35 Burst results for "Skin Cancer"

"skin cancer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

05:35 min | Last week

"skin cancer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here and two day. I have the privilege of hosting cody. Simmons is a bio engineer and entrepreneur that has spent his whole career dedicated to bringing new health technologies to physicians and patients prior to his tenure with dermot sensor cody lead commercial efforts for a silicon valley medical device screening startup and also held business development and commercial strategy roles at genetic cody join dermot sensor in may two thousand sixteen as co founder and ceo. He has led the company through raising fifteen million in financing extensive product-development efforts multiple clinical studies and most recently successful regulatory clearances that now allow for the product to be sold commercially. He is an excellent leader in health. Care taken really. You know the advantage of of the advances in digital health to help primary caregivers as well as patience maximize their health cody. I'm really excited to have you on the podcast to learn more about what you guys are up to and more about you. Thanks for joining. I appreciate that and the excitement is shared <hes>. Thanks for having me today. And like i said very excited to be speaking with you and to have our work featured on your podcast. Absolutely code eight. Now dermot sensor is is. I mean just fascinating evaluating skin cancer in a much simpler way. <hes> one on learn more about this as the listeners. Do too but before we dive into that. I love the know more about what inspires your work and healthcare. Sure will i think first and foremost helping patients <hes>. Is really my inspiration for working in healthcare hands down. I think that everyone faces at least some challenges and frustrations <hes>. With their job and their day to day work. And i think our company and me personally you know no exception to that would be called work but dinner the day knowing that if you're able to overcome those challenges in your start up and your product is successful knowing that success will benefit hundreds or thousands of patients that is incredibly motivating for me. And i'd say in line with that. I think for entrepreneurs you know. The common expression is that we're supposed to dress unmet needs and as as you've seen obviously from from from all your your work in the podcast. Unfortunately there's no shortage of unmet needs in healthcare and many of them are very large. Ones that fixing not only greatly benefit people's health but depending on the solution also oftentimes i think has a potential to sit health system money and of course patients ultimately pay for parole healthcare whether it's directly or through their employer for private insurance or through taxes that go to medicare and medicaid <unk>. For sure yeah. And you know we were experiencing so much change and you know. The epidemic has accelerated that change in digital medicine and telemedicine remote care what you guys are doing fascinating and skin. Cancer is a huge problem. It goes unaddressed like undiscovered. It's way too late and so tell us a little about what you guys are doing to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure sure and yet it really is a big problem and you know a clear. Our product is not yet approved by the fda for use in the us but as you mentioned in it is available and certain areas abroad. Who just announced that. Dermot sensor received seamark for sale in europe as well as regulatory clearances australia in a new zealand. So for the u. s. Yeah so that that's been exciting milestone for us and in the us we hope to be approved next year and then after that to start. Adding value to healthcare system in a couple of men was to just address your question so our our company's mission is to improve patients access to effective stink cancer checks as you noted. Writing cancer is very common. It's actually the most common cancer in the united states in melanoma the number one cancer killer of young women fortunately effective effectively skin cancer can be successfully treated if it's detected early enough unfortunately the average wait time in the us dermatologist's appointment once a two months and because of that and other cost access issues. The majority of americans report having never been checked her skin cancer in illness. Small fraction of americans do so annually. Which is direct recognition for many of us <hes>. So our our main objective to fulfill our mission of improving patients accessed effected skin cancer. Sharks is really empower. America's hundreds of thousands of frontline providers primary care providers like family physicians internists clinicians at retail clinics to more effectively. Catch skin cancer <hes>. Study showed that primary care providers they're not dermatologists and that that they only correctly decides to refer biopsy a malignant lesion as little as fifty four percent of the time but melanoma fighters survival rates. Go from well under fifty percent for stage. Four melanoma to high nineties for stage. one mellon all not <hes>. so virtual helps detect nominal. Earlier helps these primary care providers which by definition frontline providers right so the patients often in early. That would be huge. So so detecting melanoma earlier. It's this to help a bad dad. Be a huge benefit for patients. Survival and also treatment costs relate stage. No no law can be over a million dollars whereas stage one mellon on the treatment typically just cost a two thousand dollars

Equipping Frontline Providers in The Fight Against Skin Cancer with Cody Simmons

Outcomes Rocket

05:35 min | Last week

Equipping Frontline Providers in The Fight Against Skin Cancer with Cody Simmons

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez. Here and two day. I have the privilege of hosting cody. Simmons is a bio engineer and entrepreneur that has spent his whole career dedicated to bringing new health technologies to physicians and patients prior to his tenure with dermot sensor cody lead commercial efforts for a silicon valley medical device screening startup and also held business development and commercial strategy roles at genetic cody join dermot sensor in may two thousand sixteen as co founder and ceo. He has led the company through raising fifteen million in financing extensive product-development efforts multiple clinical studies and most recently successful regulatory clearances that now allow for the product to be sold commercially. He is an excellent leader in health. Care taken really. You know the advantage of of the advances in digital health to help primary caregivers as well as patience maximize their health cody. I'm really excited to have you on the podcast to learn more about what you guys are up to and more about you. Thanks for joining. I appreciate that and the excitement is shared Thanks for having me today. And like i said very excited to be speaking with you and to have our work featured on your podcast. Absolutely code eight. Now dermot sensor is is. I mean just fascinating evaluating skin cancer in a much simpler way. one on learn more about this as the listeners. Do too but before we dive into that. I love the know more about what inspires your work and healthcare. Sure will i think first and foremost helping patients Is really my inspiration for working in healthcare hands down. I think that everyone faces at least some challenges and frustrations With their job and their day to day work. And i think our company and me personally you know no exception to that would be called work but dinner the day knowing that if you're able to overcome those challenges in your start up and your product is successful knowing that success will benefit hundreds or thousands of patients that is incredibly motivating for me. And i'd say in line with that. I think for entrepreneurs you know. The common expression is that we're supposed to dress unmet needs and as as you've seen obviously from from from all your your work in the podcast. Unfortunately there's no shortage of unmet needs in healthcare and many of them are very large. Ones that fixing not only greatly benefit people's health but depending on the solution also oftentimes i think has a potential to sit health system money and of course patients ultimately pay for parole healthcare whether it's directly or through their employer for private insurance or through taxes that go to medicare and medicaid For sure yeah. And you know we were experiencing so much change and you know. The epidemic has accelerated that change in digital medicine and telemedicine remote care what you guys are doing fascinating and skin. Cancer is a huge problem. It goes unaddressed like undiscovered. It's way too late and so tell us a little about what you guys are doing to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure sure and yet it really is a big problem and you know a clear. Our product is not yet approved by the fda for use in the us but as you mentioned in it is available and certain areas abroad. Who just announced that. Dermot sensor received seamark for sale in europe as well as regulatory clearances australia in a new zealand. So for the u. s. Yeah so that that's been exciting milestone for us and in the us we hope to be approved next year and then after that to start. Adding value to healthcare system in a couple of men was to just address your question so our our company's mission is to improve patients access to effective stink cancer checks as you noted. Writing cancer is very common. It's actually the most common cancer in the united states in melanoma the number one cancer killer of young women fortunately effective effectively skin cancer can be successfully treated if it's detected early enough unfortunately the average wait time in the us dermatologist's appointment once a two months and because of that and other cost access issues. The majority of americans report having never been checked her skin cancer in illness. Small fraction of americans do so annually. Which is direct recognition for many of us So our our main objective to fulfill our mission of improving patients accessed effected skin cancer. Sharks is really empower. America's hundreds of thousands of frontline providers primary care providers like family physicians internists clinicians at retail clinics to more effectively. Catch skin cancer Study showed that primary care providers they're not dermatologists and that that they only correctly decides to refer biopsy a malignant lesion as little as fifty four percent of the time but melanoma fighters survival rates. Go from well under fifty percent for stage. Four melanoma to high nineties for stage. one mellon all not so virtual helps detect nominal. Earlier helps these primary care providers which by definition frontline providers right so the patients often in early. That would be huge. So so detecting melanoma earlier. It's this to help a bad dad. Be a huge benefit for patients. Survival and also treatment costs relate stage. No no law can be over a million dollars whereas stage one mellon on the treatment typically just cost a two thousand dollars

Skin Cancer Marquez Cancer Simmons Cody Dermot Sensor America Melanoma Medicare FDA New Zealand Europe Australia Sharks
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 2 months ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:20 min | 2 months ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Board certified radiation Doctor, New York and one of the few in the world that's who I am. And when I give advice, it's based on years of practice and years of study. Usually much more study in years and board certification than most doctors you'll find, and we'll talk about the skin cancer is a woman who came from his former Soviet Union. She's 61 years old, and she had a skin cancer on her right knows who was eating through the skin eating through her nose whose destructive it was also rate of mass. You measured about a centimeter and a half growing just eating through you conceal. It's eating through the nose. There's not much of a normal knows tissue there and she saw dermatologists insurgent who wants to remove the right part of her nose and That's called Moe's Emily. Just most surgeons. She just does not want that destruction that excavation of her nose and she learned about our special skin cancer program. And by the way, we have a new Skin cancer book to show you and you may want to take a look at that your hands on that. It's very, very, very informative. Anyway, we talked about all the options and with her would be a short course of treatment, No cutting and no bleeding. This is the work that we do treating skin cancers. Base ourselves and squamous cells and character. I can't Roman other cancers of the skin, So if you have a cancer, the skin or if you have a bump, it's not going away. They want to give us a call. Two and two choices or come in you get a booklet and get a DVD or you can come in and get a booklet. Many people come to our office threat in the middle of New York City, Manhattan, sort of half a million people every day in our neighborhood between Penn Station and Macy's and Grand Central in Port Authority, in times, where there's a lot of people in our neighborhood, and you might be one of them and pick up some booklets. You pick up some extra book was people like to look at the skin cancer book a toe learn. Would skin cancers look like? Look what most looks like you could see pictures of people who had most of their nose and it's not a very appealing picture compared to our treatment. No cutting, no bleeding. This is the work that we do every day at 13 80 for Broadway, Broadway and 38 Street in the heart of New York City. Don't care about a man who comes in with prostate cancer. He has a Gleeson, a PSA 30. He also had them Foma. He was born in New Jersey 69 years old. He has two Children. And while he had them Foma treated successfully 10 years ago, and now he has this cancer of his prostate Gleason aid and he knows with surgery. Success rate is very low. It's about 20% with us. The majority of people are treated. He went to a doctor, the neighbouring state. You did a biopsy without anesthesia of the prostate. Well, we don't like that because we don't like people in pain. So if you have a need for a prostate evaluation or prostate biopsy might want to come in. And we can arrange to it that if you need a biopsy, get it painlessly..

