35 Burst results for "Sixty Seventy S"

How Have US-China Relations Changed Since 1971?

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

02:10 min | 2 weeks ago

How Have US-China Relations Changed Since 1971?

"With president biden now at the helm and the chinese economy predicted to overtake the us. In just a few years. How have relations between the two nations changed since kissinger's visit in nineteen seventy one. And what is the future of these two superpowers who better to ask than vincent. Knee the guardians china affairs correspondent who presented a documentary on bbc world. Service called when kissinger went to china. I started off by asking him. How nineteen seventy-one meeting came about what to some extent. It was a multi year project. Starting with both sides signaled intention of contact. This was initially conducted a very quietly and in a very subtle way beginning with the us. Calling china it's proper name at people's republic of china instead of red china or communist china and in beijing mao also wants to get in touch with richard nixon and his administration so they stay on the media's began to reduce the use of blessed capitalists. The things like this a eventually president. Nixon told pakistani president. Y'all calm and yao coundon tote chairman mao. That's the americans was serious. So that was the beginning of this contact. At in retrospect it was a very practical way of changing the course of the cold war. If you think about in the ninety sixties seventies when richard nixon came to power in ninety sixty eight vietnam. War was still a huge controversy in the us. Adding china around ninety sixty nine. There was a border war between china and the soviet union and around around autumn nineteen. Sixty nine It was rumored that's soviet union wants to to plan a pre emptive strike on china's so chairman mao at the time was really looking for a way out of this. And of course you know for nixon. I going to another communist big power. They wanted to change the triangular relationship between the us soviet union and china

China President Biden Kissinger MAO Richard Nixon Yao Coundon Vincent United States BBC Beijing Nixon Vietnam Soviet Union Chairman Mao
Kim Kardashian denies affair with Travis Barker: "False narrative"

Johnjay & Rich On Demand

00:54 sec | 2 months ago

Kim Kardashian denies affair with Travis Barker: "False narrative"

"So kim kardashian on the latest episode of keeping up with the kardashians which is tonight admitted. She failed the baby bar. Give you do law school at the way that i'm doing. It is a four year program instead of your typical three year program and after one you have to take the baby bar. This went ashley is harder. I hear than the official bar. Five sixty seventy four failure failure and not pass gets your spirit down and just makes you wanna give up spoiler alert. She's not giving up and she is also sticking up for herself when it comes to those rumors about her having an affair with travis barker back in the day she took to instagram a to say false narrative. We've been friends for year. And i'm so happy for him and court. That is a flat out. Denial which is basically what happened to her.

Kim Kardashian Ashley Travis Barker
How to Pronounce Knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa

Books and Boba

02:02 min | 3 months ago

How to Pronounce Knife by Souvankham Thammavongsa

"Stories that make up how to pronounce focus on character struggling to find their bearings in unfamiliar territory or shuttling between idioms cultures and values a failed boxer discovers what it truly means to be a champion when he starts painting nails at his sister salon. A young woman tries to discern the invisible immutable. Social hierarchies at a chicken processing plant. A mother coaches her daughter in the challenging art of worm harvesting in todd. Visceral pro style. That establishes her as one of the most striking and assured voices of her generation. Tonka interrogates what it means to make a living to work and to create meaning so at the top like this is a story. A collection of stories about the lao refugee diaspora and laos is a country is adjacent to vietnam. But it's southeast asian like block. That wasn't solved the the vietnam war and because of that were the source of a lot of refugees along with vietnam. Cambodia that came from that area in the seventy s sixty seventies. Yeah it was like The sixties and seventies laos is the only landlocked country in southeast asia. Like you said it. Borders vietnam also borders thailand and is also the most heavily bombed country in all of history in terms of country size and population and most of that is from americans and a lot of the bombs that were dropped. Not all of them have detonated so every year. There is a lot of casualties from these from these bombs. So yeah western colonization and meddling has definitely you. I don't know what else to say.

Vietnam Laos Tonka Todd Diaspora Cambodia Asia Thailand
Interview With Kimberly Bryant, CEO of Black Girls Code

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

02:13 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Kimberly Bryant, CEO of Black Girls Code

"Again. Today is kimberly bryant. Kimberly is founder and ceo. Black girls code a nonprofit organization dedicated to introduce girls of color to the field of technology. She's also an electrical engineer. Kimberly has received numerous awards for our work and technology inclusion. She's been business insider's list of the twenty five most influential african americans in technology and she was named one of fast company's most creative people in two thousand thirteen. She was recognized as a white house. Champion of change for tech inclusion and in two thousand fourteen received an american ingenuity award in social progress from the smithsonian institute. Welcome to the show. Kimberly thank you for having me can pay a. I want to apologize ahead of time. I have a new puppy on. Nate mieko seized busy in the morning. So little noise in the background i followed. That is awesome. No problem at all. Is this a covert puppy. It is it is. He's a quarantine puppy that is That is excellent. Well it's like. I think one of the one of the awesome things people are doing to get pandemic so no no worries at all so. I'm just really excited to learn more about your journey. So can can we start with you telling us a little bit about how you got interested in science and technology in the first place. Of course so. I grew up in in memphis tennessee. Back in out. I will raise sixty seventies. Wanna give away my two bunch of my age but in the late sixties and seventies and one of the things that i was lucky. I guess i would classify it as being lucky to be able to experience. Was this accelerated pathway in math and sciences Author middle school into high school so during that period of time when your high school student a year trying to figure out what you wanna do with the rest of your life one of those conversations with my guidance counselors resulted in her really kind of encouraging me to explore in the generic pathway.

Kimberly Kimberly Bryant Smithsonian Institute Nate Mieko White House Memphis Tennessee
Biden urges caution as U.K. coronavirus variant spreads rapidly through United States

The World and Everything In It

01:27 min | 5 months ago

Biden urges caution as U.K. coronavirus variant spreads rapidly through United States

"As numerous states began to ease corona virus restrictions. The biden again urging state and local governments to slow down the president's chief medical adviser. Dr anthony fauci told. Cbs's face the nation. It really would be risky to have yet again another surge which we do not want to happen because we're plateauing at of quite a high level. Sixty seventy thousand new infections for day is quite high new infections peaked in early january about three hundred thousand per day and then fell off sharply for five weeks straight but around the middle of last month that progress ground to a halt over the past three or four weeks. The rate of new daily infections is virtually unchanged an epidemiologist. Dr michael ulcer home warned on sunday. We are in the eye of the hurricane right now. It appears that things are going very well. He will see blue skies but we know is about to come upon. Is the situation with this. Be one one seven. Variant of virus originated in the united kingdom. That today is wrecking havoc. In parts of europe dozens of countries have renewed lockdowns to try and control spread of the variant but even as the decline of new daily cases in the united states has leveled off. Since mid february new hospitalizations have continued to drop and some governors say. Now that most high risk americans have access to vaccines. It's time to reopen.

Dr Anthony Fauci Dr Michael Ulcer Biden CBS United Kingdom Europe United States
Chris Kennedy and David Weber discuss their new book, "Into The Light"

Read Between the Lines

05:55 min | 5 months ago

Chris Kennedy and David Weber discuss their new book, "Into The Light"

"Today i'm interviewing david weber. Chris kennedy there. How are you doing today. I'm doing fine. Except i think a another dominion another another dimension on timing but aside from that all is good excellent So can you tell me about your books about our collaborative books because we only have one of those. Yes i know that you have. You have more books outside of that too. So if you'd like to talk a little bit those two okay. Chris sure Although i'm i have a few traditionally published works i'm predominantly an independent author publisher I've got about thirty books on my own as well as forty published short stories Almost all of those are science. Fiction and fantasy Also published over two hundred other books through the various imprints of christianity publishing at Unlike the pusher you were just talking to. I am simply a supplier. i Have let sixty seventy Traditionally published books out I guess the two that people know me for our the honor harrington series with bain books and the Safe hold series with tour But i also have some fantasy scattered through their primarily military science fiction. Although i actually think of it almost as political science fiction because i spend so much time in the nuts and bolts of the politics of my various liberate. Worlds right so actually. Can you talk a little bit about military science fiction. You said political science fiction. Because i before starting your book no idea that this was a genre and i know how is not notice but well into the light actually bins jonynas just just Just oil yeah. Yeah the only other thing. I've got that really came close to that i think is In theory born in which i Pair a female commando with The last surviving. Greek fury but Military science fiction is science fiction which is primarily in which the conflict is primarily centered around A military conflict not simply social dynamics or or philosophical You actually have people shooting each other pretty much In terms of it The reason that i said Political science fiction is that there's military science fiction. There's what i think of as militaristic science fiction tony bain actually coined that term for me. Militaristic science fiction is written by people who just went to write something. A lot of people get shot. I mean it's at is written by people who frequently don't understand how the military works at all in real life How politics impact The military so when i'm writing military science fiction i try to give the political background that is driving these people to do something as inherently Not saying as shooting other human beings if you follow what i'm saying. Yeah i typically just stay with the military side I generally don't get into the politics as much However with twenty years of being a naval aviator i do have a a decent idea of how military's work out. Show off help. Okay and well in david does too. I mean he's done so much research on military things that i'm sure he knows you know a a wide variety of military's that that i've never looked at so in. They're they're all pretty much the same under the skin in a lot of ways. Somebody just sent me a a pay stub from a roman legionnaire. That they absurd. I saw that. No i saw that thing. Yes they excavated at. What's left of the pay slip of a roman legionnaire from the from israel in And it's all about what he had to pay the quartermaster. For food and everything else. It turns out that he got paid. He paid the quartermaster and he was flat broke again. Some things don't change a lot okay so you were talking a little bit about it already. But what is your collaboration process. Look like in like there's different perspectives in this book's one of you gravitate more towards the perspectives or Okay i do collaborations with quite a i. I am somebody who is in one. Its comfortable doing collaborations and in another sense. Not i am not. I am not comfortable doing a collaboration in which somebody says okay. I'm going to put my name on the book. You write it I'm going to be involved in collaboration. I'm going to be hands on which chris found out i expected to. I mean it was your your you know your series to start with And i'm i'm kind of the the squatter in it so i. I knew that you would have many ideas for where the series was going to go and what it was gonna look like And i came in welling came in willing to work within that framework.

David Weber Chris Kennedy Tony Bain Bain Harrington Chris David Israel
You thought herd immunity would save us? Maybe not

Coronacast

05:06 min | 6 months ago

You thought herd immunity would save us? Maybe not

"We're talking about pandemics norman one of the phrases that was bandied about a lot especially at the beginning was the idea of herd immunity that we get to a stage where the virus con spread willy nilly through the community anymore because enough people have had it that it doesn't spread as rapidly anymore and the theoretical threshold for that based on how much a single person with covid sort of tends to spread to was about sixty seventy percent. So what do we know about places in the world where there has been a lot of cover transmission whether we're reaching this community threshold and it's actually making a difference. Well funny you should say that because a couple of days ago in the lancet published a report from brazil which is actually quite disturbing. So the reported from a city in brazil called monas- who are monogamous. Which is in the amazon northwest brazil. I think it is and they had done a study of blood. Donors indicated four seventy. Six percent of the population had been affected with sars cov to by october of last year. And therefore you would assume with fat pie attack rates. You've got herod immunity which is above sixty as you said between sixteen seventy percent except that happened in january in other words just this month between the first of january in january nineteenth compared to december first two thousand nine hundred they had three thousand four hundred thirty one hospital admissions for sars coffee to for covid nineteen compared to five hundred and fifty two in the first twenty days for three weeks of december right. So they've had a big spike last year. It's dropped off. And now the saying a big spike again now. This and hospitalizations had remained low for about seven months. And you've just seen this spike in january and The question is what's going on here. So you could have overestimated the attack rate and the haired immunity ratio so possible that it's a high estimate in terms of when people were immune but even their low estimates based on perhaps errors in their assumptions of Wayne people what antibody response. It's still about fifty two percent as their low estimate there and that should still can fair some degree of immunity. But they do say that when you compare. The blood donors to average population. There was no difference in the university seems to be quite a representative sample of the general community. So they assume but seventy six percent is accurate so then they go onto looking at whether or not. There's been a waning of antibodies. During that time that could be other response but they showed that you and british healthcare workers reinfection was rare up to about six months after the primary infection. It could be due to variance because we've talked a lot on kron cast by the variance in brazil and they've really got to three lineages of variants in brazil which could be both more virulent and indeed war contagious. So the worry here is that we don't really know why they've had a resurgence in a community that should be pretty immune and it's not that these people are getting a model infection the second time around either because the measure that they looking at his hospitalization so presumably people quite sick. Yes and there is growing evidence that some some of these variants are were virulence. Although that's that's not been confirmed in any pure view jr journal. In fact one thing i need to say. But this paper is that it's in the lancet. And therefore it has gone undergone some degree of peer review rather than some of the other pre publication papers. We sometimes court from. So what are we. Take away from this. It seems like a pretty scary fact is is heard immunity. A false goal. Do we know whether vaccination is going to have a long long lasting immunity associated with it like this kind of worrying. It is kind of wearing. The good news is that consistent evidence from immunization at least with the astro vaccine and the fis vaccine even though the astro vaccine may be less efficacious at preventing all disease is that they do seem to generate an immune response. That's bigger and deeper than you get from alive infection which is very unusual. 'cause usually live infections. Give you a better degree of immunity particularly with influenza. But it seems to be contradicted in this. So it's likely that vaccination gives you a better immune response that lasts longer. But you'd have to say that from the study you don't have to watch pretty closely whether or not immunity wayne's faster are your vulnerable to variants more than people have thoughts. I mean it's it's mystery could be wrong but it's a it's a real warning sign.

