35 Burst results for "Sixty Years"

Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:37 min | 1 d ago

Have You Forgotten Your Friends?

"By, the end of this hour we're hoping to inspire you to pick up the phone and reconnect with a friend. You've lost touch with just a phone call, but hopefully a new start for your friendships and hopefully those of you who haven't made the call in six years ten years twelve will get the nerve from this show to pick up the. Phone and reconnect as one woman wrote us a true best friend nurtures the soul and that couldn't be more Trooper Anna and Regina their bond save their lives during World War Two they help each other survived the Nazi death camps and they were only young girls at the time, and now as women they a bond that so strong they consider themselves sisters. I came into the camp was eleven was nineteen, ninety, two I was a long line I don't know why. CAN'T And side. Little go nothing. It was the beginning of a friendship that would last for sixty years in the midst of death and suffering in the concentration camps of Poland and Germany. They were two little girls reaching out for each other that was looking for somebody. To. Be Nice because I didn't have no matter no more I didn't have no fad I. didn't have no family look for each other one could. We're not supposed to go from one back to the other sometimes I, would go in they say hi and then she would be afraid they're going to do something to me. She would succeed give up give out the two girls were separated several times when one girl was shipped to another camp heard it like animals onto cattle, cars, but fate drew them together each time we'll want so many cans wouldn't again too wide. Say Anything of course we should communicate. Was, then to Bruce I had. Half Time. So I was. So Hang I was yanked I needed food. Sites. To Steal from the dog, Regina had smuggled a loaf of bread with her and even though she was hungry, Regina risked her life to share it with her friend. When I saw I rapped the play. Talwar to hey. And votes. killed. I forgive put we went to well. I so what? People just Within weeks they were scheduled to be guest but liberation came I lost in the chaos they never knew if they would see each other again they were separated once more they both married and began families, and after years apart fate Ju- them together again, they discover dot only had they both resettle in the united. States. But actually we're living in the same Boston neighborhood just blocks from each other. Clam to the same street. Trout Chink hours so We're boats that shock. After the war was over a wonderful friends, their friendship grew deeper as the years passed we cannot sit and talk about those things to allow the people's because even even to my kids, this is the bond between us. It's concentration. Can I cherish? Come forget what? What fifty sixty years. If I before she dies before we we're gonNA still love each out. And an-and Regina stories featured in the book. Best Friends. Now, where's Judy night duty I, hear you had a best friend since you were what? By five five years old but you haven't seen each other more than thirty. Thirteen thirty years, thirty years really cracked and the reason for that is. We just don't find the time. I. Guess We make excuses for it and we've just never. Merged our time together to make it work. What you do talk you do communicate we communicate through letters. We've been pound pals for over forty years. and. Where does she live and where you live she lives in like Huntington, New York and I live in Naperville Illinois. Wow. Never a Greyhound bus between you. Never, would you recognize her if you saw her on the street I would hope so through photographs but I don't know. What does she look like? Last. I knew she had long blond hair. Very pretty face does she look like anybody here? Not that I see right now okay. Stand up look around take the audience know. Right there. Say. Anti.

Regina Bruce I Trooper Anna Boston JU Judy Germany Illinois Naperville Huntington Poland New York
You Are In Control of Your Happiness

The Daily Boost

05:31 min | 2 weeks ago

You Are In Control of Your Happiness

"So as usual, we will start at a Monday. Even, though it's a holiday weekend here. Gives you even more time to do it do your homework have you done your homework? You sit down and check where your life is I. Tell You I work with a lot of people every single week, a lot of personal coaching clients. And those who sit down and pay attention to how their life is going not just once a week but every day. Really. It goes the direction they wanted to easier. Yeah. Actually it doesn't feel that way the beginning but things flow better when you check in, you make sure Hey, am I taking actions that are GonNa lead me in the direction that I want to go or not? Am I pay attention to the roles in my life throws at a really WANNA fulfill. Am I happy or am I not happy or the things I want to keep your things I want to get rid of? When you take the time to ask those questions. Things Change. Get my perfect week planner at perfect planner dot com download. The PDF watched the short video. It's about twelve minutes. It'll explain to you how to first and foremost. Take control of your time and in that time that we're going to create. You can take control of anything. Go get it. Okay. So you don't already have a lot of people already do they're already using it but just in case So all your happiness. Are you a happy person I personally believe. That we are on this planet to do lots of things but I think the personal quest almost all of us have. Is, to, be, happy. Not Not, just kind of you know sort of not though diet I also not rollercoaster happy either you know now that. But to be happy with the way things are going I. think that's our quest. It's a long life if you're lucky. So I guess it's a double quest. It's to be happy and keep going right. That's a long thing to do if we live eight or nine years of reluctant to do that. But are you in control of your happiness? What would I say if what would you say if I were to tell you? That you're in control. And doesn't have anything with your mindset. Where does Scott everybody says all you mindset got to get your head right checkup from the neck up right attitude ticket. I don't know. It's kind of hard to think yourself happiness. Have you noticed? Never works that way for me just maybe for a minute I'm going to be happy I just could be I know I can decide to be that way, but does it stick now until? It doesn't just doesn't. So. How do we get there? Well. Let's put the facts on the wall I if you're less eighteen years old. That's right this on the wall. You're probably happy. About the time you turn eighteen it Kinda goes down. It's the you right very happy in the beginning. Real life hits. He goes down. And between thirty years old and sixty years old. You're kind of like down in the happiness thing forty seven by the way his about when it begins to turn most people by the time they get to sixty pretty happy in between we go down that Darren rollercoaster you talked about. So it's okay to some degree. It's Illinois okay it's not. We want to be happy right just to get there I want to be happy I wanna be on the rollercoaster you. So how do we get off the door rollercoaster? How do you stay? Happy Turns out. Three. Things help. If you'RE GONNA ask me Scott, what makes you happy and I will usually answer I. I need to be growing. I need know there's I can explore whatever possibility I want. Basically I need to be moving forward and growing when I'm not growing I. AM unhappy. I'm grumpy. I really am. So I constantly keep myself a mode of growing. I. WanNa. Be a control too. So the number one thing that people need to feel happy is feeling in control. When you feel like you have a grasp on what's happening in your world and boy has it been tough this year So you grasp even a small party world. But when you feel like you're in control, you'll be happier. So, how do get their? Education. A college degree does wonders for people but you know you can teach yourself to you can self educate way beyond what you could ever learn in college? And guess what the more you educate yourself. The happier going to be. You see this all the time. So you want control. So getting controls is GonNa make you happy. But one of the ways you get that control is to educate yourself. How did you get yourself? It could be anything. Some people do hobbies they learned lot about fishing. I don't do that hobby nothing about fishing. My Line has not been wet for a very long time. I liked learning about aviation et makes me happy. And other things as well. Education, really the key. So it doesn't that before they will have to go back to school things like that, but you could learn learn learn. Learning expands you it creates mastery which enjoy feel happier. A job. sky don't want a job. What is this thing about Americans don't WanNa work it hit hardest working people on the planet that's not to put anybody else elsewhere the pining down. Americans regard guard they do with the truth is this dream I just don't WanNa work. Yeah. I'll tell you what if you had all the money in the world and you didn't have to work us about six months and you'd get busy some you would get bored you need to stay busy right your job. Whether it's a time job or it's a part time job even if you don't particularly like your boss. Your job gives you purpose every single day even owning your own business, which is not always easy thing to do. It gives you purpose every single day when you have a full-time job a part time job, but you own your own business when you make your income. You're happier person. Don't believe me. Maybe you don't have a job right now how do you feel? Need to educate yourself finds something you do find a way to earn some money. Put yourself back in control, but it's not a mindset. Is it probably the biggest part of the mindset here is getting you to believe that this will happen automatically if you put yourself in that action mode.