skin cancer cancer Gleeson New York City New York Foma Soviet Union New Jersey Penn Station Macy Port Authority Manhattan
Washington's Rivera has cancer, plans to coach

Toby and Chilli

00:15 sec | 3 months ago

Washington's Rivera has cancer, plans to coach

"Rivera says he's got a form of skin cancer, he says it's in the early stages and is very curable. The 58 year old coach said he will continue to lead his team, but he has a plan in place just in case he can't and, according to a

Rivera Cancer
Washington coach Ron Rivera has a form of skin cancer

Mornings on the Mall with Brian Wilson

00:24 sec | 3 months ago

Washington coach Ron Rivera has a form of skin cancer

"Head coach Ron Rivera has revealed he has cancer. The cancer squamous cell carcinoma is a form of skin cancer. Rivera says he spotted the lump on his neck back in July and went to the doctor who told him he can keep coaching as he undergoes treatment. Rivera says he'll do just that, though he does have a plan B in case he needs to step up. Side That could be defensive coordinator Jack Del Rio, who has previous head coaching experience with two teams.

Ron Rivera Jack Del Rio Defensive Coordinator
Washington head coach Ron Rivera diagnosed with cancer

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

Washington head coach Ron Rivera diagnosed with cancer

"Team coach Ron Rivera has been diagnosed with skin cancer, he says it's the in the early stages and says it's very treatable and curable. The good news this morning. The diagnosis has been reported by ESPN. The 58 year old says. It's a business as usual for now, but a plan B is in place in the event. That something happens and he is not able to coach Stay tuned more than

Ron Rivera Espn
Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

BrainStuff

05:19 min | 4 months ago

Are You Putting on Enough Sunscreen?

"As I record this, it is August which here in the northern hemisphere means hours of outdoor time under the blazing summer Sun. But even though many of us do wear sunscreen to help prevent sunburn skin cancer and the kind of skin damage that the beauty industry calls premature aging recent researches found that we're not applying that sunscreen is thickly as we should hang its effectiveness by about forty percent. Sunscreen is rated for Sun Protection factor or SPF WITH SPF thirty able to block ninety, seven percent of ultraviolet rays, the higher, the SPF, the greater the protection although even SPF one hundred doesn't block one hundred percent of UV light. The problem according to this recent research out of University College. London is that few of US US enough sunscreen to enjoy those high levels of protection. Lead author entity young explained to US via email that to calculate ratings in the lab. Sunscreen is applied thickness of two milligrams of product per each square centimeter of skin. He said, an average woman has about one point, seven square meters or eighteen point three square feet of skin for a whole body sunscreen she will need about thirty three grams or one point. One fluid ounces with three whole body applications a day that's about one hundred grams or three point four fluid ounces. For reference, a fluid ounces roughly equivalent to a shot glass of sunscreen and a large tube of sunscreen holds eight fluid ounces of product. So a person spending a full day in the Sun should use about half a tube by themself. Are you using that much sunscreen probably not young and his colleagues estimate that our real life application of Sunscreen is closer to about point seven five milligrams per square centimeter at less than forty percent of the recommended thickness as a result or not getting anything close to the ninety seven percent protection promised on a bottle of SPF. Thirty. The good news from young study is that you can get away with using less product with SPF of fifty or higher. They found that even the real world application rate of point seven, five milligrams of sunscreen per square centimeter if using SPF, fifty provided considerable DNA protection compared to untreated skin. So does that mean that you should run out and buy the most expensive SPF one hundred or spread your regular SPF thirty as thick as cream cheese on a BAGEL. We also spoke with Ivy Lee a board certified dermatologist based in Pasadena California who explained that you could. But that the best daily Sun Protection Strategy is to keep it realistic. Lee, said I tell my patients to go for the highest SPF possible. That feels good on the skin for daily use. How do you know you're really applying two milligrams per square centimeter? No one knows we don't want to induce anxiety over this we want to build healthy habits. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States and exposure to ultra-violet or UV. Light is a risk factor for all types of cancer including melanoma more than nine thousand, three, hundred Americans die for melanoma every year. UNPROTECTED EXPOSURE TO UV light damages the DNA and skin cells leaving them more susceptible to skin cancer DNA damage can result from either a few severe sunburns or a lifetime of cumulative sun exposure. Incredibly the American, Academy of Dermatology reports that getting just five or more blistering sunburns between the ages of fifteen and twenty will increase your overall melanoma risk by percents. and. Lee says that although skin cancer is less prevalent in people of color exposure to UV, light can also cause premature aging they sunscreen use will slow the appearance of wrinkles and age spots for all skin tones. Healthy sun-protection habits include avoiding sun exposure during the peak between ten am to two PM wearing a wide brimmed hat and sunglasses went outside and full sun, and of course, applying sunscreen on all exposed skin even in overcast conditions. For full coverage, Lee recommends starting the day with a cream or lotion type sunscreen preferably fifteen to thirty minutes before you step outside. Instead of measuring out of full shot glass of product, Lee tells her clients to think of applying sunscreen like a massage or can fully into the skin without missing a spot since body sizes vary and product spread. Differently there's no preset amount that works for everyone. Lease suggests reserving spray or powder type sunscreen for fast reapplication on the go the ideal is to reapply every two hours but lease as a more realistic plan is to reapply around lunchtime if you're going to be out all day. If you're heading out on water sanders snow more frequent applications are required because UV rays reflect off of those surfaces. According to Lee it's a myth that you can't burn the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet. Also, tablets and other hand held devices reflect UV light too. So pick a shady spot if you're going to spend some time in the sun scrolling.

Skin Cancer Ivy Lee United States Premature Aging Sunburn University College London Dna Damage California Pasadena Academy Of Dermatology
"skin cancer" Discussed on GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

03:52 min | 5 months ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on GSMC Health and Wellness Podcast

"The I'll be disclosed. Seeing will be of great use I feel like again. There's not a lot of information when it comes to sunscreen. There's also a lot of meth so. My goal for today's episode is kind of you know, educate you guys on Sunscreen care and had a properly and effectively used the product, so let's get into it. The very first question frequently asked questions that terminated dermatologists receive is who need sunscreen. And I think this is a very important and great question, everyone okay, everyone need sunscreen sunscreen use can help prevent skin cancer by protecting you from the sun's harmful violet rays, and anyone could get cancer. You guys anyone regardless of your age. Your gender or race in fact, it's estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime. That's a pretty high statistic. One in five Americans, developing skin cancer in their lifetime, and I want to settle into this question for a little bit because I know for my darker complected individuals out there the black individuals you know there's this mess that if you're black or you have dark skin complexion, then you don't need to put on sunscreen because you've got that. Extra Melanin in your skin that protects you from the harmful rays, which is true but. A whether you're black, White Brown! You need to put sunscreen on. One of my very close friends who is block? Her Dad got skin cancer and she even expressed to me how? Prior to her dad being diagnosed with skin cancer, she herself thought that. Oh, I'm black like skin. Cancer only happens to lighter complexions. I totally understand why a lot of people would. Think that way I. Feel like I for a while, thought that way as well you know again due to a lot of darker complexion to have more Mellon their skin. There it's an extra layer of protection as far compared to people with lighter skin, and that is the case, but. Everyone needs sunscreen again. If you're black. You consider still get skin cancer. If you're Brown, you can get skin cancer. If you're white, you can get skin cancer skin. Cancer does not discriminate. Okay, so please you guys. Protect your skin and wear sunscreen. I'M GONNA come to very brief. Break Right now. We come back more on. Sunscreen frequently asked questions. Are you looking to learn more about the latest trends from the fitness world? Are you confused by all the different trends that are out there? The GS MC fitness podcast is the place for you. The GMC fitness podcast is the place to come for people of all skill and interest levels. Join us as we explore the latest trends in the fitness world. Does that new exercise really work? Should I try yoga? Whatever your question chances are good. You'll find an answer on the GS MC fitness podcast..

skin cancer Brown
The moral dilemma of COVID-19: Difficult decisions on economy and saving lives