Brazil Norman Amazon Jr Journal Kron Wayne FIS Influenza
How to Avoid Becoming a Meal for a Cheetah

60-Second Science

04:15 min | 7 months ago

How to Avoid Becoming a Meal for a Cheetah

"The cheetah is the rarest big cat in africa less than seven thousand adults remain on the planet think of it this way for every cheetah on the planet. There's more than four starbucks. Coffee shops the most important cheetah stronghold is in central namibia but the cheetahs. They're don't live within national parks. They live on privately. Owned farmland. Pharma's having huge problems with cheetahs losing a lot of stuck and there are other farmers who actually didn't have any problem at all ecologists you're melts heimer from the live knits institute for zoo and wildlife research in berlin assumed at first that all farmers had cheetah trouble. It was just that some were more likely to complain about it. But after tracking fifty collared cheetahs he began to suspect that there really was a pattern to their killing by the time his team had data from one hundred six cheetahs colored over the course of a decade. Not only was. He certain that cheetahs were more likely to kill in some places than others but that he could solve the problem. We indeed found. These communication hubs of cheetahs which spread evenly across the landscape with a high activity of cheetahs within the hubs cheetahs. Aren a social species but they still need to trade information. They don't meet physically typically not but they leave marks and prominent lent marks and whether they either use during fees to communicate with each other. Think of it as a coffee shop for cats where animals trade gossip even though these communication hubs only comprise around ten percent of the landscape cheetah. Spend most sometimes all of their time within them. These basically a long-term tradition which is passed on from cheetah generation to cheetah generation Some of these communication hubs basically no-no. Let's say the mocking location. Mocking trees were known by farmers. For sixty seventy years like the grandfather of current farmer already knew the mocking cheese in this area. What the farmers never realized is that only some farms overlap with the cheetahs communication hubs melts. Heimer thought that if those farmers relocated their most vulnerable herds. It could be a huge help. Here remembers the first farmer. He tried to convince and i told him. Look wilfred i have. I have the idea that they are actually there because of these mocking trees. And you happen to have your small shops accepting the same area. Let's try to move your herds out of this area and and keep them somewhere else and then let's measure the losses. And he was laughing at me said i can nice idea but i'm not sure whether it's going to work. They would probably follow the cast so we tried this. Actually it worked and he. He earned much money because he lost less cavs. After that thirty-five more farmers agreed to try it out in all the number of calves to cheat. Predation fell by a whopping eighty six percent. Of course some cattle outside of communication hubs were still lost. The cheetah's but it was at a low enough level that most farmers seem to tolerate it. What this means is that. Cheetahs aren't actively following the cattle. They simply take advantage of whatever food is available nearby. If it's not cattle then they go after. Wild ungulates springbok orix or coup. There are no so called problem. Cheetahs who intentionally seek out cattle instead there are problem areas. That's a much easier problem to solve. And it's one that doesn't result in farmers killing cheetahs melts. Heimer is now hard at work collecting tracking data from cheetahs in other parts of africa to see whether his findings hold up in other ecosystems so often it seems as if the goals of wildlife conservation are incompatible with the goals of commerce but this story reveals that infect biodiversity and agriculture can coexist allocates is really one of these nice example which can go hand in

Heimer Live Knits Institute For Zoo A Namibia Pharma Starbucks Africa Berlin
What if you were hunted by the Japanese Mafia?

This is Actually Happening

04:53 min | 7 months ago

What if you were hunted by the Japanese Mafia?

"By most profound theory lights was that i would lead and uninteresting life and i was forever in envy that other people would read an interesting life and i wouldn't. I came from kind of a prototypical new york city to kid. Jewish family father was a stockbroker and my father became time to perfect barometer of the stock market so he would come home in the evenings and his behavior was completely function of how the stock market had done that evening. My mother by contrast was a much more complex individual who had been a market researcher at the beginning of her career and felt that no amount. The questions she asked of her children would ever be enough growing up. Under my mother's careful observation was extremely close to the experience of being cross examined by a brilliant attorney so speaking through my teenage years. She was a person to be diligent. We avoided this wonderful figure in my youth and my teenage years. And i've actually my college years. My mom's first cousin who was art buchwald art buchwald by first cousin was america's preeminent political satirist in the sixties seventies eighties He tried to hide as much as possible that he was highly aligned with the democratic party. But he in fact actually was at became the godfather of bobby. Kennedy's kids as ethel chose him To help advise her and support her. After bobby. kennedy's assassination and sixty eight. He wrote a series of. I think about thirty five books that made the new york times bestseller list was syndicated in seven hundred papers and he was an incredible force of personality. Everything about art was kind of exuberant consciously or unconsciously As i went through college. And i spent a little bit of time in dc where though i did live in his house i tried to live as much as possible on his dime soaking up as many free lunches either in his office or what may some blank where. He held court several times a week. in his company just because he was so funny and so connected in washington society the closer my commencement from university came the greater. Manning's -iety grew that. I needed to come up with something interesting to do. My experience upon graduating from university was a lot like the film. The graduate i moved back into my parents house and settled into. What i think is for a lot of people the most profound depression that the ever have to return to their parents home and to be faced with the prospect of organizing the rest of their lives. I moved back in and tried to come up with an interesting concept and The only thing interesting. I could think to do it seemed lucrative and it seems. My skill set were Jobs on wall street and since my father had spent thirty five years on wall street and was a good guy. I received an offer to go to work for bear stearns and the idea of accepting that offer filled me with horror so one night upon accepting that offer. My mother and father took after dinner. My mother in attempting to make levity of suggested that she would buy me a picture book of the world and this idea stopped me dead in my tracks me sitting in a cubicle up two. Am in an investment bank office and taking the book out for my desk and looking at pictures of japan. I decided that japan was paris. Paris was where buchwald had begun his career. So this moment hit me like a brick. And i. I never showed up. I never accepted the job or went to work. Through a series of connections. I found out there was position open to become a newspaper reporter in tokyo naturally. Went to see my uncle about it. He said you've got to go. This is your moment. There's a travel agency on the first floor. Get up off your seat. I'm going downstairs to buy the ticket for you.

Buchwald Art Buchwald Bobby New York City Ethel Democratic Party Kennedy New York Times America Manning DC Washington Bear Stearns Depression Japan Buchwald Paris Tokyo
Brain Tracking: The Future of Brain Health with Paul Sorbo, Director of Sales at Wavi Medical

Outcomes Rocket

05:39 min | 8 months ago

Brain Tracking: The Future of Brain Health with Paul Sorbo, Director of Sales at Wavi Medical

"Welcome back to the outcomes racket. Today i have the privilege of hosting paul sorbo. He is the director of sales at wabi medical. Where they're helping the world to think better they're doing brain performance assessments with a very unique approach and in this interview. I have an extraordinary conversation with him. Learning more about how they're making a difference in brain health. And so with that intro. I am so privileged to have you here on the podcast paul. Thanks for joining me. Thank you chris. It's great to be here. Yeah so you know. We previously had another member of your team. Aaron from wabe. If you guys haven't had a chance to listen to that podcast go to the website. Go to wabe mad. And you'll see our rate chat with erin but today we've got paul on the podcast and he's gonna die of a bit deeper into the topic of brain health and what we're doing to do more and to do better within that field so before we do that though paul you know why. Don't you go ahead and tell us what exactly inspires your work in healthcare watts. Broad question to me I think for me it was always. I had a fascination with the human body whether it was from the performance aspect. i. I'm an ex bodybuilder. And so i always had this huge fascination trying to manipulate the human body to be the best at it could all the way through my undergrad. And we'll getting in about school. I had a huge fascination at the genome and and a genetic and solving things like duchenne muscular dystrophy with genomic other being crisper cast nine gene regulation. And you know all of a sudden. I started thinking about this and you know genetics. You're just familiar with upi genetics and and protonix. And when you really get into that you know you start looking at medicine as a whole and realizing that we are not controlling what we can. And that i want to continue to strive to make people the best version of themselves that they can be and continue to drive the education behind that specifically in now with lobby kind of the brain sector. Yeah that's pretty cool man so you did like weight training professionally or what. What's the story there. Never professionally I had a whole bunch of friends that were professional bodybuilders. Still to this day. You know on a fascination with muscle for lack of a better term probably unhealthy fascination for being I like to call bodybuilders the first bile hackers you know when when tides just now coming out and getting into mainstream medical community us bodybuilders. Been using uptight for twenty years and not in a nearly regulated fashion. Obviously very underground bro science for lack of a better term. But yeah i mean i. I'm five foot nine. I was all the way up to about two hundred fifty four pounds. It less than ten percent body fat which was not healthy by the way could punish shoes And realize that you know. I think that's a good topic of conversation about health. Though you know people. I think genuinely believe that external appearance can actually reflect internal health and that is so far from true. 'cause x i looked extremely healthy right. I ate what i thought right things. I had low body fat. I had astronomical amount of muscle mass for my frame but internally when i started looking at my labs my panels my lipid panels cluster all levels my ratios. My inner cellular calcium levels all of a sudden. I'm like close. I am the furthest thing from health. Yeah and you know. It's a good call and we've got a measure to understand where we're at and that's a lot of what you guys are doing with wabi around the brain so talked a little bit about the business and some insights about how you guys are helping. Health care leaders do their job around brain assessment. Yeah i think the key there to what he's done let me start by saying why doesn't do anything do what we do. Is we make information significantly more accessible so measuring the brain has been really underdone. Because it's never been a accessible be. It's never been affordable. Those are the two things that david oakley data joffe really set out to change e. g. and evoked potentials or. Erp have been around for sixty seventy years. The problem with both of those erp specifically was really only used in brain death situations to measure. You know long hospital procedure and prostate expensive and b. e. g. is really people are familiar with the g. from epilepsy studies. And these really terrible torture base you know. Eeg say league caps. You're just awful and they're expensive and they're not quick right so when you talk about measuring the brain you know. Are you going to send a client or patient to go. Get a yearly. Mri no are you gonna go send a client to get a yearly specs or anything else out there eeg. No you're not gonna do it because it's going to cost them. I don't know that many people that have five to ten thousand dollars our way every year. Nobody i mean right very hit. I know people that do it yearly. And i'm like that's excessive right but when you really look at that the problem is that by not doing that on a regular basis as we don't have a whole bunch of data on the parade you know it's not like we're able to just go in with a stethoscope and listen to the way than our heart is a. We haven't been able to do that with the brain and so really. The only clinton which measurement is happening is when. There's already a problem whether there's already issues of cognitive decline whether there's already ti stroke whether there's already behavioral sheeps and so we don't really know these baseline normative were supposed to be or house amongst progressing their cognitive science progressing as they age. And that's really. The foundation of lavi is providing a simple fast and affordable assessment that we establish a baseline and then compare subsequent. Scans to see how someone is progressing

