35 Burst results for "Skin Cancer"

"skin cancer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

02:45 min | Last month

"skin cancer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Available for primary care providers for skin cancer. So we're excited about that just in kind of being being a first globally. We spoke earlier about. It's kind of i any kind of skin. Dancer tool in the us for product providers. Also as i mentioned the first medical product in the world that uses this type of optical spectroscopy so the company and the inventor of this field is spectrography professor of israel very excited about that. And who knows what other opportunities might be ahead for. You know this opticals spectroscopy so fascinating work. Lots to build upon and certainly exciting for the people that are not receiving the care that could potentially be receiving the care. The right care moving forward. Yeah knowing that that's actually somebody mentioned that. Because there's a dozens of pure viewed publications on the use of elastic scattering spectroscopy in assessing malignant tissue. Only a few of them Are on skin. you know. Obviously some of our work included among that. But there's a lot so a lot out there for other cancer types. I know of professor bijon his group. You've done tons of work on colon i think. Also there's been a few studies papers on esophageal cancer. So certainly this types of technology you'll lot long development cycles right some the scheme of things you know couple of decades old in the invented. It's relatively new. But i think we really benefit from the optical noninvasive nature paired with the very recent developments. I would say machine learning kind of having a new common noninvasive optical modality that is able to benefit from the very recent advances in machine learning. I think we certainly were. Were fortunate. That both of those trends. You know kinda noninvasive assessment and monitoring and whatnot as well as machine learning have both become such important parts of healthcare tools and products and is big focus for health technologies moving forward because obviously that you know those are key aspects of our product. Yeah no some great college. There cody and exciting so man. I mean Congrats you guys Certainly rooting for the release or the approval and released here in the us. But in the meantime you know the the commercialization abroad and so with that in mind You know what what. Call the action. Or what thoughts would you like to leave us with. And then the best place that listeners could get in touch with you and and the dermot censor team sure will. At the end of the day you know in terms of closing thoughts right identity. Anyone at any time is literally able to see skin cancer so effectively detecting and treating it. It's really a healthcare boils down to healthcare access or even could be considered a public health issue. So it's all about for.

bijon skin cancer esophageal cancer israel us cancer cody
The Benefits of Using a Near Infrared Sauna

A Healthy Bite - ThatOrganicMom

01:47 min | 3 months ago

The Benefits of Using a Near Infrared Sauna

"Want to share with you all of the reasons why i purchased the infrared sauna and what it has done so far. What the benefits have been for me. Now i've moved around a lot in my life and there's no denying that sunny days brighten my mood. I always feel better when. I'm enjoying more time in the sun in the area where i live right now. I don't get quite as much sun as i did. I lived in florida. So when i lived in florida i always had good vitamin d levels. I didn't experience depression. And i definitely didn't experience seasonal blues like. I do sometimes living here in tennessee. The sun's rays regulate our sleeping patterns and it supports physiological processes. That help our body to just function better. So i understand a lot of people have become more and more afraid of the sun and we tend to sometimes forget that de son also has really a powerful. He leaned benefits when used appropriately. One of the best ways to reap the benefits of sunlight without necessarily Overexposure or the risk of skin cancer is by using near infrared sauna. Now this isn't the main reason why i wanted an infrared sauna and i'll get into that a little bit more as i go along and share my story but this is definitely a bonus side benefit that as if you do experience seasonal affective disorder. You couldn't possibly benefit from fifteen to twenty minutes of daily infrared light therapy.

Florida Depression Tennessee Skin Cancer Seasonal Affective Disorder
"skin cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

05:39 min | 11 months ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Can you tell us first of all. Why would someone need to have this type of surgery. And how common is it to need it. This surgery is a relatively uncommon surgery when you look at the nation or a region as a whole however. It's very common for us here at the mayo clinic ends particularly in my small group. This is something that for us instead of being very rare as actually a weekly if not more frequent than that occurrence that we're doing these surgeries and the most common reasons why we are rebuilding noses at a small component or even the entire thing is skin cancer trauma or a birth abnormalities. Someone was born with well. We all hear that skin cancer is on the rise and does this mean that you are seeing more patients who need reconstructive surgery. Absolutely i think that it is two parts for us. One is that skin cancer is on the rise and we have a generation that lived out in the sun and got some exposure. And we're taught that that was normal to pace themselves with iodine or other things to get that nice rosy tan glow an now as we continue to starting to see them unfortunately have the side effects of skin cancer. Additionally down here as we've developed this kind of small group of experts in this and people are recognizing that level of expertise..

skin cancer mayo clinic
"skin cancer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here and two day. I have the privilege of hosting cody. Simmons is a bio engineer and entrepreneur that has spent his whole career dedicated to bringing new health technologies to physicians and patients prior to his tenure with dermot sensor cody lead commercial efforts for a silicon valley medical device screening startup and also held business development and commercial strategy roles at genetic cody join dermot sensor in may two thousand sixteen as co founder and ceo. He has led the company through raising fifteen million in financing extensive product-development efforts multiple clinical studies and most recently successful regulatory clearances that now allow for the product to be sold commercially. He is an excellent leader in health. Care taken really. You know the advantage of of the advances in digital health to help primary caregivers as well as patience maximize their health cody. I'm really excited to have you on the podcast to learn more about what you guys are up to and more about you. Thanks for joining. I appreciate that and the excitement is shared <hes>. Thanks for having me today. And like i said very excited to be speaking with you and to have our work featured on your podcast. Absolutely code eight. Now dermot sensor is is. I mean just fascinating evaluating skin cancer in a much simpler way. <hes> one on learn more about this as the listeners. Do too but before we dive into that. I love the know more about what inspires your work and healthcare. Sure will i think first and foremost helping patients <hes>. Is really my inspiration for working in healthcare hands down. I think that everyone faces at least some challenges and frustrations <hes>. With their job and their day to day work. And i think our company and me personally you know no exception to that would be called work but dinner the day knowing that if you're able to overcome those challenges in your start up and your product is successful knowing that success will benefit hundreds or thousands of patients that is incredibly motivating for me. And i'd say in line with that. I think for entrepreneurs you know. The common expression is that we're supposed to dress unmet needs and as as you've seen obviously from from from all your your work in the podcast. Unfortunately there's no shortage of unmet needs in healthcare and many of them are very large. Ones that fixing not only greatly benefit people's health but depending on the solution also oftentimes i think has a potential to sit health system money and of course patients ultimately pay for parole healthcare whether it's directly or through their employer for private insurance or through taxes that go to medicare and medicaid <unk>. For sure yeah. And you know we were experiencing so much change and you know. The epidemic has accelerated that change in digital medicine and telemedicine remote care what you guys are doing fascinating and skin. Cancer is a huge problem. It goes unaddressed like undiscovered. It's way too late and so tell us a little about what you guys are doing to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure sure and yet it really is a big problem and you know a clear. Our product is not yet approved by the fda for use in the us but as you mentioned in it is available and certain areas abroad. Who just announced that. Dermot sensor received seamark for sale in europe as well as regulatory clearances australia in a new zealand. So for the u. s. Yeah so that that's been exciting milestone for us and in the us we hope to be approved next year and then after that to start. Adding value to healthcare system in a couple of men was to just address your question so our our company's mission is to improve patients access to effective stink cancer checks as you noted. Writing cancer is very common. It's actually the most common cancer in the united states in melanoma the number one cancer killer of young women fortunately effective effectively skin cancer can be successfully treated if it's detected early enough unfortunately the average wait time in the us dermatologist's appointment once a two months and because of that and other cost access issues. The majority of americans report having never been checked her skin cancer in illness. Small fraction of americans do so annually. Which is direct recognition for many of us <hes>. So our our main objective to fulfill our mission of improving patients accessed effected skin cancer. Sharks is really empower. America's hundreds of thousands of frontline providers primary care providers like family physicians internists clinicians at retail clinics to more effectively. Catch skin cancer <hes>. Study showed that primary care providers they're not dermatologists and that that they only correctly decides to refer biopsy a malignant lesion as little as fifty four percent of the time but melanoma fighters survival rates. Go from well under fifty percent for stage. Four melanoma to high nineties for stage. one mellon all not <hes>. so virtual helps detect nominal. Earlier helps these primary care providers which by definition frontline providers right so the patients often in early. That would be huge. So so detecting melanoma earlier. It's this to help a bad dad. Be a huge benefit for patients. Survival and also treatment costs relate stage. No no law can be over a million dollars whereas stage one mellon on the treatment typically just cost a two thousand dollars

Equipping Frontline Providers in The Fight Against Skin Cancer with Cody Simmons

Outcomes Rocket

05:35 min | 1 year ago

Equipping Frontline Providers in The Fight Against Skin Cancer with Cody Simmons

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here and two day. I have the privilege of hosting cody. Simmons is a bio engineer and entrepreneur that has spent his whole career dedicated to bringing new health technologies to physicians and patients prior to his tenure with dermot sensor cody lead commercial efforts for a silicon valley medical device screening startup and also held business development and commercial strategy roles at genetic cody join dermot sensor in may two thousand sixteen as co founder and ceo. He has led the company through raising fifteen million in financing extensive product-development efforts multiple clinical studies and most recently successful regulatory clearances that now allow for the product to be sold commercially. He is an excellent leader in health. Care taken really. You know the advantage of of the advances in digital health to help primary caregivers as well as patience maximize their health cody. I'm really excited to have you on the podcast to learn more about what you guys are up to and more about you. Thanks for joining. I appreciate that and the excitement is shared Thanks for having me today. And like i said very excited to be speaking with you and to have our work featured on your podcast. Absolutely code eight. Now dermot sensor is is. I mean just fascinating evaluating skin cancer in a much simpler way. one on learn more about this as the listeners. Do too but before we dive into that. I love the know more about what inspires your work and healthcare. Sure will i think first and foremost helping patients Is really my inspiration for working in healthcare hands down. I think that everyone faces at least some challenges and frustrations With their job and their day to day work. And i think our company and me personally you know no exception to that would be called work but dinner the day knowing that if you're able to overcome those challenges in your start up and your product is successful knowing that success will benefit hundreds or thousands of patients that is incredibly motivating for me. And i'd say in line with that. I think for entrepreneurs you know. The common expression is that we're supposed to dress unmet needs and as as you've seen obviously from from from all your your work in the podcast. Unfortunately there's no shortage of unmet needs in healthcare and many of them are very large. Ones that fixing not only greatly benefit people's health but depending on the solution also oftentimes i think has a potential to sit health system money and of course patients ultimately pay for parole healthcare whether it's directly or through their employer for private insurance or through taxes that go to medicare and medicaid For sure yeah. And you know we were experiencing so much change and you know. The epidemic has accelerated that change in digital medicine and telemedicine remote care what you guys are doing fascinating and skin. Cancer is a huge problem. It goes unaddressed like undiscovered. It's way too late and so tell us a little about what you guys are doing to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure sure and yet it really is a big problem and you know a clear. Our product is not yet approved by the fda for use in the us but as you mentioned in it is available and certain areas abroad. Who just announced that. Dermot sensor received seamark for sale in europe as well as regulatory clearances australia in a new zealand. So for the u. s. Yeah so that that's been exciting milestone for us and in the us we hope to be approved next year and then after that to start. Adding value to healthcare system in a couple of men was to just address your question so our our company's mission is to improve patients access to effective stink cancer checks as you noted. Writing cancer is very common. It's actually the most common cancer in the united states in melanoma the number one cancer killer of young women fortunately effective effectively skin cancer can be successfully treated if it's detected early enough unfortunately the average wait time in the us dermatologist's appointment once a two months and because of that and other cost access issues. The majority of americans report having never been checked her skin cancer in illness. Small fraction of americans do so annually. Which is direct recognition for many of us So our our main objective to fulfill our mission of improving patients accessed effected skin cancer. Sharks is really empower. America's hundreds of thousands of frontline providers primary care providers like family physicians internists clinicians at retail clinics to more effectively. Catch skin cancer Study showed that primary care providers they're not dermatologists and that that they only correctly decides to refer biopsy a malignant lesion as little as fifty four percent of the time but melanoma fighters survival rates. Go from well under fifty percent for stage. Four melanoma to high nineties for stage. one mellon all not so virtual helps detect nominal. Earlier helps these primary care providers which by definition frontline providers right so the patients often in early. That would be huge. So so detecting melanoma earlier. It's this to help a bad dad. Be a huge benefit for patients. Survival and also treatment costs relate stage. No no law can be over a million dollars whereas stage one mellon on the treatment typically just cost a two thousand dollars