Scott Illinois Darren
A Conversation About The Postal Service

They Call Us Bruce

07:04 min | 2 weeks ago

A Conversation About The Postal Service

"Low. Welcome. To another edition of call us, Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I'm Phil You and Jeff Yang and this week on the podcast we have been thinking and talking about doing something for a while and our wishes are finally coming true as if delivered to us. Our. I'm sorry we've come. A Dad jokes attention but we we've been talking a lot about the postal service, not just amongst ourselves but in society right I mean the relevance of the US mail to our society internal democracy has been more prominent now more than the headlines now than ever before, and one of the things that we recognized is that the postal service actually plays a really critical role even. Specifically in our communities and there are. There are a lot of Asian Americans who work at the Post Office The post office connects us are far-flung relatives and friends, and in general we just thought it was time to give a little shine to this institution that. Is taking a few bumps, these days, and so we actually found. A postal. Service employees who was. Happy to talk to us about this profession and about the stories and. The world behind the scenes at the post. Office. As, well, as other things going on his life as well. So we love to welcome to they call us Bruce Kevin Again UN. He is a musician and multimedia. A graphic designer, a fan of A. Pretty Amazing Music. I can tell social platforms and also a employee of the PS Kevin Welcome to the show. Hi. Welcome guys. Ola. So Kevin you're in Oakland right. Yeah. I wouldn't opened. And did you reborn in scripture? I was actually born in southern California and. Always, knew that I would end up in the bay area. So sometime around two thousand and two, thousand five moved up here. And I found myself. Here. To sort of blend in. Oh Yeah Oh. Yeah. And and you say you're from southern California originally like a like Los Angeles or or. Montebello okay. And now A. End, up actually working for the postal service. Honestly. I was laid off in rather time the pandemic. was. Gaining momentum. and. I was desperately looking for work and I I had heard this echoing my head, my mom's voice. You know like you should go work work at the post office like your uncles grandfather. Finally listen to the voice. And Sure Enough I. went onto the USPS site. And, saw their openings locally and swint for and they ask for references. Internal references and. Plugged in some family members names, and I was pretty much and within twenty four hours. In the family. It's a family business. It really is. Yeah. How many of your other family members worked for the postal service that are alive to? But. But it's it's been like kind of multigenerational thing or it has absolutely. Is there. Is there something about the post office or the Postal Service that has been? particularly. Peeling I'm guessing in some ways it's because it's eighth always there be. It. You know like they're always jobs in the postal. I. I just Kinda remember Hollywood shuffle under if you've seen that movie Robert Townsend movie. where? Kind of what you're saying is one of the themes in the movie that. His family's like A. Get A job. The Postal Service it's it's you know it's it's a secure job. You know it's comfortable. It's something which you can rely on and Robert Townsend characters like I wanna be a star in Hollywood but you know as a black actor in Hollywood. You gotta deal with a whole lot of bullshit and movies about the bullshit and. Kind of like you know no spoilers or yes boilers. Movement. You haven't seen it. You should see it but. In the end in the end, actually the post service ends up being a where he lands and and you know he's it's sort of like a celebration affected like you can still do when you dream of but other things can also be part of that dream and anyway I'm kind of curious if if that's kind of the story of how how like your uncles and other folks in working for the post office to. For my grandfather. I believe he went in right after he was discharged from the military e- so he. He had served in the Cold War came back They relocated to Daly City from Dallas. and. I think he that's it hired pretty much on the spot. And it's still the case to this day So he he was there until I moved up here. And two, hundred five. I remember him getting village. One Am and coming home. And afternoon. He. Yeah it's interesting my Uncle Sam deal with him in Minneapolis. He got out of the Air Force and became a carrier pretty much immediately. And my uncle Kennedy in. Hawaii. I think he started in Minneapolis, but then transferred to Hawaii, which is apparently. The most requested transfer. Why And he's been a mechanic for. Sixty years. He's he's been there for a long time I. Think he's been here the longest. Everyone fixing like postal trucks, postal trucks, the machinery he's he's really handy guy i. mean he used to build birdhouses? Similar skills I guess.

Postal Service Bruce Kevin Robert Townsend Phil You California United States Kennedy Minneapolis Asia America Jeff Yang Usps Hawaii A. End Oakland Hollywood Los Angeles Montebello Air Force Daly City
Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

Jewish History Matters

05:14 min | 3 weeks ago

Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

"So highmark. Welcome to the PODCAST. Great to be here. Thank you. Yeah. I'm really glad that you can join us for I. Think Really Important and relevant conversation. I read through the book I think it's a fantastic book. I think that you're offering a revision of some of the ways in terms of how people have understood. Especially, Jewish people have understood the question of the history of black Jewish relations. You maybe WANNA get US started off by saying a brief word about your argument in the book and what it is that you're putting forward. Yes, sure when I was growing up as a white suburban Jewish kitten in in La I learned that the civil rights movement was the story of a black Jewish alliance that brought heroic Jews to the south where they fought on behalf of racial justice until the mid nineteen sixties. The. Rise of black militancy of. Black Power of anti-semitism. Community purge Jews and ended what was a wonderful alliance. When I looked in the archives though and began researching the book. I discovered an entirely different story emerging instead of sort of the Dr King Rabbi Hessel arm in arm narrative that I was raised on. I. Found that even White Male Jewish leaders of National Jewish organizations understood as early as the nineteen fifties. There was a fundamental difference between being white and Jewish in America and being black? In. America. And they in fact, knew that there would be limits to the black Jewish alliance and That was my first sort of shocking discovery in terms of revising I knew growing up. It's a really jarring perspective for a lot of people Jewish people I want to say who grow up thinking about and being taught about this alliance within the civil rights movement and the involvement of Jews within the civil rights movement. So I think that what you're offering here is a almost radical perspective, a radical revision of how we understand the role of the Jews in the civil rights movement. I'd like to frame it s a both and and it's really important I to acknowledge the extraordinary American Jewish participation in the civil rights movement and in social justice causes. When you look at the ethnic groups in America, Jews are the most liberal. Progressive. Democratic. Party. Now Voting Group only African Americans vote more. And by that standard I think there's justifiable pride amongst American Jews for the work that we have done and those perspectives have been covered in the historic. Already. What's also true is even as many heroic. Jews. Did go to the south to register voters and in some tragic cases, of course, gave their lives most Americans use didn't. And there became almost sort of in the north, a sense that watching on TV, what the Jewish heroes were doing extended to them as well. So what my book is trying to do is take a broader more inclusive look of all Americans, or at least white American Jews, and now we get to see more complexity to what's going on. So I don't see this as as undermining. The existing truth about Jewish involvement but I see it hopefully deepening it and making it more complex. Why do you think that it's important to offer this complexity to the narrative of first of all? It's surprising in and of itself there's something that custodians recall historical memory, which is what actually happened and what we remember or think happened what we were taught happened is often different. In fact, there's a history of historical memory which says the way in which we choose to remember or forget or analyze or spin. If you want to be more cynical, our historical past actually is meaningful in and of itself. So what I found, when I was surprised to find was that as early as the nineteen fifties, Jewish leaders were calling out the limits of white Jewish liberalism and the inevitability of of African American autonomy and what would become the rise of black power. So at the very time that the public narrative was consensus arm in arm. But I love the called peace love and Bobby. Sherman. Everything's great. At that moment, even the Jewish leaders who were engaged in that kind of consensus politics understood its limits. That's the part that we've forgotten. I think over the last fifty or sixty years and I think it's really important especially in today's climate for us to understand better that it was always deep and complicated an intense and we knew about it at the time. And then the real story is how in journalism and historiographer and in public memory, we sort of forgotten that element until we've remembered it again with the national reckoning on race

Dr King Rabbi Hessel La I America Bobby Sherman
2 storms pose possible double threat to US Gulf Coast

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

2 storms pose possible double threat to US Gulf Coast

"And almost never seen double shot of tropical weather could be in the offing for the Gulf coast the computer models are all over the place one storm Laura is on a path through Porter Rico over or near the Dominican Republic and Haiti and Cuba by Sunday if it survives all that then possibly South Florida into the Gulf toward the panhandle in the western Gulf there's a depression that could become tropical storm Marco national hurricane center specialist Richard passes once it crosses the you could tan he could move somewhere toward the central northwest Gulf of Mexico coast is a little too early to be specific about that we do think it'll strengthen to hurricane the last time two tropical storms were in the Gulf was more than sixty years ago there are no records showing two hurricanes in the Gulf at the same time I'm Jim acquire

Laura Porter Rico Dominican Republic South Florida Gulf Depression Richard Haiti Cuba Mexico
Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | Last month

Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

"WanNa. Start today's than by explaining why businesses consider offering lifetime deals. The bottom line is, is that lifetime he is often generate a large lump sum of revenue of cash. It's a cash grab really they might partner with a deal signed with large affiliates or they offer it to their list, and because such an incredible deal, it's a lifetime deal. They'll get lots of sales at the start people see this as a way. To Fund, their business at the star. So that's kind of the motivation behind lifetime deals outside of that. It also gives you new users, new customers, people to give you feedback the star and people that are invested. That's really the positives and and there's not really much outside of that. That's positive. Just being frank but for many people, that's a lot. You know making a lot of money at the start to fund the business. Can, really help them and really propel the business to avaiable full-time option for them and allow them to make some hires and scale quickly the issue is that most products and services have a running cost. So even if you say for example, sell a lifetime deal for a thousand dollars per customer yes. You'll earn a thousand dollars, but each customer will have a cost for each subsequent year to come. Agree. Thirty forty, fifty, sixty years for long as that person is alive right and some of us don't really do the math and that leads me to my I tip. You got to do the math. How much does it cost you per customer per year and a lot of people are like well, I sell my product it's course it's a forum it's something that really has a minimal cost on my end. And that's pretty much it. No you gotta dig deeper. You have cost Phantom costs that you're not counting like how much it cost you per customer for your web hosting to host your community to host your APP how much that cost on a monthly basis divided by the number of customers is cost more per customer. It's not a once in done kind of thing, the more traffic you have the more you have to pay what about customer support the more customers you have the more support staff you need the more time take from them you need. To factor that in, are there any other costs whether it's your time or money that's involved every time you have a customer, break it down because you might find out yes. This might be a very small amount per customer in it's worth to offer the lifetime deal but often more times than not when we do the math, you're like, wow, we start to break-even after five years and after five years we're losing money. Then after ten years, we're really losing money. So this really is a red flag that you can raise before you offer a lifetime deal. My next tip is you have to make sure that if you're going to offer a lifetime deal, you don't offer a deal or a plan or a product that they will not outgrow. The play of the lifetime deal is to give them something that is valuable, but is just to get them started. The point here is that get them onto your platform onto your product. And therefore get used to it. Love it enjoy it. But at some point, they're going to outgrow whether they need more contacts in your APP or the want to get access to more training. Basically, we're talking about here is you want to offer them the basic of basic plans. It's still valuable. It's still something that you would charge a monthly or annual basis for normally but. You, WanNa push them towards upgrading anytime. You're running a lifetime plan you should aim for seventy percent of the people that by will upgrade out of the lifetime plan. So lifetime is something that's basically temporary this takes a bit planning the six a bit of a branding and package INC when it comes to offering this lifetime deal so don't rush into a lifetime deal if. You're not ready. Make sure you're crafting the right one. So you know that people will be graduating to different plants off the lifetime. The third thing I want to mention is often in my experience lifetime customers in general, not all of them of course, but in general will tend to be difficult customers to deal with what you mean by that well, people that don't invest much. Will actually cost you more time and more headaches people that actually pay you a lot of money. They do the work that get the most out of it and they're professional they get it. They understand the onus is on them to make it happen. But those who pay the minimum and Gopher lifetime deals people that maybe don't really take action but they will complain about every little thing if they have the opportunity of course, I'm speaking in. Generalities of course, there are lifetime deal customers that are hard working that are serious about their business and they are great and they're not headaches. But if we're talking about a percentage or a majority of the users, higher paying customers are lower maintenance customers that's just the facts of business. So I want to give you some direct advice. If you do the math, you have a graduation plan a plan to get them to upgrade out a lifetime. And everything pans out and it's very, very minimal cost on you. Even if you stretch out of twenty thirty years of this customer being active, then go for the lifetime plan if not avoided if you can even if it means growing slower if you're still looking for that cash grab, my advice is limit the number of lifetime members whether it's one hundred or two hundred people Max and then you. Close it. This will create scarcity and it will also allow you to say, Hey, this is the amount of money I will get from this lifetime offer I can work with us the influx of cash I need, and from there you're only dealing with a minimal number of customers that are dealing with the lifetime planet you have to pay for for the longevity of your business in for their

