35 Burst results for "Sixty Year"

You Are In Control of Your Happiness

The Daily Boost

05:31 min | Last week

You Are In Control of Your Happiness

"So as usual, we will start at a Monday. Even, though it's a holiday weekend here. Gives you even more time to do it do your homework have you done your homework? You sit down and check where your life is I. Tell You I work with a lot of people every single week, a lot of personal coaching clients. And those who sit down and pay attention to how their life is going not just once a week but every day. Really. It goes the direction they wanted to easier. Yeah. Actually it doesn't feel that way the beginning but things flow better when you check in, you make sure Hey, am I taking actions that are GonNa lead me in the direction that I want to go or not? Am I pay attention to the roles in my life throws at a really WANNA fulfill. Am I happy or am I not happy or the things I want to keep your things I want to get rid of? When you take the time to ask those questions. Things Change. Get my perfect week planner at perfect planner dot com download. The PDF watched the short video. It's about twelve minutes. It'll explain to you how to first and foremost. Take control of your time and in that time that we're going to create. You can take control of anything. Go get it. Okay. So you don't already have a lot of people already do they're already using it but just in case So all your happiness. Are you a happy person I personally believe. That we are on this planet to do lots of things but I think the personal quest almost all of us have. Is, to, be, happy. Not Not, just kind of you know sort of not though diet I also not rollercoaster happy either you know now that. But to be happy with the way things are going I. think that's our quest. It's a long life if you're lucky. So I guess it's a double quest. It's to be happy and keep going right. That's a long thing to do if we live eight or nine years of reluctant to do that. But are you in control of your happiness? What would I say if what would you say if I were to tell you? That you're in control. And doesn't have anything with your mindset. Where does Scott everybody says all you mindset got to get your head right checkup from the neck up right attitude ticket. I don't know. It's kind of hard to think yourself happiness. Have you noticed? Never works that way for me just maybe for a minute I'm going to be happy I just could be I know I can decide to be that way, but does it stick now until? It doesn't just doesn't. So. How do we get there? Well. Let's put the facts on the wall I if you're less eighteen years old. That's right this on the wall. You're probably happy. About the time you turn eighteen it Kinda goes down. It's the you right very happy in the beginning. Real life hits. He goes down. And between thirty years old and sixty years old. You're kind of like down in the happiness thing forty seven by the way his about when it begins to turn most people by the time they get to sixty pretty happy in between we go down that Darren rollercoaster you talked about. So it's okay to some degree. It's Illinois okay it's not. We want to be happy right just to get there I want to be happy I wanna be on the rollercoaster you. So how do we get off the door rollercoaster? How do you stay? Happy Turns out. Three. Things help. If you'RE GONNA ask me Scott, what makes you happy and I will usually answer I. I need to be growing. I need know there's I can explore whatever possibility I want. Basically I need to be moving forward and growing when I'm not growing I. AM unhappy. I'm grumpy. I really am. So I constantly keep myself a mode of growing. I. WanNa. Be a control too. So the number one thing that people need to feel happy is feeling in control. When you feel like you have a grasp on what's happening in your world and boy has it been tough this year So you grasp even a small party world. But when you feel like you're in control, you'll be happier. So, how do get their? Education. A college degree does wonders for people but you know you can teach yourself to you can self educate way beyond what you could ever learn in college? And guess what the more you educate yourself. The happier going to be. You see this all the time. So you want control. So getting controls is GonNa make you happy. But one of the ways you get that control is to educate yourself. How did you get yourself? It could be anything. Some people do hobbies they learned lot about fishing. I don't do that hobby nothing about fishing. My Line has not been wet for a very long time. I liked learning about aviation et makes me happy. And other things as well. Education, really the key. So it doesn't that before they will have to go back to school things like that, but you could learn learn learn. Learning expands you it creates mastery which enjoy feel happier. A job. sky don't want a job. What is this thing about Americans don't WanNa work it hit hardest working people on the planet that's not to put anybody else elsewhere the pining down. Americans regard guard they do with the truth is this dream I just don't WanNa work. Yeah. I'll tell you what if you had all the money in the world and you didn't have to work us about six months and you'd get busy some you would get bored you need to stay busy right your job. Whether it's a time job or it's a part time job even if you don't particularly like your boss. Your job gives you purpose every single day even owning your own business, which is not always easy thing to do. It gives you purpose every single day when you have a full-time job a part time job, but you own your own business when you make your income. You're happier person. Don't believe me. Maybe you don't have a job right now how do you feel? Need to educate yourself finds something you do find a way to earn some money. Put yourself back in control, but it's not a mindset. Is it probably the biggest part of the mindset here is getting you to believe that this will happen automatically if you put yourself in that action mode.

Scott Illinois Darren
A Conversation About The Postal Service

They Call Us Bruce

07:04 min | 2 weeks ago

A Conversation About The Postal Service

"Low. Welcome. To another edition of call us, Bruce unfiltered conversation about what's happening in Asia America. I'm Phil You and Jeff Yang and this week on the podcast we have been thinking and talking about doing something for a while and our wishes are finally coming true as if delivered to us. Our. I'm sorry we've come. A Dad jokes attention but we we've been talking a lot about the postal service, not just amongst ourselves but in society right I mean the relevance of the US mail to our society internal democracy has been more prominent now more than the headlines now than ever before, and one of the things that we recognized is that the postal service actually plays a really critical role even. Specifically in our communities and there are. There are a lot of Asian Americans who work at the Post Office The post office connects us are far-flung relatives and friends, and in general we just thought it was time to give a little shine to this institution that. Is taking a few bumps, these days, and so we actually found. A postal. Service employees who was. Happy to talk to us about this profession and about the stories and. The world behind the scenes at the post. Office. As, well, as other things going on his life as well. So we love to welcome to they call us Bruce Kevin Again UN. He is a musician and multimedia. A graphic designer, a fan of A. Pretty Amazing Music. I can tell social platforms and also a employee of the PS Kevin Welcome to the show. Hi. Welcome guys. Ola. So Kevin you're in Oakland right. Yeah. I wouldn't opened. And did you reborn in scripture? I was actually born in southern California and. Always, knew that I would end up in the bay area. So sometime around two thousand and two, thousand five moved up here. And I found myself. Here. To sort of blend in. Oh Yeah Oh. Yeah. And and you say you're from southern California originally like a like Los Angeles or or. Montebello okay. And now A. End, up actually working for the postal service. Honestly. I was laid off in rather time the pandemic. was. Gaining momentum. and. I was desperately looking for work and I I had heard this echoing my head, my mom's voice. You know like you should go work work at the post office like your uncles grandfather. Finally listen to the voice. And Sure Enough I. went onto the USPS site. And, saw their openings locally and swint for and they ask for references. Internal references and. Plugged in some family members names, and I was pretty much and within twenty four hours. In the family. It's a family business. It really is. Yeah. How many of your other family members worked for the postal service that are alive to? But. But it's it's been like kind of multigenerational thing or it has absolutely. Is there. Is there something about the post office or the Postal Service that has been? particularly. Peeling I'm guessing in some ways it's because it's eighth always there be. It. You know like they're always jobs in the postal. I. I just Kinda remember Hollywood shuffle under if you've seen that movie Robert Townsend movie. where? Kind of what you're saying is one of the themes in the movie that. His family's like A. Get A job. The Postal Service it's it's you know it's it's a secure job. You know it's comfortable. It's something which you can rely on and Robert Townsend characters like I wanna be a star in Hollywood but you know as a black actor in Hollywood. You gotta deal with a whole lot of bullshit and movies about the bullshit and. Kind of like you know no spoilers or yes boilers. Movement. You haven't seen it. You should see it but. In the end in the end, actually the post service ends up being a where he lands and and you know he's it's sort of like a celebration affected like you can still do when you dream of but other things can also be part of that dream and anyway I'm kind of curious if if that's kind of the story of how how like your uncles and other folks in working for the post office to. For my grandfather. I believe he went in right after he was discharged from the military e- so he. He had served in the Cold War came back They relocated to Daly City from Dallas. and. I think he that's it hired pretty much on the spot. And it's still the case to this day So he he was there until I moved up here. And two, hundred five. I remember him getting village. One Am and coming home. And afternoon. He. Yeah it's interesting my Uncle Sam deal with him in Minneapolis. He got out of the Air Force and became a carrier pretty much immediately. And my uncle Kennedy in. Hawaii. I think he started in Minneapolis, but then transferred to Hawaii, which is apparently. The most requested transfer. Why And he's been a mechanic for. Sixty years. He's he's been there for a long time I. Think he's been here the longest. Everyone fixing like postal trucks, postal trucks, the machinery he's he's really handy guy i. mean he used to build birdhouses? Similar skills I guess.