WBBM Late Morning News

08:46 min | 8 months ago

The moral dilemma of COVID-19: Difficult decisions on economy and saving lives

"Save the economy or save a life that's the key moral dilemma facing officials as they weigh which steps to take next in response to the pandemic president trump is eager to restart the economy but medical experts warn if the U. S. moves too quickly more lives could be lost the New York times held a video conference with five experts from different backgrounds to discuss the difficult decisions that lie ahead prominent political activist and Reverend William barber took part in that discussion and he joins us now from Goldsboro North Carolina robin thank you so much for waiting this pandemic has led to an unprecedented national emergency what do you believe the moral response should be thank you so much for having me along what we have to know first and foremost explore the issues and the breakages and societal inequalities and America has a lot of rooms in that area when it comes forward racism is structural issues and what makes you as they explore that they do when you don't close the pictures you deepen and expand the life of the pandemic so the moral issue is that before the pandemic ever happened we have seven hundred people dying a day from popular hundred forty million people four and low income pandemic we don't put your mall thing we haven't done in the trump administration McConnell there is a push for mobile arrest reveals about treating also corporation and gave the people people sales workers we have whole middle seats basically we can get tested but we don't have any insurance are we don't have a guarantee that they can have the right all the water will be shut off so we're actually in the midst of this pandemic you in the qualities and you deepen any qualities actually calling the plan poverty was the pandemic could be for this pandemic at river in our own Paula Reid who works in Washington asked to advisor to the president kellyanne Conway about why there was such a lack of diversity on the president's council to re open the economy she didn't have an answer for that I mean we're hearing more and more about how minority small businesses are really challenged when it comes to accessing a little bit of this these billions of dollars that have been set aside to help them stay alive financially is the government doing enough to ensure that all Americans financially survive this pandemic no they weren't doing enough for even the pandemic there was no diversity and that's the one hundred and forty million poor and low income people but for his friend six three of sixty one percent of Americans look for a little while well the twenty six million people don't forget sixty six million white Americans all formal well but also fifty four percent of all people living wage what will people of color there's this ministry has dismissed that he brags about one one half American unit but actually while wages have gone down and people looking both ways and go all the way for and then the administration has not done anything to really be staff recommend before you get those businesses the fact is one of my friends says black people are dying to mostly be tested at least we are saying over and over and over in communities that you're having the highest rate ripping in Mississippi seven percent of those are African Americans desperate because of structural racism and what was his Surgeon General say black people need to stop smoking stop doing drugs and stop doing alcohol and does not address the systemic realities of the lack of health care the lack of hospitals that lack of treatment and the lack of testing which all the structural issues if anything this administration is is widening the racial gaps and creating more hall finish creating cooler we had a conversation yesterday with clergy and the clergy across this country we will open letter to the president and vice president the task the server general saying listen we need hospitals in our communities of color we need testing sites and community of color we need to just ask authorization act you can ask and then it later so that you can price that out and we can get those things to our home and we don't need I'll less about personal responsibility which is always the way some people try to dismiss dealing with structural realities of racism rubber nose points are really important to those points are really important to highlight because as you as you say there are deeper rooted issues that has sort of eggs been exacerbated by by this pandemic for example we know that people with asthma are can be severely affected by Kobe nineteen a lot of black and brown people live in communities that are close to highways and so that that will have an effect on asthmatic conditions for a lot of people a lot of black and brown people a lot of immigrants are those front facing service workers that we rely on those of us who are all working from home and it's easy to say to people you know Netflix and chill but for a lot of people who need that paycheck the bus drivers the postal workers that bodega owners they're going to work every single day and they are coming into contact with people who may be a symptomatic and so these are some of the issues that are sort of coming to light even though black and brown people knew those issues existed before cove in nineteen you remember sometime ago trump's interests with the war was over as I said while I'm sitting here forty three percent of our country formal welcomes sixty one percent of Americans work for low income and it's not because people are lazy it's because their jobs will not be under the ground helping job with this company thank you just mentioned the Surgeon General of the day say about people need to stop smoking author of smoke people come from plants and telecommunications you can close the plants that are needing like you saying errors in Louisiana it has the highest per capita rate of death in the country before and then and now still has the highest rate of deaths from the pandemic those people all the diseases because of the cancer carcinogens that are produced by the plant skin cancer our issues that we have to do and they're not giving him we called the central workers and many people are among the orderlies the groceries the fashion work with nurses what not who are who are essential workers get broader than just we say people essential workers and they represent the soul of America will win all the dissension workers going to seat the soul of America we tell them to go to the front line we don't guarantee them healthcare we have not guaranteed them safely we have guaranteed them a living wage we've done all those things for the corporations we bailed out before there was even a full blown panic diminish what we left DC central workers with our assistance and and and we have to come to okay just relax everybody has a right to lead it if they don't we don't know if they are sick it's not going to stay among the poor low income workers lack communities are sick the Germans lock on the state Tino communities are safe it's not going to stay there is going to continue to spray it and extend the life of this pandemic to the rest of us one reason we've been pushing according to scripture and I said whoa onto the old legislate evil and rock for their rights we are seeing a robbing poor and low income people basic fundamental human rights the right to a decent wage the right to healthcare the right to sick leave and again a pandemic it does hurt all you might be able to hide it during a pandemic you will be exposed and by those things continuing to exist it will extend the life and in the end this number also soccer so everybody has a right to me you know if they don't we don't and we better hurry up and relaxed it and this administration but over the

Donald Trump President Trump
Can ultraviolet light kill the novel coronavirus?

WBBM Late Morning News

00:58 sec | 9 months ago

Can ultraviolet light kill the novel coronavirus?

"If masks don't work what does stop coronavirus hi Brian Cooley from scenic in search of the next big thing those N. ninety five masks are actually not recommended for the average person by the CDC partly because human coronavirus is often the smaller particle than those masks can block hospitals instead use a bright blue ultraviolet light when they want to kill viruses in large areas but it can cause skin cancer and cataracts if you're exposed to it but Columbia University Medical Center just put out a research paper that found if you use just the right slice of bright blue UV light it will still kill viruses but not causing cancer and cataracts the researchers suggest that mounting such UV lights in the ceiling at places like schools hospitals airports are in planes could really knock down blue virus among us and more importantly other viruses including new and emerging like the coronavirus it will help with the current outbreak but the color of public spaces may one day be

Brian Cooley CDC Columbia University Medical Ce
Melanoma Medicine

2 Docs Talk

08:15 min | 10 months ago

Melanoma Medicine

"Just to be clear there are lots of different kinds of skin cancer knowing them as just one of many chewed chewed happens to be the kind of cancer that comes from land sites which are the cells in our skin that make pigment and it's the third most common type of skin cancer right right behind squamous cell and Basal the Cell Carcinoma. And I would say it's also the scariest meaning people rarely die from squamous or Basal cell cancers but definitely can with melanomas right but let's not feed people out the five year survival for all. MELANOMAS is greater than ninety percent so that's good true. The thing to know is that survival rates are dependent on the size of the melanoma. Ah really the depth of the melanoma so if the melanoma just involves the top layer of skin. That's good treatment is almost always curious. Yeah but if the melanoma extends down into deeper layers of the skin or even metastases to different parts of the body then the five year. Survival rates dropped precipitously so for stage four disease which is the worst. The five year survival rate is pretty crappy. I think around twenty five percent. Yes so for obvious reasons. There has been a big emphasis on prevention and early detection. The idea being if you can find these things before they grew too big or too deep in prognosis will be better right so the first thing with respect to prevention is who is at risk because the risk of developing a melanoma is not the same for everyone. Yeah so people who are fair complected have blonde hair especially red hair and blue or green. Eyes are at an increased risk from Elena's. Yeah I think it's like twenty times more common in white people than black people. Yeah all white people I guess. Yeah Yeah and also if you spend a lot of time in the sun or -taining booth that's not good. Yeah we're talking to you. Donald trump does he couldn't attaining booth. I thought that was just a Tan from the spray on. It might be anyway if if you've got sunburn when you were a kid or teenager that's also not good. You know every time I right now. I'm just like checking every box I just cringe. I mean growing growing up. We spent so much time at the local pool. My mom would just drop us off at ten. For Time. Warner cod same. The lifeguard lifeguard was our babysitter but anyway that wasn't good. It was fun but not good. Yeah also win. The lifeguard wasn't there we douse ourselves with ketchup. And then fall at the diving boards like we'd been shot. I still feel really guilty about that. But it was also not good in a little disturbing. No good for the soul. But we digress. There are also some heritable disorders orders and genetic mutations that ran families that's put some people at risk and Radiation therapy in childhood also. So that's not good and people who just have a lot moles that increases the risk of developing melanoma. Okay so that brings up a question. If you're somebody that has a lot of moles. How can we tell them? Melanoma from Benign Neva or a normal old mole. What is melanoma look like? Well there are some characteristics that can help us tell good from bad but before we get into those we should probably say see. That doctors aren't really very good at predicting good from bad. I mean we're better than a crap. Shoot you mean better than fifty fifty right but even dermatologists the folks that look at these things all the time. I'm only get it right about seventy percent of the time so means that means if you're a good dermatologists you're still be removing normals. Pretty often right so anyway. There are a couple of tricks they teach you in Moscow to help you get it right one being the ABCD rule. Okay let's see if we can remember that far back as stands for a symmetry if the mole is asymmetric metric. That's not a good time right and be is borders. The borders are irregular. Also not good for color so lots of different colors red white blue also black and gray not good a mole should be just one homogeneous color right not a variety just read is okay just blues okay but not various colors then. D is diameter if the mole is six millimetres wide greater gus worrisome and finally which stands for evolve if you've had them all for years and then suddenly it starts to changing color shape size. Whatever north boy no moles should not evolve? Yeah they should remain uninvolved evolved. Yes also let's not forget. The Ugly Duckling will or one of these things is not like the other rule exactly so if someone has a lot of moles and they all look alike except for one. Maybe that one isn't just a mole and the ones that do look like just them all could also pretend that the potential is there that they could be something. It's very rare but you know we're not saying we're not diagnosing every normal here if it doesn't meet these criteria are not hard and fast. Yes that's true okay. So now everybody out there. Listening has stripped down birthday suit in his examining themselves with magnifying glass. Thanks for the mental energy me my pleasure but the thing is dermatologists are really working to improve public awareness of skin cancers I including melanomas true for good reason over the past twenty to thirty years a number of cases of melanoma has just skyrocketed in fact the number of invasive melanoma Mama cases has doubled from nineteen eighty to two thousand eleven which is scary because these are later stage melanomas the ones with a bad prognosis. Yeah but here's the deal. Most people think this is due to increased diagnosis from screening not a true increase in the number of cases. Well then we have a problem. I mean if the number of cases week diagnosed has doubled old because we're doing a better job screaming than we should see a corresponding decrease in mortality. Exactly but that's not what's happening. Mortality has decreased only a very little bit certainly not close. Goes to what you would expect with such a huge jump in diagnoses. And here's the other thing. The United States Preventative Services Task Force the USPS T.F. The the folks at review the body of research on a topic to see what the scientists telling us. These folks don't recommend screening. Let me repeat that they don't recommend screening. There's just not enough evidence evidence to say it really works so we're diagnosing more and more melanomas but it's not really affecting mortality. People are dying almost as much as before right and this is something. We're starting to see fairly early regularly and medicine. These days across many specialties We want to believe it. Screening the general population for cancers works. But this may not always be the case. Yes yes so the risks of not screening. We get you'll miss a cancer if it's early enough to do something about it but the risks of screening or not as well known or appreciated right and we've talked about this on previous podcast screen and can lead to false positives unnecessary procedures increased cost to patients inside in general anxiety pain suffering. All those things get so maybe we need to not necessarily screen more people but screen the right people right screen people who have a higher risk of the disease than the general population. Okay but it's not all doom and gloom in fact there's some really good news out there about MELANOMAS. There is for one. The number of melanomas diagnosed in young people is going down. We're seeing it less and less and young folks not exactly sure why this is happening. Maybe it's due to increased emphasis on prevention. I mean I was out there with baby oil on my kids. Were not out there with baby. Yeah so there's there's a big difference right there yeah. Meeting more people stayed out of the sun or covered up. More people wearing sunscreen. That kind of thing. Yeah I slathered sunscreen on my kids way more than my parents ever did for me. I was religious about a real then still there were a few cents sunburns in their same. Because we're so pale but well. I'm wondering if you've been getting questions from friends and family lately about the safety of Sunscreen because of that study the FDA publish this yeah right so this is a study that showed chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed systemically Klay levels at the FDA would normally require choir phase one through three testing before approving exactly. So here's the thing we have no idea what these chemicals are up to. And our body wants to gibbs or maybe they're up to nothing they're totally harmless more. Maybe not we just don't know but we do know that using sunscreen prevents skin cancer sir. That's not in doubt so we need more studies. That what I hear you saying. We need more studies to figure out what's going on. But until then dermatologists are recommending. Continued it to use sunscreen because the benefits are so great. Yeah and the risks are basically unknown. If you're really freaked out about it you can use zinc oxide based or titanium oxide Bay sunscreens trains. Those aren't absorbed. They just sit on the top of the skin right there barriers. But don't stop protecting yourself from the Sun. We knew the benefits to some protection. So keep up the good work mom and