Skin Cancer Marquez Cancer Simmons Cody Dermot Sensor America Melanoma Medicare FDA New Zealand Europe Australia Sharks
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Board certified radiation Doctor, New York and one of the few in the world that's who I am. And when I give advice, it's based on years of practice and years of study. Usually much more study in years and board certification than most doctors you'll find, and we'll talk about the skin cancer is a woman who came from his former Soviet Union. She's 61 years old, and she had a skin cancer on her right knows who was eating through the skin eating through her nose whose destructive it was also rate of mass. You measured about a centimeter and a half growing just eating through you conceal. It's eating through the nose. There's not much of a normal knows tissue there and she saw dermatologists insurgent who wants to remove the right part of her nose and That's called Moe's Emily. Just most surgeons. She just does not want that destruction that excavation of her nose and she learned about our special skin cancer program. And by the way, we have a new Skin cancer book to show you and you may want to take a look at that your hands on that. It's very, very, very informative. Anyway, we talked about all the options and with her would be a short course of treatment, No cutting and no bleeding. This is the work that we do treating skin cancers. Base ourselves and squamous cells and character. I can't Roman other cancers of the skin, So if you have a cancer, the skin or if you have a bump, it's not going away. They want to give us a call. Two and two choices or come in you get a booklet and get a DVD or you can come in and get a booklet. Many people come to our office threat in the middle of New York City, Manhattan, sort of half a million people every day in our neighborhood between Penn Station and Macy's and Grand Central in Port Authority, in times, where there's a lot of people in our neighborhood, and you might be one of them and pick up some booklets. You pick up some extra book was people like to look at the skin cancer book a toe learn. Would skin cancers look like? Look what most looks like you could see pictures of people who had most of their nose and it's not a very appealing picture compared to our treatment. No cutting, no bleeding. This is the work that we do every day at 13 80 for Broadway, Broadway and 38 Street in the heart of New York City. Don't care about a man who comes in with prostate cancer. He has a Gleeson, a PSA 30. He also had them Foma. He was born in New Jersey 69 years old. He has two Children. And while he had them Foma treated successfully 10 years ago, and now he has this cancer of his prostate Gleason aid and he knows with surgery. Success rate is very low. It's about 20% with us. The majority of people are treated. He went to a doctor, the neighbouring state. You did a biopsy without anesthesia of the prostate. Well, we don't like that because we don't like people in pain. So if you have a need for a prostate evaluation or prostate biopsy might want to come in. And we can arrange to it that if you need a biopsy, get it painlessly..

skin cancer cancer Gleeson New York City New York Foma Soviet Union New Jersey Penn Station Macy Port Authority Manhattan
Washington's Rivera has cancer, plans to coach

Toby and Chilli

00:15 sec | 1 year ago

Washington's Rivera has cancer, plans to coach

"Rivera says he's got a form of skin cancer, he says it's in the early stages and is very curable. The 58 year old coach said he will continue to lead his team, but he has a plan in place just in case he can't and, according to a

Rivera Cancer
Washington coach Ron Rivera has a form of skin cancer

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

Washington coach Ron Rivera has a form of skin cancer

"Head coach Ron Rivera has revealed he has cancer. The cancer squamous cell carcinoma is a form of skin cancer. Rivera says he spotted the lump on his neck back in July and went to the doctor who told him he can keep coaching as he undergoes treatment. Rivera says he'll do just that, though he does have a plan B in case he needs to step up. Side That could be defensive coordinator Jack Del Rio, who has previous head coaching experience with two teams.

Ron Rivera Jack Del Rio Defensive Coordinator
Washington head coach Ron Rivera diagnosed with cancer

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

Washington head coach Ron Rivera diagnosed with cancer

"Team coach Ron Rivera has been diagnosed with skin cancer, he says it's the in the early stages and says it's very treatable and curable. The good news this morning. The diagnosis has been reported by ESPN. The 58 year old says. It's a business as usual for now, but a plan B is in place in the event. That something happens and he is not able to coach Stay tuned more than

Ron Rivera Espn
Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

BrainStuff

05:19 min | 1 year ago

Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

"As I record this, it is August which here in the northern hemisphere means hours of outdoor time under the blazing summer Sun. But even though many of us do wear sunscreen to help prevent sunburn skin cancer and the kind of skin damage that the beauty industry calls premature aging recent researches found that we're not applying that sunscreen is thickly as we should hang its effectiveness by about forty percent. Sunscreen is rated for Sun Protection factor or SPF WITH SPF thirty able to block ninety, seven percent of ultraviolet rays, the higher, the SPF, the greater the protection although even SPF one hundred doesn't block one hundred percent of UV light. The problem according to this recent research out of University College. London is that few of US US enough sunscreen to enjoy those high levels of protection. Lead author entity young explained to US via email that to calculate ratings in the lab. Sunscreen is applied thickness of two milligrams of product per each square centimeter of skin. He said, an average woman has about one point, seven square meters or eighteen point three square feet of skin for a whole body sunscreen she will need about thirty three grams or one point. One fluid ounces with three whole body applications a day that's about one hundred grams or three point four fluid ounces. For reference, a fluid ounces roughly equivalent to a shot glass of sunscreen and a large tube of sunscreen holds eight fluid ounces of product. So a person spending a full day in the Sun should use about half a tube by themself. Are you using that much sunscreen probably not young and his colleagues estimate that our real life application of Sunscreen is closer to about point seven five milligrams per square centimeter at less than forty percent of the recommended thickness as a result or not getting anything close to the ninety seven percent protection promised on a bottle of SPF. Thirty. The good news from young study is that you can get away with using less product with SPF of fifty or higher. They found that even the real world application rate of point seven, five milligrams of sunscreen per square centimeter if using SPF, fifty provided considerable DNA protection compared to untreated skin. So does that mean that you should run out and buy the most expensive SPF one hundred or spread your regular SPF thirty as thick as cream cheese on a BAGEL. We also spoke with Ivy Lee a board certified dermatologist based in Pasadena California who explained that you could. But that the best daily Sun Protection Strategy is to keep it realistic. Lee, said I tell my patients to go for the highest SPF possible. That feels good on the skin for daily use. How do you know you're really applying two milligrams per square centimeter? No one knows we don't want to induce anxiety over this we want to build healthy habits. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States and exposure to ultra-violet or UV. Light is a risk factor for all types of cancer including melanoma more than nine thousand, three, hundred Americans die for melanoma every year. UNPROTECTED EXPOSURE TO UV light damages the DNA and skin cells leaving them more susceptible to skin cancer DNA damage can result from either a few severe sunburns or a lifetime of cumulative sun exposure. Incredibly the American, Academy of Dermatology reports that getting just five or more blistering sunburns between the ages of fifteen and twenty will increase your overall melanoma risk by percents. and. Lee says that although skin cancer is less prevalent in people of color exposure to UV, light can also cause premature aging they sunscreen use will slow the appearance of wrinkles and age spots for all skin tones. Healthy sun-protection habits include avoiding sun exposure during the peak between ten am to two PM wearing a wide brimmed hat and sunglasses went outside and full sun, and of course, applying sunscreen on all exposed skin even in overcast conditions. For full coverage, Lee recommends starting the day with a cream or lotion type sunscreen preferably fifteen to thirty minutes before you step outside. Instead of measuring out of full shot glass of product, Lee tells her clients to think of applying sunscreen like a massage or can fully into the skin without missing a spot since body sizes vary and product spread. Differently there's no preset amount that works for everyone. Lease suggests reserving spray or powder type sunscreen for fast reapplication on the go the ideal is to reapply every two hours but lease as a more realistic plan is to reapply around lunchtime if you're going to be out all day. If you're heading out on water sanders snow more frequent applications are required because UV rays reflect off of those surfaces. According to Lee it's a myth that you can't burn the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet. Also, tablets and other hand held devices reflect UV light too. So pick a shady spot if you're going to spend some time in the sun scrolling.

Skin Cancer Ivy Lee United States Premature Aging Sunburn University College London Dna Damage California Pasadena Academy Of Dermatology
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Urinary Life works and he's happy. He's very happy about the treatment. That was terrible of 76 year old man is also happy. He's married. He's got two kids, and he had a skin cancer, the basal cell cancer on the face. It was growing and growing and growing. His dermatologist who's a surgeon, dermatologist, dermatologist, terming skin and largest means study someone who studies a skin. It's actually a dermatologist is surgeon who cuts on the skin usually well, This is a man who's 76 they had a big cancer on his cheek. And his dermatologist wanted do most, which is like an excavation surgery on his cheek, often with patches or graphs, or pulling the skin together after large amounts of Skinner. Removed while this man had three skin cancers in five years ago, and they were never treated and this cancer keeps on, growing and growing and growing and still forming. He did have some most surgery on his ears. And he's worried about how it looks in the part of his ear, which is no longer with him. When most surgeries done, Usually part of the patient's body is thrown into a bucket. Well, this man likes the idea about radiosurgery the fact that we're able to treat skin cancers. With no cutting and no bleeding, And that's in fact what we did. Almost two years ago, he came to us with a basal cell cancer of the left cheek and temple. He was diagnosed three years ago. He let it grow. Why did he let it grow? Let it grow. Because it had most radical surgery and he just did not want to have more radical surgery. He knows with most radical surgery that the surgery could be deforming. And painful and multiple steps and procedures and excavating the tumor, removing the skin and taking a pass from somewhere else. He didn't want that, and he came here for non invasive treatment and we treat Thousands of people of skin cancers over decades. This is the work we do, and we do treat people over the most critical, delicate parts of the face by the eyes and ears and nose and mouth and also The hands and feet and legs and arms and trunk neck. This's the work we do every day here at 30 for Broadway. And if you call her office now or come in, you'll get a booklet and you'll see a special section about skin cancers,.