Postal Service Bruce Kevin Robert Townsend Phil You California United States Kennedy Minneapolis Asia America Jeff Yang Usps Hawaii A. End Oakland Hollywood Los Angeles Montebello Air Force Daly City
Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

Jewish History Matters

05:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Black Power and Jewish Politics with Marc Dollinger

"So highmark. Welcome to the PODCAST. Great to be here. Thank you. Yeah. I'm really glad that you can join us for I. Think Really Important and relevant conversation. I read through the book I think it's a fantastic book. I think that you're offering a revision of some of the ways in terms of how people have understood. Especially, Jewish people have understood the question of the history of black Jewish relations. You maybe WANNA get US started off by saying a brief word about your argument in the book and what it is that you're putting forward. Yes, sure when I was growing up as a white suburban Jewish kitten in in La I learned that the civil rights movement was the story of a black Jewish alliance that brought heroic Jews to the south where they fought on behalf of racial justice until the mid nineteen sixties. The. Rise of black militancy of. Black Power of anti-semitism. Community purge Jews and ended what was a wonderful alliance. When I looked in the archives though and began researching the book. I discovered an entirely different story emerging instead of sort of the Dr King Rabbi Hessel arm in arm narrative that I was raised on. I. Found that even White Male Jewish leaders of National Jewish organizations understood as early as the nineteen fifties. There was a fundamental difference between being white and Jewish in America and being black? In. America. And they in fact, knew that there would be limits to the black Jewish alliance and That was my first sort of shocking discovery in terms of revising I knew growing up. It's a really jarring perspective for a lot of people Jewish people I want to say who grow up thinking about and being taught about this alliance within the civil rights movement and the involvement of Jews within the civil rights movement. So I think that what you're offering here is a almost radical perspective, a radical revision of how we understand the role of the Jews in the civil rights movement. I'd like to frame it s a both and and it's really important I to acknowledge the extraordinary American Jewish participation in the civil rights movement and in social justice causes. When you look at the ethnic groups in America, Jews are the most liberal. Progressive. Democratic. Party. Now Voting Group only African Americans vote more. And by that standard I think there's justifiable pride amongst American Jews for the work that we have done and those perspectives have been covered in the historic. Already. What's also true is even as many heroic. Jews. Did go to the south to register voters and in some tragic cases, of course, gave their lives most Americans use didn't. And there became almost sort of in the north, a sense that watching on TV, what the Jewish heroes were doing extended to them as well. So what my book is trying to do is take a broader more inclusive look of all Americans, or at least white American Jews, and now we get to see more complexity to what's going on. So I don't see this as as undermining. The existing truth about Jewish involvement but I see it hopefully deepening it and making it more complex. Why do you think that it's important to offer this complexity to the narrative of first of all? It's surprising in and of itself there's something that custodians recall historical memory, which is what actually happened and what we remember or think happened what we were taught happened is often different. In fact, there's a history of historical memory which says the way in which we choose to remember or forget or analyze or spin. If you want to be more cynical, our historical past actually is meaningful in and of itself. So what I found, when I was surprised to find was that as early as the nineteen fifties, Jewish leaders were calling out the limits of white Jewish liberalism and the inevitability of of African American autonomy and what would become the rise of black power. So at the very time that the public narrative was consensus arm in arm. But I love the called peace love and Bobby. Sherman. Everything's great. At that moment, even the Jewish leaders who were engaged in that kind of consensus politics understood its limits. That's the part that we've forgotten. I think over the last fifty or sixty years and I think it's really important especially in today's climate for us to understand better that it was always deep and complicated an intense and we knew about it at the time. And then the real story is how in journalism and historiographer and in public memory, we sort of forgotten that element until we've remembered it again with the national reckoning on race

Dr King Rabbi Hessel La I America Bobby Sherman
2 storms pose possible double threat to US Gulf Coast

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

2 storms pose possible double threat to US Gulf Coast

"And almost never seen double shot of tropical weather could be in the offing for the Gulf coast the computer models are all over the place one storm Laura is on a path through Porter Rico over or near the Dominican Republic and Haiti and Cuba by Sunday if it survives all that then possibly South Florida into the Gulf toward the panhandle in the western Gulf there's a depression that could become tropical storm Marco national hurricane center specialist Richard passes once it crosses the you could tan he could move somewhere toward the central northwest Gulf of Mexico coast is a little too early to be specific about that we do think it'll strengthen to hurricane the last time two tropical storms were in the Gulf was more than sixty years ago there are no records showing two hurricanes in the Gulf at the same time I'm Jim acquire

Laura Porter Rico Dominican Republic South Florida Gulf Depression Richard Haiti Cuba Mexico
Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | Last month

Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

"WanNa. Start today's than by explaining why businesses consider offering lifetime deals. The bottom line is, is that lifetime he is often generate a large lump sum of revenue of cash. It's a cash grab really they might partner with a deal signed with large affiliates or they offer it to their list, and because such an incredible deal, it's a lifetime deal. They'll get lots of sales at the start people see this as a way. To Fund, their business at the star. So that's kind of the motivation behind lifetime deals outside of that. It also gives you new users, new customers, people to give you feedback the star and people that are invested. That's really the positives and and there's not really much outside of that. That's positive. Just being frank but for many people, that's a lot. You know making a lot of money at the start to fund the business. Can, really help them and really propel the business to avaiable full-time option for them and allow them to make some hires and scale quickly the issue is that most products and services have a running cost. So even if you say for example, sell a lifetime deal for a thousand dollars per customer yes. You'll earn a thousand dollars, but each customer will have a cost for each subsequent year to come. Agree. Thirty forty, fifty, sixty years for long as that person is alive right and some of us don't really do the math and that leads me to my I tip. You got to do the math. How much does it cost you per customer per year and a lot of people are like well, I sell my product it's course it's a forum it's something that really has a minimal cost on my end. And that's pretty much it. No you gotta dig deeper. You have cost Phantom costs that you're not counting like how much it cost you per customer for your web hosting to host your community to host your APP how much that cost on a monthly basis divided by the number of customers is cost more per customer. It's not a once in done kind of thing, the more traffic you have the more you have to pay what about customer support the more customers you have the more support staff you need the more time take from them you need. To factor that in, are there any other costs whether it's your time or money that's involved every time you have a customer, break it down because you might find out yes. This might be a very small amount per customer in it's worth to offer the lifetime deal but often more times than not when we do the math, you're like, wow, we start to break-even after five years and after five years we're losing money. Then after ten years, we're really losing money. So this really is a red flag that you can raise before you offer a lifetime deal. My next tip is you have to make sure that if you're going to offer a lifetime deal, you don't offer a deal or a plan or a product that they will not outgrow. The play of the lifetime deal is to give them something that is valuable, but is just to get them started. The point here is that get them onto your platform onto your product. And therefore get used to it. Love it enjoy it. But at some point, they're going to outgrow whether they need more contacts in your APP or the want to get access to more training. Basically, we're talking about here is you want to offer them the basic of basic plans. It's still valuable. It's still something that you would charge a monthly or annual basis for normally but. You, WanNa push them towards upgrading anytime. You're running a lifetime plan you should aim for seventy percent of the people that by will upgrade out of the lifetime plan. So lifetime is something that's basically temporary this takes a bit planning the six a bit of a branding and package INC when it comes to offering this lifetime deal so don't rush into a lifetime deal if. You're not ready. Make sure you're crafting the right one. So you know that people will be graduating to different plants off the lifetime. The third thing I want to mention is often in my experience lifetime customers in general, not all of them of course, but in general will tend to be difficult customers to deal with what you mean by that well, people that don't invest much. Will actually cost you more time and more headaches people that actually pay you a lot of money. They do the work that get the most out of it and they're professional they get it. They understand the onus is on them to make it happen. But those who pay the minimum and Gopher lifetime deals people that maybe don't really take action but they will complain about every little thing if they have the opportunity of course, I'm speaking in. Generalities of course, there are lifetime deal customers that are hard working that are serious about their business and they are great and they're not headaches. But if we're talking about a percentage or a majority of the users, higher paying customers are lower maintenance customers that's just the facts of business. So I want to give you some direct advice. If you do the math, you have a graduation plan a plan to get them to upgrade out a lifetime. And everything pans out and it's very, very minimal cost on you. Even if you stretch out of twenty thirty years of this customer being active, then go for the lifetime plan if not avoided if you can even if it means growing slower if you're still looking for that cash grab, my advice is limit the number of lifetime members whether it's one hundred or two hundred people Max and then you. Close it. This will create scarcity and it will also allow you to say, Hey, this is the amount of money I will get from this lifetime offer I can work with us the influx of cash I need, and from there you're only dealing with a minimal number of customers that are dealing with the lifetime planet you have to pay for for the longevity of your business in for their

Partner Frank Gopher Package Inc
Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

The Bio Report

04:27 min | Last month

Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

"Marco, thanks for joining us. All my pleasure, then a four inviting me. We're GONNA talk about drug resistant Fungal Infections Sign Nexus and your efforts to develop Antifungal to treat these infections. Maybe, we can start with how big a problem resistant. Fungal. Infections. Today. It's a growing problem and simply because Antifungal. A unforgotten being to use many decades ago, and that are very few of them. Only free classes. One, the pollyannas introduce sixty years ago. That's all introduce four years ago, and Makino candidates introduced twenty if ago, and of course, we've all this time. Fungi had an opportunity to develop the fastest against these free classes. This is why we are developing a new class in order to overcome the growing problem of these. Phone. Calls. How threatening are these infections? Well the type section that we're treating. Difficult to treat an invasive fungal infections invasive from getting fashion. Infections meaning infection bloodstream of internal organs. Usually, they happen in patients water immortal compromised. So cancer patients with a undergoing chemotherapy or. Transplanted patients, solid organ transplant, bone marrow, transplant patients, and these patients. They don't have the emotional defense five vs infection. So using fictions. They are very aggressive. They can spread inside the body of the patients in mortality of visiting factions can be still. Now, we've a best treatment between twenty to fifty percent Wayne thirty to fifty percent, go extremely high mortality. You have, infections. Are Not internal like, for example, Mucosal infections of his office of the mouth of China. That, that can be very, very difficult to treat and these are we all the type of infection invasive and dilemma Khoza that we are trying to treat. Now we've our compound. We hear a lot about antibiotic resistance and the causes of that. Why are we having this problem with Resistant Fungal Infections? Very good, question Danny. Video. Not The resistance to antibacterial as being on the wrong line is because bacteria. Very. Quick in developing resistance and reason is because they are very promiscuous. Based chain the. Not Charlie between the same species, but also between different species of bacteria and very for development over resistant to antibacterial usually develops very quickly after a few years of being actual product on the market. I'm fungal. Infections and. July. Up the development is extensive slower. It may take ten fifteen years before the be significant amount of. Become, resistant, and these. These why? Now, we start to see the problem becoming bigger and bigger. When you start to see classes a been introduced point, you're forty years ago or even longer. And reason of the focus romantic materials is because They develop resistance. Very, quickly. And in very visas being before course over the last. Probably fifteen point years. But he's not Antifungal. 's is becoming a major issue and you have new species amounting like a candidate horace of. Be Shown to be more drag resistance with high mortality, very difficult to control infections.