Partner Frank Gopher Package Inc
Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

The Bio Report

04:27 min | Last month

Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

"Marco, thanks for joining us. All my pleasure, then a four inviting me. We're GONNA talk about drug resistant Fungal Infections Sign Nexus and your efforts to develop Antifungal to treat these infections. Maybe, we can start with how big a problem resistant. Fungal. Infections. Today. It's a growing problem and simply because Antifungal. A unforgotten being to use many decades ago, and that are very few of them. Only free classes. One, the pollyannas introduce sixty years ago. That's all introduce four years ago, and Makino candidates introduced twenty if ago, and of course, we've all this time. Fungi had an opportunity to develop the fastest against these free classes. This is why we are developing a new class in order to overcome the growing problem of these. Phone. Calls. How threatening are these infections? Well the type section that we're treating. Difficult to treat an invasive fungal infections invasive from getting fashion. Infections meaning infection bloodstream of internal organs. Usually, they happen in patients water immortal compromised. So cancer patients with a undergoing chemotherapy or. Transplanted patients, solid organ transplant, bone marrow, transplant patients, and these patients. They don't have the emotional defense five vs infection. So using fictions. They are very aggressive. They can spread inside the body of the patients in mortality of visiting factions can be still. Now, we've a best treatment between twenty to fifty percent Wayne thirty to fifty percent, go extremely high mortality. You have, infections. Are Not internal like, for example, Mucosal infections of his office of the mouth of China. That, that can be very, very difficult to treat and these are we all the type of infection invasive and dilemma Khoza that we are trying to treat. Now we've our compound. We hear a lot about antibiotic resistance and the causes of that. Why are we having this problem with Resistant Fungal Infections? Very good, question Danny. Video. Not The resistance to antibacterial as being on the wrong line is because bacteria. Very. Quick in developing resistance and reason is because they are very promiscuous. Based chain the. Not Charlie between the same species, but also between different species of bacteria and very for development over resistant to antibacterial usually develops very quickly after a few years of being actual product on the market. I'm fungal. Infections and. July. Up the development is extensive slower. It may take ten fifteen years before the be significant amount of. Become, resistant, and these. These why? Now, we start to see the problem becoming bigger and bigger. When you start to see classes a been introduced point, you're forty years ago or even longer. And reason of the focus romantic materials is because They develop resistance. Very, quickly. And in very visas being before course over the last. Probably fifteen point years. But he's not Antifungal. 's is becoming a major issue and you have new species amounting like a candidate horace of. Be Shown to be more drag resistance with high mortality, very difficult to control infections.

Infections Marco Makino Charlie China Wayne Danny
Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

The Bio Report

04:33 min | Last month

Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

"Marco, thanks for joining us. All my pleasure, then a four inviting me. We're GONNA talk about drug resistant Fungal Infections Sign Nexus and your efforts to develop Antifungal to treat these infections. Maybe, we can start with how big a problem resistant. Fungal. Infections. Today. It's a growing problem and simply because Antifungal. A unforgotten being to use many decades ago, and that are very few of them. Only free classes. One, the pollyannas introduce sixty years ago. That's all introduce four years ago, and Makino candidates introduced twenty if ago, and of course, we've all this time. Fungi had an opportunity to develop the fastest against these free classes. This is why we are developing a new class in order to overcome the growing problem of these. Phone. Calls. How threatening are these infections? Well the type section that we're treating. Difficult to treat an invasive fungal infections invasive from getting fashion. Infections meaning infection bloodstream of internal organs. Usually, they happen in patients water immortal compromised. So cancer patients with a undergoing chemotherapy or. Transplanted patients, solid organ transplant, bone marrow, transplant patients, and these patients. They don't have the emotional defense five vs infection. So using fictions. They are very aggressive. They can spread inside the body of the patients in mortality of visiting factions can be still. Now, we've a best treatment between twenty to fifty percent Wayne thirty to fifty percent, go extremely high mortality. You have, infections. Are Not internal like, for example, Mucosal infections of his office of the mouth of China. That, that can be very, very difficult to treat and these are we all the type of infection invasive and dilemma Khoza that we are trying to treat. Now we've our compound. We hear a lot about antibiotic resistance and the causes of that. Why are we having this problem with Resistant Fungal Infections? Very good, question Danny. Video. Not The resistance to antibacterial as being on the wrong line is because bacteria. Very. Quick in developing resistance and reason is because they are very promiscuous. Based chain the. Not Charlie between the same species, but also between different species of bacteria and very for development over resistant to antibacterial usually develops very quickly after a few years of being actual product on the market. I'm fungal. Infections and. July. Up the development is extensive slower. It may take ten fifteen years before the be significant amount of. Become, resistant, and these. These why? Now, we start to see the problem becoming bigger and bigger. When you start to see classes a been introduced point, you're forty years ago or even longer. And reason of the focus romantic materials is because They develop resistance. Very, quickly. And in very visas being before course over the last. Probably fifteen point years. But he's not Antifungal. 's is becoming a major issue and you have new species amounting like a candidate horace of. Be Shown to be more drag resistance with high mortality, very difficult to control infections. Given the.

Infections Marco Makino Charlie China Wayne Danny
Wim Stocks: Covid-19 is an opportunity for esports to go mainstream

BIG Esports Podcast

04:18 min | 2 months ago

Wim Stocks: Covid-19 is an opportunity for esports to go mainstream

"Those people who've. been listening to some of the content for period of time, when of ours was still fresh, we had women wheels headband Pfefferman I'm Canada from UK, capital and Mckay sports on board to work about a bit of coronavirus, economic response and things like that and one of the main things. He said women's right now you'll find his blowing up twenty four seven with presidents of basically every single media netware Colin you asking for content, a be interested in Konic kicking off the conversation with that e e, still getting these mainstream organizations looking for a splits programming way we are, and just had a sort of a conversation yesterday, which with a bunch of sports networks. At are represented under an umbrella of a media company, and and all still to this day all baseball comes back Major League baseball tonight in the United States. So that's a good thing. more normalcy, CPJ seeing some some driving events some some of those coming back, but still east or is the is the predominance or these days, and and it's yes, it's on twitch, Time Youtube, and and showing up on facebook gaming in elsewhere, but but now the these these I think what what has happened in the past pandemic is, that is traditional. Broadcasters potential traditional networks now Allie, the stand what he's is, and no, it's. It's a replacement for sports. that as I mentioned I think last time Jesus Alabama's back in the bottle, but also they're. They're now really sort of waking up the fact that man. We need younger audiences here we are is fifty year old. baseball demographic isn't going to is isn't going to. Be around forever. The sixty year old PGA demographics tackled mirror off forever, so so they're all waking up the fact that this is the way to communicate with an affiliate with much more youthful audience. Lousy Jesse's, and it's it's now. It's home to roost. These guys get it. They get managed, and they've got now got to figure out how to be gall whether or not. It can be involved is another Matt as another matter entirely I think he's four. doesn't need traditional media as much as traditional media needs. These sports but. You know this is their livelihood. This is what they do. They not Ino- broadcast. They know entertainment. They know how to do engage millions of people, and and with with the right formula with right approach. They have ever shot at this, but but thus far as we all know. This is all playing onstream in online and not -sarily other. You know we were just reflecting yesterday in this conversation about Turner. Journal riots early Turner had it right early with their first league in for car strike, and and not only do they have right, but the brands that they brought in to support it. They also had right, and that was that was four years ago. I was a long time ago. And and in the scheme of things yet they made some of their forays into in a broadcast use for in in bringing predictability around the broadcast that that's still Jack. Jamie stands up is one of the other great moments in in. In sort of democratization of of sports so so. I think I I don't think it's over for traditional media, I think. There's plenty of opportunity especially, as as now more organization comes to sports. It is getting more predictable. There are more path as two point eight to point B., or for players for events for mountain and the notion of broadcasts. Predictable broadcast is scheduled broadcasts that we all we all know. You know even if you're not. Austrailia I think you're pretty much. Know that NFL owned Sundays. At. One PM Eastern time and four PM time at eight eight thirty eastern time on Sunday. That's a sport doesn't have it, so I do think this is. Predictability. What what scheduling and programming can do for his or these? These big networks that are more traditionally focused I think they have. Do they replacing in this

Baseball Turner Jamie Mckay Matt Konic Facebook Allie Youtube Major League Canada CPJ United States Colin Jesus Alabama INO UK Austrailia
Losing Someone You Love

