that we have sustainable not just environment but a sustainable economy as well and so as as people are are thinking about this time we're in I just strongly encouraged folks to to also try to focus on where we going. What direction doing to go. And what kind of leadership do we need to help get us there? Say you mentioned the primary is coming up. How can listeners help out with your campaign Between now and then you know and I guess at this point it doesn't matter where in the country they live since it's all the same absolutely and so leadership on this on his important across the country but again here in Oregon. Our Secretary State is sending governor and then also will likely be responsible for redistricting that will really shape the politics also oversees the election process. So that's something that impacts all states. My website is Jamie Oregon Dot Com. That's J. M. F. O. R. Oregon or E. G. O. N. DOT COM and Greatly appreciate any support. People can give to You were doing fundraising. I'm actually the only candidate in this race. Who's not taking corporate contributions from in general but especially from fossil-fuel industry from big Pharma. Our state has been devastated by the OPIOID crisis and so specifically being accountable only voters I think is really important and so getting some support and help their. It'd be really appreciated. And then also you know. People can make calls in out to folks if they know folks in Oregon or also just engaging in their social media network. It's Jamie Macleod. Skinner for Oregon is our facebook and our twitter in our instagram site..

Oregon Jamie Oregon Jamie Macleod Kobe Secretary big Pharma facebook Skinner instagram twitter J. M. F. O.
Chryl Laird, "Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior"

The Electorette Podcast

10:02 min | 9 months ago

Chryl Laird, "Steadfast Democrats: How Social Forces Shape Black Political Behavior"