Paul Sorbo Wabi Medical Paul Upi Genetics Erin Aaron David Oakley Chris Joffe Clinton Foundation Of Lavi
Tencent Buys Warframe

The Business of Esports

06:13 min | 8 months ago

Tencent Buys Warframe

"The first here is from the motley fool and the headline tencent makes another billion dollar gaming acquisition. The chinese technology and media conglomerate has been on an acquisition spree in the gaming space making its leadership position even stronger What they bought here was Lay you lay you technologies. Which is the parent company of digital extremes And it's a canadian. Based video game studio known for war frame they also own studios including athlon and splash damage. Ten sense going to be paying roughly one and a half billion in cash Choir the company which is incredible The buying spree that they've been on the amount of cash that they've put out there the second acquisition this one I think we talked about it on a previous podcast And it was a agrees to a us. One point two billion dollar deal for f one video game developer code masters. I think when we talked about it we were talking about it in the context of take two interactive having made an offer and ea sort of just trump them. The came came up with an offer for about two hundred or two hundred and fifty million dollars more so they were willing to pay a higher Share price 'cause code masters is publicly traded. And so it looks like ea is going to end up acquiring code masters having outbid take two interactive. Which i think at the time when we talked about it we felt that was a big price. Tag billion dollars for code masters and now the looks like the trading price is going to be one point. Two billion so curious to get your guys thought You know we can talk about them individually or we can talk about sort of which one we think is the better acquisition Neil i don't know if you know the war frame guys. I know it is canadian based a candidate based But curious to get your thoughts on these two. My i take is. I know you guys are fans of this gentleman. But jeff bezos when you look at code masters being bought yeah code about being bought for one point two billion. Let's just taking kids that are issued. How amazing that twitch nine hundred seventy six years ago right on decide to eight point. Nine children should win. Ea i think is in such a good spot and we might say openly. Here that one would you billionaires demo overpaying if you look at the stock run that they've been onto it's a currency unto itself and there probably sixty seventy percent on the year and adding more aaa titles to their. Snow is all the better. I think they've just done a tremendous job in and similar racing at f. One especially with what we saw as a result of that netflix series drug survive and get him is f. One is making a huge comeback younger audiences and people that have now seen this through netflix. And then people that are you know. Middle aged or know mid thirties to my age is. We're all obsessed and we're following it every week and it's quite dramatic as i didn't care about f. one at all in the last couple of years. But i'll admit. I've i've in the playstation store i've bought the f. one game it's not that great in my opinion maybe not that good at driving it but i think the acquisition is worth the risk. You want to be known as as a world class when it comes to fee for Nhl sim racing. They've got such great titles along the way and you know the team over there in teams doing it competitive gaming entertainment now. They're just making the right most. I don't know much about this. Said deal admittedly But anything tencent touches It's a powerful move and they're building empire that we should be very very afraid of. I mean both seem like really good acquisitions from synergies perspective right because ea has all the sports titles so f one feels like a perfect fit and and ten cents graded monetization right. Probably better than anyone and wore. Frame really is one of these free to play like monetize. Every which way up the wazoo kind of games like it's in the ten cent portfolio both of these acquisitions. I have to tell you like in a vacuum. I thought they were already owned by the people. Buying them like no joke. Like i literally thought were frame was somehow i was like. That's just the sort of thing they buy and the same for ea. Like i literally thought. Like i played grid quite a lot in my memory. Brid was an ea game like it was published by ears. I don't know. But like i just that tells you how lake like well on portfolio on message these acquisitions. Our prices are high. But as neil said like the market tie and then took to other point as well you know putting in context of bazo acquisition. Like doesn't matter where you put money and put it games like i think anything that was bought for a billion dollars a couple years ago smart because there were a couple wasn't just twitch we had minecraft myra look in a world where roadblocks goes public at thirty billion or forty billion market cap like buying minecraft at four or five or whatever they paid right seems like house. Yeah just like microsoft like so like the bottom line is but guises whiting. Listen to this podcast. It's so important. It's just like this is not the exception. This is the norm putting money in games today will turn into more money later. More likely than not investment advice aside. I'm not a credit above because the industry is just so positioned. It's the future of so much entertainment media and everything so like the reason. We're observing these crazy exits and outcomes is because the space is a whole is growing so much right so lake. Get into the space. That's the bottom line william. I'm with you on that. A hundred thousand percent. And i think the interesting thing is re that are in the industry. we talk with these things very openly. We discuss them. But from an outside portfolio manager at a morgan stanley wherever they probably are afraid

EA Tencent Netflix Jeff Bezos Neil Brid NHL Whiting Microsoft William Morgan Stanley
Norm Crosby, comic mangler of language, dies at 93

The Frankie Boyer Show

00:30 sec | 9 months ago

Norm Crosby, comic mangler of language, dies at 93

"The English language who thrived in the sixties seventies and eighties is a TV nightclub in casino comic Norm Crosby. Has passed away at the age of 93. Crosby's daughter in law, Maggie Crosby told The New York Times. The comic died Saturday of heart failure in Los Angeles. In the 1989 interview, Crosby said. I was looking around for fresh ideas. I kept hearing people misuse words. So I started to do it in my act. Norm Crosby dead at 93. I'm y of cocks.

Norm Crosby Maggie Crosby Crosby The New York Times Los Angeles
Cleve Jones: Queer Spaces After COVID-19

LGBTQ&A

06:04 min | 10 months ago

Cleve Jones: Queer Spaces After COVID-19

"The reality is that the Gayborhood are going away. So, if you look at San, Francisco's Castro district or Seattle's Capitol Hill or Washington DC's Dupont circle or boys town in Chicago West Hollywood or anywhere you want to look lavender Heights in Sacramento wherever you look where there's a defined gay neighborhood. It's not just a place where there's bars though bar life has always been an important part of our culture. It's where very important things happen. I is political power. When we are concentrated in specific precinct gives us the power to elect our own public office the the power to defeat our opponents, the power to pass legislation that directly affects our lives in our wellbeing. As we are dispersed. We lose that power. Another super important part of it was the cultural vitality look at all the amazing stuff that's come out of West Hollywood that's come out of my neighborhood I mean it's no coincidence that the rainbow flag and the First Gay Synagogue and the First Gay Film Festival and the Aids Memorial Quilt and the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence all were born in the Castro because there's that magic that happens when creative people when choreographers and filmmakers dancers and deejays and painters. Are All in that same area and I. Know that collaboration can occur very effectively online but there's nothing like the magic of face to face contact close proximity for that cultural vitality, and then the third thing that's at risk are the specialized social services for our most vulnerable population. So. Whether we're talking about people like myself who are getting old long term survivors of HIV or queer kids trans kids who were fleeing trump's America where do they go? They can't come to the Castro a little crappy studio apartment in the Castro is going to cost you twenty, five, hundred dollars a month. So this is the reality that nobody's really quite talking about that that community that has given so much and strengthened us in inspired US moved. US forward. Being threatened and there's many factors technology. Many. People will say, Oh, well, we can live anywhere. We want. No, you can't. Tell me that try it. You know go to Duluth and walk down main street and hold hands no offense to duluth or any other city. You Might WanNa try doing that outside of a gayborhood. So we need these these spaces they're important and we need to figure out what's our next move? Do you have a solution. There's no easy solution but yeah, when people say oh, cleave. Cities Change well. Thank you for that brilliant observation. Yes. Of course, it has changed but we want to. Be Thinking about that change and the big factor is that cities have changed in a way. That's profoundly new. For generations since the industrial revolution, the cities were the place where refugees went immigrants, Bohemians, counterculture people, artists, homosexuals, and all these people of all these different backgrounds and ethnicities genders would you know create this these cauldrons of creativity and and they would climb their way up the economic ladder move out to the suburbs and that was really accelerated in the Post Warrior the nineteen fifties, the nineteen sixties, nineteen seventies, the phenomenon of white flight. So when I got to San Francisco, the population of that city had been declining steadily since the end of World War Two and we were able to go into these neighborhoods that had been largely abandoned by the working class immigrants that had built them originally. And create what we created I on Polk Street. Then on Castro and folsom street hate streets you know he's really vibrant communities. These are now some of the most expensive neighborhoods in the world. So the district that gave us Harvey Milk. is now inhabited increasingly by wide heterosexual gendered millionaires when you arrived in San. Francisco, you had a sleeping bag and a couple of shirts and forty two dollars and you were welcomed into this guy's home. You would never met who was not expecting you. It was an address you have from a friend and there was a safe place to live and to get on your feet. Even, if it's not as San Francisco, like that mentality is so unique. I think that's pretty much now partly because it's just so difficult to survive. So the young people I meet in their early twenty S. You know these and of course San Francisco, it's all tech And there's a lot of anger towards the tech invaders but I have a lot of empathy and. Real concern for them because first of all, most of them are working sixty seventy hours a week. They have no job security. There would never use the the phrase exploited workers to describe themselves but are blanche you are but I think also back then and especially in San Francisco it was still Kinda Hippie dippy. And it was very counterculture. It was very communal. And everybody was kind of expected and really encouraged to contribute in some way. You didn't necessarily have to be all that good at what you did, but you needed to do something whether it was a drag show or video or film or A. Poetry contest or something there was A. There was a real nurturing of people's creative pulses and a lot of support for there was so many places I knew where if I was hungry I just show up and there would be every night. There would be a communal potluck dinner. There were probably six or seven of those households within a few blocks of where I was living on Castro Street. So I never went hungry.

San Francisco Castro Hollywood United States Francisco First Gay Synagogue Duluth Sacramento Seattle Dupont Circle Chicago Donald Trump A. Poetry America Harvey Milk.
Protect privacy with Priiv app

Talking Tech

04:13 min | 10 months ago

Protect privacy with Priiv app

"So we all know that Google facebook and Amazon are following US everywhere we go monitoring our every move. A lot of us are upset about it. A lot of us don't know what to do about it. Craig Danilov has a solution with an APP called PRIB- and Craig before. I had you tell everybody about it let's just say what it says on page is you can stop. At sites and devices from taking and share your data tell everybody how you do that. Well, as you say, everyone's got a little uncomfortable with the amount of privacy and data were leaking of having stolen, and so we set up a couple of years ago out to help people to take back control, and there's basically three steps. The first is changing a bunch of settings. There's. A lot of options to protect yourself but you have to opt into privacy because by default your opt into sharing, and so we help people to make those changes You have to know a few things to make good decisions. So we give people tips and and educated a little bit and instruct, and then number three you need to add a few tools that are fulltime protectors. Like a password manager or tracking blocker VPN and so we help people to learn their options there choose and by a the privacy protecting tools that they need beside proof. So privy assorted guide, it's like a coach for privacy that gives you a path to make the changes that protect yourself do do you believe that if I follow your rules your guidelines? I can actually stop facebook. From actually following me. Well, you certainly cannot stop one hundred percent, but you can stop massive amounts of data that they get now and you can do some of that using facebook options. You know one nice thing in the last year. So they added a little toggle you can throw that stops them from getting off facebook data. So data when you go to all the websites that have liked buttons and Facebook integrations on the web, they're getting all that data about you thousands of data points you throw that switch at least that's not in their pile other. Things that you do with APPs tracking blockers cut off more and more. So I'd say probably cut off sixty seventy percent of their data. You know if you log into facebook in Click on instagram ads and scroll, they're gonNA know that but you can stop him from doing your location that there's a lot you can do and it'll help and I'm guessing that you don't think people should take the easy route and sign into APPs and websites with their facebook log in as opposed to separate one. Absolutely correct the log in with facebook is something or Google or linked in our once we do not recommend. Signed with apple however is pretty privacy friendly both since apple is more privacy friendly by default and they actually obfuscate or give you the choice of hiding your email from the co the signing into. So we actually allow signer with apple in the PRIV- APP. Okay. So the APP is free to download a do you have a recurring charges? the APP is free. There's going to be a pro version of starting next month, which has sort of like the. The first level or to are free, and then if you want to go further, you'll need to use the paid one anyone who gets prove before December, first is GonNa get pro for free for life. So if someone hears this and wants to grow grab the APP store, now's the time and we also have just started selling. Bundles of third party tools. So we recommend in review a lot of passer managers, VPN's and tracking blockers identity theft products. We now on our website which is the Privacy Dot Co.. Sell a bundle of those from third party. So we have dash. Lane, and we have Nordea peon and we have different products that we put together at a really great price for people who WanNa add that component to their protection already in the name of the APP is printed in its P. R. I.. B.