Infections Marco Makino Charlie China Wayne Danny
Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

The Bio Report

04:33 min | Last month

Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

"Marco, thanks for joining us. All my pleasure, then a four inviting me. We're GONNA talk about drug resistant Fungal Infections Sign Nexus and your efforts to develop Antifungal to treat these infections. Maybe, we can start with how big a problem resistant. Fungal. Infections. Today. It's a growing problem and simply because Antifungal. A unforgotten being to use many decades ago, and that are very few of them. Only free classes. One, the pollyannas introduce sixty years ago. That's all introduce four years ago, and Makino candidates introduced twenty if ago, and of course, we've all this time. Fungi had an opportunity to develop the fastest against these free classes. This is why we are developing a new class in order to overcome the growing problem of these. Phone. Calls. How threatening are these infections? Well the type section that we're treating. Difficult to treat an invasive fungal infections invasive from getting fashion. Infections meaning infection bloodstream of internal organs. Usually, they happen in patients water immortal compromised. So cancer patients with a undergoing chemotherapy or. Transplanted patients, solid organ transplant, bone marrow, transplant patients, and these patients. They don't have the emotional defense five vs infection. So using fictions. They are very aggressive. They can spread inside the body of the patients in mortality of visiting factions can be still. Now, we've a best treatment between twenty to fifty percent Wayne thirty to fifty percent, go extremely high mortality. You have, infections. Are Not internal like, for example, Mucosal infections of his office of the mouth of China. That, that can be very, very difficult to treat and these are we all the type of infection invasive and dilemma Khoza that we are trying to treat. Now we've our compound. We hear a lot about antibiotic resistance and the causes of that. Why are we having this problem with Resistant Fungal Infections? Very good, question Danny. Video. Not The resistance to antibacterial as being on the wrong line is because bacteria. Very. Quick in developing resistance and reason is because they are very promiscuous. Based chain the. Not Charlie between the same species, but also between different species of bacteria and very for development over resistant to antibacterial usually develops very quickly after a few years of being actual product on the market. I'm fungal. Infections and. July. Up the development is extensive slower. It may take ten fifteen years before the be significant amount of. Become, resistant, and these. These why? Now, we start to see the problem becoming bigger and bigger. When you start to see classes a been introduced point, you're forty years ago or even longer. And reason of the focus romantic materials is because They develop resistance. Very, quickly. And in very visas being before course over the last. Probably fifteen point years. But he's not Antifungal. 's is becoming a major issue and you have new species amounting like a candidate horace of. Be Shown to be more drag resistance with high mortality, very difficult to control infections. Given the.

Infections Marco Makino Charlie China Wayne Danny
Wim Stocks: Covid-19 is an opportunity for esports to go mainstream

BIG Esports Podcast

04:18 min | Last month

Wim Stocks: Covid-19 is an opportunity for esports to go mainstream

"Those people who've. been listening to some of the content for period of time, when of ours was still fresh, we had women wheels headband Pfefferman I'm Canada from UK, capital and Mckay sports on board to work about a bit of coronavirus, economic response and things like that and one of the main things. He said women's right now you'll find his blowing up twenty four seven with presidents of basically every single media netware Colin you asking for content, a be interested in Konic kicking off the conversation with that e e, still getting these mainstream organizations looking for a splits programming way we are, and just had a sort of a conversation yesterday, which with a bunch of sports networks. At are represented under an umbrella of a media company, and and all still to this day all baseball comes back Major League baseball tonight in the United States. So that's a good thing. more normalcy, CPJ seeing some some driving events some some of those coming back, but still east or is the is the predominance or these days, and and it's yes, it's on twitch, Time Youtube, and and showing up on facebook gaming in elsewhere, but but now the these these I think what what has happened in the past pandemic is, that is traditional. Broadcasters potential traditional networks now Allie, the stand what he's is, and no, it's. It's a replacement for sports. that as I mentioned I think last time Jesus Alabama's back in the bottle, but also they're. They're now really sort of waking up the fact that man. We need younger audiences here we are is fifty year old. baseball demographic isn't going to is isn't going to. Be around forever. The sixty year old PGA demographics tackled mirror off forever, so so they're all waking up the fact that this is the way to communicate with an affiliate with much more youthful audience. Lousy Jesse's, and it's it's now. It's home to roost. These guys get it. They get managed, and they've got now got to figure out how to be gall whether or not. It can be involved is another Matt as another matter entirely I think he's four. doesn't need traditional media as much as traditional media needs. These sports but. You know this is their livelihood. This is what they do. They not Ino- broadcast. They know entertainment. They know how to do engage millions of people, and and with with the right formula with right approach. They have ever shot at this, but but thus far as we all know. This is all playing onstream in online and not -sarily other. You know we were just reflecting yesterday in this conversation about Turner. Journal riots early Turner had it right early with their first league in for car strike, and and not only do they have right, but the brands that they brought in to support it. They also had right, and that was that was four years ago. I was a long time ago. And and in the scheme of things yet they made some of their forays into in a broadcast use for in in bringing predictability around the broadcast that that's still Jack. Jamie stands up is one of the other great moments in in. In sort of democratization of of sports so so. I think I I don't think it's over for traditional media, I think. There's plenty of opportunity especially, as as now more organization comes to sports. It is getting more predictable. There are more path as two point eight to point B., or for players for events for mountain and the notion of broadcasts. Predictable broadcast is scheduled broadcasts that we all we all know. You know even if you're not. Austrailia I think you're pretty much. Know that NFL owned Sundays. At. One PM Eastern time and four PM time at eight eight thirty eastern time on Sunday. That's a sport doesn't have it, so I do think this is. Predictability. What what scheduling and programming can do for his or these? These big networks that are more traditionally focused I think they have. Do they replacing in this

Baseball Turner Jamie Mckay Matt Konic Facebook Allie Youtube Major League Canada CPJ United States Colin Jesus Alabama INO UK Austrailia
Losing Someone You Love

Mentally Yours

04:42 min | 2 months ago

Losing Someone You Love

"Everyone and welcome to Liles, Metro, cutty case mental health cost. And today on chatting to you andy, Langford of cruse bereavement care I'm going to be finding out from him. What charity does and also how we can all support? People who've lost loved ones during these difficult times. Chris has been around for sixty years S on. We suppose anymore. He's been bereaved and in the. That's historically been through provided an Walsall. Suppose Oh. Group support on face suffice face. Usually defined as a type of bereavement counselor. Both sadness over the last few years. We've been expanding all services to include lots of supporter. Of light shoots the A. Global pandemic. We've massively stepped on off helpline. She's offset response savage to people who need support that. We do a lot more on the on the web now and also on social media. Only also over the past few years, really dot mystified, so he did not small. Epilogue is around Pan Group support why people may with each? And facilitate supposedly I don't. On the seventies, wow Soviet Paul ships rounds people? Going for walks so doing creative things together. Which can certainly come? To speak with each other. There's lots of things that we do. To to help people and also to help people help each. It sounds pretty. Can you tell me a little bit more about the way that you've adopted during the pandemic in terms of the support you doing? Zoom meetings support, or is it that the phone line wants to the things that you will focused on? Yeah, absolutely I mean what we'd have. To and from all. Clients cruise is the at people tend to be different things at different times in the berets, but also each bereavement people experience as as so experiencing a different light so there there are different challenges different problems whatever even copes Lewis on. What we told this we shifted. Off Face to face. Remote remote suppose the majority of it is von telephone, and as a say, so his bond to help line, but also we provide ongoing support will. Provide decisive face. We now provide side, and we provide so what they suppo- by zoo, but a lot of all kinds continue to cited comfortable, speaking on the side and actually try to. The global, pump, Daddy, we will find out more and more people will save. They provides interactive aside because it gave the a sense at security and safety in that they could be as I'm transparency needed. Today is a felt comfortable. But Will Announce a little bit more than nobleness said was some value without the people, said the soul. Then finally they would transfer in that type. Anyway. Yeah I'd love if you could tell us a bit more about the helpline. What it's cooled sensitive when it runs in also what people can expect when the coalition as well. Yeah absolutely. Chris Pump Davick outline, and as it is, around, also rams weekdays. Three and that's three from nine thirty in the morning straits find the cheese night. Wednesdays incised is we started to call? On Saturdays and Sundays world so from ten am so to. On when you found out what you would do is, you would be able to speak with. A very volunteer, and that someone is fully trained at an experienced at taking those calls for people. If experienced bereavements an that can be any type of agreements it can be one is a GT band directly through covid nineteen. All, it can pay a brief of the amount of experienced over of years ago, but actually the the type of its heavy into out with every day around around how dynamic assault triggered those and difficult emotions difficult salt. Processes the municipal how to Cope Islands, so you can speak about those things as well.

Chris Pump Langford Liles Walsall Pan Group Cope Islands Andy Assault Lewis Nobleness
Around 20K fans attend All-Star race at Bristol

the NewsWorthy

00:31 sec | 2 months ago

Around 20K fans attend All-Star race at Bristol

"Thousands of fans turned out for a Nascar race in Tennessee last night. They AP reports. This was likely the biggest sporting event crowd in the US. Since early March at least twenty thousand people showed up for the All star race at Bristol Motor speedway there was social distancing though fans were spread out across the stands, and they did have plenty of room. The speedway can hold about one hundred sixty thousand people, but ticket sales for last night's event were capped at just one fifth of that, so while it was the largest major sporting event crowd and months it likely the smallest turn out in the race tracks nearly sixty year history.