"I'm Jen Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with Cheryl Laird. Shirl laird is a professor and political analyst who specializes in race and ethnic politics and political psychology and she joins me to discuss new book titled Steadfast Democrats. How SOCIAL FORCES SHAPE BLACK POLITICAL BEHAVIOR? She Co authored the book along with Ishmael White and if they analyze historical data to better understand why black Americans by far the most unified racial group in American politics and our conversations share laird and I draw parallels to the historical examples from the book and we correlate them to more recent political events. Like of course the Democratic primaries instance. This is a book that I personally will have to read more than once. It's that important. So without further ado here is my conversation with Cheryl. Layered sure leered welcome. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you for having me you know. I just have to say when I was reading this book as a black woman. It was really interesting because I was basically reading an analysis of my own political behavior. And I've never actually read it examined in this way. It was really strange for me to read this. And because I don't think that much about my own political motivations right like I think about policy but I don't think you know why Democrat. Why have I always been a democrat? Why do I never question right and that was really interesting for me yet? No I think That's literally what are trying to do with this book and we also are african-american and I'm trying to speak from experience of understanding politics in a particular way And often I think the literature thus far in some of the fields of political science sociology and other areas where they examine behavior and even in this case political behavior. We haven't really seen something that takes on this kind of question And particularly like wire wiser people doing this thing The way that they're doing it and we're able to really tackle it in a political science sort of way but a lot of it is based off of our own lived experience as African Americans and understanding that politics works differently. Yeah and so. The thing is the open. The Book Win Alabama Senate Race Between Doug Jones Roy Moore. We all remember that race for some really terrible reasons because of the allegations around. Roy Moore but what? I think what keeps happening elections like this. Is that people try to analyze and predict a black voter behavior. Right they have all. These assumptions aren't right. And then what happens? Is that black voters in surprising them like they did in this election. I think ninety eight percent of black women voted for Doug Jones then it was following that when Tom Perez made this statement online that Blackman backbone of the Party and I think that was the first time that someone at that level of leadership the head of the DNC made a declaration like that and acknowledged that publicly. I think that that's that's right. It's like it is. It is clear that the partisan norm is very strong. The loyalty to the Party is incredibly significant. And in this defining to the Party itself and its success in numerous elections and I think the Alabama election would just put that into high relief. A you're just able to really see that at work and black women being like the people at the front lines of it not only in the voter box but also on the ground like they were the ones shepherding. The grassroot efforts on the ground they were the ones behind a lot of the the poll souls to the polls or gathering people up to get them to go vote informing people about what was going on And so they are. They're they're doing that work for the Party and often just getting knowledge for it. So what actually happened in that race? Why wasn't it as predictive as people? Thought? Alabama is typically. A red state was at the mobilization on the ground that happen in the context of the election right so we have two individuals Roy Moore and Doug Jones and Roy Moore has especially this incident that comes up about Some sexual impropriety. Right like this situation of pedophilia as part of the conversation. But I also think part of the reason why people didn't see it coming is that the speaks a lot to the data that gets collected that goes into the predictive models of elections. Which is the sample sizes often in those data are very small when it comes to the African American sample And so if you do not have very good. Data data that is large in terms of the size of the black sample. That's in it. Additionally that is broad in that it's not just focused in any one location but is spread across sets of black communities the predictive nature than of what you're going to get from that data is not going to be right. Like a selection bias can create a problem with that Additionally I think people also don't know of some of the resources that African Americans are often dealing with in this case if we look at in political science the way that African Americans participate in politics all of the indicators that we typically use things like education level income on all typically are things that would say what is likely for someone to participate. African Americans have to make up for all of that because they're very resource deprived especially in a place like Alabama. And so what you then have to rely. On our black institutions black churches black colleges like organizations became the frontline for trying to mobilize people and again most types of tapping of that information through polling or through other forms of assessment. If you don't know about that you wouldn't know where to go. Look for it and so people did it. They did it not go look there. They didn't know that people would be energized. In this election. With these circumstances that play to get themselves out to vote and at the partisan role of that vote would matter so much right. Did you think that's true? Nationally that black people are underrepresented in polling. Generally I think they are. I think that's how you get often. Polls for instance. I remember not too long ago. The president had cited to a poll where he said he thought he had a whole bunch of black people who are supportive of Ham radio or something like thirty percent of black people saying they were okay with Donald Trump. The mmediately my thought was I need to see the data because I want to know where the poll was taken. Is this a random? Sample poll is a poll that is targeted to black communities. Are you targeting? This poll to black people at a certain location like what's his taken at a convention of some sort like all of that would matter because it's going to skew the data and if you're not attentive to this in the sampling that you're doing and waiting the sampling and the size of it so often times really. It has to do with the size of the sample often in a poll of maybe a thousand or thirteen hundred people in terms of African Americans that are in that sample. You'll be lucky if you see a hundred people in it well enough when you're talking about about black political ideology and I think another thing that's misunderstood about. The black voting block is just how conservative they are like socially conservative in a lot of ways and I think it's because there's this confusion around. We are generally in allegiance to a non Conservative Party. No I think that's right. I think because we think of ideology and political science typically the conservative Liberal ideology spectrum that we have is used heavily to predict partisanship and in most literature which is often used basically assessing white Americans. What we find is that people's ideology very predictive of their partisanship especially in a polarized environment for African Americans. It's different right and I think part of that has to do with how ideology works for African Americans. Black people are very politically diverse in their views. Say That again why he very click over to the partisan behavior needs to be thought about much more from a strategic advantage at the group is trying to do to be able to minority group in majority system and having a voice but people have varying opinions and a lot of people are very conservative. Especially on things like social conservatism fiscal conservatives on religiosity often as a driving force and we know from data especially from Pew Research Center. They find the African Americans as a racial group are some of the most strongest actors when it comes to their role engagement of religious institutions and those religious institutions are also African American. Right like this is like Martin Luther King talking about the most segregated day of the week is Sunday right. Like that is where they are. And it still is true. So conservatism manifests differently. For Blacks and ideologically. It also is very shaped by race. Where the goals of what people are leaning into in terms of their ideology could have a lot more to do with what they believe is important for trying to improve the status of the group even if they are varying in how they believe one would try to approach that but at the end of the day the partisanship though is done. In a manner that is trying to elevate the voice of the black community And political power in a space where we are a majority based system the one of the things. That's really interesting about that is that it's almost subconscious right. We don't necessarily like myself. I don't think necessarily my role in this larger picture of what we're trying to do collectively but we just we just do it. We just do it. I mean it's interesting because when we presented on this before we like to use this episode of black ish again. I think it's like elephants in the room. Or something to that effect about their son Junior Andrea. Both junior decided that he wants to join the young. Black Republicans Club at school. Or something and Andre is stunned and he's trying to explain it as family members and they all can't understand see China explaining to bow Chinese to his mother And they're both like what do you mean? He wants to join a republic. He wants to be like he wants to be a the Republicans like the League. Keep he wants to go to Banana Republic and buy clothes like they can't even process it because you're right it is become such a partly to be black is to Democrats and people who seem to be different from that are seen as strange right But I think it speaks so heavily to how long this norm of collective group race behavior has been informing black political behavior over