Facebook Apple Craig Danilov Google Nordea Amazon Instagram
The Importance of the Print

This Week in Photo

06:28 min | 10 months ago

The Importance of the Print

"Able to little something different for you today here with an old friend of mine as in I've known him for a long time not that he's. Data's. Data start is here. He's from Epson a little company that that makes printers that you may have heard about printers and a bunch of other things but we're GONNA WANNA. Have Dental on to talk about printing. From the standpoint of the importance of it in how people that that may be afraid of printing today or somehow said, you know I don't print stuff on facebook and instagram whatever what's a print? I WanNa talk about that and get to the crux of why people should be printing especially if you're an advanced amateur beginner or or or professional photographer. So denno Steinar welcome to the program and how you doing great veer. It's great to see you and you're a game of thrones. Very symmetrical background their employees. Against Green. Screen. Good Yeah. Thank you. This is this is a brand new setup. People have been watching this show no, that normally that's not my background. Normally, my desk is actually slipped in the room is the background. So some different you guys got mix it up every now and So let's let's talk about this. So you're at you're at Epson let's talk about like the your role at Epson what what does Danone do at the company? Well, title is marketing manager my primary responsibilities are. Working with the creative professional markets in the marketing things that go along with that primarily photography certainly work with anybody that's creative professional. A fine artist and illustrator in other markets. I also do video production and amd because of some of the crazy background ahead in the early days of printing I've been I sometimes a pulled into some color science things related to projection because of all the pain we went through early in printing. I consider these long boring international color science meetings and understand what's going on. The. Yeah Yeah Yeah I definitely want to talk about that because. You know we were. We were talking before I clicked the record button about. Just sort of back in the day you know we won't have to go back. You have to put a time stamp on it, but back in the day. The printing experience was, hey, I got this brand new printer gamma. I got my box of paper and you run your first print through it and he came out. Magenta. Okay let me what did I do wrong. Okay and now gotta understand all this stuff. You run another printer it comes out yellow. This was you know. So let's talk about that a little bit. or excellence. Let's let's do that a little bit deeper I want to talk about the history. Of Printing itself you. Touched on that a little bit. Back in the day was enlargers. Remember those you know we had enlargers. Black and white, and then we went to color enlargers, which was a little more involved than a little less tolerance of temperature and all that, and then today you know it's it's file print. So talk to talk about sort of the evolution of where things were in the digital printing world and where they are today. How much time do we have? We have have about three days. So make a quick. To say you know. If you were to take the entire history of photography from nips if I'm pronouncing that correctly, when took that eight hour exposure the French street scene. and to kind of the the beginning of the digital age, you know that is like ninety five percent of photography and digital that term is just this. Let little. Little Flash. Little. Wink of the eye and just in perspective how quickly and things evolved. But as I've been with Epson and a little over twenty years, I was recruited from the Eastman Kodak Company. And this was when Kodak was Kodak. Amazing Kodak Moment. But it was so. Before, that I was a commercial photographer, I used to use a biton view cameras. Shooting. Food for magazines. Cargo, but if you look just a quick thing in the past. The. Printing was always about black and white printing. And it was not an uncommon thing that post World War Two for hobbyists to have dark rooms and advanced amateurs do dark rooms, and if you define yourself as a professional photographer, you always had a black white darker. Color Printing as we know it, we call now the analog world then it was called color print. That slowly came in the kind of mainstream. Sixties seventies, but that was purely big labs big photofinishing houses. It was difficult. You need a big processors he needed temperature control you needed. People Staff and. The Lap And? And it'd be fair to say that traditional see printing. I've never met anyone that said, Gosh I just love the way my seat prints used to. There were revered print processes back there like dye transfer some people remember CPA chrome off of things. But they're just kind of there in the past. It's kind of interesting history lesson in I. I lived at and that's where all this hair went in those darker. Darker. But the first kind of digital printing. started. Really A in the early nineties and I was then a Kodak technical sales representative which was a revered job back in the analog days in my territory to zip codes in Manhattan. New. York City district.

Epson Eastman Kodak Company Facebook Instagram Marketing Manager People Staff AMD Danone York City Sales Representative Manhattan
How to Run Effective In-Person and Online Workshops with Dr. Isabeau Iqbal

GradBlogger

06:47 min | 10 months ago

How to Run Effective In-Person and Online Workshops with Dr. Isabeau Iqbal

"Welcome to episode number eighty of the ground blogger podcast. This is the podcast for helping them exchanged the world through online business helping you by giving you the tools and tips strategies. You need to build an online business around your research experience and your background around the change. You want to make in the world. I'm your host doctor Crisco. It is episode. We're doing interview on how to run an effective in person and online Workshop to do that. We have back on the podcast. Dr. Iqbal from he's the boat, and we're really excited get around the podcast. Dr. Iqbal. Thank you for coming back on. Thanks Chris for having me back and really happy to be able to have this conversation with you today suppose you have been listening to the last couple of weeks and months. We had a table on an episode 74 the podcast talking about starting a coaching business as an academic her background their her story about how she started her her business where she coaches ambitious perfectionist dead. And around the higher education space talk about her journey things like how she finds clients and just overall some ideas around how to build up a business as a coach some really important takeaways there were around focus on doing just that make sure you get the skills actually be able to build a business what you're doing. It's not just coaching people you have to do but you have to actually sell services and build up an infrastructure there as well with certification a lot of other important topics as well. I want to get Isabelle back on for a couple of reasons to talk about this process of online workshops. So reason number one is that Workshop facilitation. I'm not exactly sure why but maybe she can can point out but seems to be a place where a lot of academics start there entrepreneurship journey. I think they probably have some skill sets in this already and they start doing and finding a good at it and they kind of built this up as a home service offering it they can do at other universities. The second kind of reason is if you're doing one-on-one coaching like, you know all the coaches who had on the podcast for it started with then moving dead. More towards as many to one model moving more towards workshops where you can teach and coach and help multiple people at once seems to be a place that that coaches and academic coaches in particular seem to gravitate towards as well. So in this episode over and talk about why should you consider adding workshops to your business model and talk about what are some of the common key components around planning and effective workshop and delivering an effective Workshop or how how to keep paging aged and maybe even more importantly if you want to keep the business running keep an organized there's happy and what this does look like as we transition in the space over in today to online more online learning more online workshops more online events. So as always, you know, the transcripts of this podcast episode at gravatar.com. Eighty. That's 801 probably pull out a cheat sheet with tips on running and planning effective Workshop from this intervention download at that link as well. So Isabelle we covered your kind of story your backstory while you got in the business how you build your business over the last number of years and episode 74 taking this one will probably just jump right into why wage In your business. Do you include workshops as part of your your business model? Sure. Yeah. It's pretty much what you were saying just a few moments ago. So initially it was really because off I have experience and comfort and designing and facilitating workshops from my career as an educational developer at a university teaching Learning Center. And I really enjoy Sylhet ating. So it seemed like a natural place to a natural thing to to include also as I talked about in that previous conversation that we had. I was initially trained through a tool called the Clifton strengths assessment and that approach is really focused. Well, not only on individual strengths but also team's strengths and team collaboration. So it did seem also like a really good fit with with that approach and then of course in terms of Revenue wage So what you were saying just a few minutes ago again was around. I do the one on one coaching and then to have an offer where I could also offer request with groups. It helps me in terms of having more reach and more impact in in that way to that makes a lot of sense and I have seen this come up with folks are inside the self tanner Community people they worked with and coaching where you if you're doing one-on-one services and it doesn't have to be coaching. It could be website design. It could be any sort of service of that your your business office told there's a there's inherent maximum roof. You can only you know work so many hours in a week. Hopefully, it's less than than fifty sixty seventy. Eighty. If you're if you're doing things, you know the wage like to see and maybe less than forty or Thirty if you're really dialed-in and sure you can charge more but charging more is also a tough one cuz it's not, you know charging 30% more is pretty hard to do age. Turning sixty percent more is even harder to but the end of the day, how do you charge you know, ten times or a hundred times more it's hard to do on 121. You can really move into these other models. We can serve more people at one time exactly wage. Yeah, so someone's just getting started and they're thinking well, I I do have some skills and workshops. Like you said, I understand some of the tools and I'm interested expanding into this. I think we zoom out to sort of rain this, from what are the key components around planning and effective Workshop where the pieces that we we should dive into in the rest of this conversation. Yeah, because the planning is so crucial to say you are running effective workshops. So I have eight suggestions around planning effective workshops. And the first is to to learn more about your clients need so often I'll get a phone call or an email and it'll be a really vague requests. We'd like a workshop around strengths and that dog Tell me a lot. So one of the very first things I do is request a phone meeting where I can find a little bit more about what the client is is 1:15, and that is so so helpful find things about you know, who the participants are going to be their age their backgrounds their education, whether they know each other down there strangers. So those bits will really help with the with the planning and then another part around client needs is how do they want to work together? So some people want to be more involved and others don't and I think that it's really important to to know that up front because it will help ensure their satisfaction with with the process. So that's that's one piece and I'm not sure if I should pause if you have follow-up questions or questions continued.

Isabelle Dr. Iqbal Doctor Crisco Sylhet Ating Self Tanner Community Chris Developer
The Reasons Behind Our Faulty Dietary Guidelines

20 Minute Fitness

05:27 min | 10 months ago

The Reasons Behind Our Faulty Dietary Guidelines

"Hi, Brian, how's it going good Dylan Grades Swell. Thank you so much for making it onto our show. Absolutely exciting. So can you just tell our listeners late more about your background? Yeah. Well, actually lives nutrition twenty-five day for three years. I've been making a film I'm just all in I just read studies I watched lectures I go to conferences. My whole world is around finding out about health and I'm making film called food lies, which is all about that. It's trying to demystify nutrition nutrition super complicated right everyone has their own idea diet everyone someone who went vegan in loss late and someone did. The. They went carnivore they lost weight and they feel great houses even possible. So my big overarching goal is trying to get the average person to understand nutrition and eating and how to be health. Yeah. So I've been a reading about the documentary lies that you're working on and I think site were saying that you know the documentaries reading intended to cover the history of dietary. Guidelines the epidemic of chronic disease and obesity that followed from that on the new signs actually telling US humans what we should be eating and how to eat that food sustainable. Let let's unpack that actually one by one because I'm curious about what you mean actually when you talk about the history of dietary guidelines. Yeah. Well, there there's a long history there and actually I should say. I've been doing this longer than three years. I just spent three years full-time actually actually have background mechanical engineering and tech, but also had my own sort of health during my family I lost both my parents at eight thirty, thirty one to these chronic diseases from people eating the wrong diet, and this leads into dietary guidelines because we follow the dietary guidelines, our whole life they ate. The Food Pyramid we ate the low fat foods cooked food ourselves. We weren't going out to McDonald's we weren't. You know doing anything crazy. We were we were just making our own food and falling the guidelines and they slowly got just sicker as they aged and we kind of except that, right it's people like Oh. Yeah. It's like the dad body you know yeah, you're supposed to. Get a dad bought as you grow up, wait a second. That's that's not right. Actually you know and look myself in my twenties. I was getting that dad bod I didn't I have great health I was getting sick every once in a while I had just pudgy and now I'm ten years older thirty seven now and I'm in way better health than I was when I was twenty seven and it's because I went away from the dietary guidelines on way from the Food Pyramid and you know as the cliche goes you do the opposite and just to be clear like when when when you say food pyramid, that's something that was introduced by the Food and Drug Administration like what's sixty sixty seventy years ago? Yeah. Whilst Nineteen, seventy, seven, there was the original deter nineteen eighty. I. Think was a even more recent. Yeah. It started. Okay. So I will go into that. The actually history of it started around nineteen, fifty five with President Eisenhower had heart attack right? So this is the time when a lot of people smoking and a lot of these all these new vegetable oils are coming through diet like, Fried, foods and people are moving away from the national foods. You know they cook for themselves. So there's a lot going on in this time and yet he was like, Hey, what's going on why do I have heart disease and he had more heart attacks basic put together. The McGovern. Committee. Also in the in the nineteen sixties and seventies is one is all taking place and there was a guy named Ansel keys that was kind of tasked with figuring out what how does heart disease developed right and he looked any thought it was saturated fat and cholesterol is it that was his hypothesis and he did the famous seven countries study and there's a lot to that story. Some people turn a million times something have never heard of it but he basically looked at all these different countries in he cherry picked seven out of twenty two and showed this correlation where the. More, saturated fat cholesterol, the country eight, the more heart attacks died from and you know it, it's actually wasn't done well it it's correlation science not causation on he also cherry picked it and we look at all the countries he skips there was no direct correlation was all over the place and there was another guy named John Yetkin who had a competing theory that it was the sugar and the refined flour that was causing the problem and he was over in England and looking at all these different societies that just recently changed their diet than started adding a lot more. Sugar and flour and stuff like that, and they were getting sick. So that was his idea but he's won out eventually we came to these dietary guidelines like I said in seventy seven and nineteen eighty was food pyramid. Now it's called my plate, but it's all about the same and is kind of the same around the world and those guidelines to told us to what like eat more grains and less meat dairy or what was it exactly the Food Pyramid people don't even remember the food. The whole base of the Food Pyramid is starches and grains. You know it's like e. Eight to eleven, servings of starches and grains, rice, and Pasta and bread, and all this stuff, and then it was fruits and vegetables in the next level and it was like whatever five to six servings of each and then we finally got to the the highly bioavailable nutrient animal foods up up near the top and in the very top were you know backed sugar and oil I guess we're the very top. So yeah, this is what they put out to the world. They basically put the world's on an experiment unproven low fat diet and they actually said, what's the worst that could happen? The world on the low fat diet and you know how can be bad fat Scott would be bad for you even though we've been eating fat for all of human history