Cancer Mortality FDA Cell Carcinoma Donald Trump Sunburn Diving Elena Moscow Radiation United States Preventative Ser Gibbs Usps
'TikTok saved my life,' user says after viewers tipped him off to problem mole

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

'TikTok saved my life,' user says after viewers tipped him off to problem mole

"Media here's a good story potentially bad social media social media may have saved a man's life twenty four year old Alex Griswold says after he posted a video on the social media site tick tock last month viewers urged him to get a mole on his back checked out by a doctor two people who saw griz waltz what it's like to be married video warned him that mall look like it might be cancerous we shared a new video on Friday saying he had avoided skin cancer because of the strangers warnings a software developer has nearly a half million tictoc followers and said a week after viewers notice the irregular growth you went to a dermatologist performed a biopsy in a week later was told that it needed to be

Alex Griswold Software Developer
Strides in lung cancer lead steep decline in U.S. death rates

What A Day

03:36 min | 11 months ago

Strides in lung cancer lead steep decline in U.S. death rates

"According to a new report from the American Cancer Society Cancer Death rate in the United States dropped two point two percent from twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen. That's the largest decline ever reported in the span of the year. which is great news for us so second circuit grim reaper? Akilah what does the research actually say about wide. Those rates are dropping so there are a few reasons for the drop but before we get into them. Let's let's talk about what that two point two percent number actually represents so what's really driving. This is lung cancer. Rates and skin cancer rates And that's where they've seen the most progress so a lot of that is due to change behaviors in the population's less smoking wearing sunscreen but also there are much better treatment treatment options than there have been previously. The report did also say though that progress has stalled on other types of cancers those cancers are prostate breast and colorectal rectal cancers experts blame sedentary lifestyles and unhealthy food which can lead to hormonal issues and inflammation but they also blamed geographic economic an racial disparities in access to care and exposure to environmental toxins. So you know lots of factors right and these numbers are kind of more reflective of lung and skin cancer rates declining client versus all cancer rates overall declining and statistically lung cancer kills more people than breast prostate colorectal and brain cancers combined. So why are people more likely to survive lung cancer now. Yeah I mean a big part of that answer is how doctors are treating cancer now so imaging. Technology has advanced to a point that doctors there's are now accurately assessing the stage of cancer and its prognosis. So you know there's not all this over treatment that might lead to side effects In recent years more doctors have turned to less invasive options for surgery which leads to better recovery times and outcomes and immunotherapy has become way more widely used since two thousand fifteen so therapy for those. Who Don't know is essentially when you know? There's something that stimulates your immune system to help you. Fight the disease in tumors The same can also be said about skin cancer and it's also really important to note though that even though there has been progress. The progress is uneven across the country so these cancer death rates still vary between states that promote preventative healthcare like vaccinations and those that tend not to so perfect perfect example from the New York Times You are probably more likely to cervical cancer in Arkansas than in Vermont because Arkansas hasn't widely adopted the HP vaccine ax seen as Vermont has done for the past decade. Okay Well now it's time to address the elephant in the room. That is We're we are a daily news podcasts. And other Daily News shows did a whole two part special teams juuling so if you smoking in vaping usage is up. Does that mean that this progress progress could be loss at some point so it is tough to say right now so scientists are still studying the effects of e cigarettes when used for long periods of time and there are are carcinogens and e cigarettes they just don't know yet what the full cancer risk is. Because it's a new thing but based on the report the decline in deaths from lung cancer can can be attributed both to people quitting smoking and advances in treatment so if juuling leads to cigarette smoking then yeah we could zero versatile in this downward trend of lung cancer it would be bat. Yeah but one thing that is conclusive is that access to treatment and vaccines and advocating for equal treatment across socioeconomic and racial lines will in the long run ensure less people die from cancer.

Lung Cancer American Cancer Society Cancer United States Juuling Daily News New York Times HP Vermont Arkansas
Doctors remove 5-inch cancerous 'dragon horn' from man's back

Brian Kilmeade

00:41 sec | 11 months ago

Doctors remove 5-inch cancerous 'dragon horn' from man's back

"U. K. man baffled doctors after five inch cancerous dragon horn is they're calling it sprouted Adams back despite having no history of skin cancer according to this new study a process to go on to the dermatologist every three months like you this fifty year old man it lives in a country where medical care is readily available he had everything available to him he did look into this scintillating grown about five inches he let this go on for years and turns out this is a cancerous deal they were able to remove it remove it nothing is going to be okay that's what it literally does look like a horn a **** that's why I asked if

Adams U. K.
The 2019 ozone hole is the smallest on record since its discovery, but there’s a catch

the NewsWorthy

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

The 2019 ozone hole is the smallest on record since its discovery, but there’s a catch

"In a rare event the ozone hole over Antarctica is the smallest it's been since its discovery the whole forms every year when colder temperatures caused the ozone layer to thin out well CNN reports the whole usually rose in September and October but this time it actually shrank to the smallest it's been on record and that's good news but scientists say because of unusually warm temperatures it's not necessarily a sign that the ozone is on a fast track to recovery the ozone layer is the part of our atmosphere that sort of like sunscreen it blocks true violet rays from hitting the planet surface so it stops us from getting things like skin cancer and cataracts scientists think the Antarctic ozone will recover back to levels seen in the nineteen eighties around the year twenty seventy

CNN
Vitamin D: Should you be taking a supplement?

Joel Riley

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Vitamin D: Should you be taking a supplement?