skin cancer Skinner
"skin cancer" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Died wasn't a national story. He had skin cancer. He beat it and that he had skin cancer a couple years ago wasn't a national story. But you know the because it didn't serve anybody's political purpose. It didn't fit the narrative. It's just that he was just a guy getting cancer. A lot of people get cancer. But you know this guy, a Republican governor, who were in a wide open state has now been struck down. It's It's the great It's irony. Of the classic Greek. Tragic, right? No, No, it's just a coincidence. God Yeah, six. Toe three, says normal flu is deadlier for kids and shot all the schools that, Yeah, That's what Dr Scott Atlas said. We we We tweeted that interview I was Scot Atlas from the Hoover Institution. He's a He's an MD. He's not a PhD in social welfare. He's an M D. And he said the same thing. More more kids die of the flu that have died of covert 19. Basically, no kids have died of covert 19 not have died in Massachusetts. 603 California never opened up. Why are they spiking? Could could it be the rioting? Could be a good day. 844 542 42 919 Democrats in mainstream media are AH R P OED aboutthe Roger Stone pardon but gave no worries with thousands of criminals being released from jail. I just don't get them. Yeah. I mean, how about all these have so many of these crimes that have been committed in New York and in recent months have been committed by the people that were let out of jail first on the no bail. They had committed crimes and they you know, and the normal circumstances they couldn't come up with the bail. That's did still be behind bars. And then you had on top of that. All the people being released from jail because of these, the so called the danger that they face to their public health from the Corona virus, and they're committing crimes toe. Eight for four or 542 42. Well, thank your calls when we come back. What's the number one sign of a bad home security system? Ah, Home security system That's so complicated. You never use it. This is exactly the type of security system simply safe has spent a decade fighting against. They believe that simple is safer..

skin cancer Dr Scott Atlas flu Hoover Institution Roger Stone New York Massachusetts. California
"skin cancer" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

04:30 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Skin cancer this is another reason why we treat so many people with skin cancer that's the other reason why so many people with skin cancer do not want to have mows MOH has surgery do not want to have surgery to route one of radical surgery one surgery leads to another calamity this man's nose cancer led him to become blind about the cancer is back in the nose and the I what a difference it makes by getting a fresh second opinion here he went to six doctors at six hospitals unknown examined his nose wow they all want to remove his eyes they were eye doctors who wanted to do their thing which is I. surgery known recommended go see doctor leader unknown motives knows no one found the recurrence of the cancer what a difference it makes by coming to thirteen eighty four Broadway another woman eighty three years old she's whittled has two children and she's been caring for a handicapped child at home for decades and had a needle biopsy of the breast was first thought to be a precancer and then she actually had papillary cancer she was seen by a surgeon in one of the neighboring boroughs you want to do lumpectomy but even stager up well we staged her up and found that the cancer already traveled to the chest so what good would a surgery due on the breast when the cancer all ready traveled to the chest is another surgeon pushing her to have surgery in his area of expertise the breast but understand that breast cancer any cancer that's the definition of cancer can travel can spread and lucky for her she came she got staged up we found the cancer we found that it traveled to the long that there was no need for her to have breast surgery were able to treat the breast and the long with radio surgery we're able to offer all the options and that's why she came here that's why so many people comes to learn about what they have to learn about the options and not just be sold a bill of goods and another patient a sixty seven year old position he's married with two children he came to me with a large prostate body was found actually to have a gastrointestinal stromal tumor cancer yeah the cancers abdomen who founded because he wasn't feeling well he wanted to have chemotherapy offered him all the options in the scheme of therapies that are supposed to be very good he have the chemotherapies which are supposed to be very good and it didn't work he had came on came on came I went to a famous doctor yet came on chemo came out did not work the cancer kept growing around the liver kept growing around the stomach masses of cancer Kaplan growing despite so called best treatment and then he came back to me as a doctor later but I don't know this cables not working the special chemo it's not working for my G. I. S. T. tumor and I said well we can offer you other treatments another option is a doctor later what are the other options as of now all of them including radio surgery and he chose to register due to two masses they were treated with chemotherapy the Kim is forced to be so special the immunologic therapies so special didn't work we should them with focused beam radiation radio surgery and he is now in remission both masses are gone no new masses you doing well no side effects no adverse effects because radiosurgery just goes to the cancer in general so I like chemo or immunotherapy which goes throughout the bodies like putting your body in a tub of you poison and other men will talk about sixty five with the Gleason seven cancer PSA four point seven I saw him years ago he came back this week for follow up his PSA is zero he's in remission doing very well and he's happy about that I saw another man who came to be eighty two years old is a magazine publisher of mass on his tongue as a squamous cancer of the tongue and a massive back and he went to the head of surgery one of the most famous hospitals they want to cut off his tongue and open up his naked do a trek well you came to me this is a man who was out of the public who knows if they cut off part of his tongue that will never speak normally one eat normally in the surgeon forgot to power on that exactly given radiation anyway so we talked about giving them radiation only and leave his tongue intact and avoid the radical surgery on his tongue and his knack doing the last surgery I gather certain for got to tell him about non surgical options and he forgot to talk about the whole package deal because surgery by itself.

Skin cancer
Melanoma Medicine

2 Docs Talk

08:15 min | 1 year ago

Melanoma Medicine

"Just to be clear there are lots of different kinds of skin cancer knowing them as just one of many chewed chewed happens to be the kind of cancer that comes from land sites which are the cells in our skin that make pigment and it's the third most common type of skin cancer right right behind squamous cell and Basal the Cell Carcinoma. And I would say it's also the scariest meaning people rarely die from squamous or Basal cell cancers but definitely can with melanomas right but let's not feed people out the five year survival for all. MELANOMAS is greater than ninety percent so that's good true. The thing to know is that survival rates are dependent on the size of the melanoma. Ah really the depth of the melanoma so if the melanoma just involves the top layer of skin. That's good treatment is almost always curious. Yeah but if the melanoma extends down into deeper layers of the skin or even metastases to different parts of the body then the five year. Survival rates dropped precipitously so for stage four disease which is the worst. The five year survival rate is pretty crappy. I think around twenty five percent. Yes so for obvious reasons. There has been a big emphasis on prevention and early detection. The idea being if you can find these things before they grew too big or too deep in prognosis will be better right so the first thing with respect to prevention is who is at risk because the risk of developing a melanoma is not the same for everyone. Yeah so people who are fair complected have blonde hair especially red hair and blue or green. Eyes are at an increased risk from Elena's. Yeah I think it's like twenty times more common in white people than black people. Yeah all white people I guess. Yeah Yeah and also if you spend a lot of time in the sun or -taining booth that's not good. Yeah we're talking to you. Donald trump does he couldn't attaining booth. I thought that was just a Tan from the spray on. It might be anyway if if you've got sunburn when you were a kid or teenager that's also not good. You know every time I right now. I'm just like checking every box I just cringe. I mean growing growing up. We spent so much time at the local pool. My mom would just drop us off at ten. For Time. Warner cod same. The lifeguard lifeguard was our babysitter but anyway that wasn't good. It was fun but not good. Yeah also win. The lifeguard wasn't there we douse ourselves with ketchup. And then fall at the diving boards like we'd been shot. I still feel really guilty about that. But it was also not good in a little disturbing. No good for the soul. But we digress. There are also some heritable disorders orders and genetic mutations that ran families that's put some people at risk and Radiation therapy in childhood also. So that's not good and people who just have a lot moles that increases the risk of developing melanoma. Okay so that brings up a question. If you're somebody that has a lot of moles. How can we tell them? Melanoma from Benign Neva or a normal old mole. What is melanoma look like? Well there are some characteristics that can help us tell good from bad but before we get into those we should probably say see. That doctors aren't really very good at predicting good from bad. I mean we're better than a crap. Shoot you mean better than fifty fifty right but even dermatologists the folks that look at these things all the time. I'm only get it right about seventy percent of the time so means that means if you're a good dermatologists you're still be removing normals. Pretty often right so anyway. There are a couple of tricks they teach you in Moscow to help you get it right one being the ABCD rule. Okay let's see if we can remember that far back as stands for a symmetry if the mole is asymmetric metric. That's not a good time right and be is borders. The borders are irregular. Also not good for color so lots of different colors red white blue also black and gray not good a mole should be just one homogeneous color right not a variety just read is okay just blues okay but not various colors then. D is diameter if the mole is six millimetres wide greater gus worrisome and finally which stands for evolve if you've had them all for years and then suddenly it starts to changing color shape size. Whatever north boy no moles should not evolve? Yeah they should remain uninvolved evolved. Yes also let's not forget. The Ugly Duckling will or one of these things is not like the other rule exactly so if someone has a lot of moles and they all look alike except for one. Maybe that one isn't just a mole and the ones that do look like just them all could also pretend that the potential is there that they could be something. It's very rare but you know we're not saying we're not diagnosing every normal here if it doesn't meet these criteria are not hard and fast. Yes that's true okay. So now everybody out there. Listening has stripped down birthday suit in his examining themselves with magnifying glass. Thanks for the mental energy me my pleasure but the thing is dermatologists are really working to improve public awareness of skin cancers I including melanomas true for good reason over the past twenty to thirty years a number of cases of melanoma has just skyrocketed in fact the number of invasive melanoma Mama cases has doubled from nineteen eighty to two thousand eleven which is scary because these are later stage melanomas the ones with a bad prognosis. Yeah but here's the deal. Most people think this is due to increased diagnosis from screening not a true increase in the number of cases. Well then we have a problem. I mean if the number of cases week diagnosed has doubled old because we're doing a better job screaming than we should see a corresponding decrease in mortality. Exactly but that's not what's happening. Mortality has decreased only a very little bit certainly not close. Goes to what you would expect with such a huge jump in diagnoses. And here's the other thing. The United States Preventative Services Task Force the USPS T.F. The the folks at review the body of research on a topic to see what the scientists telling us. These folks don't recommend screening. Let me repeat that they don't recommend screening. There's just not enough evidence evidence to say it really works so we're diagnosing more and more melanomas but it's not really affecting mortality. People are dying almost as much as before right and this is something. We're starting to see fairly early regularly and medicine. These days across many specialties We want to believe it. Screening the general population for cancers works. But this may not always be the case. Yes yes so the risks of not screening. We get you'll miss a cancer if it's early enough to do something about it but the risks of screening or not as well known or appreciated right and we've talked about this on previous podcast screen and can lead to false positives unnecessary procedures increased cost to patients inside in general anxiety pain suffering. All those things get so maybe we need to not necessarily screen more people but screen the right people right screen people who have a higher risk of the disease than the general population. Okay but it's not all doom and gloom in fact there's some really good news out there about MELANOMAS. There is for one. The number of melanomas diagnosed in young people is going down. We're seeing it less and less and young folks not exactly sure why this is happening. Maybe it's due to increased emphasis on prevention. I mean I was out there with baby oil on my kids. Were not out there with baby. Yeah so there's there's a big difference right there yeah. Meeting more people stayed out of the sun or covered up. More people wearing sunscreen. That kind of thing. Yeah I slathered sunscreen on my kids way more than my parents ever did for me. I was religious about a real then still there were a few cents sunburns in their same. Because we're so pale but well. I'm wondering if you've been getting questions from friends and family lately about the safety of Sunscreen because of that study the FDA publish this yeah right so this is a study that showed chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed systemically Klay levels at the FDA would normally require choir phase one through three testing before approving exactly. So here's the thing we have no idea what these chemicals are up to. And our body wants to gibbs or maybe they're up to nothing they're totally harmless more. Maybe not we just don't know but we do know that using sunscreen prevents skin cancer sir. That's not in doubt so we need more studies. That what I hear you saying. We need more studies to figure out what's going on. But until then dermatologists are recommending. Continued it to use sunscreen because the benefits are so great. Yeah and the risks are basically unknown. If you're really freaked out about it you can use zinc oxide based or titanium oxide Bay sunscreens trains. Those aren't absorbed. They just sit on the top of the skin right there barriers. But don't stop protecting yourself from the Sun. We knew the benefits to some protection. So keep up the good work mom and