Bristol Motor Nascar Tennessee United States
Where Did the Phrase 'Grandfathered In' Come From?

BrainStuff

03:21 min | 2 months ago

Where Did the Phrase 'Grandfathered In' Come From?

"Across the globe, language and history are inevitably intertwined. Linguistic origins are borrowed and transformed and a society changes, new words or phrases are created to reflect the current cultural understanding some phrases and words simply morph into accepted usage their origins, forgotten or conveniently misplaced one such phrase grandfathered in has become common shorthand to mean that someone is exempt from following new rules or regulations, although it may evoke the image of a gray haired gentlemen, let off the hook because of his age. The term rose from something far less innocent. A deeper look into the first use of the phrase reveals the political racial climate in the United States during the late. Late Nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a personal business is considered to be grandfathered in when they're exempt from new rules and can continue to operate under the existing set of regulations. New Rules will then only apply to future cases today the term is widely used across various sectors most notably in real estate and health insurance. But when the term was first coined in eighteen nineties, it referred to only one thing voting rights. After the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified the US Constitution in seventy, thus banning the infringement on citizens right to vote on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude, some southern states did not readily accept the ruling. Instead they carefully crafted amendments on the state level that circumvented the federal decree in an attempt to prevent black Americans from using party stations since the basis of race could no longer be used the state amendments imposed things like poll, taxes and literacy tests, these limits were powerful close to thirty percent of all voting age. Men were literate, a majority of whom were poor black men. But those taxes and tests would also affect poor illiterate white voters, thus a grandfather clause was added to allow an illiterate man to vote as long as he or his lineal ancestor that is his grandfather had been a registered voter before eighteen, sixty seven, which was three years before the passage of the fifteenth amendment. The clauses suppressed the vote along racial lines, but party lines were at play to at the time. Most Black Americans were Republicans. The Party of Abraham Lincoln, which then favourite expensive government, funded programs and most whites for Democrats. The Democratic Party then favored curbing expansion of government power. Suppressing, the vote served to keep power in the hands of the Democrats, the Party's wound up switching their big government versus small government ideologies of next sixty years, or so leading to the stances. We see today, but that's a different episode. In Nineteen Fifteen, the state amendments and clauses were ruled nationally unconstitutional, but the poll taxes weren't eliminated nationally until the adoption of the twenty fourth amendment in nineteen, sixty four, and on the state level in nineteen, sixty six with the Supreme Court's decision in Harper versus the Virginia Board of elections. That decades of continued voter suppression the phrase grandfathered in is used today without the connotation of disenfranchisement, but even as culture shifts whether we're aware of it or not. Language pulled the power of our history, positive and negative.

Democratic Party United States Supreme Court Virginia Board Of Elections Abraham Lincoln Harper
Leaving the World Health Organization

Second Opinion

03:41 min | 2 months ago

Leaving the World Health Organization

"This is Dr Michael Wilks with. The pinion over the past few years. Our President has made some incredibly ill informed policy decisions even in the face of clear evidence to the contrary, these decisions have negatively impacted people's lives through policies around covid climate change, immigration health care women's rights, lgbt rights education, and of course, our relationship with foreign countries, but the president's recent decision to leave the sixty year. Old World Health Organization is among the very most irresponsible decision will. Will hurt the US every bit as much as it will hurt the rest of the world the W. H.. O. Is not a perfect organization. It is plagued by politics and infighting and a low budget, but it's still serves a super important function. The whol plays a key role in many decisions that directly or indirectly affect our lives more than ever before our global interconnected world create great risks particularly with regard to the spreading. Spreading of diseases, it is the WHO that is. Our First Line of defense the WHO. I alerted the world to the infection that came to be called covid in early January, and it advised healthcare workers how to protect themselves from the spread. Perhaps it could have been more aggressive with its policies, but if there is a problem, conduct an audit help improve the organization. Don't be a baby and take your toys and walk away. Away and it's not just covid were who plays a vital role. It coordinates the global response to diseases like polio Ebola Malaria HIV TB and yellow fever. The near nation of diseases like polio has saved the US tens of billions of dollars in treatment costs, and the WHO isn't the only Health Organization the US refuses to work with as the US decided to focus inwardly. We have already stopped funding the pan. American Health Organization. Pan. America is the area that is currently home to half of the top ten countries with co Vid. Now aside from helping ourselves, we also have a social responsibility to help resource poor countries by helping to provide education laboratory training tools like p. p. e. and clinical trials drugs to treat emerging and reemerging diseases. When we step back from these responsibilities, China steps in, and they're now in our backyard, working with countries that will old them a big favor. The WHO also directly benefits the US for example each year influenza virus mutates resulting in new variants around the world. It is the W. H. O. that leads the. The flu vaccine development process each year which includes several American researchers and organizations like our FDA and CDC. The US depends on data from the WHO to predict which strain of the flu will spread to the US so that we can make ineffective vaccination in the end the total US funding for the WHO is equivalent to the overhead of about one ass hospital about three hundred seventy million dollars. It would be very hard to get better value for that

United States World Health Organization WHO Covid Dr Michael Wilks President Trump American Health Organization Flu Vaccine Polio Health Organization Malaria FDA W. H. O. America CDC China TB
Bone Fragments in Mexico Identified as Belonging to One of 43 Missing Students

Democracy Now! Audio

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Bone Fragments in Mexico Identified as Belonging to One of 43 Missing Students

"Mexico. There's a major development in the case of the forty three IOT. Students who were kidnapped and disappeared nearly sixty years ago in the town of Gwala Gato. A bone fragment found in the nearby town of Kula. Kula has been determined to be from one of the students twenty one year old, Christian offense, Rodriguez to lumbering, the Mexican government, has long claimed the bodies of the students were burnt in disposed of in a garbage dump in Coca Cola or a nearby river, but the bone fragments were found in a different location, casting new doubts about the government's official account of what. To the

Kula Mexican Government Gwala Gato Rodriguez Official
Hospitals Struggle to Contain Covid-19 Spread Inside Their Walls

Daily Coronavirus Update

06:45 min | 2 months ago

Hospitals Struggle to Contain Covid-19 Spread Inside Their Walls

"As the coronavirus continues its spread throughout the country, some hospitals are also struggling to contain the spread inside its walls. Well. It's only a small number of overall cases US medical centers have reported over five thousand cases of patients, catching coronavirus after being admitted there for other conditions, and that number does not include the case of medical staff that have caught the virus at work. Melanie Evans Hospital reporter at the Wall Street. Journal joins us for more on how hospitals try to protect both staff and patients from infection. Thanks for joining US Melanie. Thanks for having me wanted to talk about an interesting facet of this whole corona virus thing and how it plays out in hospitals. Obviously, people are going to hospitals to get the treatment they need. Sometimes they're spending long stays there and the hospital staff. Obviously, has to work with. With them. They have to work with regular patients as well. It can be a very difficult thing and right now. We're seeing that US. Medical centers have reported over five thousand cases of patients that caught cove in nineteen after being admitted to the hospital for other conditions I think that's that was just patients, but there's also a lot of a hospital staffers that are also catching it there from work as well. Melanie a little bit more about, please. Hospitals even outside of a pandemic. Go to some pretty extraordinary lengths to prevent infections from spreading inside the hospital itself. So you've got doctors nurses taking care of patients. Some of them have a contagious disease. You can think of measles you could think of to burke yellow says and so hospitals have all of these various strategies for trying to ensure that contagious patients don't infect hospital workers, and that the disease whatever it may be doesn't spread, and you don't get a outbreak. Hospitals began to try to adapt the way they operate in order to prevent the virus from spreading internally. What we found was that there was a pretty inconsistent approach across hospitals as the pandemic hit the United States, and so as you as you noted, hospitals are starting to report what they consider to be hospital onset cases so patients who've been exposed and contracted or respected to have contracted covid nineteen while inside of the hospital. There isn't good data for exposure of hospital staff. and. It's interesting I mean one of the things that kind of hinders. This is the reporting structure that they use to be certain that an infection occurred in a hospital. You know the federal government doesn't ask them to report everything. It's Somebody's gotta be there for at least two weeks and catch the virus there before the reported has an infection. You got there at the hospital, so there's a possibility of a bunch of other people that could have gotten it before that to expand their one of the hospitals that you. You focused on for your piece was the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago as you were mentioning? Hospitals are trying to prevent the spread of this thing as much as they could, but even still it got through, and by mid June more than two hundred sixty nurses, clerical staff custodians texts had contracted the virus there four staff members died, so even still it's it's just tough to contain all this. The Standard, the threshold for reporting a case of a patient contracting covid nineteen inside the hospital is pretty high. It's also voluntary. So for those reasons, the infectious disease experts we talked to said the number is likely higher, so we've got about five thousand cases since May fourteen that excludes anything that occurred prior to that since May. Fourteenth there have been roughly. Five thousand cases reported voluntarily by hospitals that met as very high threshold, and to your point we looked at one specific hospital that struggled with these protocols for keeping patients and staff separate, and when we interviewed staff and the head of infection control. What we were told was. It is likely that the virus spread internally that they were investigating, but they declined to share with us. The results of their investigation, citing privacy for employees have died Joyce Hacker Bus Leblanc. She's fifty three year old nurse, Juan Martinez and. Room technician who worked on the third floor, Maria Lopez a nurse, who on the third, floor operating unit. And then FLA botanist Edward Starling. He's sixty years old and he died on June seventeenth. You know speaking to what you're saying about. Some of these protocols they isolate infected patients. The buildings are engineered to help reduce the viral spread. A lot of people talk about these negative pressure rooms, which kind of sucked the air out so the virus staying there, but then there's other research that shows that there's been a particles of the virus kind of hallways outside of those rooms, so it's a very difficult thing to. To contain and be clear these numbers that we're talking about these over five thousand cases, these are a very small fraction of the overall number of cases, but you know it's hard to for a lot of people to feel comfortable there. If certain things like these are happening you know, it just complicates everything. contact tracing is difficult in the hospitals especially at the University of Illinois Hospital that we're talking about at one point, there were so many people are getting sick and was the contact tracing their. They continue to work to boost their infection control practices. As we reported this story, we talked to hospitals across the United States over several weeks and the course of that reporting. hustles described the ways enrich their protocols, and their efforts were changing so early in the pandemic testing was limited. There was no requirement that everybody wear a mask. Now taking is more widespread and hospitals have policies that require universal masking patients and staff are being asked to wear masts to help slow the spread of the virus hospitals in the course of the pandemic raced to reengineer their ventilation systems and add negative pressure rooms, so yes, it is sort of involving response by US hospitals in order to try to contain any possible outbreaks. Hopefully as we continue to get through this, the hospitals can learn to manage it as best they