Food And Drug Administration Brian President Eisenhower Dylan United States Mcdonald Ansel Keys Cherry Mcgovern Scott John Yetkin England
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:37 min | 11 months ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Listen to consider this from NPR. And as you start your day area morning clouds, Then some sun some fog hanging around, Not a lot, but watch out for some patches of it. Sixties seventies Coast and bay Upper eighties inland again today. And Sonny and hazy around the Sacramento Sacramento Valley. Also again today, Sacramento's high about 86 degrees. It should clear up tonight with lows in the Valley, 52 to 60. On K Q. B D Good morning the time 5 51 Good morning. This is the California report. Soul Gonzalez in Los Angeles. Although more than 15,000 of our fellow Californians have died from the Corona virus, the state's cove in 19 numbers like it's seven day positivity rate and hospitalization rates continue to drop, says Governor Gavin Newsom. And he says the state continues to expand testing with 124,000 average daily tests over the last week. We are committed to increasing testing in the state of California. We're not retreating. From our testing responsibilities. Quite the contrary. The governor says he expects to see the number of tests will increase once the state opens a new testing lab and he wants to see test results come back quickly within 24 hours. All of this is vital, Newsom says. If California is going to continue to reopen parts of its economy and its schools and what the heck is happening at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, when it comes to the Corona virus information it's providing to the public. On Friday, the CDC issued new guidelines for how Corona virus spreads. Saying aerosol transmission might mean the virus could travel more than 6 ft through the air that on Monday, the CDC removed that information, saying it was posted an error. Cooties Peter are cootie reports on what some California researchers are saying about this. UCSF infectious disease specialist Dr Peter Chen, Hong says the medical community has been aware of potential aerosol spread since early in the pandemic and at the CDs, he's update was overdue. They wouldn't say anything to you at all but the main importance of them, saying it was really about optics and for the fact that they took it seriously chain on worries that removing the guidance since mixed messages to the public About the risk of catching or spreading the virus. The CDC said in an e Mail that the update on airborne transmission was posted without sufficient technical review. Dr Seema Yasmin is an epidemiologist and science communicator at Stanford. She says the CDC is decision may be based more on politics you have to wonder. Is this based on science or is what we've seen happen before repeating yourself here, where people who are not expert in epidemiology interfering Yasmin sites, media reports alleging the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services influence the CDC. Published guidance last month that asymptomatic people with Corona virus exposure didn't need to get tested. Federal officials get contradictory claims about who reviewed the guideline, which has since been removed for the California report. I'm Peter Arco, let's turn from the Corona virus to shelter the governor has announced a second round of funding for the state's project home. Key $236 million will be spent turning hotels, motels and vacant apartment buildings into housing for homeless individuals. It's an example of how California continues to struggle with housing and homelessness, even as it battles the pandemic that struggle to create more housing is explored in a new cake city podcast. Siri's called sold out. It's hosted by reporters Aaron Baldessari in Mali. Solomon and Molly joins us now, Molly not so long ago. Housing and homelessness were the biggest problems facing the state, and then the Corona virus came along. How is the pandemic? Change the conversation about housing in the state? Yeah. I mean, I think that everything that we've been going through with the past few months of the pandemic with recent protests over racial justice across the country. I mean, if anything, housing is still at the forefront and has a lot to do with all of these things that have been happening. I mean, I think that what we've seen with Corona virus in particular is, you know, we hear this phrase that This pandemic has really laid bare a lot of the inequalities, and I think that's really true, especially when it comes to housing. I got to say, though I mean, we were searching for solutions before the pandemic, and then the virus comes along. It doesn't not only complicate things I mean, at the very least, there's less attention being paid housing and homelessness and there may be a lot fewer resource is to spend on solving the problem of creating more housing and reducing homelessness. You know, I think something that stood out to us is that it feels like finally there is actually some political will to do some things and you're not going to give away all of our solutions here. But in our first episode that's sort of what started to drive. This whole conversation. And the direction of the podcast is that we saw, you know, homelessness has just really reached this emergency level of crisis. And what happened after the Corona virus pandemic hit was that there was this movement really? To move people inside of hotels into house, Paul? Most people inside hotels really, really fast, and I think for us on the housing team, we saw that as you know. I don't think we've ever seen something like that happened before, and especially on the scale that we're seeing it what we're really seeing 15% of the state's homeless population. Get housing. And so I think there is something about this moment that is pushing pushing the needle of it..

California CDC Governor Gavin Newsom Sacramento Sacramento Sacramento Valley Dr Peter Chen Sonny Dr Seema Yasmin bay Upper NPR UCSF Los Angeles Peter Arco Yasmin Soul Gonzalez asymptomatic U. S. Department of Health and Stanford Aaron Baldessari Molly
Lockdown in Honolulu

Travel with Rick Steves

05:06 min | 11 months ago

Lockdown in Honolulu

"Don Wallace is on the line from Honolulu. He tells US authorities they're put in a new set of restrictions because of a recent surge in Cova cases on Oahu justice they were hoping they could start reopening. It's crucial tourism industry. Don's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine and he's updated us on Hawaii tourism in the past and done you're you're out there about twenty five, hundred miles away from anywhere else in the middle of the Pacific. Hawaii depends so much on tourism and I would imagine it's been quite a stressful time with the coronavirus continuing to spread. What's it like in Hawaii right now. Well the whiny started out as soon as thirty thousand tourists stopped coming way did very well on the virus were the lowest in the nation for states. Now we've had a spike starting at the fourth of July and August it began to get up to two hundred cases a day. I know that doesn't sound like much but. you don't have that many hospital facilities. That, we had to do a banning perks, beaches hiking trails and gatherings over ten So is the response and the impact of the corona virus different from different islands. who gets most of it in fact, it's almost miniscule on now big island, the ninety MILICI, those islands, the people can pretty much go cleese they. You wear masks you're allowed to fly into a walk who without according to you. But people who can't find their without of quarantine. What about people in the tourism industry? Are they impatient or they realizing that haste makes waste when it comes to getting over the so they can start making money again. It's a very interesting case people very concerned. There's no voice irresponsibly pushing for white opener light opening deal like Texas, did for instance. And I think that's because the workers sixty seventy percent of the are. No a minimum wage workers they don't have good health plans. They carry the burden of this, and the other part is the Theresa Stop Coming. Can Americans from the mainland fly into Hawaiian vacation if they want to yeah, you can come We get about three thousand a day. And I think the hitch there is you do a fourteen day quarantine and you check into your hotel and you can't leave your hotel room. The impact on tourism would be you're probably wondering around the beaches thinking this is like it was back in the old days. You're very much in nineteen threes, Hawaii. Waikiki is a ghost town. That's not entirely a bad thing We think tasteful Hawaii empty beaches, very clean water clean here you feel like being caress be hanging out with the beach boys. Old School Beach Boys. And if you do go out to dinner, for instance, you may have the restaurant to yourself just one or two people. Magic. So That's interesting. I mean, of course the you've lost the revenue, but you've regained your beaches as far as the locals go there was something in the news and I think you wrote about it about gun toting extremists who are wearing Hawaii shirts. It doesn't seem like the Aloha spirit to me what's Really thought it. Up in the news, there's one of these Gun Group extremists start showing up at the black lives, matter protests and other places. Instead of what they weren't Loescher it's Kinda create a sort of scary dissidence. Then people here reacted really strongly. Ensured is about Aloha Aloha is welcoming. It's inclusive. And it's actually something. I wrote an article about how Hawaiian shirts fight extremism. Hungary magazines. It's a love story about two sisters from Portland. Hawaii's eighteen twenty. Married South Asian immigrants helped create yellow her shirt industry. It's a beautiful beautiful story and it's that Louis Spirit that sort of loved that easygoing nece that caring for others. What a what a dissonance by these? What do they call? Boo Goo Boo Voice Blue Boys. Okay. Well I hope you have to handle and then we can read about that in your article and then very quickly what's open now if you are in Hawaii, museums, clubs, restaurants what's The dishes and Him after limited reopening had to close again. We hooked to get them back up in a couple of weeks neither good their little outdoor cafes and restaurants they've shifted to putting cafe tables out on the sidewalks and even the streets in some cases. So Madonna. Of Lua. And you know, thankfully, why is a very outdoor culture? So eating outdoors is. No big concession. So that lends itself to social distancing done. It's so great to have you on. We'll talk again soon I hope everything goes well with Hawaii and tourism, and your work there done Wallace's a contributing editor at Honolulu magazine. He's written the French house about buying a fixer upper on the island and Brittany and he's written articles about what's going on. In Hawaii these days