Cancer Mortality FDA Cell Carcinoma Donald Trump Sunburn Diving Elena Moscow Radiation United States Preventative Ser Gibbs Usps
'TikTok saved my life,' user says after viewers tipped him off to problem mole

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

'TikTok saved my life,' user says after viewers tipped him off to problem mole

"Media here's a good story potentially bad social media social media may have saved a man's life twenty four year old Alex Griswold says after he posted a video on the social media site tick tock last month viewers urged him to get a mole on his back checked out by a doctor two people who saw griz waltz what it's like to be married video warned him that mall look like it might be cancerous we shared a new video on Friday saying he had avoided skin cancer because of the strangers warnings a software developer has nearly a half million tictoc followers and said a week after viewers notice the irregular growth you went to a dermatologist performed a biopsy in a week later was told that it needed to be

Alex Griswold Software Developer
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"With prostate cancer than three skin cancers all successfully treated with success well number one the cancer doesn't come back number two the patient keeps his cause medic appearance of you looked at this man you would not see any scars irregularities from the cancer that's the beautiful thing about our radiosurgery for skin cancers there were able to attack the cancers without removing a chunk of skin unlike the surgery Mohs surgery Moses MO H. as surgery for skin cancer so he declined Mohs surgery on his in his nose in the seer came to us we treated him the negative is very happy it was a proof of happiness well he brought his son in about a month or two ago he brought his son in wearing a hat the sun's about twenty five thirty years younger than him but also fair complected takes off his hat and he has his big mass of skin cancer on his forehead right in the center is bigger than a silver dollar and as the thickness about three or four silver dollars has been grown and grown and grown and back home they wanted to do radical surgery move part of his scalp and take a grafted tissue and Greek grafted tissue to that area and have this big hole in the defect in his scalp and had them for had and he just refused to do just that the cancer grow did not want to have radical surgeon finally is dead short of the three areas that we treated on him years ago the eyes the nose the ear and you decide to come in and he came in and that we talked about all the options of course would already refused surgery and he refused to me we talked about all the options and he doesn't want to do nothing anymore because the cancer is growing into forming and he's a bears five sub slightly it's bleeding and in fact it and so we treated him all non invasively this is the work that we do every day we see so many people with skin cancers because the other options are just not desired by many people who just do not want the whole world excavation of their skin in the patch which is what really mows turns out to be for so many people what about eighty four year old woman this is a woman born in New Jersey also she's eighty four she's retired secretary she has diabetes and high blood pressures as a weak bladders his arthritis just a spastic colon she has her news shows and Robert C. answers diagnosed with where in cancer is found over in cancer she had her uterus removed her ovaries removed and other tissues removed and should chemotherapy for three years well we're having chemotherapy for three years it's usually a sign that the chemo is not working when he was working it usually given for a month or two and then stopped because it worked when you get chemo for a year or two or three years of means is probably not working or not gonna work and that's exactly what happened to this woman ship progression Rick cancer kept on growing she came to us with nine centimeter mass my fist a big one is eight centimeters services online centimeter mass up against the bile causing blockage of for kidney instead of the other mass four centimeter mass of spoke almost two inches he came to me should the blockage of the kidney issues is large masses of on medicines for diabetes and blood pressure I saw her and examined her and we talked about all the options are member the chemo didn't work she was pretty much sent home to die but she didn't want to die she wanted to attack the cancer and she said by the way more vaginal bleeding she's a year and a half of vaginal bleeding with the cancer coming back what he came to us last year we offered all the options including no treatment I offer that to everybody and she decided she wanted our pin point non invasive treatment for this large masses ovarian cancer we treated her and she comes back now doing well in remission in remission one three years Chemother member three years of chemotherapy the average came was about ten thousand hours a month three years thirty six month check up about a third of a million dollars in someone's paying she or you or me or off everybody and well with our just a few treatments ten ministry miss the commode of the body resented invisible beams retek the cancer and she now is in remission doing well happy and we have proof yeah we have proof because of course we follow up our patients get imaging and blood tests this is the work that we do every day here at thirteen eighty four Broadway Broadway thirtieth street where we see so many people there was a man who came to me also the skin cancer but different than most seventy four year old man is born in New York state the US is who is married is because his girlfriend nineteen years very devoted he has two children of his own is that the road of surgery can cancer surgery in hernia knee surgery no is a base also is a skin cancer on his right lower eyelid the medial Parsis apart by the nose going by the tear duct to set it for a year it biopsy positive he saw a skin doctor dermatologist dermatologists in tomorrow's emballages surgeon which I talked about is a few minutes ago and the patient was offered the part of his Hylian removed well we need our eyelids to see without our eyelids the I. goes dead so they're going to remove part of his I live in and so is a lives shot wow oh wow oh wow it was easy to see why he did not want to have surgery members had this for a year now his ophthalmologist his skin doctor plastic surgeons reconstructed certain no one told you about non invasive options are all pushing for this radical Sir whose courage and handsome man seventy four is life living his life fully functional now was her with the skin cancer they want to cut off the island are part of the island and so is eyes shot so we would have that I function imagine the social life if you walk around how do you walk around and talk it communicated go to church and religion and restaurants and be with his girlfriend with one night so one shot without people looking news I'd and then you came to.

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Avoid radical surgery to avoid robotic surgery with excellent results out patient with her but a woman who came to me she's eighty five years old a very surprised woman says very spry I'll tell you that she's born in Poland she has a skin cancer left cheek it was a very big skin cancer on the left cheek and seen by a dermatologist she has two children she came with her son in law who's a very smart man and she had breast cancer treated with mastectomy said to say she went to one of the big hospitals twenty years ago and showed mastectomy too bad regency here because you know our results are excellent while most likely keeping the breast so couple months ago shelter for skin cancer over life at age eighty five it was a big skin cancer on her cheek it was a regular and raised sadr mythologist should squares cancer and the dermatologist wanted to have her undergo mows MO H. as CMOS surgery where they kind of excavate all the cancer big area in her and then try to put it together either to take a pass from her but talks or something and patch in the skin well she was just totally opposed like anti we see hundreds probably thousands of patients with skin cancers who just do not want excavation surgery and then a flap of skin from the buyout talks or somewhere to try to fill in the hole she's a very beautiful woman and she wants to keep her beauty and she doesn't want to have rather cold deforming surgery especially on her face and she came to me she came to me and say two months ago and she decided on treatment and she just finished a treatment I saw her yesterday and skip the cancer is gone the skin is beautiful she's happy her family so happy or some of the law came with me with her to meet me we all met and I can tell you they're all very happy we treat Manny's skin cancers basal cells and squamous cells care to recant almost almost any part of the body people got a loser here come to us or their nose other cheek or miles are part of the a or arm or leg or hands or feet or truck this is the work we do and you'll see plenty of examples in our body radiosurgery booklet under skin cancer seeing calls to get information this is the work that we do every day non invasive outpatient treatment in just minutes treating skin cancers with high success rates in excellent cosmetic results and I can tell you that our patients in general are very very very happy and that makes us happy this is what we do but I'm such a leader mon we'll take a short break many people with cancer.

Poland skin cancer cancer Manny
Strides in lung cancer lead steep decline in U.S. death rates

What A Day

03:36 min | 1 year ago

Strides in lung cancer lead steep decline in U.S. death rates

"According to a new report from the American Cancer Society Cancer Death rate in the United States dropped two point two percent from twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen. That's the largest decline ever reported in the span of the year. which is great news for us so second circuit grim reaper? Akilah what does the research actually say about wide. Those rates are dropping so there are a few reasons for the drop but before we get into them. Let's let's talk about what that two point two percent number actually represents so what's really driving. This is lung cancer. Rates and skin cancer rates And that's where they've seen the most progress so a lot of that is due to change behaviors in the population's less smoking wearing sunscreen but also there are much better treatment treatment options than there have been previously. The report did also say though that progress has stalled on other types of cancers those cancers are prostate breast and colorectal rectal cancers experts blame sedentary lifestyles and unhealthy food which can lead to hormonal issues and inflammation but they also blamed geographic economic an racial disparities in access to care and exposure to environmental toxins. So you know lots of factors right and these numbers are kind of more reflective of lung and skin cancer rates declining client versus all cancer rates overall declining and statistically lung cancer kills more people than breast prostate colorectal and brain cancers combined. So why are people more likely to survive lung cancer now. Yeah I mean a big part of that answer is how doctors are treating cancer now so imaging. Technology has advanced to a point that doctors there's are now accurately assessing the stage of cancer and its prognosis. So you know there's not all this over treatment that might lead to side effects In recent years more doctors have turned to less invasive options for surgery which leads to better recovery times and outcomes and immunotherapy has become way more widely used since two thousand fifteen so therapy for those. Who Don't know is essentially when you know? There's something that stimulates your immune system to help you. Fight the disease in tumors The same can also be said about skin cancer and it's also really important to note though that even though there has been progress. The progress is uneven across the country so these cancer death rates still vary between states that promote preventative healthcare like vaccinations and those that tend not to so perfect perfect example from the New York Times You are probably more likely to cervical cancer in Arkansas than in Vermont because Arkansas hasn't widely adopted the HP vaccine ax seen as Vermont has done for the past decade. Okay Well now it's time to address the elephant in the room. That is We're we are a daily news podcasts. And other Daily News shows did a whole two part special teams juuling so if you smoking in vaping usage is up. Does that mean that this progress progress could be loss at some point so it is tough to say right now so scientists are still studying the effects of e cigarettes when used for long periods of time and there are are carcinogens and e cigarettes they just don't know yet what the full cancer risk is. Because it's a new thing but based on the report the decline in deaths from lung cancer can can be attributed both to people quitting smoking and advances in treatment so if juuling leads to cigarette smoking then yeah we could zero versatile in this downward trend of lung cancer it would be bat. Yeah but one thing that is conclusive is that access to treatment and vaccines and advocating for equal treatment across socioeconomic and racial lines will in the long run ensure less people die from cancer.