Alabama Party Cheryl Laird Doug Jones Roy Moore Black Republicans Club At Scho Political Analyst Jen Taylor Skinner Conservative Party Ishmael White Banana Republic League Pew Research Center Martin Luther King Professor Tom Perez Junior Andrea Donald Trump Andre
"skinner" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"skinner" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"To those who say what to do for you then if you if you work on absolutely positively opens you up to being much more attractive to other people people connect people connected first and foremost right the moment you encounter each other you would cover me I gather you we have an inside Skinner and if this is making a decision a good guy and your ability being open and transparent and you know just okay with not being perfect that is highly attractive to other people that is right for them to do the same thing we got a team working together our only save other parade the the other people had the best interest in mind when you attack the problem or create a new solution innovate something it just flows the energy is wide open but when people are the protective mode don't be vulnerable if you don't get the best quality what do we mean by the more conscious of the power of trust well in the match is really about do you have the top of your mind power of a trusting others and what it means to trust them and how powerful that is it if you don't trust somebody how much it causes you to shut down and you also have to be conscious that as the leader one of the branding items I want I want people to say I trust that guy so so it but actually with the work conscious means literally working on about and want to be known as a person you can trust and so if you're not conscious you just go through the day gets what happened you have transactions which with people which are just transaction all so you know what here's the problem everybody is so freaking busy wired in done but.

Skinner
"skinner" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"skinner" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Cattle and your question to the number seven one eight five five you had coach Skinner the volleyball team over the house SO you know what coach Skinner is done like unbelievable work with our volleyball program and the girls and they were playing this weekend and I was going to try to do something before the NCAA tournament started having over the house you know and feed him and just have some fun and we weren't able to do it until they get through there in the Sweet Sixteen they leave I think for Baylor Tuesday or Wednesday but up well I just I went down and saw them practice spray it in he stopped at a nice ladies I gotta tell you when you all left I said to my wife did you enjoy that she said I loved it I said I think we enjoyed it more than the girls and you know Ellen's over there talking about ID she watches all those murder mysteries and stuff and they were talking in the and we had some fun with it and you know it was it was it was just need to have on there and you know I think again you just want all these teams to know how pushy a day or by all of us how bout a football team going to the bowl Lynn saying he's playing the you know the spirit of the team and and here's a guy that you know he's he's doing it because he wants everybody to have a great experience going to Charlotte where my dad lives I may try to go to the game take my dad over there but our football how many bowls now three in a row on row form or me think about where we were in it again you know things happen you win some games losing games and in but what what they've been able to do with all the facilities with all the recruiting like the guys that are coming back it's great to see the program on such solid footing you know I hit mark this morning and I said are you happy where you going he said oh yeah absolutely and they said let's get down there and get something done and you know couldn't be more happy for those about our women they're undefeated Ryan Howard back to back career highs I mean you know the only one is struggling is our men's basketball program but it's whether it's whether it's baseball softball were the golf but the dance team and it it's just the then then when you look at facilities so one thing I'll tell you you know Mitch when it's all said and done I think the legacy will be he was more than just about football on but men's basketball he was about all these kids and all these girls and all of them that they would have their chance to have an unbelievable experience at the university and he's done that here these really done he's done you know set and it's not like he's left football behind our basketball behind but he's you know he's done it these dumb what an athletic director supposed to do it's got a question on the Twitter feed at U. K. sports network from Michael do Ashton and Tyrese still go at it head to head in practice every day and if so can you speak to how that's made each one of them but well I I can't do it every day because Thai Reese would be demoralized so I put a manual over there and when he scrambles him up a little bit then I I don't want a manual be scrambled eggs either so then I switch it over and I put Tyreese to get tortured a little bit you know but when you put a manual and Ashton together you're talking about you know two pit bulls it really and it makes it hard and we're still down in numbers we don't you know the second unit doesn't have that then there's no real second unit I I kind of like what I did last time with the first group go put the other three and and then kind of go from there but you know we can't Ashton's learning and it's hard to learn against an or up Tyreese's learning hard to look pretty against action any files all the time he never thinks he falls anybody scrapping Holden Pushin sticking his arm in there and then the key to Tyreese is looking at me for like what I so what do you want me to do you want me to Tom stopped that don't push him get a play soul but I just like I said the competitiveness that's what our culture's about the problem is we're down to eight guys that makes it hard I mean normally were having ten guys really go after each other sometimes eleven so someone this year you know we had ten one guy gets hurt in a car accident in the summer so now you're down to nine another guy gets hurt at some point we're down to seven but can Zack is down to seven guys and I think one of their seven maybe a walk on no one you know it's it is what it is she just next team next man up and let's go we'll get to for your questions coach cal we come right back you listening to the U. K. healthcare John Calipari show on the U. K. sports network when you're out recruiting an email or text doesn't always.