Hawaii Don Wallace Honolulu Magazine Contributing Editor Aloha Aloha Honolulu United States Old School Beach Boys Cova Oahu Hungary Portland Waikiki Texas Louis Spirit Brittany
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:26 min | 1 year ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"All and I think you know we have to fix our campaign finance system so it's not so dominated by the red Sox not so dominated by the cook brothers networks are set out to dominate by corporations I think it's something really wrong when you know someone could give a hundred million dollars and have a huge voice in the campaign and have much more say than a school teacher or a nurse or a steel worker so I think that's something we need to do so we're gonna I'm gonna I'm gonna push you to do sort of rapid fire here so we you know in the house we Pat we passed HR one art which would for example I have public financing for campaigns of people gave up to two hundred dollars the it would be match six to one and some states right you know cities have done that so that's one let me let me ask you you haven't I counted seventeen proposals I think I thought it was terrific and I'd say four or five of them are covered by what we're working through in the house right now the protecting the right to organize act the or the pro act which we have we have passed through the education and labor committee which I'm the vice chair of and you know if you talk about briefly what happens a workers try to form a union and you know some of the just have you had the name you know kind of quickly three or four things that need to change so that workers could actually former union today what would they need to be I mean what what do you see as I said you know we have this disconnect we're basically wanted to non union workers say they like to join the union but only one at sixteen or any union and and you know in the book explains the main reason for US corporations dissection effective aggressive job beating back unions I have this line in the book that's really been picked up saying you know the United States is the only you know of all the industrial nations corporations United States fight harder to beat back indeed quash unions than than corporations and any other country and and you know they fire workers they spy on workers and one of the crazy things that under federal law corporations that break the law to keep again and they can't be fine they face no punishments whatsoever it often takes years to win back the jobs of workers were fired for supporting you union and I I argue in the book at that you know something is broken when corporations can flagrantly and repeatedly break the law to keep our union and only have their wrist laughs I think we need much stricter penalties to discourage companies from doing that and I think another problem is that you know how we all workers only bargain you know one work place at a time whereas in Europe there's like industry wide bargaining which gives workers much more clout when they when they bargain with an industry I think we have to figure out a way as a society because corporations so dominate now and worker power so weak we have to figure out a way to give workers more power in bargaining so wait right I was world bargaining or something like a sector of our and our right now here in New York City where I am you know there are tens of thousands of uber lift drivers and they can't unionize because they're often considered independent contractors but the need in New York City did a study finding that about ninety five percent of uber lift drivers make less than the minimum wage so you have all these drivers driving sixty seventy hours a week sometimes falling asleep at the wheel doing dangerous things so the city enacted a law that creates a minimum payment of compensation for over a lift driver to seventeen dollars and twenty two cents an hour and and you know they're a city is stopping and saying something is really broken for tens of thousands of workers and we want to do what we think is fair for both the industry and for these drivers to help ensure that they can make a decent living yeah I'm not have to work seventy hours a week and fall asleep well the wheel yeah you know what I I one of the things I think that your book does such an effective job of doing is showing that there is the agency of the individual there's the solidarity of group of workers coming together often thousands are teachers across the state whatever the examples are and then there's an electable role of policy and we're not different from Europe because god ordained it or the invisible hand its power countries states cities make policies right that that because these things so you know to wrap up what what what is your you know do you think there's hope for workers in America and and if so why because we just got about a minute left and I I want to let you you know leave us on a on no because I feel home right myself in your book game so why are they I think you know there's the odd I think much for hope in just a few years ago there's you know there's been a strike so workers are showing you know where you're fed up and we want better public approval of unions is way up you know if you even Donald Trump is is calling for paid family leave you know something Republicans have opposed for years and years and and you know and young workers are really standing up you know graduate student unions in my profession journalism nurses a unionizing teachers are really feeling bold and so I think there's a sense that something is broken in the workplace and that collective action unions going on strike working together even twenty thousand go the workers went on strike to protest how the company was mishandling sexual preference I think workers really see that there are benefits to the collective action to working together to improve you know their lives in the family lives in trying to create a fair society an affair America well that's great you know Steve green house I just feel like your book really lays out how we could have a more hopeful future if we enact policies that just can unleash all this energy we see around the country so that workers can really come up with their own solutions to organizing and having a voice at work again so thank you so much for your book for your work and thanks for this conversation I really appreciate it this is great thanks for doing this with me great talking with you all right take here journalist Steven greenhouse beaten down worked up the past the present and the future of American labor interviewed by democratic congressman into Levin of Michigan afterward get others he's been programs.

red Sox
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"We call a set sixties seventies eighties nineties it's the box I think just the two thousand I like the two thousand I know but the twenty tents were in the del okay do you think we'll call it the team maybe the teens better but but I don't like the ads that it ought to be this turned out to be that it is a site what does the word I mean does it mean zero so it's thank you I don't know what it means what is going to make the two thousand it's it gets a bad name bringing you everything entertainment Lori and Julia on my top one of seven one last along what are you doing here with and trust from Tressler live somewhere with the holidays just around the corner I'm curious as to how divorcing couples with children cope with creating new holiday schedules is this something you work with Brian sign or do people come up with their own schedule it's really both it depends on how well the parents are working together is there going through the divorce process it's always best if they can do it and maybe kind of encompass family traditions and keep that consistency for the kids they definitely need a holiday schedule if they can't do it themselves then yes we're definitely going to step in and and help them get through that process but it sounds like you really try to encourage people to put the kids first despite whatever is going on absolutely as I've just give the example of maybe keeping the family traditions in place that's an example of showing that your priority is the kids it's.

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"I think this is a good dynamic that we've got and expect the numbers to go higher. Well, here's, here's one reason I want to talk to you about this topic is it because, you know. They're one of the things that can happen among political parties or political classes. They can get a kind of group think, right? Yes. And that happens, and it happens. It happens. It's a big problem. Right. And I remember back in twenty two dozen three would you're right, for it was a big group thing about Iraq, like, oh, we gotta root for Iraq war defendant, you came along. Like, what are you nuts of? That's crazy. And I just wonder if like the sort of establishment view that impeachments, too risky. It has political downsides represents a kind of group think that could it could be inside the beltway group thing. That's true. But what's look at the dynamic of what's happening? It's better for the public to lead this, and that's what they're doing with a lot of them cards, these sixty seventy years of congress, I, I don't think anybody's doing anything wrong here, I think that's very moving the way we wanted. I had not I had not sort of thought of that thought it in that way, because part of what I've been hearing from democratic leadership is, like this, this piece in the Washington Post was interesting. The idea that, like, we need to focus on these sort of kitchen table issues. You know, we're passing a prescription drugs Bill, and we're passing a campaign finance Bill, h r one. And then there's this piece in the Washington Post today about how that message is not breaking through that, that Sherry Boustos who chairs the d triple c was sort of briefing, fellow house leaders saying, like no one's paying attention these bills. That's not where the energy and I was like, yeah, no kidding. So here's this about the election. How this is going to work if we are talking about Trump, four months before the election. Trump's going to win the idea is, we need to dismiss Trump yet we don't have to put up with all his silliness. We can just say we can do it club. Did when she announced just you think Donald's hair would look like isn't a snowstorm, and then then we need to talk about the kitchen table issues. Right. Look, Trump is an expert at getting people to talk about Trump. That's all he cares about. He's nuts that way. Don't disagree with. So, so that's not. Play his game. But right now it is game. We have no spokesperson until we have a nominee. That's right. Exactly my. But do you agree with me? Guess my mind read on the situation is that the idea that from the house, you can pass these bills which some of which we've covered and some of which are quite worthy. Right. I mean ending LG but, you know it in Asia, they're they are not. They are not that cannot drive agenda for national loyal in eight months, when there's a candidate and this week when there to know. Do it from the house you. Yes, you can't, here's why you can't. Because it's just as important to win the presidency is, it's actually almost as that I sent it right. So we got these Republicans on record of reading against people's healthcare, getting rid of a premium assistant conditions. Maybe bombing Iraq. God knows what they're gonna do now that's going to be important three months before the election right now. People are caught up in the drama of Trump because nobody's better than Trump. And he's the president he gets you, Jen tracking attention, the gender is creeping up against him now to see that fifty percent of the people think you should be impeach that needs. Fifty percent of the people know what Democrats have known for a long time. This guy is a crook and he's incompetent. Let Trump prove that he's a crook and he's incompetent. He does it every day that my question you don't alternate Vendee you have to have to sort of press the button. So to speak on actually, we may have to do that. We don't know it depends. What comes out the Miller report turned out after the gross disingenuous..

Trump Iraq Washington Post Donald congress president Asia Sherry Boustos Miller LG Jen sixty seventy years Fifty percent fifty percent eight months three months four months
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The people that have started the ball rolling and what we have today in sports. Yeah. And now WGN traffic bike. The drive all over with actor, nor miss it already. Don't you? I miss it. Maybe we should do track to drive right now. Let's see what happens with all the cars, right? Let's see what anybody could be out there when there's nothing out there. Go out there with the cars zoom in by so. All the other radio stations in town. Reporting slow going on lake shore. Drive to reports of two people writing tricycles in the middle of the northbound lanes. Apparently they got on at Wacker drive sort of love that a little. But no rest assured things moving well on lakeshore drive. They are slowing on the Kennedy. However, we have slow traffic outbound between Austin and Sayer and inbound between canfield in Harlem, and, of course as you move into the burn interchange because of the ongoing construction, downtown out to Montrose, fifteen minutes and twenty five minutes from downtown out to O'Hare. It is a half hour from O'Hare to downtown. Twenty minutes for Montrose on in and Elgin. Watch for an accident at Bowes road and Randall road, still the situation in elk grove village in earlier accident that took place to we as clawing closing to in both directions between elmhurst road and mount prospect road and personalized traffic on demand, get the Traffix Chicago app. It's approved by the mortgage experts team hockberg just search. T. R. A. F F. I extract the forecast from the WGN Chicago weather center. Cloudy this afternoon. We may see some sunshine, in spots high in the sixties. Seventies.

WGN Montrose O'Hare Chicago elk grove lake shore Kennedy T. R. A. F Elgin Harlem canfield Austin Sayer twenty five minutes fifteen minutes Twenty minutes
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Sixty seventies. So that's gonna put us pretty close to the end of may at that point. So it seems very likely that that's no we had last week will be the last of it for the season get out and do some yard work, then I guess, thank you. Yes. Right. Means a lot of work. That's right. All right. Take care. Now on Colorado's morning news, President Trump and congress facing off over investigations tax returns in the mother report ABC's Phillips has the latest Democrats are firing back accusing President Trump of stonewalling their investigations at every turn a new analysis from the Washington Post shows the president and his allies are working to block more than twenty separate investigations led by congressional Democrats refusing to comply with at least seventy nine requests for information. The president insisting he will not release his tax returns while I'm under audit. I won't do it. He's exerted executive privilege to stop congress from getting access to the full Muller report indicating there's no need for the special counsel to testify. I think to me it looks like a redo leaving that decision to his attorney general Republicans saying Muller's testimony won't change the reports outcome, but Democrats say that country is in a constitutional. Crisis. He is every day. Demonstrating more obstruction of Justice and disrespect for congress of legitimate role. The speaker of the house saying President Trump's actions have made him quote, self impeachable. The top democrat on the intelligence committee, though, warning taking that step could have consequences certainly true that these additional acts of obstruction of person having obstructed the Justice department investigation. Now obstructing congress does add weight to impeachment. But part of our reluctant is we are already bitterly divided country than impeachment process. We'll divide us further ABC's Phillips reporting in China continue informal discussion talks are believed to be scheduled Monday. The negotiations are ongoing in the president appears to have the support of Republicans though, some like Senator rand Paul are expressing concerns about the effects long-term get this done because a longer were involved in tariff battle or a trade war. The better chance there is that we could actually enter into a. Session because of the president also using the negotiations as a rallying point later tweeting the China is hoping former vice president Joe Biden or any other democrat gets elected in twenty twenty because he says China loves ripping off America. Trevor alt- ABC news, Washington sports time, Mike Reiss, the Denver Nuggets season..

President Trump president congress ABC vice president Muller China Phillips Senator rand Paul Washington Post Joe Biden Mike Reiss Justice department Denver Trevor Colorado special counsel
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