Lung Cancer American Cancer Society Cancer United States Juuling Daily News New York Times HP Vermont Arkansas
Doctors remove 5-inch cancerous 'dragon horn' from man's back

Brian Kilmeade

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Doctors remove 5-inch cancerous 'dragon horn' from man's back

"U. K. man baffled doctors after five inch cancerous dragon horn is they're calling it sprouted Adams back despite having no history of skin cancer according to this new study a process to go on to the dermatologist every three months like you this fifty year old man it lives in a country where medical care is readily available he had everything available to him he did look into this scintillating grown about five inches he let this go on for years and turns out this is a cancerous deal they were able to remove it remove it nothing is going to be okay that's what it literally does look like a horn a **** that's why I asked if

Adams U. K.
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"To avoid radical surgery to avoid robotic surgery with excellent results out patient with her but a woman who came to be she's eighty five years old a very surprised woman says very spry I'll tell you that she's born in Poland she has a skin cancer left cheek it was a very big skin cancer on the left cheek and seen by a dermatologist she has two children she came with her son in law who's a very smart man and she had breast cancer treated with mastectomy said to say she went to one of the big hospitals twenty years ago and Chad mastectomy too bad we didn't see here because you know our results are excellent while most likely keeping the breast so couple months ago she had her first skin cancer over life at age eighty five it was a big skin cancer on her cheek it was a regular and raised sadr mythologist should squares cancer and the dermatologist wanted to have her undergo mows MO H. as CMOS surgery where they kind of excavate all the cancer big area in her and then try to put it together either to take a pass from her but talks or something and patch in the skin well she was just totally opposed like anti we see hundreds probably thousands of patients with skin cancers who just do not want excavation surgery and then a flap of skin from the bod talks or somewhere to try to fill in the hole she's a very beautiful woman and she wants to keep her beauty and she doesn't want to have rather cold deforming surgery especially on her face and she came to me she came to me and say two months ago and she decided on treatment and she just finished a treatment I saw her yesterday and they're scared the cancer is gone the skin is beautiful she's happy her family so happy years some of the law came with me with her to meet me we all met and I can tear they're all very happy we treat Manny's skin cancers basal cells and squamous cells of care to account almost almost any part of the body people got a loser here come to us or their nose other cheek or miles are part of the a or arm or leg or hands or feet or truck this is the work we do and you'll see plenty of examples in our body radiosurgery booklet under skin cancer seeing calls to get information this is the work that we do every day non invasive outpatient treatment in just minutes treating skin cancers with high success rates in excellent cosmetic results and I can tell you that our patients in general are very very very happy and that makes us happy this is what we do but I'm such a leader mon.

Poland skin cancer cancer Manny Chad
The 2019 ozone hole is the smallest on record since its discovery, but there’s a catch

the NewsWorthy

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

The 2019 ozone hole is the smallest on record since its discovery, but there’s a catch

"In a rare event the ozone hole over Antarctica is the smallest it's been since its discovery the whole forms every year when colder temperatures caused the ozone layer to thin out well CNN reports the whole usually rose in September and October but this time it actually shrank to the smallest it's been on record and that's good news but scientists say because of unusually warm temperatures it's not necessarily a sign that the ozone is on a fast track to recovery the ozone layer is the part of our atmosphere that sort of like sunscreen it blocks true violet rays from hitting the planet surface so it stops us from getting things like skin cancer and cataracts scientists think the Antarctic ozone will recover back to levels seen in the nineteen eighties around the year twenty seventy

CNN
Vitamin D: Should you be taking a supplement?

Joel Riley

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Vitamin D: Should you be taking a supplement?

"Don't know if you think about it but you know we get closer to winter time less and less sunshine so that means your body is not getting the vitamin D. from from the sun right so should you take a supplement well doctors say the answer is really not that simple you've got literature that says if you're taking supplements not really sure if it's a health benefit or not what we do know vitamin D. is important for bone health there's also research that says it can help reduce prostate colon and skin cancer but there's also reports that say if you get too much then it's a bad and it actually hurts your with diseases it's supposed to protect you against so National Academy of medicine says upper limit of four thousand international units per day of vitamin D. and no more than that to be safe and by all means talk to your doctor before you consider states consider taking a

National Academy Of Medicine
Boris Johnson referred to Police watchdog

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:18 min | 2 years ago

Boris Johnson referred to Police watchdog

"Coming up on the news trump's past phonecall minnows also concealed. RS Johnson referred to police watchdog over US businesswoman links and skin cancer half of people surviving advanced melanoma it Saturday September twenty eight. I'm Anthony Davis Donald Trump told two senior Russian officials in twenty seventeen office meeting that he was unconcerned about Moscow's interference in the twenty sixteen presidential election because the the United States did the same in other countries and assertion that prompted alarmed White House officials to limit access to the remarks to an unusually small number of people according to three former officials with knowledge of the matter the comments which have not been previously reported will part of a now infamous meeting with Russian in Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Russia's ambassador Sergey Kislyak in which trump revealed highly classified information that exposed a source of intelligence intelligence on the Islamic state a memorandum summarizing the meeting was limited to a few officials with the highest security clearances in an attempt to keep the president's is comments from being disclosed publicly according to the former officials who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive matters the White House's classification of records about trump's communications with foreign officials is now a central part of the impeachment inquiry launched this week by House Democrats White House officials were particularly distressed by trump's election remarks because it appeared the president was forgiving Russia for an attack that had been designed to help elect him the three former officials said trump also seemed to invite Russia to interfere in other countries elections. They said one former senior officials said head trump regularly defended Russia's actions even in private saying no countries pure. He was always defensive of Russia. The person said adding the president had never made such specific remark about interference in their presence. He thought the whole interference thing was ridiculous. He never bought into wit meanwhile. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has been subpoenaed by Democrats to turn over documents relating to the trump administration's stations dealings with Ukraine. It is the latest move in rapidly escalating impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump in a separate development. Yes today today the US special envoy for Ukraine negotiations. Kurt Volker resigned Morris Johnson has been referred to the police watchdog to decide whether or not to investigate the prime minister for a potential criminal offence of misconduct conduct in public office while he was London Man. It is alleged businesswoman Jennifer. A curry received favourable treatment to friendship with with Mister Johnson Mister. Johnson has denied any impropriety. The allegations refer to claims that Mister Curry joined trade missions led by Mister Johnson when he was mayor of London and her company received several thousand pounds in sponsorship grants the reason the is involved now is because the role of the mayor of London. John is also London's police in Crime Commissioner responding to the referral number ten said the prime minister as mayor of London did a huge amount of work when selling capital pedal city around the world beating the drum for London and the UK meanwhile a vote of no confidence in the government aimed at replacing Boris Johnson as prime. I Minister could be held next week. A senior Scottish National Party M P has said Stewart Hosie said such a move may be the only way of avoiding and no deal brexit rex it on the thirty first of October. The aim of a no confidence vote will be to install an interim prime minister who would secure a short brexit delay and then cooler general election. Momen half of patients can now survive at deadly. I skin cancer that was considered untreatable. Just a decade ago say doctors ten years ago. Only one in twenty patients would live for five years after being diagnosed nosed with late stage melanoma most would die in months but drugs to harness the body's immune system mean fifty two percent now live at least five of years a clinical trial shows doctor said it was an extraordinary and rapid transformation in care melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and kills nearly two thousand three hundred people each year if it is caught in the early stages than the chances of survival good but as the cancer becomes more aggressive and spreads throughout the body then survival plummets the trial investigated to immunotherapy drugs which designs to enhance the immune in system and let it attack cancer immunotherapy is Nobel Prize winning science that he's making the untreatable treatable. The field is one of the most most exciting in cancer treatment the immune system constantly patrols body fighting off hostile invaders such as viruses it should attack. Kansas is to but cancers are a corrupted version of healthy tissue and can evolve ways of evading the immune system you can subscribe to the news with your favorite podcast APP. Ask Your Smart Speaker or enable the news as your Amazon Alexa Flash briefing skill follow us on twitter at the news underscore podcast. The news is an independent production covering politics inequality the health and climate delivering honest verified and truthful World News daily.

Donald Trump Morris Johnson Prime Minister Russia United States London President Trump Mister Johnson Sergey Lavrov Ukraine UK Mister Curry Boris Johnson White House Sergey Kislyak
Dr. Dendy Engelman Talks All Things Vitamin C

The Emma Guns Show

12:33 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Dendy Engelman Talks All Things Vitamin C