Skinner
"skinner" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"skinner" Discussed on That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

"That's what she said is presented by ziprecruiter ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire that's what she said. That's what she said. That's what she said what. She says. That's what she said. Welcome to. That's what she said. Conversations with interesting people wolf the world of sports music comedy more talking about their lives careers successes and failures welcome into a special bonus. That's what she said. Podcast cast featuring jane skinner goodell talking about her new documentary a lifetime of sunday's. It profiles the four matriarchs of the n._f._l. Virginia halas mccaskey of the bears patricia rooney any of the pittsburgh steelers normal hunt of the kansas city chiefs and martha ford of the detroit lions the film which was made in partnership with n._f._l. Films and his co executive produced by skinner cadel and michael strahan debut on e._s._p._n. At one p._m. Eastern sunday august twenty fifth and on a._b._c. at three thirty pm eastern sunday september i this this is not only fascinating for anyone interested in what it's like to be an owner but so much history of the n._f._l. In old videos and photos and conversations with these women who are all eighty eighty plus some in their nineties <hes> and so happy to have jane here to talk about it. Let's go way back because in doing my research for this. I found out your lake forest forest girl. You went to lake forest high school. Those are my stomping grounds as well so we matriculated from the same place yes a few years apart sarah lately older other than you are but <hes> i know all about you because my nieces and nephew my whole family everybody is lake forest high school graduate and they used to tease me that when they would have finals during high school they to in order to relax and get a good laugh they'd go down and look at my photograph on the lake forest high school wall of fame because it looked so goofy senior year like cohn head kind of and then they would say you know who's really cool who's on their vince vaughn and sarahspain. They're like the real famous people on the team. I was just like the wiki or when they were looking for someone so come on <hes>. I'm very excited to get to talk to you and spend time with you because everybody in lake forest is are there big s fans. I love that yeah that was that was a really cool moment to be on the wall until like go back and see some people and you kind of forget like rob. Pelinka is a lake forest high school. Guy you know looking like rob lowe up on the wall and of course vince vaughn and yeah you you it's not matt graver glamour or there's a lot of really cool people anyway people in sports so you you went to northwestern after lake worth high school and you became a news reporter you kinda bounced around to a couple of different gigs but that was that was your big career before you kind of moved into motherhood and being roger goodell's the author of the other half <hes> the other commission my life to you now <hes> yes i did. I went to <hes> miguel at northwestern and i did ah very traditional path where us in not business and you start out and smaller markets and work your way up so my first job reporting was in duluth minnesota and then i moved onto portland portland maine saint louis missouri. I was in milwaukee. My goal actually my big career goal. I was <hes> a couple of years away from it. I think when i was in milwaukee i really wanted to go back home <hes> to work as a political reporter in chicago it was it's the place i love the most <hes> i grew up in a in a kind of a family that was involved in politics and that was my dream team and then i went to this wedding when i was still working in milwaukee and i sat at the table and who is sitting at the table but this guy named roger goodell and somehow somehow fast forward. I ended up in new york city not a place. I ever thought i would be <hes> so then. When i came to new york i worked in local news here for a little while and then <hes> <hes> worked at the fox news channel for about twelve years <hes> so it was all fired all totally exciting cool places to be <hes> secretly. I still wish i was living in chicago. I love it so much and every time we meet someone who says something about chicago. Roger says don't bring it up and soon painful so so we go back a lot. We're coming back for the kickoff. <hes> it's my day and all that so we're lucky you mentioned the <hes> political ties your father sam skinner with the former secretary of transportation and white house chief of staff under george h w bush so when you got into news was your intent always to try to find a path to politics or was it once you had already begun doing regular news that you were like. I would like to find a way to that. No i really intended to be a political reporter to be very honest with you. I would've would've loved to have been a sports reporter. <hes> there aren't a ton of women <hes> sports. I grew up in a really sports loving family <hes> but they want a ton and and i didn't quite know how to do it <hes> and so politics was a second love from era another love for me so it made sense so my first job in duluth i covered. I was my <hes>. I was the political reporter in minnesota and <hes> ended up trying to follow that path from there <hes> also very interesting kind of like sports a little bit of who play calling here and there <hes> <hes> so it was really fun but i i do kinda. Secretly also have in the back of my mind. If i had to do it over again would i