06:41 min | 2 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Welcome back to the. Show. Oh, it's great to be here with you today, Pat, and we have a very exciting topic to cover today pack. They were talking about string and power. How do you get it back even if you're in your fifty sixty seventies eighties? So if you want to feel better if you wanna feel stronger, this is some very important information. We're gonna cover today. This is an exciting topic talk to me about this important message today. What molecule are we talking about how it's impacting the lives of people who follow the science, right? Well, we're talking about a new supplement it's called ever strong. And it features and exciting molecule polled, creating now Pat, a lot of our listeners may have heard of creating I know you've used team, but for those that don't know about creating it's mainly used in the Olympic circles, professional athletes, bodybuilders college high school athletes, because it does something extraordinary and what I'm about to tell you is proven by hundreds and hundreds of human studies. So here's where creatine does it helps us to get. Stronger. More powerful helps put muscle mass on the body, and it helps protect us from losing muscle tissue as we get older. We know that's a big part of aging. Not only that Pat great for the brain great from memory, and it helps promote bone strength as well. So an amazing molecule that everybody needs to know about can you share some of the science tell us why you're calling creating one of the best kept secrets to healthy aging. Sure. Pat, what we need to understand with creating is that it's a natural molecule to the body. It's in every single cell tissue organ in your system and its job in the body is to generate and maintain strength and power. It's in every single cell in the body ninety five percent of it, however is in your muscle tissue. Because that's where we tend to use it. The most powers up the muscles. It's good for strong muscle contraction. And it's important to help mean tain strength and muscle contractions when you're using them over and over again, for instance, if you're working out at the gym. If you're playing sports golf tennis anything like that? It keeps your muscles powered up in their high energy state to their strong and ready for action. Now, Pat, here's the key. This is so important for those of us in our fifties. Sixties seventies. We had lots and lots of creating when we were young. We had this stuff. It was coming out of our ears. We had lots of creating our bodies made a lot of it. But as we get older like everything else, we don't do that as well. We have less creating in our muscles. Now, the good news is that hundreds and hundreds of human studies show that when you supplement with creating a goes to work, I go straight to your muscles absorbed easily it pumps up decreasing in your muscle tissue. And you get stronger, you get more powerful not only that it helps support memory and brain health, and it helps support the strength of your bones. You know, we were talking before the show, and you were talking about how Olympic athletes have been using creatine for years to enhance their strength and performance. Tell me more. Well, this is the premier. Sports nutrition supplement. There's no question about that. You've used it bodybuilders know about it athletes know, about it create team is the premier sports nutrient. So, you know, back twenty twenty five years ago, the Olympic athletes, and their coaches, of course, being do about it. They knew what meets you bigger and stronger and faster they knew as natural to the body. It was supposed to be there. But they were a little bit of free to supplement with it because they were freed eight might be considered cheating. It might be considered too much of an edge. But back in nineteen eighty eight the International Olympic Committee. They came out the officially confirmed that I'm quoting here creating ten be used by athletes to enhance their performance. And now it's not just for anymore because the studies are plainly showing that adults for people in their fifties. Sixties seventies. This stuff is amazing. And purity has this incredible new formulation. We call it every strong because that's exactly what it does. It helps you get stronger and stays stronger with hundreds of human studies. And it's the. Purest form of creating muddy combine the stuff from Europe. This stuff is fantastic. And we should point out. It's naturally occurring in red meat to promise in order to get the amounts that are going to benefit you you'd have to eat large amounts of red meat like four pounds of red meat a day. Most people aren't gonna do that. And what about vegetarians they can be creating deficient. Exactly when I have a vegetarian that comes in here and their energy deficient. And I put them on every strong. Hey, notice the benefits almost right away because they've been so low on your personnel that staying away from red meat if you're staying away from meeting general, this is for you. You definitely want to add that every scrawl, right? So obviously this works with athletes, but you say creatine is going mainstream. A lot of studies are showing that folks in their fifties. Sixties seventies and beyond creating can be a cornerstone compound to help people. Stay strong. Stay healthy. Stay sharp. Stay vital. Right. Oh, exactly. I mean, this is the ideal muscle enhancing strengthening muscle protecting nutrient for folks as we get older fifty. Plus like you and me, Pat, let's go to a couple of studies on seniors just to show this will do one on the guys and one on the gals. Okay. I on the guys loved the title of this one. Creating supplementation improves muscular performance in older men. Studied on its several American universities, a group of men get this Pat age fifty nine to seventy two. Hey, can we know that's not when people are known for getting stronger. Right. Right. So this was just a one week study people need to understand that. That's how effective and rapidly. This stuff works get this. The guys aren't creating they put on four pounds of lean mass that's muscle tissue for those that don't know that it shows, they built the muscles and the hydrated the muscles nicely increase the strength of their chest press by seven percent. The increase the strength of the leg exercises. They were doing by fifteen percent, Pat, they could get in and out of a chair more times faster without using their arms on top of that they could generate more power on a stationary bike. Pat, this happened in one week when I think about that. It's really quite incredible. All right. But what about the women out there? Did they get those kinds of benefits too as well? Will it actually help women in their fifties? Sixties and seventies get stronger to absolutely let's go straight to another study loved the title on this one as well. Creatine. Supplementation improves muscular performance in older women published in the European journal of applied physiology, thirty women age fifty eight to seventy one the of course, they got either creating or placebo, that's the way they do these things. Again, a one week study the women on creating increase their bench breasts by almost four pounds. They increased their lake press by over eleven pounds, and they had better balance and Jilani so fifty eight to seventy one year old women.

Pat International Olympic Committe Olympic Europe European journal of applied ph four pounds one week twenty twenty five years ninety five percent seventy one year fifteen percent eleven pounds seven percent
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Th day, January and. Lone ranger. One. See that video of that road rage, Massachusetts. I did the guy hanging on the hood of the car hanging out in the middle of the that was unbelievable sixty seventy miles an hour. The car I'm gonna guess since he was driving a post. He might have been a self centered above it, all you know, rules. Don't apply to me type person arrogant, but the news report was being. The fact that the guy who actually neutralize the rayson was responsible gun owner with a concealed carry permit who held a gun guy made him get out of the car and kill a cop. Got there. Of course, the liberal news network. Don't want to give credit through a on it because that would make them look good. And they can't have that. But anyway, that's that's the rest of the story. Plus, some other motorists the block the valium. Yeah. Who was a concealed carry permit? Oh, you wasn't a cop is a private citizen. Now the guy being that nutty. We'll be somebody on trying to kill him projects murder. Really? He had a gun. Yeah. Leading up probably not. Somebody so hats off to the responsible gun owner that because I got a couple of things. The guests on the movie. I don't know. I just off the wall gas, I've probably completely wrong with the Annie hall. That's the thing. I remember that. With Woody Allen. Diane Keaton, I remember. I don't know. I I I'm really sorry to tell you. But you're right. Are you kidding me? No. You are right about that. Heating, and you got them, right. Woody allen. Movie daughters. I'm sure you don't the famous quote that came out of that movie. I probably don't remember because I don't remember. It was lied. He lied and.

Woody Allen Diane Keaton Massachusetts Annie hall murder
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

08:56 min | 2 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Hundred three to one zero seven ten and if you wanna book on the subject of taxes, and how it could affect your retirement plans. Call us at eight eight nine hundred a Josh. And schedule knowable Gatien review. So let's talk more about a seventy percents marginal rate. You know, whatever forty percent marginal rate. Why would having a thirty nine percent? Let's just go back to the days of Obama. Why would a thirty nine point six percent? Marginal rape, be bad for the economy. The higher you raise income tax rates. The more you reduce incentives to work save it invest a lot in a lot of people will say well, but this only hits a small number of people. It would hit a lot of income. And it would also hit a lot of people were the higher up you go on the income chain the more tax sensitive. You can be low income lower income people don't really have that luxury of timing their income in deciding how to take their income upper income people have a lot more flexibility to decide when to work save it invest when to be productive. And so you reduce those incentives in you, don't raise that much money. There's also a lot more ways to get out of the taxes. Income can be shifted overseas. Going up a couple points isn't necessarily fatal for the economy. When you start going up. Forties. Fifties sixties seventies. It really becomes a lot. Especially don't forget. When you add state and fight taxes. That's about fifteen more percent. So what might be forty percents? Federal marginal tax rate is actually about a fifty five total marginal rate if you state and taxes. Break that down. I mean, I brought this up years ago. When they were raising it back to thirty nine point six. But yeah, if you're in the higher marginal brackets today federal rates are thirty five you add another eight point nine seven. If you're from New Jersey, you add another fifteen that's about fifty eight cents on every dollar depending on where you are on social security taxes social security taxes ended about one hundred and thirty seven thousand but you're paying Medicare taxes, which are two point nine. Plus, plus, there's a surtax really let's say you're in Calvary. You're adding eleven percents federal California income tax top bracket plus about four percent Medicare assuming that you're actually passed the social security tax. So you're adding about fifteen percent right there. So let's say we go to seventy percent if you're living in California, you're actually paying eighty five percent. If you're living in New Jersey, you're actually paying eighty two percents. There's you won't find an economist who thinks that that would raise any money whatsoever. Yeah. Well, that's why everybody's moving from California to Nevada to Wyoming to. You know, Idaho. All these people moving. Texas, Florida all these low tax states. It's even the companies in Boston moving to New Hampshire. So go ahead. Get a point. I was gonna say, you know, I I ran the numbers on the court has tax plan. And if you set the top rate at seventy percent over ten million dollars, you would raise at most twenty two billion a year. And that's before you take into account. The fact that people would do things to avoid seventy percents federal an eighty five percent total marginal tax rates people could easily shift their income. Take doctrines moving overseas. Even if you set that aside, you only get twenty two billion dollars a year now. She's proposed spending this money on a green new deal that would cost seven hundred billion to a trillion year. Overall, Alexander occasional Cortez has proposed new spending that would do it beyond the green new deal if you count everything else would come through five trillion a year and her prefer tax plan would raise at best one half of one percent of that five trillion dollar annual coughed and again that as soon as people actually pay the tax which they won't. So if you look at it from just in terms of financing, the liberal wish-lists, it's almost comical. So you did a study also breaking down how democratic socialism? You did a study for vox that breaks down. How democratic socialism wants things like single payer healthcare? Guaranteed jobs and free college. Yeah. What I did is. I added up the cost of everything they were promising, and and and to be as generous as possible, I used their own estimates of how much everything would cost which by the way are huge low ball figures, it's going to cost a lot more than they think what I came up with is at the time when I wrote the report in August. It would be forty two trillion dollars over ten years to put that in context the entire federal budget over the next ten years is scheduled to spend about fifty trillion and this was forty two if you add the subsequent green jobs initiative, we're up to fifty two trillion over ten years, which is a doubling of the size of the federal government over ten years. It would it would under their plan. The the size of the federal government and state governments combined would become bigger than Scandinavia. In europe. We would essentially have the biggest government in the developed world a doubling. Well, that's crazy. So what what do we do to spread the benefits or the knowledge of free markets lower taxes when people on the right had the opportunity for two years of unified rule, and we did nothing about the debt. What what what? What do we what do you do? I mean, you know, basically, you get these, you know, some of these people are sort of like, well, well, you didn't even lower the debt when you had everybody in there. So so what do you say to that? Republicans certainly missing a major opportunity because themselves credibility, and frankly, they poison the well on on the deficit not only I mean, the the tax cuts are going to have some people debate. How much the tax cuts are gonna cost, but they're going to have some costs the increasing in the spending caps. They broke the spending caps that's gonna cost as much as the tax cuts. So wait now, we're headed to a deficit of eight hundred billion this year, that's gonna wise to two point one trillion dollars per year in the next ten years, and even that assumes record low interest rates have interest rates, go up. We're headed to a deficit of three trillion. What publicans costs themselves a lot of credibility by not reforming the deficit. And really you need to go where the money is. As which is nearly the entire deficit. In fact, over thirty years the entire increase in the national debt is gonna come from social security and Medicare and Republicans don't wanna touch social security and Medicare because it's a third rail. But let me tell you if you want low tax rates if you want to avoid a seventy percent tax bracket, you absolutely have to deal with social security and Medicare because they are driving the entire long-term national debt for the next thirty forty years, and you're not gonna you're not gonna be able to sustain today's tax rates unless they're fixed. Yeah. Good good point to conclude. Our segment so Brian Riedel what what website people can go. Check out your work, the Manhattan institute to do Google Manhattan institute. I'm there, Bryan. Riedel B R I A N R E D L. Great. Thanks so much for coming on the show hope to have you on again the future, folks. What do you think give us a call eight hundred three to one zero seven ten sound off on the tax plan? I mean, I think it's nothing to worry about you have to get informed. You got to inform your friends, your neighbors, your kids, your nephews your nieces because the troubling things people. Remember when they said, oh, well, Donald Trump will never get elected. And then he's president. So what they say often doesn't happen. You you see these transformative figures in American history. And not saying she's one of them. But certainly, you know, you look at Bernie Sanders in.