Mentally Yours

04:42 min | 2 months ago

Losing Someone You Love

"Everyone and welcome to Liles, Metro, cutty case mental health cost. And today on chatting to you andy, Langford of cruse bereavement care I'm going to be finding out from him. What charity does and also how we can all support? People who've lost loved ones during these difficult times. Chris has been around for sixty years S on. We suppose anymore. He's been bereaved and in the. That's historically been through provided an Walsall. Suppose Oh. Group support on face suffice face. Usually defined as a type of bereavement counselor. Both sadness over the last few years. We've been expanding all services to include lots of supporter. Of light shoots the A. Global pandemic. We've massively stepped on off helpline. She's offset response savage to people who need support that. We do a lot more on the on the web now and also on social media. Only also over the past few years, really dot mystified, so he did not small. Epilogue is around Pan Group support why people may with each? And facilitate supposedly I don't. On the seventies, wow Soviet Paul ships rounds people? Going for walks so doing creative things together. Which can certainly come? To speak with each other. There's lots of things that we do. To to help people and also to help people help each. It sounds pretty. Can you tell me a little bit more about the way that you've adopted during the pandemic in terms of the support you doing? Zoom meetings support, or is it that the phone line wants to the things that you will focused on? Yeah, absolutely I mean what we'd have. To and from all. Clients cruise is the at people tend to be different things at different times in the berets, but also each bereavement people experience as as so experiencing a different light so there there are different challenges different problems whatever even copes Lewis on. What we told this we shifted. Off Face to face. Remote remote suppose the majority of it is von telephone, and as a say, so his bond to help line, but also we provide ongoing support will. Provide decisive face. We now provide side, and we provide so what they suppo- by zoo, but a lot of all kinds continue to cited comfortable, speaking on the side and actually try to. The global, pump, Daddy, we will find out more and more people will save. They provides interactive aside because it gave the a sense at security and safety in that they could be as I'm transparency needed. Today is a felt comfortable. But Will Announce a little bit more than nobleness said was some value without the people, said the soul. Then finally they would transfer in that type. Anyway. Yeah I'd love if you could tell us a bit more about the helpline. What it's cooled sensitive when it runs in also what people can expect when the coalition as well. Yeah absolutely. Chris Pump Davick outline, and as it is, around, also rams weekdays. Three and that's three from nine thirty in the morning straits find the cheese night. Wednesdays incised is we started to call? On Saturdays and Sundays world so from ten am so to. On when you found out what you would do is, you would be able to speak with. A very volunteer, and that someone is fully trained at an experienced at taking those calls for people. If experienced bereavements an that can be any type of agreements it can be one is a GT band directly through covid nineteen. All, it can pay a brief of the amount of experienced over of years ago, but actually the the type of its heavy into out with every day around around how dynamic assault triggered those and difficult emotions difficult salt. Processes the municipal how to Cope Islands, so you can speak about those things as well.

Chris Pump Langford Liles Walsall Pan Group Cope Islands Andy Assault Lewis Nobleness
Around 20K fans attend All-Star race at Bristol

the NewsWorthy

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Around 20K fans attend All-Star race at Bristol

"Thousands of fans turned out for a Nascar race in Tennessee last night. They AP reports. This was likely the biggest sporting event crowd in the US. Since early March at least twenty thousand people showed up for the All star race at Bristol Motor speedway there was social distancing though fans were spread out across the stands, and they did have plenty of room. The speedway can hold about one hundred sixty thousand people, but ticket sales for last night's event were capped at just one fifth of that, so while it was the largest major sporting event crowd and months it likely the smallest turn out in the race tracks nearly sixty year history.

Bristol Motor Nascar Tennessee United States
Where Did the Phrase 'Grandfathered In' Come From?

BrainStuff

03:21 min | 2 months ago

Where Did the Phrase 'Grandfathered In' Come From?

"Across the globe, language and history are inevitably intertwined. Linguistic origins are borrowed and transformed and a society changes, new words or phrases are created to reflect the current cultural understanding some phrases and words simply morph into accepted usage their origins, forgotten or conveniently misplaced one such phrase grandfathered in has become common shorthand to mean that someone is exempt from following new rules or regulations, although it may evoke the image of a gray haired gentlemen, let off the hook because of his age. The term rose from something far less innocent. A deeper look into the first use of the phrase reveals the political racial climate in the United States during the late. Late Nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a personal business is considered to be grandfathered in when they're exempt from new rules and can continue to operate under the existing set of regulations. New Rules will then only apply to future cases today the term is widely used across various sectors most notably in real estate and health insurance. But when the term was first coined in eighteen nineties, it referred to only one thing voting rights. After the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified the US Constitution in seventy, thus banning the infringement on citizens right to vote on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude, some southern states did not readily accept the ruling. Instead they carefully crafted amendments on the state level that circumvented the federal decree in an attempt to prevent black Americans from using party stations since the basis of race could no longer be used the state amendments imposed things like poll, taxes and literacy tests, these limits were powerful close to thirty percent of all voting age. Men were literate, a majority of whom were poor black men. But those taxes and tests would also affect poor illiterate white voters, thus a grandfather clause was added to allow an illiterate man to vote as long as he or his lineal ancestor that is his grandfather had been a registered voter before eighteen, sixty seven, which was three years before the passage of the fifteenth amendment. The clauses suppressed the vote along racial lines, but party lines were at play to at the time. Most Black Americans were Republicans. The Party of Abraham Lincoln, which then favourite expensive government, funded programs and most whites for Democrats. The Democratic Party then favored curbing expansion of government power. Suppressing, the vote served to keep power in the hands of the Democrats, the Party's wound up switching their big government versus small government ideologies of next sixty years, or so leading to the stances. We see today, but that's a different episode. In Nineteen Fifteen, the state amendments and clauses were ruled nationally unconstitutional, but the poll taxes weren't eliminated nationally until the adoption of the twenty fourth amendment in nineteen, sixty four, and on the state level in nineteen, sixty six with the Supreme Court's decision in Harper versus the Virginia Board of elections. That decades of continued voter suppression the phrase grandfathered in is used today without the connotation of disenfranchisement, but even as culture shifts whether we're aware of it or not. Language pulled the power of our history, positive and negative.

Democratic Party United States Supreme Court Virginia Board Of Elections Abraham Lincoln Harper
Leaving the World Health Organization

Second Opinion

03:41 min | 2 months ago

Leaving the World Health Organization

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with. The pinion over the past few years. Our President has made some incredibly ill informed policy decisions even in the face of clear evidence to the contrary, these decisions have negatively impacted people's lives through policies around covid climate change, immigration health care women's rights, lgbt rights education, and of course, our relationship with foreign countries, but the president's recent decision to leave the sixty year. Old World Health Organization is among the very most irresponsible decision will. Will hurt the US every bit as much as it will hurt the rest of the world the W. H.. O. Is not a perfect organization. It is plagued by politics and infighting and a low budget, but it's still serves a super important function. The whol plays a key role in many decisions that directly or indirectly affect our lives more than ever before our global interconnected world create great risks particularly with regard to the spreading. Spreading of diseases, it is the WHO that is. Our First Line of defense the WHO. I alerted the world to the infection that came to be called covid in early January, and it advised healthcare workers how to protect themselves from the spread. Perhaps it could have been more aggressive with its policies, but if there is a problem, conduct an audit help improve the organization. Don't be a baby and take your toys and walk away. Away and it's not just covid were who plays a vital role. It coordinates the global response to diseases like polio Ebola Malaria HIV TB and yellow fever. The near nation of diseases like polio has saved the US tens of billions of dollars in treatment costs, and the WHO isn't the only Health Organization the US refuses to work with as the US decided to focus inwardly. We have already stopped funding the pan. American Health Organization. Pan. America is the area that is currently home to half of the top ten countries with co Vid. Now aside from helping ourselves, we also have a social responsibility to help resource poor countries by helping to provide education laboratory training tools like p. p. e. and clinical trials drugs to treat emerging and reemerging diseases. When we step back from these responsibilities, China steps in, and they're now in our backyard, working with countries that will old them a big favor. The WHO also directly benefits the US for example each year influenza virus mutates resulting in new variants around the world. It is the W. H. O. that leads the. The flu vaccine development process each year which includes several American researchers and organizations like our FDA and CDC. The US depends on data from the WHO to predict which strain of the flu will spread to the US so that we can make ineffective vaccination in the end the total US funding for the WHO is equivalent to the overhead of about one ass hospital about three hundred seventy million dollars. It would be very hard to get better value for that

United States World Health Organization WHO Covid Dr Michael Wilks President Trump American Health Organization Flu Vaccine Polio Health Organization Malaria FDA W. H. O. America CDC China TB
Bone Fragments in Mexico Identified as Belonging to One of 43 Missing Students

Democracy Now! Audio

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Bone Fragments in Mexico Identified as Belonging to One of 43 Missing Students

"Mexico. There's a major development in the case of the forty three IOT. Students who were kidnapped and disappeared nearly sixty years ago in the town of Gwala Gato. A bone fragment found in the nearby town of Kula. Kula has been determined to be from one of the students twenty one year old, Christian offense, Rodriguez to lumbering, the Mexican government, has long claimed the bodies of the students were burnt in disposed of in a garbage dump in Coca Cola or a nearby river, but the bone fragments were found in a different location, casting new doubts about the government's official account of what. To the

Kula Mexican Government Gwala Gato Rodriguez Official
Hospitals Struggle to Contain Covid-19 Spread Inside Their Walls