have. Maybe tried to sports reporter possibly well. I feel like there's so many women who would have had there been you know we always say at e._s._p._n. W if you can see you can be in so i didn't even it didn't even occur to me to do it till i was in my mid twenties because there just wasn't enough of it out there to see and be like oh. That's an option <hes> so yeah. I bet if you were growing up now. You've probably already be interviewing doing people in your backyard. We will you know when i was doing an interview last week with christine brennan u._s._a. Today and we were just talking about when she she actually she and roger met each other when they were both twenty three twenty four. He was a brand new intern at the jets handing out press credentials. She thinks she said it had just gone with the miami. Herald gerald is a cub reporter their big break for her and i said well who's that lake to be a twenty three or twenty four year old woman at the time <hes> you know all those years ago being such a trailblazer l. blizzard and she said it was great. It wasn't easy though you know in a lot of ways so there were people doing it just not a lot and i was not as brave as she was. She's a massive badass total total leader in the in the field for women <hes> so you met roger at a wedding. What was he doing at the time because i know he was not yet the commissioner. No he's been there <hes>. I was just doing the mouth this morning. I think he's been at the national football league for thirty seven years. <hes> he had started as an intern with the jets he can't. He always laughs it. He kind of did everything but work. In the mailroom i mean one year he was driving for <hes> pete rozelle. They needed someone to marry him around and that's what he did and <hes> so at the time he was in business development. He had done international before that he was in business development when we met and then after we got married he he was in this role. I can't remember what his exact title was. He was like i guess he. Maybe he was a c._o._o. He was kind of the equivalent of that and worked with very closely with paul tagliabue so thankfully <hes> i liked loved football so if you didn't love football and you were married to a guy who is obsessed with it. It would probably be not so much fun on <hes>. The big joke was when he went to ask my dad if he could marry me <hes> he's sons roger says i don't. I don't know if i'm supposed to be telling a story. Writer says your dad started crying. I couldn't tell those because he was losing his last child and his only daughter because he knew he got super bowl tickets for the rest of. We're still not clear what the terriers were about but needless to say my dad said yes and he told me the effect of like oh. You're so lucky roger. I've prepared or well for the big game since nineteen seventy two so that's great so when he was going to take the job as commissioner are. How much did you get that is going to be massively life changing not necessarily monetarily which certainly seems like it has been but i mean like in terms of attention publicity criticism all that because that's a big leap from any other job in the front office there <hes> yeah you know in and at the time i think <hes> you know times have changed so much i think obviously with the media and social media has changed the attention has changed and just the the rapid pace is you know and i know having having worked in the business of the news cycle and all that social issues have now coincided with the league so all those things you probably couldn't have really predicted <hes> but i also also think that <hes> roger kind of inhabits the job differently. Maybe them paul did before. I'm a huge fan of paul's. He's a super bright awful awful lawyer a little <hes>. Maybe <hes> on the quieter side <hes> and the job was quieter than and <hes> roger as i say he like came him out of the womb like shaking hands he loves people he loves to engage you love to listen <hes> get to know people and <hes> he's it has a very strong sense of self and he bottom line loves his game like you cannot believe he did not sleep teddy bear we have pictures of him sleeping with a small let uh other football football when he was little <hes> so and he really had <hes> you know he didn't dream about playing the superbowl he like like he wrote a letter to his dad. Upon graduation from college thing i have two goals one is to make you proud pop and the other is to become commissioner of the national football league. So it really was a dream for him. <hes> i think he felt like he could <hes> you know kinda as he talks a lot about protecting the shield. I think that's very is very important to him tall fantastic and so i just think he jumped in with two feet and <hes> so it did become very big. <hes> you know a lot of the stuff has been unexpected did but he keeps <hes> a very cool head. I've never met anybody who kind of handles the pressure like he does he. He wakes up every day a and this says we are grateful to be part of this. I'm so lucky and says i talk all the time so <hes> it's been really really fine like chaotic on days a is about <hes> but really really fun and it sounds like <hes> your your sort of being drawn to politics you found yourself. Someone who you said was shaken. Shaken hands out of the woman knows how to handle these situations so it certainly feels like he's got you know sort of a pen shot for that kind of life to which works out well for the job that he's in and i but i wanna make it clear like he's not somebody who shakes hands 'cause he's looking for votes and wants people to like him like he does that..