United States University Of Illinois Hospita Melanie Evans Hospital Journal Melanie Reporter Joyce Hacker Bus Leblanc Chicago Burke Maria Lopez Juan Martinez Edward Starling Technician
Sahara dust cloud causes Code Orange Air Quality Alert for Sunday in Atlanta

Money Matters with Wes Moss

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Sahara dust cloud causes Code Orange Air Quality Alert for Sunday in Atlanta

"That code orange air quality alert in place now for Atlanta today due to that big dust cloud making its way here across the state tell to action news meteorologist Brad nets but it does lower the air air quality quality of of some some of of that that dust dust comes comes down down so so for for that that reason reason a a code code orange orange air air quality quality alerts alerts have have been been issued issued and and WSP WSP Jennifer Jennifer Perry Perry says says the the Georgia Georgia department department of of public public health health says says wear a mask a mask will not only help prevent the spread of covert nineteen but it can also protect you from dust from the Saharan dust cloud as it moves over Georgia they say it's especially important to take precautions if you have a chronic lung condition the serin dust makes its way across the Atlantic every year it's more dense this year than it's been in the last fifty or sixty years

Atlanta Jennifer Jennifer Perry Perry Georgia Brad Nets
Kelly Asbury, Director of ‘Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron’ and ‘Shrek 2,’ Dies at 60

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Kelly Asbury, Director of ‘Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron’ and ‘Shrek 2,’ Dies at 60

"Respected animator Oscar nominated director and animator Kelly Asbury has died in an enchanted forest abundant in was at the helm another family favorites like Smurfs the lost village spirit stallion of the Cimarron starting his career Walt Disney's feature animation nineteen eighty three he worked on iconic films Little Mermaid Tim Burton's nightmare before Christmas another's represented says he died after a long battle with cancer Kelly Asbury sixty years

Oscar Director Kelly Asbury Walt Disney Tim Burton
Cracking the Leadership Code with Alain Hunkins

Dose of Leadership

04:42 min | 3 months ago

Cracking the Leadership Code with Alain Hunkins

"Hello, hello, welcome to dose of leadership so happy you're tuning in. Man. What a crazy week! It's been for me I feel like I've been out of touch with those of leadership I've been so busy with family one of my daughters. Unexpectedly, move up to Detroit so to deal with that. Then, I started flying again I actually started flying into. Believe this. Flu Can re second at the beginning of twenty twenty. And then I went on my first trip last week mid June. I'm recording this. On June twenty fifth. was a week ago I went to Inchon. China in Beijing or Inchon South Korea, and in Beijing China and then back to Dallas. Do you believe that? An implant again tomorrow ahead in the Paris of the world seemingly is coming back to normal. But it still feels weird out there I tell you it just does not seem the same. Even when I was in John, it seemed like World War Z. almost there was nobody the airport. Didn't have any passengers on the plane we were picking up. Cargo of all. Things didn't stay the night in China. Because we can't I wouldn't want to. Because of the Cova deal. But it was just weird, but it was good on one hand, but still a stark reminder of of how different things are and. It's a little uneasy and I'll be honest with you. Leadership has been attested and challenged. In the. Early. I really do think this is trying times for everybody but This is a great opportunity for leadership, and hopefully this show Dosa leadership is a great resource for you a free resource for you in your leadership journey. Where authentically we deal with leadership topics, and how all how helping you to become a better leader? That's what it's all about and I know I certainly been tested over the last two weeks. And I'm just like you and it's glad to be back in the saddle and giving you a great episode another great conversation. With Alon Hunkin 's Alana's. Spelled L. A. L., A. N., the French pronunciation, but demand. What a great guest! I really connected with him! We've been trying to get him on the show for quite some time. Even looking back to February and March and and we finally got it done. By about three or four weeks ago when I recorded this conversation and I'm excited to bring this to you this week. He's just a one of the great ones I really. Do. You think so? He's a sought after keynote speaker facilitators coach. He is a leadership expert. He's leadership junkie. It's right in. To the dose of leadership tribe. And he wrote a great book in fact, if I could write a book if I can wake up and morning, said Richard You could write any type of book that want. I think I would write. Like he did and cracking the leadership code. It's really good. It's about three secrets to building strong leaders. And he got. He has a lot of science behind e discovering the brain science behind leading people. He's got a lot of great real life leadership stories in the book and at the end of the day. The book is a practical leadership toolkit to become a better leader. That's what it's all about just like. This show is something that you can put in your arsenal in your tool kit and become a better leader. And I like what he uses to. In the tool kit as you know as with me, I got the four CS Alon has the three CS in to him. It's all about connection, communication and collaboration I love that I absolutely love that. So we deep dive into that in this conversation and we we also what I love about him. He's the first guest that I've had a near that. That references Frederick? And I do that a lot in my keynotes, and so I cannot stand Frederick. Winds Will Taylor and The idea of scientific management theory that came about, and they dusted revolution and I. Still reason why I don't like him is because of the way that he viewed people. He viewed workers as cogs in a machine and He's a mechanical engineer by trade. And he looked at these things, and anyway it Frederick was a Taylor in my opinion has created this. Cultural Rift that still is with us today, even though it's been debunked for the past sixty years that the type of scientific management theory doesn't work in the dynamic environments that we're dealing with today, it works in certain situations, but not overall and the mindset and the concepts that were brought forth from Frederick. Wendell Taylor are still we're dealing with them today in all the organizations particularly large organizations. And leadership is the solution the type of ship we talk about here on those leadership and Alon. Gets a one hundred percent, and so we deep dive into that. You're really gonNA. Enjoy that. My highly encourage you to go get his book. Cracking the leadership code again if I. Could write a book. It would be one like this it's it's that good

Frederick Alon Hunkin China Wendell Taylor Inchon Cs Alon FLU Detroit Richard You Beijing China Cova Beijing Paris Inchon South Korea John Dallas L. A. L. A. N.
Prince George’s jail has improved testing, conditions to protect inmates from covid-19, judge finds

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

Prince George’s jail has improved testing, conditions to protect inmates from covid-19, judge finds

"Morning a federal judge has blasted the prince George's county jail for recklessly disregarding coronavirus safety she issued an order conditions had to improve one month later she says this morning the jails making the right move the jail acted quickly to train up its medical staffers hire more nurses and improve testing U. S. District Court judge Paul as in this suggests there's still work to be done but the strides are notable and significant The Washington Post reports as of late last week seven hundred fifteen inmates and four hundred forty eight workers were tested for the virus twenty six of the inmates and two workers were positive but lawyers who filed a federal class action suit say there are still problems they pointed to a sixty year old with heart failure and lung disease who was asked to clean isolation cells were infected inmates were quarantined the county corrections director says they've done everything as quickly as possible now the judge hopes both sides will work together to keep things moving in the right

The Washington Post Director Prince George U. S. District Court Paul Lung Disease
"sixty year" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:06 min | 11 months ago

"sixty year" Discussed on 710 WOR

"About a man who came to a sixty years old to come to us with a bladder cancer is a quadriplegic and a gunshot wound thirty years ago I can only move his tiny little figures to go into a super pooper big hospital they found the bladder cancer can't move his legs he's got contractions and so they want to do radical services sixty year old man he's got bed sores he can't movies paralyzes arms are paralyzes legs are paralyzed hasn't moved in thirty years they want to remove his bladder they never told her about all the options is the same old story I've told you before he goes into the super hospital where these been cared for for thirty years you have bedsores they haven't provided that he's has a bladder cancer they want to remove his bladder not telling them about all the options and I can tell you for bladder cancer is removing the bladder is a big change in life for me angel never urinate the same in every year and it in a plastic bag or through a two for men the prostate and bladder removed together means a sex life is kaput it's a big surgery it's not so successful and equal at least equally successful was our non invasive treatment with low cutting and bleeding radiosurgery of the bladder this is the work we do been doing it for decades for bladder cancers bladder cancers the block the bladder holds the urine mostly cancers in the bladder not all the cancers but most of the cancer start in the lining of the blood of transitional cells and then grow into the muscle well this round there's gonna was radical removal of his bladder nervous ran cat movies a quadriplegic and they never told about all the options is chosen or treatment we've mapped amount we're sending in beams to attack his cancer this is the work that we do every day and I can tell you when I see many people with bladder cancer is often I see people at.