Daily Coronavirus Update

06:45 min | 2 months ago

Hospitals Struggle to Contain Covid-19 Spread Inside Their Walls

"As the coronavirus continues its spread throughout the country, some hospitals are also struggling to contain the spread inside its walls. Well. It's only a small number of overall cases US medical centers have reported over five thousand cases of patients, catching coronavirus after being admitted there for other conditions, and that number does not include the case of medical staff that have caught the virus at work. Melanie Evans Hospital reporter at the Wall Street. Journal joins us for more on how hospitals try to protect both staff and patients from infection. Thanks for joining US Melanie. Thanks for having me wanted to talk about an interesting facet of this whole corona virus thing and how it plays out in hospitals. Obviously, people are going to hospitals to get the treatment they need. Sometimes they're spending long stays there and the hospital staff. Obviously, has to work with. With them. They have to work with regular patients as well. It can be a very difficult thing and right now. We're seeing that US. Medical centers have reported over five thousand cases of patients that caught cove in nineteen after being admitted to the hospital for other conditions I think that's that was just patients, but there's also a lot of a hospital staffers that are also catching it there from work as well. Melanie a little bit more about, please. Hospitals even outside of a pandemic. Go to some pretty extraordinary lengths to prevent infections from spreading inside the hospital itself. So you've got doctors nurses taking care of patients. Some of them have a contagious disease. You can think of measles you could think of to burke yellow says and so hospitals have all of these various strategies for trying to ensure that contagious patients don't infect hospital workers, and that the disease whatever it may be doesn't spread, and you don't get a outbreak. Hospitals began to try to adapt the way they operate in order to prevent the virus from spreading internally. What we found was that there was a pretty inconsistent approach across hospitals as the pandemic hit the United States, and so as you as you noted, hospitals are starting to report what they consider to be hospital onset cases so patients who've been exposed and contracted or respected to have contracted covid nineteen while inside of the hospital. There isn't good data for exposure of hospital staff. and. It's interesting I mean one of the things that kind of hinders. This is the reporting structure that they use to be certain that an infection occurred in a hospital. You know the federal government doesn't ask them to report everything. It's Somebody's gotta be there for at least two weeks and catch the virus there before the reported has an infection. You got there at the hospital, so there's a possibility of a bunch of other people that could have gotten it before that to expand their one of the hospitals that you. You focused on for your piece was the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago as you were mentioning? Hospitals are trying to prevent the spread of this thing as much as they could, but even still it got through, and by mid June more than two hundred sixty nurses, clerical staff custodians texts had contracted the virus there four staff members died, so even still it's it's just tough to contain all this. The Standard, the threshold for reporting a case of a patient contracting covid nineteen inside the hospital is pretty high. It's also voluntary. So for those reasons, the infectious disease experts we talked to said the number is likely higher, so we've got about five thousand cases since May fourteen that excludes anything that occurred prior to that since May. Fourteenth there have been roughly. Five thousand cases reported voluntarily by hospitals that met as very high threshold, and to your point we looked at one specific hospital that struggled with these protocols for keeping patients and staff separate, and when we interviewed staff and the head of infection control. What we were told was. It is likely that the virus spread internally that they were investigating, but they declined to share with us. The results of their investigation, citing privacy for employees have died Joyce Hacker Bus Leblanc. She's fifty three year old nurse, Juan Martinez and. Room technician who worked on the third floor, Maria Lopez a nurse, who on the third, floor operating unit. And then FLA botanist Edward Starling. He's sixty years old and he died on June seventeenth. You know speaking to what you're saying about. Some of these protocols they isolate infected patients. The buildings are engineered to help reduce the viral spread. A lot of people talk about these negative pressure rooms, which kind of sucked the air out so the virus staying there, but then there's other research that shows that there's been a particles of the virus kind of hallways outside of those rooms, so it's a very difficult thing to. To contain and be clear these numbers that we're talking about these over five thousand cases, these are a very small fraction of the overall number of cases, but you know it's hard to for a lot of people to feel comfortable there. If certain things like these are happening you know, it just complicates everything. contact tracing is difficult in the hospitals especially at the University of Illinois Hospital that we're talking about at one point, there were so many people are getting sick and was the contact tracing their. They continue to work to boost their infection control practices. As we reported this story, we talked to hospitals across the United States over several weeks and the course of that reporting. hustles described the ways enrich their protocols, and their efforts were changing so early in the pandemic testing was limited. There was no requirement that everybody wear a mask. Now taking is more widespread and hospitals have policies that require universal masking patients and staff are being asked to wear masts to help slow the spread of the virus hospitals in the course of the pandemic raced to reengineer their ventilation systems and add negative pressure rooms, so yes, it is sort of involving response by US hospitals in order to try to contain any possible outbreaks. Hopefully as we continue to get through this, the hospitals can learn to manage it as best they

United States University Of Illinois Hospita Melanie Evans Hospital Journal Melanie Reporter Joyce Hacker Bus Leblanc Chicago Burke Maria Lopez Juan Martinez Edward Starling Technician
Sahara dust cloud causes Code Orange Air Quality Alert for Sunday in Atlanta

Money Matters with Wes Moss

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Sahara dust cloud causes Code Orange Air Quality Alert for Sunday in Atlanta

"That code orange air quality alert in place now for Atlanta today due to that big dust cloud making its way here across the state tell to action news meteorologist Brad nets but it does lower the air air quality quality of of some some of of that that dust dust comes comes down down so so for for that that reason reason a a code code orange orange air air quality quality alerts alerts have have been been issued issued and and WSP WSP Jennifer Jennifer Perry Perry says says the the Georgia Georgia department department of of public public health health says says wear a mask a mask will not only help prevent the spread of covert nineteen but it can also protect you from dust from the Saharan dust cloud as it moves over Georgia they say it's especially important to take precautions if you have a chronic lung condition the serin dust makes its way across the Atlantic every year it's more dense this year than it's been in the last fifty or sixty years

Atlanta Jennifer Jennifer Perry Perry Georgia Brad Nets
Kelly Asbury, Director of ‘Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron’ and ‘Shrek 2,’ Dies at 60

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Kelly Asbury, Director of ‘Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron’ and ‘Shrek 2,’ Dies at 60

"Respected animator Oscar nominated director and animator Kelly Asbury has died in an enchanted forest abundant in was at the helm another family favorites like Smurfs the lost village spirit stallion of the Cimarron starting his career Walt Disney's feature animation nineteen eighty three he worked on iconic films Little Mermaid Tim Burton's nightmare before Christmas another's represented says he died after a long battle with cancer Kelly Asbury sixty years

Oscar Director Kelly Asbury Walt Disney Tim Burton
Cracking the Leadership Code with Alain Hunkins

Dose of Leadership

04:42 min | 3 months ago

Cracking the Leadership Code with Alain Hunkins

"Hello, hello, welcome to dose of leadership so happy you're tuning in. Man. What a crazy week! It's been for me I feel like I've been out of touch with those of leadership I've been so busy with family one of my daughters. Unexpectedly, move up to Detroit so to deal with that. Then, I started flying again I actually started flying into. Believe this. Flu Can re second at the beginning of twenty twenty. And then I went on my first trip last week mid June. I'm recording this. On June twenty fifth. was a week ago I went to Inchon. China in Beijing or Inchon South Korea, and in Beijing China and then back to Dallas. Do you believe that? An implant again tomorrow ahead in the Paris of the world seemingly is coming back to normal. But it still feels weird out there I tell you it just does not seem the same. Even when I was in John, it seemed like World War Z. almost there was nobody the airport. Didn't have any passengers on the plane we were picking up. Cargo of all. Things didn't stay the night in China. Because we can't I wouldn't want to. Because of the Cova deal. But it was just weird, but it was good on one hand, but still a stark reminder of of how different things are and. It's a little uneasy and I'll be honest with you. Leadership has been attested and challenged. In the. Early. I really do think this is trying times for everybody but This is a great opportunity for leadership, and hopefully this show Dosa leadership is a great resource for you a free resource for you in your leadership journey. Where authentically we deal with leadership topics, and how all how helping you to become a better leader? That's what it's all about and I know I certainly been tested over the last two weeks. And I'm just like you and it's glad to be back in the saddle and giving you a great episode another great conversation. With Alon Hunkin 's Alana's. Spelled L. A. L., A. N., the French pronunciation, but demand. What a great guest! I really connected with him! We've been trying to get him on the show for quite some time. Even looking back to February and March and and we finally got it done. By about three or four weeks ago when I recorded this conversation and I'm excited to bring this to you this week. He's just a one of the great ones I really. Do. You think so? He's a sought after keynote speaker facilitators coach. He is a leadership expert. He's leadership junkie. It's right in. To the dose of leadership tribe. And he wrote a great book in fact, if I could write a book if I can wake up and morning, said Richard You could write any type of book that want. I think I would write. Like he did and cracking the leadership code. It's really good. It's about three secrets to building strong leaders. And he got. He has a lot of science behind e discovering the brain science behind leading people. He's got a lot of great real life leadership stories in the book and at the end of the day. The book is a practical leadership toolkit to become a better leader. That's what it's all about just like. This show is something that you can put in your arsenal in your tool kit and become a better leader. And I like what he uses to. In the tool kit as you know as with me, I got the four CS Alon has the three CS in to him. It's all about connection, communication and collaboration I love that I absolutely love that. So we deep dive into that in this conversation and we we also what I love about him. He's the first guest that I've had a near that. That references Frederick? And I do that a lot in my keynotes, and so I cannot stand Frederick. Winds Will Taylor and The idea of scientific management theory that came about, and they dusted revolution and I. Still reason why I don't like him is because of the way that he viewed people. He viewed workers as cogs in a machine and He's a mechanical engineer by trade. And he looked at these things, and anyway it Frederick was a Taylor in my opinion has created this. Cultural Rift that still is with us today, even though it's been debunked for the past sixty years that the type of scientific management theory doesn't work in the dynamic environments that we're dealing with today, it works in certain situations, but not overall and the mindset and the concepts that were brought forth from Frederick. Wendell Taylor are still we're dealing with them today in all the organizations particularly large organizations. And leadership is the solution the type of ship we talk about here on those leadership and Alon. Gets a one hundred percent, and so we deep dive into that. You're really gonNA. Enjoy that. My highly encourage you to go get his book. Cracking the leadership code again if I. Could write a book. It would be one like this it's it's that good

Frederick Alon Hunkin China Wendell Taylor Inchon Cs Alon FLU Detroit Richard You Beijing China Cova Beijing Paris Inchon South Korea John Dallas L. A. L. A. N.
"sixty years" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"sixty years" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"In business for sixty years so you can pretty much trust that they know what they're doing when it comes to sell you the car that you want and they're conveniently located just half a mile south of shady Grove metro recently I got to drive the new kia soul that thing drives like a dream the interior is super stealth and that all these awesome safety features inside of it which is really important to me because nine times out of ten I'm driving around with my son who's three I love this car see dealer for details. as America's trucking network live on a Friday night into Saturday morning you get a chance join us with that Mister motor coach tonight and we're playing some my this is team songs from eighties movies and I was he was a mix. because the trash hello trash man. what about about what that meant even rather go then allows you where you've been hiding yourself Sir. in Indiana. listen up here is the latest trivia question go ahead. and the song is called in the air tonight what is the movie. right in the years and I. you can hear their head and you might even though it's Phil Collins. no.