"Don't know if you think about it but you know we get closer to winter time less and less sunshine so that means your body is not getting the vitamin D. from from the sun right so should you take a supplement well doctors say the answer is really not that simple you've got literature that says if you're taking supplements not really sure if it's a health benefit or not what we do know vitamin D. is important for bone health there's also research that says it can help reduce prostate colon and skin cancer but there's also reports that say if you get too much then it's a bad and it actually hurts your with diseases it's supposed to protect you against so National Academy of medicine says upper limit of four thousand international units per day of vitamin D. and no more than that to be safe and by all means talk to your doctor before you consider states consider taking a

National Academy Of Medicine
New treatment extends life of advanced melanoma patients

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:05 min | 1 year ago

New treatment extends life of advanced melanoma patients

"Some startling statistics are coming out about the treatment of advanced skin cancer KCBS reporter Betty Gephardt says that clinical trials at places such use such as rather UCSF or offering hope to cancer patients and their families. just ten years ago what diagnosis of late stage melanoma was considered untreatable only five percent survived five years but now with the use of immuno therapy drugs that five year survival rate has jumped up to fifty two percent I deal dot professor of medicine at UCSF was involved in the clinical trials it's an amazing thing to see that that's huge meet in just you know like I I'd say ten years in melanoma research and died says those immunotherapy drugs are also helping fight other cancers cancers where they mean system is triggered like like melanoma is one example but lung cancer is another example head and neck cancer that's his kidney and bladder tumors also respond well to immuno therapy in the Silicon Valley bureau Betsy Gephardt

Betty Gephardt Ucsf Betsy Gephardt Reporter Professor Of Medicine Ten Years Fifty Two Percent Five Percent Five Years Five Year
Boris Johnson referred to Police watchdog

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Boris Johnson referred to Police watchdog

"Coming up on the news trump's past phonecall minnows also concealed. RS Johnson referred to police watchdog over US businesswoman links and skin cancer half of people surviving advanced melanoma it Saturday September twenty eight. I'm Anthony Davis Donald Trump told two senior Russian officials in twenty seventeen office meeting that he was unconcerned about Moscow's interference in the twenty sixteen presidential election because the the United States did the same in other countries and assertion that prompted alarmed White House officials to limit access to the remarks to an unusually small number of people according to three former officials with knowledge of the matter the comments which have not been previously reported will part of a now infamous meeting with Russian in Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Russia's ambassador Sergey Kislyak in which trump revealed highly classified information that exposed a source of intelligence intelligence on the Islamic state a memorandum summarizing the meeting was limited to a few officials with the highest security clearances in an attempt to keep the president's is comments from being disclosed publicly according to the former officials who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive matters the White House's classification of records about trump's communications with foreign officials is now a central part of the impeachment inquiry launched this week by House Democrats White House officials were particularly distressed by trump's election remarks because it appeared the president was forgiving Russia for an attack that had been designed to help elect him the three former officials said trump also seemed to invite Russia to interfere in other countries elections. They said one former senior officials said head trump regularly defended Russia's actions even in private saying no countries pure. He was always defensive of Russia. The person said adding the president had never made such specific remark about interference in their presence. He thought the whole interference thing was ridiculous. He never bought into wit meanwhile. US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has been subpoenaed by Democrats to turn over documents relating to the trump administration's stations dealings with Ukraine. It is the latest move in rapidly escalating impeachment proceedings against Donald Trump in a separate development. Yes today today the US special envoy for Ukraine negotiations. Kurt Volker resigned Morris Johnson has been referred to the police watchdog to decide whether or not to investigate the prime minister for a potential criminal offence of misconduct conduct in public office while he was London Man. It is alleged businesswoman Jennifer. A curry received favourable treatment to friendship with with Mister Johnson Mister. Johnson has denied any impropriety. The allegations refer to claims that Mister Curry joined trade missions led by Mister Johnson when he was mayor of London and her company received several thousand pounds in sponsorship grants the reason the is involved now is because the role of the mayor of London. John is also London's police in Crime Commissioner responding to the referral number ten said the prime minister as mayor of London did a huge amount of work when selling capital pedal city around the world beating the drum for London and the UK meanwhile a vote of no confidence in the government aimed at replacing Boris Johnson as prime. I Minister could be held next week. A senior Scottish National Party M P has said Stewart Hosie said such a move may be the only way of avoiding and no deal brexit rex it on the thirty first of October. The aim of a no confidence vote will be to install an interim prime minister who would secure a short brexit delay and then cooler general election. Momen half of patients can now survive at deadly. I skin cancer that was considered untreatable. Just a decade ago say doctors ten years ago. Only one in twenty patients would live for five years after being diagnosed nosed with late stage melanoma most would die in months but drugs to harness the body's immune system mean fifty two percent now live at least five of years a clinical trial shows doctor said it was an extraordinary and rapid transformation in care melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and kills nearly two thousand three hundred people each year if it is caught in the early stages than the chances of survival good but as the cancer becomes more aggressive and spreads throughout the body then survival plummets the trial investigated to immunotherapy drugs which designs to enhance the immune in system and let it attack cancer immunotherapy is Nobel Prize winning science that he's making the untreatable treatable. The field is one of the most most exciting in cancer treatment the immune system constantly patrols body fighting off hostile invaders such as viruses it should attack. Kansas is to but cancers are a corrupted version of healthy tissue and can evolve ways of evading the immune system you can subscribe to the news with your favorite podcast APP. Ask Your Smart Speaker or enable the news as your Amazon Alexa Flash briefing skill follow us on twitter at the news underscore podcast. The news is an independent production covering politics inequality the health and climate delivering honest verified and truthful World News daily.

Donald Trump Morris Johnson Prime Minister Russia United States London President Trump Mister Johnson Sergey Lavrov Ukraine UK Mister Curry Boris Johnson White House Sergey Kislyak
Dr. Dendy Engelman Talks All Things Vitamin C

The Emma Guns Show

12:33 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Dendy Engelman Talks All Things Vitamin C

"Arden has launched the Vitamin C. Sarah Capsules Radiance Renewal Serum and because Dundee is the consulting dermatologist and was back in London recently for the launch. I asked her if she would tell me everything that we needed to know about vitamin C. Just so that we were on the right page starting from the right place when it comes to how to use it how to layer and with that kind of stuff and my jaw Adore Ajoy I always adored my conversations nations with Dundee because she just makes everything so simple and really easy to understand that I always come away from these jobs without feeling as though I know how to look after my skin better than before if war which combat thing right I really hope that's what you get out of these conversations to we had an excellent chat. I think so I to be honest title with love I find gold and she's very cool and she really did lay it all out very simply and his longtime listeners will know she works out of her practice in New York so it's it's not often often she comes over to the UK so I hope you feel as I did better informed now about intimacy than you did before and I'm really glad that when she does come over to the UK we're able to fit these conversations because they are so valuable. We also talk about those Elizabeth Arden Vitamin C. captials capsules but I'll let her do the talking on that one and explain why it's such an exciting and interesting innovation in terms of using vitamin C. topically after our chat. I'm going to be back to talk about the five hundred products that are currently on my radar the ones that I've used and the ones that I enjoy using the ones I think are worth knowing about including those new capsules choose from Elizabeth Arden which I have been using religiously since my childhood Dundee a few weeks ago. I was very lucky to get some samples prelaunch so I had a bit of a preview and I have been using them consistently consistently every single day so stick around here a little bit more about what I think about those. I'm really delighted to have Dr Dan the anger and an her expertise back on the show so here she is Waking Waking Waking his she is making a welcome return to the poker Dr Dundee increment well. This is so incredible because friend of the show Dr Dundee engelman Elizabeth Arden's consulting dermatologist is back doc welcome to be thank you so happy to be here. You can come back anytime. I'm so glad to have you on the show. You've been previously we talked all things retinal and you are a glorious safe gentle kind mine of information about things skin-care. Thank you and skin so just I yeah. I know a lot of listeners. Will we cheating in and thinking yeah he didn't. He's back but just for those. You may be new to the show on you to you. Would you just explain what you do what Your Day job is on why you're such an authorizations skincare sure so. I'm a dermatologist in New York City. I also am a skin cancer surgeon so I did extra training in a specific type of skin cancer removal technique called Mos- surgery. Moh S and in my fellowship I also did procedural dermatology so a lot of lasers and on different devices in order to treat various skin conditions over my career. I've thankfully been had the opportunity to consult with different brands and help with research and development and really identifying either skin care ingredients that are necessary to bring to market or certain skin-care trends that we've identified and helped to develop different products for an so Elizabeth Arden has been one of my favorite brands. I've worked with and I've been working with them for the last four years and it's important to say you work with skin on the daily. Yes all the time and you also you come. APP skin skin from a very scientific background from UC the impact of the topic and ingredients have so you all very clear about what benefits can be reaped from a really good skincare regime yes and I think historically we as dermatologists masters and experts in skin disease. Not all dermatologist us were trained in skin care. If in our traditional teachings at something that you got very little exposure to e as residents accidents and during our training and so it's been something that has been an interest of mine and our patients see US experts and skin care and so we need to become that if we don't have the traditional training and years ago honestly there weren't great actives I mean there was prescription retinoids that we're for acne that could be quite harsh and the sunscreens weren't that great. We hadn't developed topical antioxidant so the evolution of skin care has been something that's it's been amazing to watch and so such a joy to be part of weird living in a a good time for skincare really really so you're more seriously much innovation and we will come onto that but last time you visited we had a full back to school on retinal and it was amazing say much and actually one of the other ingredients like retinal but I think a lot of people are curious about because they know it's another one that gets held up by just as a gold standard because it works is a vitamin C. Yes so we all going to go back to Britain mincy. When I one okay so you just very basic level. How does it work as a topical skincare ingredient and what are the main functions of Z so vitamin. C is a topical antioxidant and what that means we always throw around antioxidants and how good they are for the skin and free radicals are bad right and so people understand that concept but if you wanna think about what's happening on a cellular level. I often like to you just make the analogy to the cell membrane being zipper and when we have ultraviolet radiation or sun exposure or pollution Asian exposure various toxins from smoke in the environment it releases free radicals which are just an unpaid electron that then goes and basically UNZIPS zips the cell causing premature death antioxidants insert themselves into the zipper into the cell membrane and prevent the unzipping and so that's a very easy kind of dumbed down analogy but just to think about what the antioxidants are doing its site oh protective meaning it's protecting the cell and helping it to to resist damage that could be caused by the environment and vitamin. C is one of the most potent and powerful antioxidants that we have and we get get benefit from ingesting orally and we get benefit in the skin by applying at topically and so it does help to protect the cells from environmental damage because I think when a lot of people myself included hit the word protection when it comes to skin are immediately think of SPF yes but vitamin C. is. How did you describe it listeners? We've just done this. Just don't talk and he said it's a safety net. Yes which I loved yeah. It's it's nice there to catch what damage is filtered through because even the best sunscreens if you have the best mineral blockers that are very high. SPF They still allow allow about one point four percent of ultraviolet light to penetrate through the skin and so there is where the antioxidants are going to be to help kind of catch all of that extra damage that could be occurring even though we're doing our best to protect it with SPF and so it is a nice safety net to have underlying the SPF in order to help protect back from free radical damage so if I wanted to add victimization my skin carry jayme. I I couldn't just go yeah. I'll try it. Why would I what would be happening to my skin. That would make me a good candidate to use vitamin C. It's something I should be using anyway. Yes I tell everyone you know. It's not always formulaic formulaic and things that are not all skin care is created the same in people's skin conditions may necessitate certain ingredients over others the most everyone can benefit from topical vitamin. C in the proper concentrations. It isn't particularly inflammation inflammation inducing. It's very well tolerated. If you have very sensitive skin you may WanNa make sure that it plays well with you but I even patients who are very are prone to sensitivities or resign. They still can use a topical vitamin C. and I love it for two reasons one because it's protective against Sunday damage and accelerated photo aging because eighty percent of aging is from the environment we all think that it's intrinsic and it's genetic but really the vast majority of aging is from the environment you put your skin in but it also helps to prevent hyper pigmentation and so people who have sunspots or photo damage damage or age spots you know they'll come in or Melas MMA. That's hormonally mediated. They really bothered by that and they want ways to go about correcting. I and topical Vitamin C is a great way to do that. It works on a specific enzyme called Theresa May's which is part of Melanin synthesis pigment kind kind of creation and if you inhibit the enzyme that creates it then it's going to decrease the Melanin production so you could be using it from the the first time that you start late investing using skincare but then perhaps as you get older. It might be something. Can you spot treat you can and in some concentrations it can be exfoliating almost like a appeal if you use vitamin. C and higher concentrations so some people do use it just specifically typically on spots but the good news is it. It's not going to lighten existing skins and people ask that you know like Hydra cone could could lighten surrounding skin doesn't really discriminate between your normal pigment and hyper pigmentation so you have to be careful that way but in vitamin CS case it really just helps with the discoloration and uneven skin tone or specific spots so you can either spot treat but most people like to kind of have a diffuse application now one thing about vitamin C. is because it is ineffective ingredient. It is an antioxidant but it is an expedient at different concentrations. You can't use it in the morning MHM but you can also use it in the evening but but is it could use the same concentration in the morning and the evening and what are the different. What are the different applications locations. And what is the difference between applying it in the morning. What is it doing that and what is it doing in the evening. Yes so the morning application is more for protection from from uh-huh environmental aggressors son smoke pollution and it night if you. I would say really the best. The best patient shouldn't type or skin-tight to put that in someone who's prone to hyper pigmentation. You're using almost as a treatment there for the discoloration or uneven skin tone but if you have have even skin tone than you probably just need it in the morning what does hyper pigmentation that like some people especially Melas MMA. If it's it's hormonally mediated they'll either get hyper pigmented what we call patches meaning flat areas that aren't raised on the forehead cheeks or above the upper lip up in patients come to me all the time and they're like when I take pictures. It looks like I have a moustache. and we can get that also in pregnancy. It's called Colas MMA or the Damascus pregnancy. It almost looks like you've got a hyper pigmented mask on your face and that's all from hormonal fluctuations. Certainly women who are using oral contraceptives can be more prone to hyper pigmentation in that space or if you've had a fair amount of sun exposure you might just get brown spots we call those solar son. Linton origines which are just dark spots and that will age US makes you look older than you. Maybe even your physiologic age and so we often when patients come to me and they want to look younger. That's where I start to even the skin tone because that's a very easy way to look better her and more youthful without having to undergo procedures injectables and different things that way that was really interesting. What you were saying earlier before we started recording talking about a few you spoke to at age sports family skin. The perception will be that they are older than they actually are