thirty years sixty years sixty year
"sixty year" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"sixty year" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Reporting that sixty year old Shelton chambray the toddlers legal guardian is facing fourth degree abuse and neglect of a child after she died on August sixteenth as temperatures rose up to the mid eighties authorities allege every parked his van at the Lyndon wall Paco station before six thirty in the morning but forgot she was in the car someone eventually found her in the van just before four PM and broke the window but at that time it was too late she was pronounced dead at the scene Chad Robison New Jersey one one point five news seventy jerseys first news five forty neighbors in new from the stench of that something was wrong inside a Jersey city home they called it into the city's quality of life task force and a squad found horrific conditions inside a home with nine mixed breed dogs covered in Philly is dog urine and feces everywhere the smell was unbearable yet also living inside two young boys twelve and sixteen and there eighty three year old grandmother police arrested the children's mother and homeowner outside the home she's charged with endangering the welfare of a child and elder abuse here's a journal reports the kids were covered in leaves are now in protective custody. police in Ridgewood are sending out the alert after a Paramus man was charged taking inappropriate photos of school kids inside a local Starbucks the students all attended immaculate heart academy Lewis to more was still in the coffee shop when police got there if anybody else thinks he targeted them with his camera the rest to give police a call. New Jersey one one point five news time five forty one the future of the cannabis industry in New Jersey is still a bit hazy but folks can agree to expand exponentially at some point and today's college age kids have the opportunity to get on the ground floor of something huge stocked in university just posting a career fair for all things cannabis business major Rafi hawk says cannabis is the latest commodity not just for medicinal purposes but adult use.

cannabis Chad Robison New Jersey New Jersey Lyndon wall Paco station Starbucks elder abuse Lewis Paramus Ridgewood Shelton Philly Rafi hawk eighty three year sixty year
"sixty year" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"sixty year" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Yeah the Florida which is about thirty miles north of Orlando and I want to take you to a bar round chicken brown cow orgy Meron chicken brown concrete your eyes that was a weird invitation Bradley but night orgy cash I'll go shall we go to your orgy and it's a retired or G. because we've got a sixty three year old in question at this I mean Bungie Manji a lot of glucosamine chondroitin supplements you're gonna take before that thing yeah I know I'm gonna get hate mail whatever anyway health health okay so positioning gonna end up and exactly so apparently this party there were like twenty people it was kind of a come and go as you please sort of side was that's that's how it was described had that it was the guys who through this party room had about twenty guests I believe the only knew about five or six of these people personally I wonder what could go wrong also there was a theme at this party can you imagine what the orgy thing was blindfolds full beam I don't know the theme of the party was anonymous sex I mean that let's say that that's not clever at all no that's just like you just invited strangers yeah that's not a theme that's just like an instruction manual well if your theme the if you're orgy famous anonymous sacks what could go wrong everything basically because because you don't know they're showing and you don't know where I am in fact that's exactly what happened so of these twenty gaster so name some stuff went down there rescind you know happy times you know what is the best of times it was the worst there was some I guess frolicking in up wool and there's a lot of entertaining going ham yeah anyway that's not what made this crazy stupid idiots at its just forging in Florida with bunches sixty nothing to see here old just me a sixty year old having sex soon if something happens something something happen and something went away let's put it this way somebody stole something from the house wasn't so many body parts no no but actually you might have thought they were grabbing a body part when they were grabbing this item the that was a loose connection I'll I bet it would add that this whole event a lot was loose and that's Ernie they stole a gun deer yeah wow so it turns out that they had left a gun got into an orgy the gun out of the origin of the homeowners rangy is they had their guns stored and they're really ticked off that somebody stole their gun he's pointed out rightly so I think well you had a the film was anonymous sex and a bunch of strangers over also guest were encouraged to utilize fictitious names or use no name at all they could bring any friends or acquaintances they desired so it just seems like back from the set up like if you're going to have your maybe that they were asking for don't leave a Glock ouch you're gonna rock out with your Glock in a drawer okay and apparently there is like a no he purchased the gun for four hundred forty dollars I thought maybe they'd stolen that as well but now they just took the gun and I would suggest two things one just put your gun away yeah hide your gun at the orgy yeah I mean yeah I see what you mean was there another suggestion now okay it's Friday but I don't wanna get too loose with my lips other things that you don't hear in an orgy all right you said it not me for our last things Holly for our final crazy stupid idiots we're gonna go to Manchester New Hampshire where on Monday night Christy Benoit who is twenty years old call the police to report that her neighbor had assaulted her and she was angry I'm and when the cops came to the what had gone down she was bloodied and she looked as though she had been hurt in the process she explains the police that her neighbor had broken down the door and punched and scratched her and they and the police witness she had black eyes and scratches on her arms and legs and sure it had read scenes on it and she also had shared with officers that the assault had caused her to get these black eyes and also for her nose to believe and the officers found blood in the kitchen and the living room and the bathroom they found a coffee table out of place they found a broken play and it looks like a place where somebody had come in in a rough somebody up but after the looks a little bit closer at the blood that that that was in the home and they thought that does not look like blood and then as they search the home further they found it to be a vampire blood god and then a second look they realize that the black guys that miss Benoit had were not actually black eyes but rather eye shadow she had it completely fabricated the idea that her neighbor had roughed her up and so now she's facing charges of giving a false police report and falsifying physical evidence okay also how did she think she was getting away with vast even like case check you out no no don't touch me this is a case of not playing the tape all the way through yeah exactly don't do it if you're mad at your neighbor find a different way to DO slash K. years following while leaving bag of doggie doo on their front porch like normal people I was just gonna say like by the way some around up on a patch of grass or something but you see that there is a person there was a person who she claims that she somebody slash your tires and then one very keen eyed Twitter observer noticed that it like it literally was able to do like a bunch of Angela Lansbury murder she wrote Jessica Fletcher style on the picture of the slash tires and and like point out the five reasons why this was a tire that had gotten an accident and she had just pretended to make it look like wow and slashed so I'm just saying people will always find out the truth yeah don't try to pull a fast one just don't lie don't lie tell the truth all right and give a hoot don't pollute right now what we learn today don't lie don't leave your got out and Lori jeans ago yeah don't leave your gun out at an orgy I don't want to have **** at an orgy you know when we come back in the coming in Bradley show we're gonna play a little game that game is called the throwback live real do that after this on my tongue one of seven one the clean and Bradley shell.

Florida Orlando Bradley four hundred forty dollars sixty three year twenty years sixty year
"sixty year" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"sixty year" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"She was found a sixty year old wife and mother of three days after her husband reported her missing will tell you the story in four minutes right now eleven thirty five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the financing here's Barbara traffic slowing down in Santa Monica because of red work ten eastbound Lincoln the clover field in the fast lane that's good too busy out of them a clear tunnel and if you're going to LA acts slowly thinning out around the airport you're still gonna find delays on surface streets and at the airport but it is starting to look a little bit better through the area in commerce crews are working on the seven ten both directions Atlantic to Washington two right lanes northbound and now the three left lane southbound that's the busy side through the area and you've got a problem on the seven ten south bound has valley Boulevard heard from a tipster bed a big piece of furniture possibly a couch in the fast lane causing some very sudden swerving there's folks come up on it siege pianos and they're on the way they'll probably run a break to clear it they've been dealing with the big power outage tonight in Fullerton signal lights are still out in a lot of the major intersections the special and harbor Boulevard so if they're dark be sure and treat him as four way stops red work nearby in Fullerton ninety one westbound from east street to the five in the three left lanes looks like traffic thinned out through the area about a little bit of slowing and in some valley all is closed for a five northbound on magnolia there deterring the off the freeway Gemini up before brokers sticky exit at you click go north to add injured take that Wes that'll get you back to the freeway again if you see something become a tipster called KNX Ellie metro traffic to find three two three four six seven ten seventy year next report eleven forty five barber Brooks of our traffic reports for often can extend seventy newsradio sixties tonight then for tomorrow highs video Persephone to the coast mid eighties inland valleys up to one hundred cooler midweek.

Santa Monica LA Washington Fullerton Brooks Barbara Wes KNX Ellie three two three four six seven four minutes ten minutes sixty year three days
"sixty year" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"sixty year" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Searching for a suspect or suspects. I'm Jay Metzler. Fox news. The big question this hour in Baltimore walked up and opened fire on innocent people at this intersection. Police Commissioner Michael Harrison says people had gathered for neighborhood barbecues on both sides of the street at least seven people were shot. Baltimore's acting mayor Jack young folk at the hospital and the one person is deceased ramp behind the church laughs there. So it wasn't anything dealing with the church. So I want to make that very clear, what isn't clear whether more people were shot and fled the scene. Whether a second gunman was involved. The condition of those hospitalized victims has not been released saying member of his congregation took a bullet for all of us his arm in a sling and exhausted. Looking rabbi Israel Goldstein, remembering sixty year old Laurie K gunned down in his synagogue. North of San Diego during Passover services yesterday, allegedly by nineteen year old white supremacist. What happens? The rabbi who started the hubbub of Powell a synagogue in the sandiego suburb more than three decades ago recalled locking is with that gunman are turnaround. And I see a site that I. Undescribable here is a young man standing with the rifle. Pointing right at me. And I look at him. He had sunglasses on. I couldn't see his is his soul. John Ernest of San Diego now facing murder and hate crime charges hospitalized this hour in Virginia five men rescued from a cave in the southwest part.