"Arden has launched the Vitamin C. Sarah Capsules Radiance Renewal Serum and because Dundee is the consulting dermatologist and was back in London recently for the launch. I asked her if she would tell me everything that we needed to know about vitamin C. Just so that we were on the right page starting from the right place when it comes to how to use it how to layer and with that kind of stuff and my jaw Adore Ajoy I always adored my conversations nations with Dundee because she just makes everything so simple and really easy to understand that I always come away from these jobs without feeling as though I know how to look after my skin better than before if war which combat thing right I really hope that's what you get out of these conversations to we had an excellent chat. I think so I to be honest title with love I find gold and she's very cool and she really did lay it all out very simply and his longtime listeners will know she works out of her practice in New York so it's it's not often often she comes over to the UK so I hope you feel as I did better informed now about intimacy than you did before and I'm really glad that when she does come over to the UK we're able to fit these conversations because they are so valuable. We also talk about those Elizabeth Arden Vitamin C. captials capsules but I'll let her do the talking on that one and explain why it's such an exciting and interesting innovation in terms of using vitamin C. topically after our chat. I'm going to be back to talk about the five hundred products that are currently on my radar the ones that I've used and the ones that I enjoy using the ones I think are worth knowing about including those new capsules choose from Elizabeth Arden which I have been using religiously since my childhood Dundee a few weeks ago. I was very lucky to get some samples prelaunch so I had a bit of a preview and I have been using them consistently consistently every single day so stick around here a little bit more about what I think about those. I'm really delighted to have Dr Dan the anger and an her expertise back on the show so here she is Waking Waking Waking his she is making a welcome return to the poker Dr Dundee increment well. This is so incredible because friend of the show Dr Dundee engelman Elizabeth Arden's consulting dermatologist is back doc welcome to be thank you so happy to be here. You can come back anytime. I'm so glad to have you on the show. You've been previously we talked all things retinal and you are a glorious safe gentle kind mine of information about things skin-care. Thank you and skin so just I yeah. I know a lot of listeners. Will we cheating in and thinking yeah he didn't. He's back but just for those. You may be new to the show on you to you. Would you just explain what you do what Your Day job is on why you're such an authorizations skincare sure so. I'm a dermatologist in New York City. I also am a skin cancer surgeon so I did extra training in a specific type of skin cancer removal technique called Mos- surgery. Moh S and in my fellowship I also did procedural dermatology so a lot of lasers and on different devices in order to treat various skin conditions over my career. I've thankfully been had the opportunity to consult with different brands and help with research and development and really identifying either skin care ingredients that are necessary to bring to market or certain skin-care trends that we've identified and helped to develop different products for an so Elizabeth Arden has been one of my favorite brands. I've worked with and I've been working with them for the last four years and it's important to say you work with skin on the daily. Yes all the time and you also you come. APP skin skin from a very scientific background from UC the impact of the topic and ingredients have so you all very clear about what benefits can be reaped from a really good skincare regime yes and I think historically we as dermatologists masters and experts in skin disease. Not all dermatologist us were trained in skin care. If in our traditional teachings at something that you got very little exposure to e as residents accidents and during our training and so it's been something that has been an interest of mine and our patients see US experts and skin care and so we need to become that if we don't have the traditional training and years ago honestly there weren't great actives I mean there was prescription retinoids that we're for acne that could be quite harsh and the sunscreens weren't that great. We hadn't developed topical antioxidant so the evolution of skin care has been something that's it's been amazing to watch and so such a joy to be part of weird living in a a good time for skincare really really so you're more seriously much innovation and we will come onto that but last time you visited we had a full back to school on retinal and it was amazing say much and actually one of the other ingredients like retinal but I think a lot of people are curious about because they know it's another one that gets held up by just as a gold standard because it works is a vitamin C. Yes so we all going to go back to Britain mincy. When I one okay so you just very basic level. How does it work as a topical skincare ingredient and what are the main functions of Z so vitamin. C is a topical antioxidant and what that means we always throw around antioxidants and how good they are for the skin and free radicals are bad right and so people understand that concept but if you wanna think about what's happening on a cellular level. I often like to you just make the analogy to the cell membrane being zipper and when we have ultraviolet radiation or sun exposure or pollution Asian exposure various toxins from smoke in the environment it releases free radicals which are just an unpaid electron that then goes and basically UNZIPS zips the cell causing premature death antioxidants insert themselves into the zipper into the cell membrane and prevent the unzipping and so that's a very easy kind of dumbed down analogy but just to think about what the antioxidants are doing its site oh protective meaning it's protecting the cell and helping it to to resist damage that could be caused by the environment and vitamin. C is one of the most potent and powerful antioxidants that we have and we get get benefit from ingesting orally and we get benefit in the skin by applying at topically and so it does help to protect the cells from environmental damage because I think when a lot of people myself included hit the word protection when it comes to skin are immediately think of SPF yes but vitamin C. is. How did you describe it listeners? We've just done this. Just don't talk and he said it's a safety net. Yes which I loved yeah. It's it's nice there to catch what damage is filtered through because even the best sunscreens if you have the best mineral blockers that are very high. SPF They still allow allow about one point four percent of ultraviolet light to penetrate through the skin and so there is where the antioxidants are going to be to help kind of catch all of that extra damage that could be occurring even though we're doing our best to protect it with SPF and so it is a nice safety net to have underlying the SPF in order to help protect back from free radical damage so if I wanted to add victimization my skin carry jayme. I I couldn't just go yeah. I'll try it. Why would I what would be happening to my skin. That would make me a good candidate to use vitamin C. It's something I should be using anyway. Yes I tell everyone you know. It's not always formulaic formulaic and things that are not all skin care is created the same in people's skin conditions may necessitate certain ingredients over others the most everyone can benefit from topical vitamin. C in the proper concentrations. It isn't particularly inflammation inflammation inducing. It's very well tolerated. If you have very sensitive skin you may WanNa make sure that it plays well with you but I even patients who are very are prone to sensitivities or resign. They still can use a topical vitamin C. and I love it for two reasons one because it's protective against Sunday damage and accelerated photo aging because eighty percent of aging is from the environment we all think that it's intrinsic and it's genetic but really the vast majority of aging is from the environment you put your skin in but it also helps to prevent hyper pigmentation and so people who have sunspots or photo damage damage or age spots you know they'll come in or Melas MMA. That's hormonally mediated. They really bothered by that and they want ways to go about correcting. I and topical Vitamin C is a great way to do that. It works on a specific enzyme called Theresa May's which is part of Melanin synthesis pigment kind kind of creation and if you inhibit the enzyme that creates it then it's going to decrease the Melanin production so you could be using it from the the first time that you start late investing using skincare but then perhaps as you get older. It might be something. Can you spot treat you can and in some concentrations it can be exfoliating almost like a appeal if you use vitamin. C and higher concentrations so some people do use it just specifically typically on spots but the good news is it. It's not going to lighten existing skins and people ask that you know like Hydra cone could could lighten surrounding skin doesn't really discriminate between your normal pigment and hyper pigmentation so you have to be careful that way but in vitamin CS case it really just helps with the discoloration and uneven skin tone or specific spots so you can either spot treat but most people like to kind of have a diffuse application now one thing about vitamin C. is because it is ineffective ingredient. It is an antioxidant but it is an expedient at different concentrations. You can't use it in the morning MHM but you can also use it in the evening but but is it could use the same concentration in the morning and the evening and what are the different. What are the different applications locations. And what is the difference between applying it in the morning. What is it doing that and what is it doing in the evening. Yes so the morning application is more for protection from from uh-huh environmental aggressors son smoke pollution and it night if you. I would say really the best. The best patient shouldn't type or skin-tight to put that in someone who's prone to hyper pigmentation. You're using almost as a treatment there for the discoloration or uneven skin tone but if you have have even skin tone than you probably just need it in the morning what does hyper pigmentation that like some people especially Melas MMA. If it's it's hormonally mediated they'll either get hyper pigmented what we call patches meaning flat areas that aren't raised on the forehead cheeks or above the upper lip up in patients come to me all the time and they're like when I take pictures. It looks like I have a moustache. and we can get that also in pregnancy. It's called Colas MMA or the Damascus pregnancy. It almost looks like you've got a hyper pigmented mask on your face and that's all from hormonal fluctuations. Certainly women who are using oral contraceptives can be more prone to hyper pigmentation in that space or if you've had a fair amount of sun exposure you might just get brown spots we call those solar son. Linton origines which are just dark spots and that will age US makes you look older than you. Maybe even your physiologic age and so we often when patients come to me and they want to look younger. That's where I start to even the skin tone because that's a very easy way to look better her and more youthful without having to undergo procedures injectables and different things that way that was really interesting. What you were saying earlier before we started recording talking about a few you spoke to at age sports family skin. The perception will be that they are older than they actually are

Elizabeth Arden Dundee Dr Dundee UK New York Dr Dan London New York City United States Theresa May Moh S Linton Origines Damascus Britain
How Does Smoking Affect Your Skin?

Birthday Skin

12:38 min | 2 years ago

How Does Smoking Affect Your Skin?

"<hes> <hes> we are going to be talking about smoking and how it affects you skin. I mean it's pretty self explanatory that it's not very good volume volume <hes> but we're going to kind of go into it because you know those. Things are always going to give you wrinkles. It was like a ninety sink to say <hes> but actually actually rings true. When it comes to smoking it will make your mouth a little ball other if anybody would like to see the footage of amy making a math athletic bum hole and do you look our i._t. T._v. behind the scenes yet there it is there it is oh mm-hmm so shall we charge at home is darling before we start ri- dis stuff right now now. I don't smoke was samir cigarette. I don't remember scholley must remain. I know genuine remember last share this year this year. The shia at lot point to all of listeners have never had a cigarette in my congratulations insist on pure half of birthday skin. I'd like you to all believe it's me. I'm now pool. I recognise times will be glastonbury. The only time i've as me he's thinks ago. I'm the only time i ever go near. A cigarette is when i'm hof cope not just pissed about a few lines <hes> somebody's there with my. I'll just have of a little bit sorry ma'am. If you're listening. She will fucking disown me smoke twenty a day. I who's regional. It's close out. She said people smoke twenty cigarettes a day. We'll smoke like four eighty two thousand ninety ridiculous like it's not the nineteen twenties anymore. I really do not see why people would smoke that much to visit yeah. Well obviously on anyway karam. Yes thanks for calling me out bitch one day. I am going to tell you that you broke glass in her bathroom and then instead of just cleaning up you put it under the bath mat. I'm sure she soon after eh so no secret in the household anymore. Snow well just to clarify. I am a nonsmoker and it was one of the it was a case of you makes while you pissed english case for low with us the case of my friends yeah. I'm addicted. I would would find it very hard to get addicted. I believe 'cause is disgusting. I hate the smell of oh yeah. Oh there was a girl i used to work with and she would go on a cigarette cigarette break and i would sit opposite and this i don't know what cigarettes you smoke in but they made a breath smell like sick oh and house. I surely actually that does not taste very nice. Oh i wouldn't dream of putting a cigarette near while sober now just couldn't do it journey. Don't tell me about how it affects your skin. Yeah a will do to lake woman am to be honest this. I don't think this will be very long. Episodes museum of the things that <hes> effects we spoke to my another episodes so he's very much touch upon different vitamins free radicals collagen <hes> and just like how how your skin is affected in terms of how is created so firstly <hes> to just quickly go through some of the <hes> chemicals are in cigarettes that i've researched the most because there's like hundreds of costner jains in the cigarettes yeah caused damage to not just skin like may may we had the we are focusing on the skin here but you've got to remember that he skipped all everybody so. What are you talking about yet about wrinkles. I mean all eva just not not just justify say so <hes> all av body <hes> and then you lips as well a quite different skin cancer because of <hes> smokin the ben bloom hell has that you could cigarette noah you lips when they look huckabee mole. Oh my what you've just reminded me. I've five seed wall. Oh god when i went to thailand a woman smoked cigarette our the foof doty does what i saw but he was yeah she'll say through some though some balloons up in the corner above me and she threw a doll and it popped the balloons and i was like hope and then she popped a ping pong ball at me and i wondered why the ping pong balls on the tables when you you went and it seems that you can yes she leads bulls in there and like when unabashed like you know like a ninja turtle mine and then just like fired them papa and a wounded why there was a ping pong bats on the tables foot long but we went in there and then i realized allies very quickly. The thai actually needed the ping pong power to protect myself from fini bowls bowls now to <hes> dissect show and this poor guy got pulled upon stage. I think he was like with a group of girls on guys so don't if one of the gospels award you expect your sexual yeah and <hes> <hes> she poor sharpie over fudge. Oh yes quoit on 'em and signed a name stor. Yeah lizzy even a hips that no god that was the guilt as well forgot she also lit some candles on the top of a birthday cake and then handed the birthday ak cow and re happy birthday to whoever the person was on a piece of paper and then held up. Honestly it was disgusting. I will never forget that place but anyway back to cigarettes and smoking and yes so i looked into of scenic teen on the way that that affects your skin is because because the nicotine which is very interesting because i want you to remember that nicotine isn't just from cigarettes. Nicotine is addictive in cigarettes. So if you vaping you might think you're all high and mighty right now with you the whole they pen bull vape nation can the nicotine patch the is still innovate. They've obviously so you would need vape and nicotine free vape to dodge maganga skin somebody in the family like quit the thought unia something all from the federal union are going to do now when won't work in one of the eight-wicket topping one of those op shops every single we all those <unk> about shop on how can i get so confused and <hes> well looking innovative up shop so if your evaporator then this also affects you even if you think doesn't nicotine shrinks the blood vessels outta mostly as skin which is the essentially what that means is that oxygen can't reach this skin cells the kind of food third this out from the inside story so if you don't get an austin t- skin then he skin cells won't be able to form properly they just went very healthy <hes> and you you just gonna end up one damage in the lesson collagen production and to you just going to be looking pretty pale. There's no blood so we've spoken before about readiness in skin and it's essentially that you blood vessels a damaged so or you blood is trying to cool you down so if the blood runs to the set of skin is to try and call oh you down and which is why when you exercise you get red yeah yeah so <hes> i is also if you get embarrassed if if he flushed quite easily is because your body's i we're gonna boiling. I'm getting really embarrassed and then you'd blood russia's tease the surf ski down danila yes so you you probably noticed a little bit sallow looking. Maybe many yellowish jaundice don't if jaundice is actually a thing when it comes to smoking but it would be that kind of just looking kim a bit poorly seem just might not look very healthy <hes> but some of the other chemicals that are in cigarettes cross it damage the last in so <hes>. That's like i say if you if you <hes> produce lesson in college and then you're going to be quite saggy and not very plump plump campi he said remember the still nicotine innovate pen so if you've chosen to vote because you think is healthy because of the tar yes that's true boy is nicotine the dommage as you blood vessels so you just have to remember that if you started vapor in to try in <hes> cut down smokin one remember vape pen doesn't tell you when you get the end of typical cigarette and who just try to like every time you buy some more liquid for ever than just by a lower nicotine dose people got the mixing patches hutches auto on those punches quite a while yeah. Just we will impose the point is the point yeah well. I guess it specified long view true true fix on yeah 'cause we're thinking from the point of view like e skin how then like bodies general health and put nicotine does affect the immune system as well so that can cause inflammation it can damage skin saga of said <hes> on this can actually all really <hes> make any psoriasis worse or can cause rice's so <hes> inflammation and a lack of skin cell growth and obviously a poor immune system kind of is not very good for your leads to nasty skin conditions like that. You actually can't get rid of what you want. No yeah <hes> <hes> i also have to say carbon monoxide ms in cigarettes and not fully block oxygen from anybody so who is not very good for you anyway. Everybody knows a carbon monoxide is poisonous and book is biproduct of smoking cigarettes and overseas awesome very good for your skin n._c._a._a. Before the streaming gets to you you blocking it then ever does get to you isn't reaching your skin and you know right. You know. We spoke about vitamin c. yet so you body <hes> doesn't actually produce vitamin c. He was sparked by the synapse owed. <hes> you have to have 'victimising die every day to have any body so orange juice. Broccoli was quite high wasn't area. <hes> leads different foods. You want to know more about that. David episode after this one of course an and in terms of vitamin c. It's really powerful until extent and if you smoke than it depletes until exton level so any victim ac- that you'll get any diet it can be really bad in terms of <hes> if you're eating leads broccoli and there's a beneficial vitamin c. Then you just kind of deplete in it if you don't have a sewer. I don't know how many cigarettes you'd have to smoke for these effects by the way <hes> not just popped into my head book. This is obviously smoking every time. I think you know what's really sad. Fact names go go smoking. <hes> depletes <hes> higher onic acid so not only going to be a bit gray bit dull looking. You're also just gonna be dehydrated. Yeah you're gonna have dry skin so to be honest. That is how smoking in fact she skin is not good for you anyway. Stay away from it. I it's just it's kind of like you said at the start quite self explanatory in question good full. I'll stop think everybody knows even smokers themselves. No is not good. I just find it so weird. When i went to america earlier in the year i was not many people smoked smoked but there was smoking areas in restaurants and it was i gonna sit and smoke mario or the non-smoking area and just obviously i think there's probably a lot of restaurants now l. but in the u._k. It's law that you cannot inside. You have to go outside and if you give outside you can't be under a covered way like you have to be completely like to fresh chef breath the same everybody else around you because obviously it's not just poisonous. Smoking yourself is poisonous being