Elizabeth Arden Dundee Dr Dundee UK New York Dr Dan London New York City United States Theresa May Moh S Linton Origines Damascus Britain
Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

"September is prostate cancer awareness month it's the second most common cancer among men in the U. S.. behind only non melanoma skin cancer director Scott Agnar is co director of the university of Chicago's advanced prostate cancer clinic or most men diagnosed in a timely fashion with prostate cancer there's no symptoms and that's why the strategy is a finger exam of the prostate coupled with a blood test called PSA hanger says males with a family history of prostate cancer and man of African American descent should consider screenings after turning

Scott Agnar Director University Of Chicago
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

03:01 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Inner life and to avoid radical surgery to avoid robotic surgery with excellent results out patient with her but a woman who came to me she's eighty five years old a very surprised woman says very spry I'll tell you that she's born in Poland she has a skin cancer left cheek it was a very big skin cancer on the left cheek and seen by a dermatologist she has two children she came with her son in law who's a very smart man and she had breast cancer treated with mastectomy sad to say she went to one of the big hospitals twenty years ago and showed mastectomy two bedrooms see here because you know our results are excellent while most likely keeping the breast so couple months ago shelter for skin cancer over life at age eighty five it was a big skin cancer on her cheek it was a regular and raised she saw a dermatologist should squares cancer and the dermatologist wanted to however undergo mows MO H. as CMOS surgery where they kind of excavate all the cancer a big area in her and then try to put it together either to take a pass from her but talks or something and patch in the skin well she was just totally opposed like anti we see hundreds probably thousands of patients with skin cancers who just do not want excavation surgery and then a flap of skin from the bod talks or somewhere to try to fill in the hole she's a very beautiful woman and she wants to keep her beauty and she doesn't want to have rather cold deforming surgery especially on her face and she came to me she came to me and say two months ago and she decided on treatment and she just finished a treatment I saw her yesterday and skip the cancer is gone the skin is beautiful she's happy her family so happy or some of the law came with me with her to meet me we all met and I can tell you they're all very happy we treat Manny's skin cancers basal cells and squamous cells care to recant almost almost any part of the body people got a loser here come to us or their nose other cheek other miles are part of the a or arm or leg or hands or feet or trunk this is the work we do and you'll see plenty of examples in our body radiosurgery booklet under skin cancer seeing calls to get information this is the work that we do every day non invasive outpatient treatment in just minutes treating skin cancers with high success rates in excellent cosmetic results and I can tell you that our patients in general are very very very happy and that makes us happy this is what we do but I'm such a leader mon we'll take a short break many people with cancer.

Poland skin cancer cancer Manny eighty five years twenty years two months
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:12 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Years old. And I talked to you about him last year. This is a man who had a skin cancer on his left cheek and the doctors cut on him so much they did was called MOS, MOH, most surgery, and is they removed so much of his cheek and his nose that he couldn't close his eye, and they had to cut off part of his skull above his head. So there's a big hole in his head. It's incredible vague wholeness head to remake his nose and there remained his nose, and they cut off all the skin. He couldn't close his eyes, and then he lost his eyes went dead. Because we need our limits to close. And when the skin doctors and the surgeons cut off so much skin for the skin cancer, he couldn't close his eyes. He went blind and he came to me last year because six different doctors at the six biggest hospitals around were telling me to remove is I and it was just refused. That refusing that. And I saw suspicious area and I told him that and there were six doctors desire removed, and it was a social worker with him another personal. Get your I remove get your I removed and he lists radio show every day, and he just didn't wanna do it. And I saw him. I think there's other skin cancer. And now yeah, there's a biopsy proven skin cancer on the other side of the face on the right side of the face by the by the ear just in front of the air, on the right side, and he understands. Now there's such big differences in the treatment of skin cancers. And of course, retreat, any basal cell cancers and squamous cell cancers. This man is walking example of why not have surgery the formity and not only a formity lost his vision. He lost his function and that without a second. I there's no depth perception, people that have no depth perception. Have an increased chance of damage to themselves accidents and calamity just because of that skin cancer. So there's lots of reasons to call us at two and two choices..

skin cancer
"skin cancer" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:34 min | 1 year ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Why do you think these rates of diagnosis or up skin cancer remains the most common cancer diagnosed in the United States Nora with one in five Americans getting some form? Skin cancer melanoma, as you know, bell is the most deadly type of skin cancer. And we think unfortunately rates are still going up due to high levels of unprotected exposure, and people are still using tanning beds. But fortunately for the first time the survival rate is actually improving due to advances in treatment of advanced melanoma. So what are some of these better treatments that are now being used for melanoma? So we've known for a long time that unlike other cancers melanoma really doesn't respond to chemotherapy or radiation therapy, which is why advanced melanoma is so deadly. But recently over the past several years there have been over ten new immunotherapy, we know that melanoma is a very smart cancer, and it actually can sort of deceive our immune system. So by using immunotherapy to stimulate our own immune system to attack the Melania the improvement in survival has been gradually, increasing. Unfortunately, these therapies do have significant side effects. So they're not without side effects are definitely helping survival. Right. I always think of myself as a very private person. I'm from a family of doctors. But when I disclosed this melanoma diagnosis, so many people came up to me, including men, I was really surprised and said, oh, I had my skin check. They found something it was a basil south. What are the things we should look for? And how many times should we be visiting our dermatologist? And thank you for being such a great advocate. Really? I've heard so much. Also, you're really a role model about getting in and getting checked because skin cancer when it's caught early. Fortunately, years wise. It's almost always curable. It's really about getting in getting checked. We talk about the ABCD's ease of melanoma a is for a symmetry be is border. Irregularity see is color variation d is diameter and the most important and the newest is e which is evolution or change. So if you see a mole that's new or changing get into see a board certified dermatologist, I skin check every year for every American, but if you've had skin cancer at least twice a year. That's Dr Elizabeth HALE on CBS this morning, Microsoft launching an effort ended making voting more, secure and verifiable. The company is. Saying it's going to offer free open source software that several top US election machine. Vendors say they'll consider using their voting equipment. It's called election. Guard was an s this morning by Microsoft CEO at a developer conference in Seattle. The suffer kit is being developed by the Oregon based company Gallois, which is also creating a secure voting system. Prototype under contract with the Pentagon's advanced research agency as.