America Mister Indiana. Phil Collins. shady Grove sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

KNST AM 790

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"sixty years" Discussed on KNST AM 790

"Business for sixty years so you can pretty much trust that they know what they're doing when it comes to sell you the car that you want and they're conveniently located just half a mile south of shady Grove metro recently I got to drive the new kia soul that thing drives like a dream the interior is super stealth and that all these awesome safety features inside of it which is really important to me because nine times out of ten I'm driving around with my son who's three I love this car see dealer for details. so we have here on ninety seven point one wash FM he what are you doing Saturday September fourteenth from noon to three what aid Santana moss formally of your Washington Redskins without Peter Bondra formerly of your Washington Capitals they will be at the grand opening of the new **** store in Tyson's Saturday September fourteenth from noon to three and yes you can take photos you can score autographs gets inside the merchandise all yours while supplies last and while you're there enter to win exciting electronics for the home it for on the go like the pope magnify Max S. our sound bar home theater system or the onyx do you five by Harman Kardon it's happening on Saturday September fourteenth at the new **** stored inside Tyson's from noon to three Santana moss will be there Peter Bondra from the caps will be there and myself in Chile will be there to the Toby chilly morning show come say hi it's ninety seven point one wash FM we can't wait to see you there at the grand opening of the new **** store fourteen ninety seven.

Santana moss Washington Redskins Peter Bondra Tyson Harman Kardon Chile shady Grove Washington Toby sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"sixty years" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Business for sixty years so you can pretty much trust that they know what they're doing when it comes to sell you the car that you want and they're conveniently located just half a mile south of shady Grove metro recently I got to drive the new kia soul that thing drives like a dream the interior is super stealth and that all these awesome safety features inside of it which is really important to me because nine times out of ten I'm driving around with my son who's three I love this car see dealer for details. could be connected to E. cigarettes Houston has three the FDA now stepping up its scrutiny of the E. cigarette giant jul asking the company for documents here's ABC Stephanie yeah the company has eliminated a lot of its social media platforms they insist that this kind of targeting is not meant to reach young people but that doesn't stop other young people from posting about how much they love to vape now that all members of the crew from that cargo ship that flipped just off the Georgia coast of been rescued MBC Serena Marshall says the focus is on clean up that is a very large oil slick that's one of the things that they're turning towards now is figuring out exactly how to clean up after this ship has overturned now there are big concerns about the Oyster Bay populations tourism in that area the marine life of course another missile test for North Korea firing two projectiles into the sea just hours after offering to resume talks with the US Jerry Preston ABC news. deal thanks for listening to K. away eight fifty AM and ninety four one FM..

Houston FDA Serena Marshall North Korea shady Grove Georgia Oyster Bay Jerry Preston ABC sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"sixty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Business for sixty years so you can pretty much trust that they know what they're doing when it comes to sell you the car that you want and they're conveniently located just half a mile south of shady Grove metro recently I got to drive the new kia soul that thing drives like a dream the interior is super stealth and that all these awesome safety features inside of it which is really important to me because nine times out of ten I'm driving around with my son who's three I love this car see dealer for details here's a tender little tale fresh from the trail about a cowboy fell in love with a cow girl named Dale it was love at first sight that's what they said this week something sure went to their heads they walked and talked and shot the breeze held hands and kissed under the trees then the cow girl whispered let's get some food so they rode on to a place that looked good found a Roy Rogers restaurant just around the band cabaret said wasn't Royce some kind of legend Calabro said works for me how about you cow boy smiled I like it too folks of Roy said they're happy dues yell sit right down here Buckaroos before too long they were feeling at home cowboys said a lot better than where the buffalo roam three piece combo is a tasty surprised new chicken tenders soft drinks and fries each big tender was specially chosen the chicken was hand breaded fresh never frozen when they had their fill they said their goodbyes cowboys said we'll be back there's lots more to try folks at Royce said see you soon you too meanwhile happy trails to you door dash is now available at dissipating restaurant for all your vehicle care you need experience honesty and integrity certified female friendly match curry's Cressman auto care rockstar technicians you can trust at Cressman auto care dot com it's the Labor Day preview sale.

Dale Calabro cowboys Royce curry shady Grove Roy Rogers Buckaroos friendly match Cressman sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

04:46 min | 1 year ago

"sixty years" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Was sentenced to thirty to sixty years behind bars the former Penn state football coach is currently housed in the laurel highlands state prison which serves older inmates and those with special needs last month the state Supreme Court denied Sandusky's most recent appeal which focused on the claim his lawyer was ineffective they cited the now infamous interview with Bob Costas were Sandusky kind of handed hard over whether he was attracted to children Sandusky has maintained his innocence Kristin Johannsen KYW news radio but the rest of the month in Camden orange lights will be shining on two buildings in a sign of respect for the mass shooting victims okay why W. South Jersey bureau chief David not and says there's more to the late show than that the Florio center for public service in Camden city hall are being used to send a political message to Washington according to candy county freeholder director Lou compelling most Americans are fed up with the president and with the Republicans in United States Senate that listeners the Pathmark gun locks their refusal to is resulting in on time the deaths of dozens hundreds of people Florio former governor and congressmen was active on the gun control front it was one of the first the ban assault weapons in his state Capelli says the Senate now is to restore the ten year national band that expired fifteen years ago in South Jersey David Mack KYW newsradio and in Alabama elementary school it wasn't the kids who got into trouble but two dads responded Jim chrysalis length no one was hurt when two men became involved in a road rage incident over traffic outside a Montgomery Alabama elementary school the two fathers got into an argument at the drop off lane at blood elementary school clear wheel is the head of the Montgomery school board the schools follow their policies and procedures and were able to close the school down get everybody where they needed to be and no danger to the children inside the man with the gun ran inside the school then turned it over to school staff police arrested both men Jim chrysalis CBS news USA gymnastics is responding to scathing criticism from its biggest star Simone Biles she broke down in tears on Wednesday saying the team officials failed to protect her and her teammates from convicted sex predator Larry Nasser when he was the team doctor CBS news chief medical correspondent Dr John look as an update Olympic gold medalist Simone Biles is one of hundreds of athletes abused by former doctor Larry Nasser who worked for both Michigan State University and USA gymnastics he's in prison for multiple sex crimes you had one job you literally have one job any putting protector today Jim this is Maggie Nichols who first reported her concerns about Nasser in June twenty fifteen told CBS news it takes a lot of strange profiles to continue her Olympic training she said for me it would be very hard I give her a lot of problems while speaking out as she prepares to compete for her six national gymnastics title well a southern California police chief says crimes would not have happened if it weren't for state lawmakers he is praising his officers though for stopping a killer on a crime spree garden Grove police chief Tom to raise says the thirty three year old documented gang member was imprisoned convicted of selling methamphetamine while armed with an assault rifle he was let out on early release as stipulated in assembly bill one oh nine Wednesday the suspect killed four people violently stabbing them to death and stabbed and wounded two others in random attacks across two cities in a little over two hours erase suggests lawmakers made these crimes possible he is a violent individual who should have never been considered for early release he urges lawmakers to re evaluate these early release laws Jim Roop garden Grove it's another trump administration departure this time as deputy national intelligence director soon Gordon CBS news military consultant Mike alliance talks about what's next for the position after the president announced that he would nominate Joseph McGuire as the interim director doesn't McGuire is someone that is been in the children's community for as part of the military as well and has experience in the counterterrorism side so he should be well accepted in the international community as well as on both sides of the aisle the wire has been the serving as the director of the national counterterrorism center and he has a long and distinguished military career retiring from the navy back in two thousand ten critics agree Nora and the lost city of gold is the family film you've been searching for it's packed with action full of surprises and will knock your books on the desk in the lost city of gold BG now please don't send one here to tell you.

thirty three year fifteen years sixty years two hours ten year
"sixty years" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

The Church of What's Happening Now

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"sixty years" Discussed on The Church of What's Happening Now