Nicotine Dry Skin RI Scholley AMY Fini Bowls Jaundice Episodes Museum Russia Inflammation Huckabee America Lizzy Thailand Costner Doty
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Inner life and to avoid radical surgery to avoid robotic surgery with excellent results out patient with her but a woman who came to me she's eighty five years old a very surprised woman says very spry I'll tell you that she's born in Poland she has a skin cancer left cheek it was a very big skin cancer on the left cheek and seen by a dermatologist she has two children she came with her son in law who's a very smart man and she had breast cancer treated with mastectomy sad to say she went to one of the big hospitals twenty years ago and showed mastectomy two bedrooms see here because you know our results are excellent while most likely keeping the breast so couple months ago shelter for skin cancer over life at age eighty five it was a big skin cancer on her cheek it was a regular and raised she saw a dermatologist should squares cancer and the dermatologist wanted to however undergo mows MO H. as CMOS surgery where they kind of excavate all the cancer a big area in her and then try to put it together either to take a pass from her but talks or something and patch in the skin well she was just totally opposed like anti we see hundreds probably thousands of patients with skin cancers who just do not want excavation surgery and then a flap of skin from the bod talks or somewhere to try to fill in the hole she's a very beautiful woman and she wants to keep her beauty and she doesn't want to have rather cold deforming surgery especially on her face and she came to me she came to me and say two months ago and she decided on treatment and she just finished a treatment I saw her yesterday and skip the cancer is gone the skin is beautiful she's happy her family so happy or some of the law came with me with her to meet me we all met and I can tell you they're all very happy we treat Manny's skin cancers basal cells and squamous cells care to recant almost almost any part of the body people got a loser here come to us or their nose other cheek other miles are part of the a or arm or leg or hands or feet or trunk this is the work we do and you'll see plenty of examples in our body radiosurgery booklet under skin cancer seeing calls to get information this is the work that we do every day non invasive outpatient treatment in just minutes treating skin cancers with high success rates in excellent cosmetic results and I can tell you that our patients in general are very very very happy and that makes us happy this is what we do but I'm such a leader mon we'll take a short break many people with cancer.

Poland skin cancer cancer Manny eighty five years twenty years two months
News in Brief 09 July 2019

UN News

04:45 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 09 July 2019

"This is the news in brief from the united nations nations are not doing enough to ensure that every child goes to school and stays there by twenty thirty a k commitment of these twenty thirty global goals agenda unesco set on cheese day according to data from you ends educational scientific and cultural organization one in six youngsters aged between six and seventeen will still be out of plus decades time attendance levels are best in primary school with information from nearly one hundred and fifty countries showing that eighty four percent of children completed this fast educational taryn twenty eighteen up from seventy percent in two thousand with an extra push end investment uscca believes it getting old children into primary school is just possible civil by twenty thirty but it warms the as children get older attendance levels are much lower with four in ten children globally expected not complete secondary education by twenty thirty this figure is likely to grow to half of all youngsters in sub saharan africa forgot where the school age population is growing faster than anywhere else unesco says new cancer treatments and drugs that can be swallowed rather than injected adjusted some of their central medicines that every country should have the world health organization unsettled choose day more than one hundred and fifty countries you see you and agencies essential medicines list which contains around four hundred and sixty by to drugs deemed essential detroit public health needs the latest update adds twenty eight products the adult's at twenty three children and it will say specifies new you just put twenty six already listed products based on value for money evidence and health impacts according to w h o the five counts of therapies added to the list are regarded as the best in terms of survival rates just treat skin melanomas lung blood and prostate cancers they include to recently developed immuno therapies naval you lab and from brazil map that have delivered up to fifty percent survival rate for advanced melanoma skin cancer but until recently with incurable all the updates to the list include new oral antique arguments to prevent stroke hasn't alternative to wolfer and treatment of deep vein thrombosis these up particularly advantageous for low income countries at unlike well friend they do not require regular monitoring the issue of life threatening bleeding off the child was also addressed in this year's essential medicines last update with proposal to use champa tyson rama's dandy counties therapy oxytocin doesn't need refrigerating in related development wh as also updated it's essential diagnostics list in recognition of critical life saving importance of finding out what is wrong with patients before it's too late while the first this issued last year concentrated traded on priority diseases hiv malaria toback he likes this and hepatitis this year's list it covers mono communicable end communicable diseases and finally old grievances linked to violence perpetrated against sudanese protesters test is by security forces across the country should be investigated independently and justice must be served atop you and writes officials say don't choose day speaking at the human rights council andrew gilmore assistance extra general human rights welcomed and last week's reported power sharing deal between the transitioning military authority and civilian representatives he said you instead ready to help the country strengthen the protection of human rights as it embraced civilian rule after mass protests beginning in december last year that led to the playing of precedent alba shift for months later we encourage all parties ensued on the continue to resolve any outstanding issues through dialogue i wish they jar welcomes the agreement reached last week includes a commitment to conduct an independent investigation into the violence perpetrated against peaceful protesters more details have emerged about casualties doing the math protests that took place across their down on the thirtieth of june two thousand nineteen it's important that investigation of contribute to justice and dignity for all victims of such violence in reply sudan's osama have made a express gratitude for regional efforts to resolve tensions inside the country while also acknowledging djing be heroic and inspiring popular revolution lead in particular by young people the sudanese representative duncan fundy imminent release of all political prisoners and many others who've been arrested under a state of emergency lows along with an end to the calf you he

United Nations Eighty Four Percent Seventy Percent Fifty Percent
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Years old. And I talked to you about him last year. This is a man who had a skin cancer on his left cheek and the doctors cut on him so much they did was called MOS, MOH, most surgery, and is they removed so much of his cheek and his nose that he couldn't close his eye, and they had to cut off part of his skull above his head. So there's a big hole in his head. It's incredible vague wholeness head to remake his nose and there remained his nose, and they cut off all the skin. He couldn't close his eyes, and then he lost his eyes went dead. Because we need our limits to close. And when the skin doctors and the surgeons cut off so much skin for the skin cancer, he couldn't close his eyes. He went blind and he came to me last year because six different doctors at the six biggest hospitals around were telling me to remove is I and it was just refused. That refusing that. And I saw suspicious area and I told him that and there were six doctors desire removed, and it was a social worker with him another personal. Get your I remove get your I removed and he lists radio show every day, and he just didn't wanna do it. And I saw him. I think there's other skin cancer. And now yeah, there's a biopsy proven skin cancer on the other side of the face on the right side of the face by the by the ear just in front of the air, on the right side, and he understands. Now there's such big differences in the treatment of skin cancers. And of course, retreat, any basal cell cancers and squamous cell cancers. This man is walking example of why not have surgery the formity and not only a formity lost his vision. He lost his function and that without a second. I there's no depth perception, people that have no depth perception. Have an increased chance of damage to themselves accidents and calamity just because of that skin cancer. So there's lots of reasons to call us at two and two choices..