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"skinner" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

The Adam Buxton Podcast

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"skinner" Discussed on The Adam Buxton Podcast

"Frank skinner and he says it is so nice the very famous giveaway there's a lot of friends so there you go this year i i'm very excited about me senior like i said okay live so it reflects log on to talk about you know i will have myself realizes oh hang myself and then he carries on with that joke for a long time and a hanging oh this is towards the end of that risk let's get a news the times they go so they also talked myself so he's going on around you and then you should have stepped in and it's really interesting because you disarm him and chasing him and then he then he apologizes which i've never heard of but it's there and it's just sort of make sweet yeah yeah i love long ago that i love you i love you you chinese long gunter i don't know or no senate well good luck i'm serious about that i'm gonna get out the way now i'm sorry i don't know i'm sorry yeah and he said if humbled by the fat you say you changed my life and he and he goes i don't know i dunno it doesn't compute he doesn't know what to do in that moment is great i think since solid yeah how did you feel when you came out of see 'cause it couldn't have been a relaxing encounter no but like i say we sat for quite a while afterwards untapped you know you you are 'em he's only ticking mohawk i think they end of it i felt some human blooms romaine and also so you know i think and i wanted to tell him not anyway i think when you know with people you rarely admired like that won't tell them but you only see one side tell them that there's nowhere to go in the conversation dennis power dynamic is totally skew price he's such a it's such an old could and i i in on one level i need another level i hung like on the radio show why do we have this price price redacted to sell the highest when you eighty giants i got a text from state ferry says i absolutely love the show it's brilliant and could you play i'm not saying it rained out about yourself so i just i think that's wrong so yeah maybe it was a kind of a dramatic age he was getting a bit you know on time i don't know but i think it was but listening to that it was like i'm just gonna channel eight i'm gonna tell in el monte maine's much the full mates and right and if he's still or but at least of of dumb and interestingly as you say when you listen to that he responds to it yeah it's like he's he's he's he's tiny bit embarrassed for himself like he's a bit of shame seller yeah saw fucking hell he was funny though will i forgave him so what did he know that you're a doctor who fan i don't know if he did and he says i kept the subject comes up oh yeah because you say to him is it true that you were offered the part of doctor who are okay and he says yeah and then he carries on in says isn't jalen's will save eight the city in this kind of withering away and then it says that he lost his i know what's his after that fifty the like we did that it sounded like he did right and then the other thing that made me laugh was he goes off from one about a dozen grapes i just enjoy bands and have musical ambitions yeah he says the edit face me is all these oxes you know in groups in australia citing really underside small groups like he says you know i just think we did i says it'll be following their own groups don't let the new jaws and all oh yeah like kevin bacon stuff and don't yeah yeah yeah so slowly always really well i do arosa not should be bound.

Frank skinner
"skinner" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"skinner" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"This Skinner on the show. Gone. Bye. These. Swings. Slaying this Benny you shoes. Kiss me. Strike. Thank god. It's minded day, positively. When like not you rub journey your face. The. David. CBS FM thirty on the button here. CBS have another shot by the high low Jack Fahd game coming up bad nine ten this morning. This is the pick of the week the best day of the week on Monday rest of the week blows..

CBS Benny Jack Fahd Skinner David
"skinner" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