"This is sixty years of real. This isn't a Okie Doke shit. This is Michael Jackson to Motown two movies to record stood to, you know, I mean the movies and you albums tracked back then. Yeah. Like they made it twice. Number ten. Oh, yeah. I mean this is just phenomenal. Did you think this is the way when you were when you were put down the vocals of big bamboo? Did you see two thousand nineteen? What were you thinking? At time you're eaten. Happy. We're right in, in middle of creating when we first the first bit, we'd was an accident. You know, after we got our money from Lou thousand couple of thousand dollars and I sit and we need a little tape recorder, I thought that would be nice little added thing. And so he got his secretary got us little tape recorder so Cheech and I went in the back mixed down room in in 'em studios. And we were practising we're rehearsing, and so cheap. So used to work in live, that he went outside and put on his costumes and everything else. It's going to be a dope dealer, and he goes outside the door locks from the inside and it was really hot out there. It was like. I am in the middle of summer sons beating down on him. So he knocked on the door. And I'm supposed to let him in. So I was trying to record the sign that little tape recorder, so any not I looked up at the door and I didn't see the Nita was moving. And so I said, who is it choose? It's me men in a look down. And I seen the needle move it. So it's recording. And so I'm looking at it staring at it was that pas. And then he knocked again. So I said, oh, I thought I'll start the bit over again. So I said, who is it? And I heard it in his voice pissed up. It's, it's me man. Open up. I think the cops on me. So now I got him outside the doors like he can't get in and waiting for him to Nike, again because he's so so disciplined, once we get into a bit. He can't get out of it. So again this time little harder. And I go who is it me man? Dave, dave. No. Let me in as hot out here. Dave, Dave than Dave's nut. Here. There was a pause. And then he. Then the in, you know. The door and he wanted to punch where he was beat red sweating. Wait, wait. Wait. Listen. I played back and that was the beginning of our record career, not only the beginning of our recording career but was beginning of our style of how we would do it. We didn't need anybody. We didn't need a lot of engineers. We just need one guy that worked tape recorder and little room. And that's all we had. We put all the sound effects everything else in the first Dave's nut here was recorded on the big stage with Lou Adler. Rather did the whole thing and he did blind Mona Chillan and all that, you know because after we did Dame's here. They said, okay, what else you got and Cheech looked at each other we hadn't even thought about writing another bit. And so we just did our live show, which was blind melon Chilin, and it was am blam Chilin was a bit that I got from the committee, the committee that used to do a bit on a blind blue singer, and so not I was in fluid. By let's say that way put it that way in. And so we made up the record the blind melon children as in the in the studio. And, and then we realize that we didn't need all the ingineers producers, or the arts and so changing, I just just a producer..

Dave Lou Adler Michael Jackson Cheech Nike Motown secretary producer Dame Mona Chillan thousand dollars sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on WEEI

WEEI

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"sixty years" Discussed on WEEI

"The second level. The NFL continues to show. Why movement in sports is necessary with New York and are two teams moving in opposite directions with bell in New York. The same day in which Beckham junior's how stick with. What's happened in Cleveland you've got storyline. And that's what's associated with move. This is for the football fan that has lately on bell on their fantasy teams. This is for the football fan that has one hundred dollars or more on the jets. And there are people that are for the giants sixty years. My grandfather was a says the same thing you'll say about the jets this is not for you. This is for the average fan. This is for the fan that is invested in drama and storyline the second level weekdays from one AM to six AM eastern on ESPN radio. The second level. The NFL continues to show. Why movement in sports is necessary with New York, and there are two teams moving in opposite directions with on bell in New York. The same day in which Beckham junior is how stick with. What's happened in Cleveland you've got storyline. And that's what's associated with move. This is for the football fan that has lately on bell on their fantasy teams. This is for the football fan that has one hundred dollars or more on the jets, and there are people that have room for the giants sixty years. My grandfather was giants same thing. They'll say about the jets this is not for you. This is for the average fan. This is for the fan that is invested in drama and storyline the second level weekdays from one AM to six AM eastern on ESPN radio. Calling all sports joining us. Arizona state head football coach at believe it or not I'm gonna get myself. A new needle pray for me. Which is one that I left in Philadelphia. Oh years on the air. But they straighten these these you might be six two again. You might have one hit left. Calling all sports with rocket the news, weekday afternoons at four eastern on.

jets bell New York football Beckham NFL Cleveland ESPN head football coach Philadelphia Arizona one hundred dollars sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on Other Side of Texas

Other Side of Texas

04:43 min | 1 year ago

"sixty years" Discussed on Other Side of Texas

"More subtype place to have backups of ties beyond what's on the shelves. So we company has certainly made changes, and it's not over the years, but that's part of being around for for now approaching sixty years. Yeah. Keep her with us here. Other son at Texas wanna ask you Rick about the world famous burritos and the origin of the world spray. Does this is made pet? Green songs. It's made all the west Texas consciousness knows thing or two about the also spree. Oh, hardly. Would you meet a what? West Texan that has not eaten all spree to- talk to us about the origins, and how it might have been a little more surprising. How this came about than people might expect. I got the story directly for Mr. all that number of years ago. And he had a smile when he was telling me the story. He said we play start order as always. And we got regular supplies for the stores at that time. But there was this huge mistake and delivery. I don't know the number if there was a truck load or semi load. I don't know how big that load was but we received a huge amount of these re does that we had ordered. And Mr. also tried one and loved them and had made the decision that we'll keep these. And we're going to sell them and see folks. And that was forty plus years ago, and it has trying to become a it's funny. I talked to folks all over the country and my regular daily job, and they'll say you still have the world famous beef and being burrito. And I'm sure we do the first question is always this. Can you send me a box? Because that's such. It's one of those things you find here, and you may not find him anywhere else. Now today, I believe we have seven burritos. That's how much it has grown. Do. We still have the forty year favorite, of course. But we also have all the different burritos different types of if types I pay and hatch green, chili is in some these types of things. So that it's it's gone from one unique item to now out to seven items that support that whole retail chain if he was so in all started as a mistake. Started as a mistake. And as I think my boss at the time said, he's one where you know, once in a while things worked your way. I mean, I can't imagine a youth without ah Tolson diet coke and to also spray tos. Well, you know, once you you get into the howlers become my favorite through the years, and we used to do radio remotes for the also stores here in Blois and towelettes and around the surrounding area as well. As our stations up in borger did for ten stores there are stationed in Andrews for all sips down in that area. And the case was one thing we always did is to give away free samples when we were doing our live broadcasts. And there were folks that would look where you were at to make sure at lunchtime. 'cause we did this between eleven and noon. They would literally find which one of the stores you were at if he didn't say because they were gonna stop in and had some free food them Chuck bragging. So, you know, and I mean that the good way regular listeners than that were literally they forward to trying to find you until you sit on here in the first break, we're here at you know, whatever location because then a lot of folks would show up and off and people would come in. They try the free samples and end up going gosh, those are really good, and the hell opinion poppers, I think one of the best things that we carry those. That's just personal favorite though. Yeah. Rick Kiefer with us here on the other side of Texas three hundred fifteen stores. How many of them are east of thirty five? Do you know? You know, the largest. Not sure I couldn't even give you a good number. I would say that the farthest reach of our company in this is kind of a broad stroke explanation from Stephenville, Texas, the Gallup, New Mexico..

Rick Kiefer Mr. Texas Blois Stephenville borger New Mexico Andrews Chuck sixty years forty year
"sixty years" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

04:26 min | 2 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on WRVA

"In the game for over sixty years. Headlines at the top end thirty past the hour. Reactions and commentary in between. Thanks for taking my call on NewsRadio eleven forty W R V A. Yeah. The idea is you can use the key. For instance, you can use a standard Kia wireless fob or smartphone at so I think that's one of the reasons that the wire cutter likes it. It's the most flexible solution. I think the are are pretty good. If you want it to be able to do things like unlock the door when you're not home for repairman or lock the door. If you think you forgot it. I think a lot of people like it for that reason there is isn't August keypad. So if you wanna have a keypad. Who's this is great for Airbnb for instance, you can give the raiders access is they don't have to have the aug app. You can say, hey, the numbers one two three four and let him in. Remember to August knock on Amazon. How much should I be reading into those those you trust Amazon reviews in effect? I don't buy anything without reading Amazon reviews. But I also I would go to the wire cutter first. And then from what you've learned it the wire cutters. Stacey on IOT dot com. Then go, and you'll be able to read those reviews, I think a little bit more critically because remember that some of those reviews are from I think, you know, used to be we'd say all competitors are putting negative reviews up or the vendors putting an unusually positive reviews. I think that's less. The problem nowadays, you could kind of tell when it's one of those then there's a certain category of person who's just extremely picky more so than you and me now, those people are it's good to read the reviews, but you have to kind of understand their mindset. Which is they they want. You know, if it's not exactly perfect. Exactly. Right. And I see this a lot with smartphones. Particularly if you go on read it and you read reviews of smartphones. There is there is always that guy. Well, I don't know the screen had light bleed and then was slightly pink. And then the speaker Senate funding rice would dance on the back. And it's like, well, you got to really take those with a grain of rice or salt. Maybe okay. You'll know you can tell there's finicky people where they're complaining about silly things. The wire cutter reliable. They did mention that the keypad sometimes forgets and has to be rebooted. That's not good. They also say battery life isn't great. So, you know, maybe August isn't quite the best one take a look at this. I have never heard of it. I haven't tried it. The quick set. Kiva key second generation, this is the one the wire cutter picks. But sometimes a wire cutter pick stuff because it's cheap. It's one hundred sixty bucks, which is the least of all of these. But that's not it's not too bad. You also have to consider what you're replacing your take the whole lockout or you're going to add it to an existing lock that kind of thing. The August will will upgrade your existing deadbolt. The quick set. You know, it's kind of interesting I read the reviews. My my answer isn't going to be as valuable as those reviews, frankly that that's the key on that. Hey, nice to talk to you as a great. It's a great question nowadays with this IOT, the internet of things all of these internet connected devices securities also big issue, and I'm going to say this anytime anybody asks me about internet of thing devices internet connected thing in your house. Absolute minimum. You've gotta get one. That automatically updates because there are ways security flaws in a door lock. You don't wanna door lock that? Some guy can walk up and go with his special magic twangy and it opens up, and so if that happens, and it does happen. Sometimes you want to you want one that automatically is updated by the manufacturer that you don't have to go around the house and find firmware upgrades and check and see if it's is it up to date, as you know, is there an update you want manufacturer be able to what we call it. Push updates out to that lock. That's very important..