Baltimore rabbi Israel Goldstein I. Undescribable San Diego Jay Metzler Police Commissioner Michael Ha Jack young Fox John Ernest Powell Laurie K murder Virginia nineteen year three decades sixty year
"sixty year" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"sixty year" Discussed on The Art of Process with Aimee Mann and Ted Leo

"And if he didn't say, look, Andy, there's not a lot of sixty year old relief pitchers that would be that would be a reasonable request. Right. You still would let them any has the face like, I'd let you follow your dream. And do you like George Plumpton type thing? But I don't know. I don't know if I I don't know if I would I think, pruning, there's something to press. Croon off a couple of hobbies book prune off of islander don't reach for your dreams Dante's. Yeah. Some dreams. Yeah. I can't on six hours a day. Not going to have to we could to it also has to do with this focused and energy a g. Yeah. I think now we know how to focus. We don't have as much energy. But we know how to focus what energy we do have that whole period where I took sewing lessons. Just because I thought it would be like good for my brain to work with spatial reasoning. Like seriously, I did. And it was like interesting by mostly just followed instructions in like did which she told me, and then like made a thing that I never wore. But like a lot of time spent and now I sort of feel like, you know, what fuck sewing. I like writing songs is what I like. Right. I liked to do whether it's like a dumb parody song for Christmas show or a song. We've right for friend for their birthday or or something for my album or something for musical like whatever it is. I like to write songs, I can't wait to get back through ruining sauce. You love do you love writing? I like writing songs in the more the more. I like it like the more. I do focus on it in a regular way. Like, you know, like it's a job get up and do it every day, the more the more fun. It is. I'm like Randy Newman. But without the all mazing things he produced because he says he hates he hates to writing songs does. He really hate. But maybe say that the old days. Weirdly makes a lot of sense. If it just seems very crowded city, but I want to if I do write more songs I want to have fun doing it. I don't want to torture myself. I think I can do that. Let's go back to a little podcast chat about when you started comedy a friend's just said, you should do this. You started doing it? And then people always want this like when did you know that you were going to be a musician over and like there was never a HIV? It'll moment, right. Like, yes. I'm going to be a musician. You know, and it sounds like there was not a comedy moment. Like that for you. Well, it wasn't a sense that I basically quit. I'm quitting this plan. Couldn't play or anything. I hated everything. When I started to get the comedy thing going and started to have a met momentum of its own because I think there is like kind of an egalitarian side the comedy like really anybody can go anywhere and put their name. And I think I always felt music was more gatekeepers at the beginning. But I should probably just my own imaging again. No, I think you're probably right. Well, what with with with comedy? I mean, it started to get going. I would do these things and then just a career. I also came up in the eighties. When there was a comedy boom wrote. So within four years of starting standup. I was on the road thirty weeks a year forty weeks schools in western New Jersey, I did rascals in west orange club. The club owners liked me. That's the only reason why I got booked. That's the thing that people don't realize if you go ten minutes outside of New York City like on the island Jack's top of the town. Jack's top of the town..

Randy Newman Dante George Plumpton Andy New York City New Jersey Jack HIV thirty weeks forty weeks ten minutes four years sixty year six hours
"sixty year" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"sixty year" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Are. So we stay sick. We stay silent the shame mounts, and then we don't have the motivation to actually so. Do you recall? Your dad calling you loser. Your mom of using those words just out of frustration. There was some doctors with mom specifically probably dad not so much because he really got it differently than my mom did. But she looked at. It was just like I mean, look at it from her perspective she had struggled with him as a drug addict. And now like me here making explain your background solicits understand. Go ahead. Explain your education. Explain everything Shaw. So so I have a master's degree in clinical, mental health counseling, and the concentration of that program was in forensic in correctional counseling. The motivation for that was because here I live with this guy that's been in and out of jail on paper. Looks really scary. You know, my peers in my cohort when we do personality assessments and all sorts of other mental health related tasks, we get his results were horrified. Right. Okay. What I know the person I know the person so that motivated me to want to get into a program where I was developing the skills to help guys like him. Okay. Good. Now, we we all understand. So making is coming from and learning and moving forward with a lot of knowledge on drug addiction, right? And now, I'm in a clinical psychology doctoral programs. Okay. So here's your drug addict loser. Okay. And getting her masters or has got a massive already has a mouse to soak goes to show, you guys if you're listening that things do turn around, and there are real people in these bodies that are suffering. That's right. And some find their way out in some never find their way. So let's try look at Bobby. We kick it out here. We can help the fifty forty fifty sixty year olds they start helping themselves. My question is what is the average age of somebody that starts to touch upon drugs? Whether it's pot or whether it's straight for the gusto alcohol, what's the average age, which you say because I hear it says youngest. Eleven twelve. We hear eleven often often with the podcast alcohol. Yeah. Somewhere self medicate you in our say the theme consistently. And this was a big part of my story to was not being comfortable in your own skin being socially, anxious, not knowing how to fit in a social environment. You try that drug that drink one time. And all of a sudden, there's a relief peer pressure is a big thing. What she's saying is they don't have social. Yeah. But she's too. That's a that's a fear of peer pressure. The fact that if you're the one person not doing it, you feel left out. You don't you're not included. You're right. You then feel social not using drugs. Right. But that was my question was why did they start so young making said because a lot of being socially inept, right? And then they can come out of their skin because they had a beer they smoked a joint back in my days point, usually happens because a peer pressure. Yeah. You've been saying to me my whole life. Don't be a follower. Don't be a follower. I'm the opposite of complete follower. Always have been. She just always kept telling me that. And I was like all my friends can drink and do drugs. I don't care and she didn't. And that's really the truth. Like, she really did. And I was on my kids at a young age guys. If you'll never know if you like something, you know, if you never try you'll never know didn't drink and stuff like that. But I mean if I was choosing to drive that night. I was sober one. Everyone else was didn't bother me. But I have a lot of friends that say they would be the one that wanted to drink and they'd still drive. Okay. So my next.

Bobby Shaw fifty forty fifty sixty year
"sixty year" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Sixty year old woman Beverly. She can get away with it because no one can ever cancer downpour. Yeah. That is quite a gig. You're right. You wake up in the morning going. Wait. What do I get to do today to follow death around debt, but just disruption in that way? And I'm so grateful because you know, like, many of us we've got family at are often in the pads of things like this. And so I'm grateful that there are people that are paying attention. I just don't want them to get hurt themselves. Yes. Exactly. The kind of feels as you're watching that it's on the verge because later he needed a helmet to get out there again. For a softball helmet that clip. Yeah. And there was a guy from another network who was talking about how their friends, and this guy was also one of the people that sits in the middle of storm is it's happening. And he was like that Jim he saved my life because I didn't have my helmet, and I flew into a thing, and he grabbed me at the right time. And I was like what are you guys do? Hey guys after work today. We're going to become traffic reporters. Yeah. Well, okay. So I forgot you're doing that. Now new job traffic. Tina is a head out onto I ninety four at rush hour. Yeah. Which is safe. Give us, you know, tell us what you think of the guess what I see you the same bumper. I saw an hour ago. Fan. Exactly. But Michael following hurricane. Michael it has it hit land fast moving. It's damaging just the wins the flooding.

Michael Jim cancer softball Tina hurricane Sixty year
"sixty year" Discussed on Short Story Long

Short Story Long

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on Short Story Long

"And you're still in that job and i literally will watch fifty year old sixty year old men women get a motion because they there and this isn't to make anybody feel bad because you can change anything in a moment but i just watch how that like were were sold this process were sold the sand in lined to get good grades to get the college education to get the good job but what about life right life goes by while you're while you're while you're making live in life just screams by so i i don't know i i think things are changing faster than they ever are because of podcast because of the internet and i think people are realizing like don't feel you have to take the road everybody else does but also the my whole point was college doesn't necessarily fulfil you or make you the money you want but no college degree and sitting around hoping to get shit ass job doesn't work either if if you decided not to go to college you gotta still be a hustler and and model those playing the game at the highest level possible i mean don't listen to your you know if your aunt knows how to play tennis because she watches tennis old time if you wanna play tennis don't learn from her you wanna tennis pro right and the internet and social media has made world the world so small that you really have access to so many bad asses and how they're doing so if college isn't your thing than just make sure you learn from people that are playing go after a good okay so when you you know you said that you went back built up the body shop when all the way to selling it that's crazy was that like how old were you in that happen oh no i wasn't i wasn't young i was probably so i built the collision shop.

tennis fifty year sixty year
"sixty year" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on WTRH

"Well the most reset is my sixty year here each that i want to get out of oh sounds serious okay a sixty year marriage meaning you've been married for sixty years seventy five got married at sixteen okay so i feel like i feel like i was wide for in a pig in had your choice you know when people when we we're fifteen you'd think about what what did we know you can think you know a fair amount typical as most people they look back and they'll they'll say what did i know what did i know and you learn as you go along to you know if for those who are teachable learn to be discerning you learned that you can't trust all people the the classic phrase all the glitters is not gold things of that nature that are actually true so for you to have such pain i i'm hearing you're saying you're sixty your marriage five seventy years seventy five but you're sixty year marriage this talk i i want out of it or i don't want it any longer but let's let's go back what's what has deteriorated and why is that why there's so many whys but the turn connects his so fresh right now because my husband just got out yesterday for rehab and checked himself i'll do i to me said that the doctor released him and like a fool i picked him up and i read his report this morning were they were that he was adamant about getting out and everything was checked off a list with because he's handicap he's had a few strokes and cancer and and what does he call that stuff the doctors give them opiates are there are certain things that are supposed to win a person off is that what you mean like doing saying okay yeah claudia and you know i i don't have a thing i june you know i've always said when people ask me how long i've been married i say six times because i know that every ten years we hit a different cycle intermarriage come different so i know i know that who he was and who i was all those years ago every ten years ensure we're coming up on sixty and it's the worst ever because now i don't.

claudia sixty year ten years five seventy years sixty years
"sixty year" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on WRVA