New Jersey California Obama Medicare rape Josh Brian Riedel Donald Trump Bernie Sanders Idaho europe Boston New Hampshire president
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Twinovation

Twinovation

05:02 min | 2 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Twinovation

"Sweatshirts for sixty seventy seventy bucks trip. You talking about guys check it to make sure it's not. Guys, guys and gals out there. I want you to check and improve Jeff wrong marketing, one win scheme, brother. That's how we do it on digital. So. Yeah. Like, basically, that's the beef Whitney still lying to me now better names initiatives to be done for the rest of life. And I'm never gonna stop going. What do you call wrote because I'm gonna play with her like, I'm a puppet master, Jeff. She ruined mine life. I'm going to win. Okay. Ruin her taking her time. I'll be calling her every day ten minutes before she is about to leave work. Okay. Well, she probably is caller ID. She didn't today. Maybe what if it's actually a dumb? What if I can? I no, no, judgments, I have the recording. Listen to later. But what do you mean, you have the recordings? I record my conversations with Whitney. Now on a second phone that I have. So the voice memo, and then I'll have my phone speaker, and I'll sort of hug them a little. To court and submit as evidence or something are you re listening to them for information. When when the suing process comes to fold, you know, and and you know, if there'd any sort of thing that can push it over the age of. Law about people needing, you know, fuck Hough. If you're recording them. Whitney doesn't give me confirmation. But dom. So that's what's up. Jeff. Why don't you go to bat? I I up in the pig pen. Oh, yeah. He's more slightly and Matic twin, and my thing that correct G and there were slightly that's not proper Grece. No, no. He's like this cool job. It's like super slick. He's our main man lick. Thank you. But your beard is like flying inflict, not slimy. It all day. Oil the same beard oil that sponsors Jake's chicks pushing product as well, why can't we get wait? Does he have his own paired oil thing? So damn do. That's what we need to be done on it. All right. What are you going to sell? I'd like to sound like a I wanna feel like an axe like a twin vision acts like cool or twenty shovel or twin of Asian who making the shovel who's making the X When would like like. a like a print full thing or something, right? Just like has it and we can throw our logo on show. And all of a sudden, you're buying a Honda Civic that has a single almond baby Davey on the hood. That's where I want the future of, you know, the Sner ch- merch store to be it's actually kind of cool. That's what I'm saying. But who would buy it? I don't know. I only need what I think you need to think more about the type of like customer. You're you're out everywhere. Customer and I'm thinking about every type of customer, but I don't think you currently doing that with the baby Davey, eighty dollars sweat shirts. Ninety dollars to it's like forty or even forty. I mean. I mean, it might be closer to thirty five come to think of nation dropping the price officially the thirty five. Well, I need to look at my margin few my margin. What are they I don't know of the top of my head? I gotta look at the cost of production. I gotta talk to my guys in Sacramento. See how you know? The fields are doing in terms of making sure we got the right? Sort of Modell fabric for the sweatshirt Modell. Pipe Akon Honors. like. Maybe that type of catch. Periodic table with Modell. The pit the square from the periodic table. Yeah. But like who's wearing neon who's out do Facebook ads in Ceram ads and push it to people that are into the material. Right. Let's over fan. I am actually kind of a Modell superfan like rep. The don't rep the brand reading material. I like that. I wanna start a brand called cotton polyester sale. I wanna start a brain called tweed. I wanna start a brain called jeans dead. Dan, I'm gonna start a band called khaki. That's my brain my brain, eased the product, right? I don't sell toothpaste seller heat. You know what I'm saying? Yes piece interesting team..

Whitney Jeff Modell Davey Jake Hough Honda Facebook Dan Civic Sacramento Ceram Ninety dollars eighty dollars ten minutes
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Slowdown. You're gonna have bonds drop pretty quickly. And your for us at least we'll see his reading. We'll be able to buy investment grade bonds trading today at par. Once there's any problem with rates moving up, raving. We'll be able to buy those bombs. Somewhere around sort of sixty sixty cents on the dollar, sixty seventy cents on the doll. That means there's going to be issues and love issues. More issue's. Just give me a shoes. When does that happen? How by how much the rates have to rise? And we're on the curve or we talking about what the fed is doing. Or we talking about a repricing the middle of the long end of the curve rates move. About one hundred basis points. They will market rates for the fed raising funds. Hasa raise rates by base point as they do that the costs for companies because everything's a floating rate starts moving. And then what everybody's gonna focus on right now. Where people focus on is how much economy growing by. If you sort of look where's economy percent? Now, if rates are hundred base points higher and the economy's only growing let's say a to growing at to. That means the economy is contracted by third rate from three and a half to two two and a half. So all everybody's gonna talk about is a slowdown as opposed to growing at two percent. So once that changes that psychological change.

fed two percent
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on KTRH

"Thanks for your call let me let me say this is that ronald reagan was called everything but a white man for the eight years he was in office and for those who are you old enough to recall the nineteen fifty sixty seventy s in the eighties the odds of the soviet union collapsing the odds of the berlin wall come tumbling down without one shot being fired was like impossible couldn't happen won't happen the odds of poland being in nato along with three lithuanian cut the the odds were impossible romania hungary it wasn't going to happen the same crowd who said at the point mr gorbachev tear down this wall which reagan said in nineteen eightyseven within two years it happened that crowd who said he's going to get us into a thermonuclear war it's the same ideology today that says north korea are godless heathens they're communist for god sakes that are never going to give up their nukes it won't happen i don't know but i would equally bed unlikely and the nineteen seventies and eighties that east and west germany would unite as north and south korea uniting i think the odds and i think china is on our side with this regard they do not want the north koreans to be on the ark that they're on because it's bad for business and we owe the chinese the communist heathens in beijing about one point two trillion dollars that we owe and they don't wanna lose that money and they run about a four hundred billion dollar annual trade deficit with us and they got a large middleclass making lots of products they're selling inside of america and so they have an interest in seeing to it that business.

ronald reagan soviet union poland nato romania mr gorbachev north korea china america berlin west germany beijing four hundred billion dollar two trillion dollars eight years two years
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Know a bag is sixty seventy eighty eighty ninety one hundred dollars some of the foods twenty dollars a pound in it's an absolute one hundred percent waste there's it's not that some dogs don't need therapeutic diets that that can be a little more expensive but to think that that dog has to eat you know organic rabbit or or almost like wildebeest i ride glance or something such crazy formulations your dog just poops out a five dollar bill it does absolutely no benefit to them too bad mind could do a hundred dollar bill yes oh well let's go next to gary santa maria california high gear go ahead oh yeah thank you one thing that's really bothered me i lost two of my pointers to the old age abor world class assistive canes on trade nothing but canines they started getting to riders and the usual health problems california decriminalized and legalized recreational and medical marijuana i had some discussions with my that she can't even recommend trying marijuana two years ago i took a commercial eeg a brain scanner but it into a child's bicycle helmet styrofoam fit into my dog dogs so i could watch their brainwaves when they were sleeping and various other i could tell when they have a headache i could see the arthritis hurting them in the in the brain waves scanners but because marijuana's legalized for people there's not a better in the country.

marijuana headache gary santa california sixty seventy eighty eighty ni one hundred percent hundred dollar twenty dollars five dollar two years
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Super Station 101

Super Station 101

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Super Station 101

"I had had probably roughly sixty seventy people i had several afghan army soldiers attached to me and so you know kidding to firefight with a brand new group of guys they all know each other but i'm still learning names so you know we pushed through and then i told my my platoon sergeant and squad leaders you know let's look for a building that we could possibly set a patrol base into so i got to you know they called calling on the radio he said sir i think we've got the i think we've got the place it's it's good it's safe a good location so went took a look at it then once i made my way back to my my companies my company's little small base there in our area i talked to my company commander and he he okayed me to take my platoon out there and set up for all the troll days and once again just like the kind of the dream of a lot of platoon commanders you're you're away from higher you're out there on your wrong you know it's it's there for for you to either win or lose you know i it was a it was another good experience our guest on more your wednesday is major chris parks and chris for someone that's out there listening right now maybe they're in college maybe there at auburn university like you or not having the best start at auburn or or any university across the country there's a career opportunity in the military what would your message be to them you got to improve the your hair gpa i would tell them to might they may want to start running you know do things that are going to set yourself apart but i don't think that's just for them the marine corps i don't think it's just for the military i mean i think that's a doubt about life and one of the you know i i got suspended from auburn first semester for for poor performance but i really think that that experience made made me better because you know you won it was a huge blow but to it economy makes me also i've been a leader in the marines now for like ten years tear eleven years but maybe maybe you shouldn't take people at face value.

commander chris parks auburn university auburn eleven years ten years
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on WCPT 820

"The workforce was unionized and now we're down about seven percent and of course that's the bad public unions those are the freeloaders the private sector and then you say you don't get done in the private sector you have to work like judge to get any kind of and so what's happened is and i think richard was right these manufacturers moved over to china the united states politics policy is put themselves in the position that that's why we're the trade deficit because you look at the what it used to be when i was a kid like richard in the fifties sixties seventies to have a free market you have necessarily must have variances in quality and when you look at the goods that were produced in the united states in the nineteen sixties versus what was in china for instance the washing machine you could go to sears or whatever and say yes this was the united states this is a really good one and you could see by comparison with the one made it was junk so if you didn't want to spend the money okay by the junky one but if you wanted to really nice one was gonna laugh i just had to laugh dad told me laughter he said oh i had i had to buy another refrigerator finally yeah the frigerator was new in nineteen seventy two americanmade we don't you don't have that anymore they things are built junkie because look what's happened wages have gone down so this is why you really don't have a free market wages have gone down so much comparatively speaking that all americans are interested in is low price quality judgment because they can't afford anything more the standard of living has declined yeah you're you're buying junky stuff that doesn't last lady that i date she's she's a oh the dishwasher her houses i said well when did you buy it and she said years ago i said well you know yeah you take the old days the dishwasher lasted twenty five years but i i said eight years ago it's time to and now she's gotta buy another one because the thing just keeps has pampers and out and i can't figure out what's wrong with that i said that's because it's it's a throwaway economy now it doesn't work throw it away by new one that's the way it goes the united states.

richard united states china twenty five years seven percent eight years
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"Right actually it's not the next thing you see that she has it to the last pregnancy when she has a conversation about shirley maclaine brings up the abortion wait a while to show the baby and i had a i had a do it you know you make a really good point about the nicholson thing which is like he becomes this kind of symbol of the counterculture sixties and seventies where it's like here's the angry young man wading back against you know the institution he's one of this wave of like the new sixty seventies leading men who don't look like movie stars nobody still has the energy that he s people are trying to find that or copied or something crackling dangerous energy weird like caged animal right but then this is the turning point where it stops being jack nicholson is the audience surrogate character you're venting your like anti institution frustration through nicholson ordering too much at the diner you know sure and then this becomes like nicholson is the supporting character or the co lead he's like the dilemma and the movie is about how scary jack nicholson ways so many of his performances post this like heartburn which is eastwick is like do you really want to get in bed with jack nicholson metaphorically or literally like you sure about this i know he's charming right like might be the even like runs all the way to like the last five performances he did or all like anger management that the party not the bucket it's older men who used to be that sort of angry young man gorilla and now that's the source of their anger and frustration they're trying to compensate for it but when he's quiet in a movie like the crossing guard the pledge or something he's good too i mean that's massey's greater and about schmidt you know he he he's a very talented actor but he's also a movie star you read.

shirley maclaine jack nicholson heartburn massey schmidt
"sixty seventy s" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

The Meb Faber Show

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"sixty seventy s" Discussed on The Meb Faber Show

"Fifty sixty seventy basis points per year nothing toll to sneeze at for sure but it wasn't the biggest driver and the flip side of that is for people who were very worried about rising rates if your outlook if you're horizon is 10 20 years you really shouldn't be that concerned about rising rates what you should be concerned about is that the average yield that were starting with is so low that that it's going to be the big drag on returns they're just not enough yield to generate a meaningful toll return makes sense in so by the way i loved your phrase macro tourists no one gets more trouble than the equity guys venturing into macro and if you see if you're if you ever equity portfolio manager all of a sudden is talking about gold in macro and the dollar it's like the biggest sell signal ever we our friend the stalwart at bloomberg weisenthal at a used to have a great phrase called macro bullshit irs and so we registered the demand as i was going to give it to joe and let him run with it but all it's such as a way to do a bloomberg segment calm macro bullshit irs but it's hard because it's it's attractive right i mean it's hard to not play in that macro space because it's it's fun to think about all the things that can go right or wrong but i think when you take a step back and say well you read these papers and they they line up everything nicely like dominos right where they say this is this is what's going to happen in china and that's what's gonna happen with oil and it's all nicely cascading into each other and the reality is it's more like chaos theory than lonzo minoza says the secret to becoming a financial pundit as as soon as you lead with q e in the fed and in through golden cryptocurrencies in they're all that good stuff that's what gets a good use iowa cuban iso us and.

bloomberg dominos china lonzo minoza fed iowa equity portfolio manager joe 10 20 years