Amazon raiders NewsRadio Kia Airbnb Stacey Senate eleven forty W sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Harris who heart attack who was the producer heart attack ended up killing him but who what you know maybe smoking caused that hard to know the only fifty years old well no that can't be possible i don't think he was fifty or the movie the blob is sixty years he was born in nineteen thirty okay he died in one thousand nine hundred eighty oh yeah yeah yeah yeah yes of course years you're right your math is right that's right mathematics is has not been your subject you may be good at low but mathematics hosting horrible that's right tom in la hoya california go ahead thomas george thank you for taking my call mr lobo always a pleasure i wanted to ask you mr lobo besides the day they're still which was about impending nuclear war and they extraterrestrial response to that yes there was another movie nineteen sixty two french a french movie thirty minutes called la yeah i know that film twelve monkeys was based on that so yeah and if a che is i mean it's just a goriest thirty minutes and proves that low budget is sometimes much better and it's about a very impending nuclear war with remote viewers from the future viewing the beginning of that war and i was wondering if you would comment on that i heard that it wasn't really french it was an american director who went to france to actually produce the movie you know i had not heard that i always heard that it was french i think the most interesting and notable thing is that everything was on was was a bunch of there were a bunch of photographs that were filmed so it it's a film but you're watching a series of photographs in succession so it's very experimental film from the sixties and again the inspiration for twelve monkeys in which you have people from the future i involved at an impending holocaust so it's you know but a a great film certainly influential and i always heard it was french but that's if it's an american director that would be that'd be a win for us movies were hot in the old days because we really didn't have television in once television came out the movie industry suffered all at that time.

Harris california mr lobo director producer thomas george france thirty minutes fifty years sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Traffic and weather komo x here and on here on route sixty six we've got the guy who wrote such hits as sweet dreams that was a patsy cline hit i can't stop loving you plus vida have a lot of country hit songs himself and three pop hits as well plus he's in the country music hall of fame it's don gibson and if don were still with us he would be ninety now here he is i think he's having a bad day blue blue day from summertime sixty years blue i feel like away from it some by dave what can i do i'm glad we're blue blue day in new man away what can i do i'm glad with no way i feel two.

patsy cline dave don gibson sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on WRVA

"On what he said i i would guess that that that that he would question einstein about quantum theory because you know einstein famously did not was not a big fan of quantum theory and and now einstein's been dead for you know fifty sixty sixty year over sixty years and there's a lot more evidence of quantum theory i i'm wondering if stephen would would say what do you say now l the other thing is of course einstein was was the one who is lay ahead of his time in looking for a unified theory of everything and people at that in those days i thought that was not and now for the last forty years has been really the hottest thing in physics we had we don't have it yet but he might want to know what he thinks of those attempts did did he even at his condition ever laugh oh well he he i don't think he could laugh i've never saw how many could you see a smile on his face he had a big light up the real hit a huge smile he loved you hugh i remember once we had a heated argument i'm waiting you know as usual i'm waiting minutes five six seven eight minutes for him to compose his response to what i said i'm all like you know what what's going on we gotta get to the bottom of this and he finally you know what when finished composing it if you weren't looking over shoulder to see you know he would hit a button in his computer voice would read it finally comes and it was a joke joe did he did he with us saying it did he ever curse through that machine yes he did he eight british curse yeah jason and farmington.

einstein stephen joe jason farmington five six seven eight minutes fifty sixty sixty year forty years sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"What she said i i would guess that that that that he would question i said about quantum theory because you know einstein famously did not not a big fan of quantum theory and and now einstein's been dead for you know fifty sixty sixty year over sixty years and there's a lot more evidence of quantum theory i'm wondering if stephen would would say what do you say now l the other thing is of course einstein was was the one who is lay ahead of his time in looking for a unified theory of everything and people at that in those days i thought that was nuts and now you know that's the for the last forty years has been really the hottest thing in physics we have we don't have it yet but he might want to know what he thinks of those attempts did he even at his condition ever laugh oh well he he i don't think he could laugh i've never saw how could you see a smile on his face he had a big he light up the real hit a huge smile he loved hugh i remember once we had a heated argument i'm waiting you know as usual i'm waiting minutes five six seven eight minutes for him to compose his response to what i said i'm all like you know what what's going on and i you know i wanna we gotta get to the bottom of this and he finally you know what when he finished composing it if you weren't looking over shoulder to see you know he would hit a button and his computer voice would read it finally comes and it was a joke joe did he did he with us sane it did he ever curse through that machine yes he did he ain't british curses i could just see him do that.

stephen einstein joe five six seven eight minutes fifty sixty sixty year forty years sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"For sixty years because of how wily it is and how smart it is in negotiating its own survival uh they don't do anything out of panic at least we've never really seen it uh they danced right up to the line were you can't turn back and yet they always drag themselves back from the abyss and i don't think there's any reason to believe that they've changed so the trump administration may well feel that it is it's pressure that has brought kim to this point but that doesn't mean that kim is necessarily on the defensive they may come up with some sort of massive reykjavik like plan that will seem too good to pass down or or pass on uh that would include very quickly getting united states troops out of the peninsula normalizing relations with north korea recognizing them as a nuclear power and the like uh if trump takes it it's a worry because this needs to be negotiated very very slowly uh with everybody understanding what the implications are and of course if kim comes in with this grand bargain and trump turns down than kim gets to turn to the world and say look i was the one who wanted peace i offered this grand deal the americans turned it down i'll never give up my nuclear weapons we're speaking to michael oslin who is a security experts from hoover institution uh michael people have gone also putting out a lot of unsolicited advice to the president's in terms of what needs to happen between now and this proposed meeting which is supposed to happen in may right that's what we've been told what what what what are you make of that i did there has to be preconditions a specific preconditions for this meeting that we could already assess or do you had to kind of see what the north koreans come to us with i mean how does this dance between now and.

kim reykjavik north korea president michael oslin sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Are sixty years later did that help getting the bob let us go at least teaching about the bible teaching better judeochristian values did that somehow help our society are we better today than we were spiritually as a country in 1958 i don't think we are are we better on some social levels absolutely are we better on equal opportunity damn straight are you are we better on equality yes but are we better ony values morals uh spiritual sense i don't think so three four lot worse off bira people saying durban eighteen school shootings just this year since january one there are people saying three hundred since columbine the truth is there but 25 and it's disgusting there should have been one the should have been the columbine but stopped falling for for for the the rancour for the arguments for the latenight talk show host fading like they care as they're being protected by armed guards don't do that what we need to do is yes put our prayers together collectively and through that let's really hash this thing out let's really figure out what's going to work let's really figure out where we are as a society and what were willing to do to stop a piece of garbage devil on earth to stop evil from taking office of lives what are we willing to do one eight hundred three eight three nine 64 joe pegues dot com we come back carry will have a full wrap.

bob sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on WRVA

"You in the game for over sixty years grit position and being continuous which i'll stop he said aquatic support the i worked with towards the these flashes of no rumford what grew at boy's head resort in charlottesville an official gay watching location for virginia lettuce if you can't make it to the arena where the next best place to be here's the voice of the cavaliers gained claim good evening everbody welcome once again near the bird what girl at bores ed resort another great show free here deny great crowd on how i wasn't sure deny with the weather conditions whether folks with braved the conditions but man i'll tell you something about taken down the tar heels that seems to bring out everybody's energy at excitement and not surprisingly we've got a pretty full house here this evening glad to have our one was i am your host dave canaan unhappy be joined by the head coach of the now third grace cavaliers coach tony bennett coach team shows the coldest week of the year to get hot all right hey any time right but i mean look i know it's iin oh it's january of basketball to be played but there has to be some level of fulfillment that comes with starting the year out of the rank you're not in the rankings and now you find yourself all the way into the top five at number three i know you don't love rankings i know you don't look at me like that but accomplish some things you don't just get there by accident all about an hour and a half ago my nextdoorneighbor ron we'll i'll give them some credit he knocked on my door and i told this to pat hogan open it up and he has had a of box with a cake and i could i thought it was a cake he said go ahead open it up so open up a cake and it says on the cake delicious by the way it says number three ranking and then underneath that says rat poison you don't coach sabin said about all the the stuff that on that divide your mind or unnecessary but now the guys played well for sure and.

official cavaliers dave canaan basketball ron sabin charlottesville virginia tony bennett pat hogan sixty years
"sixty years" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"sixty years" Discussed on WJR 760

"Com and ticketmastercom bob dylan and his band at the fox theater tonight there was a time that would have been overflowing as a sell out but not now zero maybe if they have closed captioning they'll get more people to come see i'm just thinking i thought that was drummer worthy but be that as it may as i mentioned uh we have sixty years ago today they opened and the mighty mac the mac and all bridge celebrating its sixty th anniversary and they're an old colleague from my television days into toledo where i did iam magazine them mornings with paul w a alive daily morning television show one of the guy's a sign to the program was marked howell and i'm very happy and proud of mark who went on to do a series on building the mighty mac and i went online to find it it's still there in fact building the mighty mac and awardwinning documentary about the mac and all bridge the it says here the program was produced in hollywood by mark how will in includes extremely rude rare sixteen millimeter color footage showing all stages of the bridges construction it's a dvd for twenty two 99 and it's still available building the mighty mack mark owl online good for you mark that was a long time ago we work together and toledo on television and there's laps war going on and the we'll look cover it all you'll covered all as you do so nicely richard as best we can yalta the latest a story is and we're going to get more information about this guy this slug this this ccri this coward who drove his truck on the bike path running into many people and the a bus filled i guess at school bus he's a former uga driver did you hear that one yell yep oh yeah yeah among other things he appears to have been as i have put a drifter when from state to state law various tickets for things but no felony crimes except for this now new york state has the death penalty on the books they just don't use nato use it and that i can't see them using it now though they should seven.

fox theater toledo howell mark hollywood state law bob dylan iam magazine yalta uga new york nato sixty years