04:45 min | 2 years ago

"skinner" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"Skinner is now in the league with a, gene. Plus twelve Gabriel. Eleven. Sabers with goal goalie. Gerry should common? Bill already at twelve. Thirty six remaining in period. Number two is automobile second goal of the game here at key Bank center. The senators go to work in the sabers zone. From the corner ill leave it there. The Corbett for Bod Carrigan is he works out of the far corner middle stat with the watch. Back to the point deaf. Broken up chance for breakaway pass ahead. Connor Sherry cuts in. buffalo seven. Connor. Hair too far. Wing creek. Sean goaltender is taken everything away. There hasn't been a very. Conor Sherri, Sherri, I. To. Oh that is good to see. We talked about secondary story from guys getting themselves a little bit once again. You're seeing more and more the favorite guys stepping up and getting those opportunities capitalize on it. All it's gonna do is built confidence for with this team. Maybe a little bit of a below game. Like, this is going to go on up on ways for Ottawa Senators head coach is called a timeout. And he is he is what them have it. Summer paying attention. Others are trying to get out of the way. Right now, there's a lot of spouse. Just like HAMAs guys on the series venture looking back out there. Give me another shot by name. So it's good to see here. But you gotta maintain too. Mike McKenna coming into this game. It's his first game of the season. Interim relief of Anderson and not his first career game. He's played twenty four up until this point is six twelve and to record coming in. But is face to sabres team here tonight. They're up, rob. You talked about they played at good third period. And on what was important to carried over. That's exactly what they do. They have in. You know, what they're taking advantage of a young team the way they should have the other night. They let them off the hook tonight. They're keeping their finger on the guys already established that four check that they want to get down there. Checking nam they're keeping the pressure on the Ottawa Senators, and when that happened young guys tend to make mistakes, they try to do too much. They turned the puck over or they miss assignments. And right now. Sables are definitely capitalizing on all the mistakes that are happening on the other side automobiles the likes to Brady kacoos on injured reserve, John Gabriel, patios Zac Smith and Ben Harper just to name a few so injuries to some real key players, and that brings up the point of rob mentioning there's a lot of young guys in the team that probably wouldn't be seeing ice time right now with those guys back in the lineup and healthy. But as part of the game and the sabres up seventy one here back to work in the offensive zone. I haven't heard that for a while. Old server eight years. Sabers will keep it in at the line. Now, it's a chance for auto. Stone cuts in. Shot goes wide. Stone trying to dig it out of the corner Rodriguez spins it to the man at the top of the circle of quick shots stuff by Omar. Pavlina psalm are coming up with a huge safe. The stones going to get a great opportunity. To try to be aware of prevent little turnovers and make a mistake trying to do too much your stone on a breakaway. Right. Mark stays with him. And he comes across gets that, Pat. Real quick rate. There pushes the puck off into the corner. That's an S. Let's say because you give up a goal there. You know, you're at seven to getting back in but you ripple onto that momentum. The that you've just tried to create here at scoring the last goal. Sabers off the draw their own zone will lifted right down on and on.

rob Connor Sherry sabres Ottawa John Gabriel key Bank center Skinner Conor Sherri Gerry Bill Mike McKenna Wing creek Mark Anderson Bod Carrigan Sean Corbett Pavlina Stone Brady kacoos
"skinner" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"skinner" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Skinner last of the street survivors farewell tour with the Charlie Daniels. Band and the Marshall Tucker, band their DT energy music theater Tomorrow night legal street drag racing returns to Woodward avenue the speed party is set for Saturday at the m one concourse in Pontiac. Drag, racing starts at eleven AM tomorrow through. Sunday the monster. Energy, NASCAR Cup series is at m. i. s. practice and qualifying is. Tomorrow Chicago REO speedwagon are DT energy music theater Sunday at seven next week. Is the huge concert week Monday night beyond saying Jay z. or at Ford field amend. Tuesday and Wednesday it's Drake. At Little Caesars have a great weekend Roberta just seen at w., w j NewsRadio nine fifty WBZ news time to. Twenty two women's clothing retailer. Made well could be. Moving. Into downtown Detroit company under the j. crew umbrella Has posted. Job openings for a new store on Woodward Crain's Detroit businesses reporting the location will likely be between John are and grand river it would join two other locations in southeast Michigan at the Somerset collection and in the Arbor hill shopping center in Ann Arbor made well best known for its denim selection and the twelve day giveaway coming up at two twenty three WWE news time to twenty two Hi it's. Jamie progressive's number one number two employee leave a message hey Jamie it's me Jamie this is your daily pep talk I know it's been rough going ever since, people found out about your acapella group mad harmony but you. Will bounce back I mean you're the guy always helping people find coverage options with the name your price tool it should be you giving me the pep talk now get out there hit that high note and take mad harmony all the way to nationals this year Sorry it's pitchy progressive. Casualty insurance company and affiliates price and coverage match limited by state law let's. Say. You.

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