skin cancer
"skin cancer" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Monitored after they've been treated for basil squamous cell cancer. That's a great question. So usually after they have been treated by their dermatologist surgeon, they go back to their regular dermatologist for regular checkups. In this case, we're looking for both recurrence and for new skin cancers, which are a bit more likely after you've had a skin cancer. So these exams are going to be pretty frequent, if your cancer was a little riskier, and will quickly, however become less frequent over time. The exams are pretty complete. We like to look at people head to toe. We Pell pay the. Cars. We pay the surrounding lymph nodes, particularly in the case of higher risk cancers. And then over time these followups can Lincoln to perhaps once a year. Cancer's become more distant in patients, like shock, and I actually have our oldest daughter has has Crohn's disease, and I know she sees it because she's on inflict. Some AB remedied she's she sees a German tallest regularly. So the people who have some degree of immunosuppression do they maintain regular appointments. That's actually something that has happened in the past five, or ten years, that a lot of groups who have recognized immunosuppression are coming for regular screening, and perhaps yearly scan exam. Yep. That's true. The other thing that I just want to emphasize the importance of education during that appointment because, as you might imagine when your appointments become stretched out and an entire year might go before you have another checkup, one of the things we wanna teach patients his self exam. They should be as thorough as we are. They need a big mere. Maybe they need a spouse or significant other to help them. And one of the things said of late, we tell patients to do is to use their iphone or a digital camera to take pictures of places that are hard for them to monitor so that the person helping them can easily look and see if change has occurred over time we'll probably see greater submission of those photographs to the doctor, this time it's more for self help that we recommend that fantastic. Well, let's transition to how to prevent all this stuff, edit when I was a boy, you just kind of toughed it out with one or two sunburns. And then the skin was pretty much all set for the for the summer months, not a good idea. Not at all. As a matter of fact, we know that the five or more on burn in a young age between fifteen and twenty and it has been. Specifically studied on Australia increases demand on modest by eighty percent. So sunburns, especially an early age. I really dangerous. And what is what is bad about the about the sun? Why why how, how does it cause cancer? So the sun has many different raised the most dangerous race for the skin, I the UV rays, and they are three type of off, you raise UVA long range braised that consist about ninety five percent of the UV rays, and those spinach deeper in the skin, they whip up call a lasting day of break up your collagen, and most importantly through free radical production. Also can co skin cancer. UV betas are on about five percent of the race. And those are the B stands for burning, those raise that caused direct DNA damage and associated skin cancer, and so- sunscreens, if anyone goes to target right now to or to Walgreens or any pharmacy. You're going to see all these sunscreens coming off the. Shelf. So is this worth it? Or are we just contributing to industry in America, and helping the economy, do they actually do anything? Yes, they do that. Talking about your son. We'll get yours in a minute. But what about sunscreen do a lot of prevention? And that's the reason sunscreens are probably the number one recommended skincare products by dermatologists. So as a matter of fact, WHO declared UV radiation carcinogenic in two thousand twelve we do know that again, intermittent hike spoiler burning sunrays are associated nano, maybe even sixty five to ninety percent and almost one hundred percent of Karatina aside cancers associated. The sun exposure, therefore, if a sunscreen prevents sunburn and mutagenic sun damage in your skin should also prevent sons skin cancer..

skin cancer Cancer immunosuppression toe Pell Lincoln AB Crohn's disease Walgreens Australia DNA damage America ninety five percent one hundred percent eighty percent ninety percent
Skin Cancer on the Rise

Kilmeade and Friends

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Skin Cancer on the Rise

"Up. Here's a warning, if you're headed to the lake the ocean, or the pool this holiday weekend tested, that every hour, an American dies from skin cancer. Dr Leonard Lipton filled with the American Cancer Society skin cancer is the single most common cancer by a wide margin, this year alone estimates that there will be nearly seventy four thousand new cases of malignant melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer to protect yourself. He says, we're sunscreen and reapply and don't get burned. Dr Phil says, if possible avoid the outdoors between ten AM and

Skin Cancer Dr Leonard Lipton American Cancer Society Dr Phil
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"One years old. I talked to you about him last year. This is a man who had a skin cancer on his left cheek and the doctors cut on him so much. They did was called MOS MOH has most surgery and his cheap they removed so much of his cheek and his nose that he couldn't close as I and they had to cut off part of his skull above his head. So there's a big hole in his head. It's incredible. The big hole in wholeness head that the remake is knows and there remained his nose, and they cut off all the skin. He couldn't close his eyes. And then he lost his eyes. I went dead because we need our I leads to close and when the skin doctors and the surgeons cut off so much skin for the skin cancer. He couldn't close his and he went blind. And he came to me last year because six different doctors at the six biggest hospitals around were telling me had to remove is I and he was just refusing. That refusing that and I saw suspicious area, and I told him that and there were six doctors time to have desire removed, and it was a social worker with him. Another person. Get your IRA move get your I removed, and he listened to this radio show every day. And he just didn't wanna do it. And I saw him as I think there's other skin cancer and now, yeah, there's a biopsy proven skin cancer on the other side of the face on the right side of the face by the I by the ear just in front of the ear on the right side. And he understands now there's such big differences in the treatment of skin cancers. And of course, retreat, many basal cell cancers and squamous cell cancers. And this man is walking example of why not have surgery the formity and not only did the formity lost his vision. He lost his function and that without a second. I there's no depth perception people that have no depth perception. Have an increased chance of damage to themselves the accidents and calamity just because of that skin cancer. So there's lots of reasons to call us at two and two choices..

skin cancer One years
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:41 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And we have an extensive experience with kidney cancers and lung cancers and head and neck cancers, and breast cancers, and liver cancers and pancreas and bladder and prostate you name it here. We are with lots of information if you wish. Very gentle, man. Very nice man from neighboring state. Seventy four years old. He is with his girlfriend. He's been with his girlfriend for nineteen years. He has two of his own children. And he said, Tom Selecta me knee surgeon. Hernia surgery and skin cancer. And he comes to me, and he has a scan cer- on the right lower eyelid next to the knows. That's the media portion Meteo right lower eyelid, and he was seen by doctors at big hospitals, and they want to remove is I led. And so is I shut. Most likely for the rest of his life. For treatment of the skin cancer. I can tell you. I have another patient just like that who accepted that treatment had a skin cancer a basal cell on his eyelid. He had surgery here in New York or one of the biggest hospitals. He lost his eyelid. He lost. His is the cancer came back. They gave standard radiation didn't work. And then he came to me when the cancer traveled to the maximum sinus, and we were able to treat him and stop that cancer with just a few shots of radio surgery. Well, this man from Connecticut with a girlfriend of nineteen years long duration relationship came to me before he agreed to surgery. He refused. The surgery. He was looking for better treatment options. And I spoke to him examined him. I got his records. And yes, he's seventy four years old with a basal cell cancer. Not wanting to lose his eyelid not wanting to lose his I wanted to go around the rest of his life with his eyes. So and shot, and he came here where we treat the so many skin cancers basal cell and squamous cells and others care. Toy cat thelma's with high success rates noninvasive -ly our treatment for skin cancers. The opposite of surgery surgery is the mechanical removal of part of your body or your friends body or your loved ones spotty. Radical surgery. Well, this man didn't want that. And we spoke to him and talked about all the options to protect his vision. A while we give pinpoint treatment for the eyelid this cancer growing through the media portion of the right lower eyelid and we treated him within a few treatments that cancer went away. We finished up his treatments all painlessly easily well tolerated. And I can tell you that he is very happy grateful, man. And of course, we pray for his success for the next fifty years. We want him to be a hundred and twenty years old. This is the work that we do. But so far within a few treatments that cancer went away. He's doing well, no significant side effects is a slight amount of pink nece where we're treating and that's going away, and we expect a speedy and complete recovery. We expect most likely the cancer to never come back. We expect him never to need that the forming surgery that they've played at that other big super pooper place and sad. It's too bad. The certain installed say, hey, you could have our radical surgery if you want we.

cancer skin cancer Tom Selecta thelma Connecticut Hernia New York nineteen years Seventy four years seventy four years twenty years fifty years
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Deformity of mos- MOH mos-, surging Moses a radical surgery for skin cancer large areas of the body for the skin cancer removed, and they usually either try to pull it together. Pull the body together. Patch and take some skin from the buttocks or someplace else and most people I don't think wind a piece of their buttocks on their face or their nose or their I led this man did not any chose achievement because he wants non invasive treatment. This is what we do. So in his right eyelid. He wants our treatment has a one centimeter mass the media portion extending to the campus, and he was told elsewhere that they would cut out the law. Lower eyelid. They would so as I shut and most likely would never have stereo vision again. So there's lots of reasons why he came to radio surgery New York for cancer treatment. Yeah. Some people patient told me this week. Sometimes what you talk about Dr Liederman his gruesome. Well. Yeah, it's true. It is gruesome, but what can I do the surgeon that surgeon for skin cancer wants to remove the eyelid? So as I shot that he'd probably never see again out of that I whereas with us it's pinpoint treatment noninvasive treatment invisible. Beams to attack the cancer with high success rates are with us most likely that skin cancer will never return all noninvasive. He comes in with us. He lays out on the table treatment takes minutes. And then he turns around, and he goes home. It does goes to work. He does what he wants it such.

skin cancer Dr Liederman New York one centimeter
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Skin cancer, and successfully did. So in fact, he had biopsies of his skin after our treatment showing the cancer was gone and his doctors at that other super place were amazed. We're able to treat his skin cancer without losing. His toes so often the surgeons who are proposing surgery haven't really had an experience with inveighs noninvasive radio surgery pinpoint invisible beams so they're talking about what they do. But often, they don't know what they don't know. And that's always a problem in life. It's a problem in medicine. It's a problem when it comes to you and your loved ones when you talk to a doctor is trying to explain something that he or she doesn't really know for example in in medicine ninety nine percent of doctors do not have any formal training in radiation. Yet, everyone has an opinion. Almost everyone not several everybody medicine sever hundred percent or zero percent. But only about one percent of doctors have experience in formal experience in radiation training, and even less have experienced in radio surgery pinpoint treatment precise treatment focusing cancer treatment on the cancer like on this fans here that's where he started talking about how to treat his cancer on his ear or anywhere in the body. Without removing that part of the body and lots of people do not want part of their body removed, by the way, I forgot to introduce myself. My name's Dr Gill Liederman, Meridian oncologist. And I know there's lots of people on the radio in life. You talk to and you get opinions from really know, what is their education. What is the basis for their opinion? Everyone can have an opinion and everyone's entitled to an opinion. That's what democracy's all about that one man or one woman is entitled to their vote. Everyone's vote is equal. But when people give medical advice, and it's your life. Sometimes you'd like to know who exactly is talking. Well, tell you who I am Dr kill leader board certified cancer doctor with school. I grew up in Waterloo, Iowa was born in Iowa was raised there. It was educated. There went to university in Iowa with the medical squad m d real doctor physician, I'm licensed in New York after my MD degree. I then went on and trained in internal medicine three years at the university of Chicago, and Michael Reese, board-certified three more years than it went on to train at Harvard Medical School in medical oncology. Three more years at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute board certified and at another three years totaling nine years after medical school of I thirty five years of my life where education turning radiation Harvard Medical School joint center for radiation. Oncology was a group of five Harvard hospitals all merged for their radiation program and was on staff, and this is the work..

Skin cancer Dana Farber Cancer Institute Harvard Medical School Harvard Medical School joint c Iowa Harvard Dr Gill Liederman Meridian oncologist university of Chicago Michael Reese Waterloo New York three years ninety nine percent thirty five years hundred percent zero percent one percent nine years