"On what he said i i would guess that that that that he would question einstein about quantum theory because you know einstein famously did not was not a big fan of quantum theory and and now einstein's been dead for you know fifty sixty sixty year over sixty years and there's a lot more evidence of quantum theory i i'm wondering if stephen would would say what do you say now l the other thing is of course einstein was was the one who is lay ahead of his time in looking for a unified theory of everything and people at that in those days i thought that was not and now for the last forty years has been really the hottest thing in physics we had we don't have it yet but he might want to know what he thinks of those attempts did did he even at his condition ever laugh oh well he he i don't think he could laugh i've never saw how many could you see a smile on his face he had a big light up the real hit a huge smile he loved you hugh i remember once we had a heated argument i'm waiting you know as usual i'm waiting minutes five six seven eight minutes for him to compose his response to what i said i'm all like you know what what's going on we gotta get to the bottom of this and he finally you know what when finished composing it if you weren't looking over shoulder to see you know he would hit a button in his computer voice would read it finally comes and it was a joke joe did he did he with us saying it did he ever curse through that machine yes he did he eight british curse yeah jason and farmington.

einstein stephen joe jason farmington five six seven eight minutes fifty sixty sixty year forty years sixty years
"sixty year" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"What she said i i would guess that that that that he would question i said about quantum theory because you know einstein famously did not not a big fan of quantum theory and and now einstein's been dead for you know fifty sixty sixty year over sixty years and there's a lot more evidence of quantum theory i'm wondering if stephen would would say what do you say now l the other thing is of course einstein was was the one who is lay ahead of his time in looking for a unified theory of everything and people at that in those days i thought that was nuts and now you know that's the for the last forty years has been really the hottest thing in physics we have we don't have it yet but he might want to know what he thinks of those attempts did he even at his condition ever laugh oh well he he i don't think he could laugh i've never saw how could you see a smile on his face he had a big he light up the real hit a huge smile he loved hugh i remember once we had a heated argument i'm waiting you know as usual i'm waiting minutes five six seven eight minutes for him to compose his response to what i said i'm all like you know what what's going on and i you know i wanna we gotta get to the bottom of this and he finally you know what when he finished composing it if you weren't looking over shoulder to see you know he would hit a button and his computer voice would read it finally comes and it was a joke joe did he did he with us sane it did he ever curse through that machine yes he did he ain't british curses i could just see him do that.

stephen einstein joe five six seven eight minutes fifty sixty sixty year forty years sixty years
"sixty year" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"That's not to say that you know we don't want people that can work together in teams and understand the politics team sports time but i really do think you got to run your own race based on the unique demands if you're just wrecked i look i don't want to beat up on rex account it's tough to lose but he's sixty year old white male career politician and that is not how you win an open seat it's different if you're an incumbent and you're known in your district and you work your district and you go back and you do your rotaries and you're and you're like but we do need cutter lamb as young as a serviceman he's the perfect candidate and do you think the gets a message from this about who to recruit well i've been trying to sort of build a counter to what the democrats are doing which actually think is quite smart by recruiting all these nine eleven veterans theron i guarantee you they're going to have success and a lot of these districts because that's just a powerful platform to run upon we need to do the same we really need to be aggressive in terms of recruiting dynamic younger obviously i'm biased towards younger candidates and i just think nine eleven vats represents that's what this country has to offer and demonstrated in some way that they're willing to put the interest of the country ahead of their own narrow growth you political interests and i think that resonates with a lot of voters not just hardcore conservatives the independence and even some high minded democrat so i think we would do well to learn that lesson and really need to up our recruitment and support for the next generation i told a group of viola students a decade ago after nine eleven that if any of them wanted to do politics really want to do politics they had to serve i they had to go and serve in a uniform if you're at war you've got to go and serve in a uniform right but that was ten years ago that's off a little bit now but the nine eleven story if you were a a young person like you and i don't know when you joined the marine how old were you when you joined the marines i think it was twenty two because there's when i graduated college yeah that's a choice that people have to make to go in or not.

sixty year ten years
"sixty year" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"A sixday that's revived seven fifty eight sixty year now here's ab dembosky direct mella considering for amy here on the emu dubovsky show it's great to be with you it's a tuesday amy of course by the find at the assembly meeting in their name cringe this afternoon forty minutes past the hour twenty two degrees here in the valley 23 in anchorage looking for low in the single digits in ankara town tonight in it'll be below zero for you uh cadeau's here in the valley it's gonna be chilean tonight so make sure those pets are taken care of speaking of against the idea to runs just around the corner trend what do they do the ceremonial started anchorage this year during the for rondi is of this coming saturday i bet i think you'd have to be know rob to look it up our been so busy lately avenue timed even think about it uh we've been looking at a lot of different knees were currently on the gun topic rate now we've had some good calls um i was reading and if you wanna call him by the way way in on any of those ideas even if it's a different topic burying arungon 357 fifteen sixty dennis prager exert radio host he's a i really like the guy and agree with most of the things that he brings up but he was talking about the left they all the the liberal left and why they're opposing some of what has been proposed for the big debate and one of the things that have been brought up his hitler arm the.

dennis prager amy ankara rondi rob seven fifty eight sixty year twenty two degrees forty minutes sixday
"sixty year" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"But we proven and science has shown that cannibus you cannot overdose from it you know wage so my put this on my facebook there the most dangerous thing about marijuana is getting caught with it and how many people are still in jail right now on possession of marijuana charged or dealing him or likely fit but you know we're kind of waiting in the recreational thinking oh what do we got this is medical only like right okay dish this will be a controlled substance you know in in my bill i legislation i heavy very nice system set up uh tori it does control with an anybody outside of that parameter we'll be breaking the law now we see how our drug laws are working right now they're not okay so this will be my sixty year in the legislature in a and i'm i'm kind of you know you involve after awhile and i've evolved to the point where i'm tired of criminalising good people because somebody might abuse something you know that's not right that we've seen the better quality of life and the countless benefits there there are possible with this now i want to make it crystal clear to you know this is the magic cure all it's not the wonder drug there are people that they don't benefit from it okay so what so you move on this is merely another tool in the toolbox physicians to reckon man hey i think that's person might benefit from medical cannibus so i'm going to recommend then for you know a medical card and then they go from there and they are now entered into a very controlled system use they can't be abused of course anything can be abused but again we shouldn't let that be uh you know roadblock to preventing um innocent people thousands of whose irs getting the relief that people in twenty nine other states or seen it didn't you mentioned the in the legislation for six years and you know you and i've worked together on other issues he's um and we've had a couple of discussions now on this one but if i had to guess when you first ran for the indiana general assembly medicinal marijuana probably wasn't of mine for you what was it that i think alike but.

facebook marijuana irs indiana sixty year six years
"sixty year" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The guy shows up to sixty year old delivery driver shows up get south and he's he shot he shot and killed the two people the police now and it was a robbery i mean it was one like let's robbed the pizza delivery guy and let's killed the pizza delivery guy of the police have now apparently arrested a twenty five year old guy liz in an apartment in the bill ding as well as the man seventeen yearold cousin she got a 17yearold and a twenty five year old who apparently murder a sixty year old pizza delivery driver in cold blood i mean seriously in cold blood as is all as part of of this you know robbery and i'm sitting there thinking okay first of all how much money can you get from a pizza delivery driver i mean seriously you know how much could he have 20 bucks fifty bucks one hundred bucks how much money to demand theoretically have in his pocket and and yet that this is you know that the cost of life he had a sixty year old guy who whose debt but unfortunately just like so many people now they're becoming targets and i guess i know we've talked about this before but i really do think it is getting to a point where you're going to have like some of these businesses look and i understand is a lot of business mrs round here who depend on deliveries that that's the nature of the business you call us up we'll get the sandwich two you will get you the pizza and if you take away deliveries well he going to hurt their business substantially but at the same time i i'm telling ya if i was if i was a delivery driver i think this would be one of the cajun's were i would seriously consider carrying a gun myself getting a permit carrying the gun legally myself so you could potentially defend yourselves the bigger picture is in a what are these stores way to do to protect their drivers and i think one of the things that you're going to has he happened more and more is that the drivers are just not going to be allowed to get.

robbery liz murder sixty year twenty five year
"sixty year" Discussed on iMore

iMore

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"sixty year" Discussed on iMore

"Yes it's done through the marketing department and fill schiller should be very proud of this but you know there are so many examples of people who use ipads as primary computers and there are as many arguments from the other side most of which are on twitter that dismiss those is not being credible or credulous and i find that to be so absurd the computer for you or me the mac book in my bag does just is is is very important to me but to say that the ipad in my sixty year old cousins book bag is not as important to him or her is is ridiculous and you know it's it's something it's just a it's it's your right it's an obstructionist argument and i find that to be extremely it's almost like it's it's immature it's a way that you're you're you're you're cutting off yourself from the larger narratives of of of of computing especially especially when there is a smartphone in in that pocket i mean josh roots of polski has a smartphone he knows how smartphones have changed his life and yet he reduces the ipad to a lesser mac book it to me that is just a crazy argument i don't want to agree drought obviously deserves it because he tweeted what he tweeted but your twitter is a realtime medium and it it geared towards don't wanna say drunk tweeting in this case but it's geared towards what of angry reactionary highly attentiongrabbing tweets and in people does piled on on both sides a from that point i think it did bring out a sentiment was that was lurking their traja adding that in in like our our field of technology that we also have this need for a media scene and by people get really people feel very like these devices are on i very personal to us and so i think that that's why comes out to such really strong emotional arguments from people when something is taken away something isn't the way that they think that it should be and in fact their life in a way that they don't want it to be and so sometimes we may be more reactive then what would be if it was in more than one hundred forty characters.

schiller ipads twitter josh roots sixty year