Skin cancer United States Microsoft Nora bell Pentagon Dr Elizabeth HALE Seattle Oregon Gallois CBS CEO developer
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Skin cancer, and successfully did. So in fact, he had biopsies of his skin after our treatment showing the cancer was gone and his doctors at that other super place were amazed. We're able to treat his skin cancer without losing. His toes so often the surgeons who are proposing surgery haven't really had an experience with inveighs noninvasive radio surgery pinpoint invisible beams so they're talking about what they do. But often, they don't know what they don't know. And that's always a problem in life. It's a problem in medicine. It's a problem when it comes to you and your loved ones when you talk to a doctor is trying to explain something that he or she doesn't really know for example in in medicine ninety nine percent of doctors do not have any formal training in radiation. Yet, everyone has an opinion. Almost everyone not several everybody medicine sever hundred percent or zero percent. But only about one percent of doctors have experience in formal experience in radiation training, and even less have experienced in radio surgery pinpoint treatment precise treatment focusing cancer treatment on the cancer like on this fans here that's where he started talking about how to treat his cancer on his ear or anywhere in the body. Without removing that part of the body and lots of people do not want part of their body removed, by the way, I forgot to introduce myself. My name's Dr Gill Liederman, Meridian oncologist. And I know there's lots of people on the radio in life. You talk to and you get opinions from really know, what is their education. What is the basis for their opinion? Everyone can have an opinion and everyone's entitled to an opinion. That's what democracy's all about that one man or one woman is entitled to their vote. Everyone's vote is equal. But when people give medical advice, and it's your life. Sometimes you'd like to know who exactly is talking. Well, tell you who I am Dr kill leader board certified cancer doctor with school. I grew up in Waterloo, Iowa was born in Iowa was raised there. It was educated. There went to university in Iowa with the medical squad m d real doctor physician, I'm licensed in New York after my MD degree. I then went on and trained in internal medicine three years at the university of Chicago, and Michael Reese, board-certified three more years than it went on to train at Harvard Medical School in medical oncology. Three more years at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute board certified and at another three years totaling nine years after medical school of I thirty five years of my life where education turning radiation Harvard Medical School joint center for radiation. Oncology was a group of five Harvard hospitals all merged for their radiation program and was on staff, and this is the work..

Skin cancer Dana Farber Cancer Institute Harvard Medical School Harvard Medical School joint c Iowa Harvard Dr Gill Liederman Meridian oncologist university of Chicago Michael Reese Waterloo New York three years ninety nine percent thirty five years hundred percent zero percent one percent nine years
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hey, Dr Liederman were back. We are back. I wanna talk about a seventy six year old man Samantha's, married. He lives in New York City and his skin. Doctor dermatologists found a skin cancer care. Toy Can Tho. On the shed which is on top of a squamous cancer. The pathologist. Dr pathologists is a doctor who analyzes the cancer cells under the microscope said he needs surgery was seen by most surgery. Well, you understood with Moses on his shin. And that means that the skin would have to be cut out. And then it'd be a patch from another part of the body put on top of that whole, well, he had a skin cancer. There's about a centimeter and three quarters almost two-thirds when inch on the front of his shin. It was raised. And he had this care. I can't tell most squamous cell elements. He was seen by surgeon syndrome pathologist, and we offered all the options is like we do to everybody. We offer all the options you have MOS which is sliced sliced sliced sliced slice and patching and skin from his buttocks or elsewhere. Or it could have our treatment or another form of surgery could have no treatment chemo doesn't really work for this kind of cancer, and he chose our treatment, and he chose our treatment. And I can tell you that he's very happy about our treatment. Why? Because number one the cancer's gone number two. He's had no side effects number three. It's all outpatient number four. It's easy. Number four. He has no wholeness botox where they're going to put a patch in that have no patch in his shin. He's just happy his bodies intact. We were able to use pinpoint radio surgery to treat his cancer. And this is the work that we do ever..

skin cancer Moses Dr Liederman New York City botox Samantha seventy six year three quarters
"skin cancer" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on Science for the People

"Yeah, it's pretty clear that their weaknesses, they have a weakness where they don't understand what's going on. Like if I had had some way to tell this thing that you're supposed to count these stitches, that's what you're supposed to do or no, the no, the row number always go up here. What numbers are here are the order of numbers and you know if I were to help it out at all, it would have done a lot better. And so this is like a lot of the algorithms we're seeing that are producing impressive results. They'll have, you know, some expert in there who has sought about this data set and who has figured out some way of setting up the problem so that the algorithm just has fewer ways to fail. So that's definitely one thing we've learned is that just kind of chucking data set added algorithm and expecting it to produce wonders and might not work, especially if the data said is really complex, like knitting patterns. Yeah, because we hear that sometimes is one of the, you know, the promises of big data and that sort of thing. We can just take these data sets and we'll throw a program at them and you know the algorithm will teach us all sorts of interesting information about this data. How realistic of an expectation is that the problem is that a the problem might be really complex in the algorithm might not be smart enough to handle it yet or be the problem could be that the outgrew them finds a way to solve the problem, which is not what we intended. So there's an example of a scientist, Roberto Novoa who has training algorithm to recognize skin cancer in pitchers and what he found outlets he'd accidentally trained it algorithm that could recognize rulers instead because the largest pictures of skin cancer had rulers next to them for scale. And there's all sorts of other. Samples of people recogni of these algorithms learning to recognize, for example, the treatment drains that people put in lungs, I certain lung condition rather than actually recognizing belong condition itself, or they'll solve problems in, you know what they thought was the simplest way. Like there's algorithm an algorithm that famously was posted, sort a list of numbers, and instead of sorting the list, it realized that what is task actually was was to reduce the number of errors in this sorting errors. And so it said, okay, well, to get rid of all sorting errors. I'll just delete list all together and that was it solution this. Insertive unexpected things to solve the problem. Sounds like something straight out of science fiction where you know, we tell the robots to protect people, and they decide the best way to do that is to like severely constrained their activities in some way. Yeah, I mean, that is totally a artificial intelligence type solutions like, well, it doesn't understand the larger context of the problem that you're trying to solve. You know, there's another example saw recently. Another thing it's like is trying to train a dog to do something. So there is a article and popular science about cancer sniffing dogs and how they're really good at. They can actually tell the difference, certain smells that cancer cells give off and we're not sure precisely what that is, but the dogs are known to be able to detect that. The problem is, when you train a dog to detect cancer, one of the things you have to make sure you do is you have to keep changing the people that they stiff during training. Otherwise, they think that there's close to recognize that individual person rather than it knows the cancer. We want you to recognize this one person. So how. How much care has to go into the data set for training for the machine learning in the neural network training? Oh, the data set is super import that the data said is one of the most important things..

skin cancer cancer Roberto Novoa scientist
"skin cancer" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on WTVN

"Like to briefly touch again on the subject of skin cancer during the last week, I have had approximately seven patients as a direct result of listening to my show come in and have suspicious skin lesions evaluated and as, I try to educate the public anytime you have a suspicious skin lesion That increases in size changes in color or bleeds then. You should have that evaluated by a plastic surgeon or dermatologist or your family physician The advantage of seeing a plastic surgeon, especially if that lesion is in an anatomically sensitive areas such as, your face your ear Around your nose eyelid, is that the plastic surgeon is the one surgeon the one specialist who is specially trained. At not only removing the skin cancer, but also being able to reconstruct those anatomically sensitive areas to make the smallest, scar possible It's not uncommon for me to have, lots of referrals from dermatologists to treat skin cancers that have been diagnosed by themselves and There are certain areas that require special treatment and special reconstructive techniques that plastic surgeons are especially trained for The other area of skin. Cancer that, you need to look out for. Would be able to detect suspiciously. Genes that might be melanoma now melanoma unlike squamous cell carcinoma and basil so carcinoma melanoma is life threatening Skin cancer that metastasized it can go to the brain to. The bone to the liver it goes to the lymph, nodes and that can cause death. So it's something that you want to be aware of the most important things to remember are the ABC's Andy of melanoma so if. You have, a skin lesion that is asymmetrical. That means that it's somewhat irregular If you, would cut it in half and folded, over on it self if. It was different, one, size side than the, other then that's one of the criteria. The other one is irregular borders the c. stands for color so skin lesions that are pink or light red or flesh colored typically are not likely to be. Melanoma melanomas usually are very dark darkly pigmented, lesions lesions that are black or dark Brown sometimes even purple or blue and. Then finally d they be season d d stands for diameter. And in melanoma if you have a lesion that has. A diameter that's greater than six millimeters or that is about the. Size of an eraser on a number to lead pencil, if you can take on race A number two lead. Pencil place it over the lesion And the, lesion still sticks out beyond the. Scope of the eraser then that's greater than six millimeters and. That's another criteria that would, make this suspicious for, melanoma these melanomas need to buy or I. Should, say these suspicious skin lesions need to be biopsy essentially what, that means. Is you inject the area with some light a cane he makes, sure it's nice and nam Then? You remove the entire lesion and you put a few? Stitches in, there to close up the skin and, then send the specimen off for pathological and the? Path all just will look at it and test it for different properties and characteristics and, look at it under the microscope to determine number one if. It's melanoma it's not melanoma is it another type. Of skin cancer is it a squamous cell or a basal cell carcinoma and finally if it is one of those things how, big is it and how deep. Is it because that determines the prognosis or that chance of. Doing well or doing bad, at all has to, do with the size and depth of the. Lesion so keep an eye out for suspicious skin lesions remember the, ABC's and, dis if you have a skin lesion That's been there that your wife or your husband, or significant other has bugged you about and you need a..

skin lesion Skin cancer ABC family physician Andy
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"For his skin cancer of his entire knows and i can tell you now he's had some of the treatment is nearly done and he's so happy i look at his nose every time he comes in and he's so happy he feels finally he says successful treatment the cancer's gone he used to our big bandages over his nose to cover up his nose voice do that any more than those looks fine after our treatment here at thirteen four broadway he's doing well he's happy just like this man who had to skin cancers one on his ear area one is knows that was treated and he is also cancer free if you call her office will send you the body booklet in the body book with is a section on skin cancers and you'll see results for the eye and nose and ears of patients that we've treated and you could see before and after pictures to give a good idea of the work that we do we'll talk about a man this man's an athlete he is sixty nine years old he's a black man is born in barbados also the negatives we know the prostate cancer rates are very high the black community here in america one in six black men will get prostate cancer one in twenty three would die of prostate cancer they also comes from the caribbean so it's kind of a double whammy and he was seen by one of the big urologist in town and this urologist hates to do radical surgery on the prostate cancer why because he knows the date is less good than with our data and he knows the quality of life is less good and his wanna take away his patients sexual life or near neri life and so he'd rather sent his patients here thirteen before broadway for prostate cancer treatment his fence and athletes fans and athlete he's sixty nine was how he was sixty nine when he came to me i haven't told you one little piece of information that is he was treated last year just to show you how good our treatment is he was treated.

barbados america caribbean neri sixty nine years
"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

This Unmillennial Life

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

"I know i have a friend in listener of the show out there who knows the story already i've talked to her about it she would love to have one but she says that her husband is not on board with that idea tried to convince her that she and one of her other good friends in the neighborhood should go in together and invest to have that tanning did together you could certainly as a neighborhood pulled together the funds for that and wind up a great to just have that for everyone who wanted to tan in your neighborhood i'm pretty sure that's probably not against anyone's homeowners association if you guys have any questions or to just tell me hey reagan you're crazy i can't believe you did that that's fine you can let me know i love to hear from you all and i'd be happy to answer any questions about how i do it how i spray tan myself if we ever run into each other in person i'll show you the flaws and imperfections because i'm not exactly perfect at it but you know what i'm doing the best that i can i hope you guys have enjoyed the show today thanks so much for listening subscribing and downloading at love to connect with you you can email me reagan at this i'm lineal life dot com you can leave me a voicemail message at this on the lineal life dot com slash contact if you're not a member of the facebook group please join at facebook dot com slash groups slash this on molyneaux life i look forward to bring a new episode to you next week hope you have a great day thank you for listening to this malania life podcast with host reagan jones musical support provided by ben williams at kudzu studio website support provided by katie wittig at make media over dot com i'm robin plotkin of robin bite dot com and on behalf of the podcast i invite you to join us next week for another episode thank you for listening.

reagan jones ben williams katie wittig robin plotkin facebook kudzu studio
"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

This Unmillennial Life

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

"The most worrisome skin cancer is mel bell and win patience think about melanoma we think of our moles turning into nova and melanoma only comes from a mole you already have twenty percent of the time so eighty percent of the time it pops up as melanoma and that's what it has always been so with the tale tell sign with these are they talk about the abc news as melanoma a being a cemetry so you wanna be able to have a mole medicine metrical the fold in half and it looks the exact same be is border you want a smooth border not jagged edges he is color we'd like a deceased brown color do not want different colors of browns blacks reds or whites okay is diameter so when we think about size anything larger than the temple of a racer beaks you've me the eraser of a pencil we will take an extra look at n e is enlarging or evolving melanoma is it's scary right it's the thing that can absolutely metastasized go throughout her body and kill us though we are always looking for that and if we find it quickly the ability to cheer a patient is extremely high but those are the ones that if a patient weights and the melanoma is progressed then the chances of survival go down and those are the skin cancers that we worry about patients who've used the tanning booth in the past who've had numerous son birds.

mel bell abc eighty percent twenty percent
"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

This Unmillennial Life

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

"Clarify for us the the definitions of each one of those okay so basal cell skin cancer that is the most common skin cancer and the most common cancer diagnosed so there will be millions diagnosed per year okay these are secondary to cumulative sun exposure and when we think about our skin we have something called the epidermis so the top layers of skin and then it abuts are terms which is deeper layers skin and there's a base layer in that's the layer skin that is right between the epidermis and the durmus and that is from where this basal cell skin cancer cubs and it often presents as a pearly pappy you'll with some overlying blood vessels it can bleed and it can also rate the wonderful thing if we have to find a silver lining and skin cancer is that it it does not generally move throughout the body so it does not often metastasized it's sitting right there in the skin and when we find it be cure it the next most common skin cancer is squamous cell carcinoma and our skin cells that make up that epidermis are squamous cells in that is from where that same cancer comes it presents differently it is also secondary to sun exposure in it often comes as a pink scaly plaque also that can also rate and bleed never heals that can be a little more aggressive than the basal cell and again if we find it at an early time we absolutely cure those as well.

cancer
"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

This Unmillennial Life

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

"Happen what are those things those those problem areas things that might be something that you might see or i might see on my own body and think you know what i actually really do need to go have that checked out who the number one thing is something that doesn't heel i have patients come in all the time because they have also been nervous about coming to see me and they say for a couple years i've had this lesion that is on my face or it's on my hands and it will get scaly and then the scale will go away but sometimes it bleeds and it seems to go away but then it comes back so savings that never fully heal that's what i'm looking for obviously i have my i trained to pick up numerous items but when i hear somebody who said i've wanted to do this i've been nervous and i've had this issue it's often something that they have seen it's new and it never goes away now i want to get a clarification on that statistic that you said at the very beginning one in five americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer is that malignant skin cancer or both benign and malignant skin cancer game cancer is malignant occurs no benign form that includes basil cell skin cancer squamous cell skin cancer and malignant melanoma okay that's fascinating first of all obviously i did not know that i'm someone who's had in my in my family history not skin cancer but various types of other cancers in of course my mind i always think oh well there's a malignant cancer and then there are benign cancers and never knew that about skin cancer so you've totally educated me on that end the statistic about how common it is now in terms of the three that you just outlined you know i'd love to for you to give a brief overview for everyone so that they kind of go in knowing you know what are the different types of skin cancers that people are being diagnosed with kind of.

"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

This Unmillennial Life

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on This Unmillennial Life

"And cosmetic surgeon she attended the university of notre dame but she also served as the chief resident at the world renowned cleveland clinic she spends her time authoring peer review journal articles book chapters and speaking about her field at the national level and that certainly comes through as you listen to her in this interview she is completely relatable but super knowledgeable and i am thrilled to invite her on the program today dr keller welcome to the show thank you i've had so many listeners of this podcast request this episode and to be able to fit into your busy schedule and take you away from your practice i'm appreciative that you would allow us to do that so we will make them most of our time together and really just jump right in and get started and i know that one of the things that i think's important to draw out for listeners because we're kind of moving from the season of in our lives of feeling like we're completely invincible and we've got the rest of our lives to this season of feeling like wow i've crossed over the mark of forty in this body has got to take me through the remainder of what i've got left on this earth when you reach that point you begin to realize things are starting to crop up with people our age women our age so i would ask you how common is skin cancer skin cancer diagnosis four women who are in this forty plus age range it could really comment and what a lot of people don't realize is that skin cancer is the most common cancer of all cancers diagnosed so one in five americans develop skin cancer and it is at this forty to sixty range where people start getting their first skin cancer and it's because of all the stuff we did when we were younger in those are the times and i really wish i could take back.

cleveland dr keller
"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"skin cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Skin cancer does not help any skin cancer hit a biopsy showing squamous cancer it was right in the base of the thumb on his right hand the big lump big massive big raised mass on his thumb and he is gotta skin cancer also has a high psa psa was four point three so we've got about twenty five percent chance of having prostate cancer and well he didn't do that i advised him about it and of course it's his choice but he has for sure the skin cancer he's alert oriented man he's got a one centimeter mass in the base of the thumb and well the surgeons wanted to cut out the base of the thumb area there and well he heard about us and he just does not want to have his mom is base of thumb skin cut out he wants non invasive treatment and i can tell you that we see many many people with skin cancers most skin cancers earn sun exposed areas so lots around the face and lots around the ears eyes nose mouth and when they cut out is years nose mouth you can imagine the calamity that befalls the patient and you can imagine why so many people with squamous cancers and basal cell cancers come here to thirteen eighty four broadway if you request our booklet just call our office you'll get a booklet and a separate section on skin cancers see plenty of examples of skin cancers and the skin cancers are before and after his see with us there's no moses no salami slicing surgery is a mechanical removal of the tissues it's removing part of your body mechanically whereas with us we don't do that we use invisible beams to attack the cancer squamous our basis our the nose and eyes ears mouth and the hands shoulders back and front chest legs and feet literally from top to bottom we're now trading a man with a big mass at the top of his head like the size of a quarter and it's going away on treatment he just had a few treatments going away we have another man about the mass about the size of a.

Skin cancer twenty five percent one centimeter