20 Episode results for "Sixty Seconds"

Squid's Glowing Skin Patterns May Be Code

60-Second Science

02:52 min | 1 year ago

Squid's Glowing Skin Patterns May Be Code

"This is scientific American sixty seconds science I am Suzanne barred more than fifteen hundred feet below the surface of the ocean. It's darker than a moonlit night. But even in this murky world there's constant activity including groups of Humboldt squid each the size of a small adult human darting around in search of fish you can think of them as little rocket ships the jet through the water they engage in these feeding frenzies. They're always looking out for an opportunity to eat. Stanford University biologist then Burford. He says feeding group requires careful navigation. These animals are cannibalistic. The pretty aggressive so there's probably some risk to group living. We think a lot of communication they do in these groups helps with that like imagine driving and heavy traffic with a bunch of aggressive drivers. Say Down in Los Angeles thank goodness you have turn signals and brake lights and horns on your car is because that prevents a lot of catastrophe from happening. Burford things Humboldt squid communicate in the dark ocean by using their own form of signalling. They do it by turning their bodies into animated message boards. How like other stuff Lapaz? They can rapidly change the pigmentation patterns on their skin by contracting and relaxing their muscles. What's more their bodies can glow. They're creating a bio luminescent back lighting for their pigmentation patterns so it becomes somewhat like an easy reader. Something you can actually read in the dark. They're essentially just you know selectively revealing and concealing different parts of a glowing body producing these patterns on top of a glowing body. Burford suspected that the squids could be combining different pigmentation patterns to create complex signals. So each of those elements could mean something and they might have the potential to combine them to generate more meanings to find out his team. Attached cameras to remotely operated vehicles. In order to study the squids behavior we looked at how they arranged their patterns in sequence during Prey capture events the researchers found preliminary evidence that the sequence of patterns varies consistently in specific contexts. For example the squid tended to flicker when many other squid were around or darken when pursuing prey only to change their pattern. Just before striking. The study is in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Burford eventually hopes to do underwater experiments. In which the squid are shown playbacks of their visual. Signalling virtual glowing squid. If you will their reactions should be illuminating. Thanks for listening for scientific American Sixty Seconds Science. I'm Suzanne Bard.

Burford Suzanne Bard Humboldt Stanford University Los Angeles National Academy of Sciences fifteen hundred feet Sixty Seconds sixty seconds
Do Grief Support Groups Help or Harm? [60 Sec Psych]

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

Do Grief Support Groups Help or Harm? [60 Sec Psych]

"Today on sixty seconds psych degree, support groups help or harm. Your patient is experiencing profound grief after the death of his wife, he can't afford individual therapy. He wonders if a support group can help, will talking about grief in a room full of strangers just trigger him more, or will it help this Meta analysis of fourteen randomized controlled trials has an answer grief support groups do work, but the effect is only marginal with an effect size of zero point three and that benefit was no longer significant with longer term. Follow up after the group ended. Individual therapy however is more effective for Greece. So. Yes, you can tell your patient that it might work, but look out for those who may get worse and support. The authors warned that hearing other people's stories of grief may worsen the patient's distress, also those with severe complex grief may come away feeling like they have it even worse than the rest of the group. That's the kind of grief disorder. That looks a lot more like post. Traumatic stress than normal green. Group leaders might not be able to contain group dynamics like jealousy and competitiveness when I recommend grief groups. I advise people to make them time limited that helps to motivate change, and if it's not time limited, the group can turn into the patient's primers court and the grief. Stricken State may become their new identity.

Greece sixty seconds
Investigating the Zombie Ant's "Death Grip"

60-Second Science

01:44 min | 2 years ago

Investigating the Zombie Ant's "Death Grip"

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yada it straight out of a horror movie. An aunt infected with a fungus starts behaving strangely it crawls his high as it can in the forest grabs elite for twig in its mouth and bites hard enters into this death. Grip phenotype is what we call it colleen mangled molecular biologist at Penn State and a couple of hours after initiation of that behavior the ant will die the fungus known in his office quarter steps then each through the corpse and sprouts a stock from the ants body to release more spores and infect more aunts. It's a harsh way to go. It's not ideal definitely not ideal mangled in her colleagues wanted to get to the bottom of why the ants. Let's do this specifically. How did they get their death grip so they dissect it infected Anson zoomed in on their jaw muscles with electron microscopes they saw that the fungus had invaded and grown into John Muscle cells perhaps to suck up nutrients and they spotted lots of mysterious mysterious tiny particles which might be produced by the ants immune system or by the fungus has away of communicating with the muscle and forcing it to contract whatever the mechanism they found that the ants jaw muscles had contracted so hard they'd been irreparably damaged?

Christopher Dodd colleen sixty seconds
Depressed and Indecisive [60 Sec Psych]

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:48 min | 10 months ago

Depressed and Indecisive [60 Sec Psych]

"Today on sixty seconds psych depressed and indecisive here's. Today's study looked at psychological factors that predict relapse into depression. They enrolled people who were recovered from depression and taking antidepressant along with healthy controls nearly two hundred and all all of them underwent a decision making tests that asked them to exert effort. It was a button pressing task in order to get rewards the antidepressants were then. and. The patients were followed for six months to see who relapsed. Here's what they found the patients in remission from depression were less likely to exert effort in order to get rewards than the healthy controls. This was true whether they were on or off their antidepressants. The researchers tested this out in a randomized fashion as part of the study second, the patients who wrestled with the decision to exert effort taking a long time to make it were more likely to relapse within six months of coming off their antidepressant, and here's what was not different between the groups, the healthy controls and the recovered patients both exerted the same amount of effort once they made the decision to do so and both found. The results equally rewarding other research has found that depressed patients are less sensitive to rewards when in a depression. So it's interesting that they're reward sensitivity returns during recovery, but they're decisiveness does not in my own practice. I have patients rate their difficulty making decisions at every visit, and I've found that this is often the most disabling symptom of depression patients can feel bad and still function will. But not if they are severely indecisive, I've also found this symptom useful in discriminating patients who are stressed out an emotional from those with clinical depression. Healthy patients under acute stress are usually pretty good at making decisions. It's when depression sets in and everything seems equally worthless that decision making goes to the pits. The study also informs behavior therapy people with depression have a tendency to make unrealistic plans that take a lot of effort for little reward. When it comes time to take action on those plans, they changed their mind and give up and this pattern becomes a ritual. So next time you see a patient with depression asked them about the plans they been procrastinating on and help them come up with new plans that require less effort and inspire more decisiveness.

depression six months sixty seconds
The Strongest Meds for Treatment Resistant Depression [60 Sec Psych]

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:07 min | 1 year ago

The Strongest Meds for Treatment Resistant Depression [60 Sec Psych]

"Today on sixty seconds psych the strongest meds for resistant depression. Lithium Atypical. ANTIPSYCHOTIC ketamine thyroid. These consistently rank among the most effective medications for treatment, resistant depression, but which one is the strongest one way to measure strength is through effect size, which tells you how big a difference the treatment made. Most effect sizes compare placebo to active treatment. But another way to do it is to compare the patients before and after each treatment including the placebo that might be more fair way to compare across studies particularly when comparing psychotherapy and medication trials, which us very different types of placebo, and that's what the authors of this Meta analysis of Twenty eight studies did and now the numbers, the most effective treatments were an MDA agonists that's ketamine and to antibiotics, Mino, cycling and decide, Assayri, these all had effect. Sizes are one point five. Next in line was era peppers, all of vilify with an effect size of one point, three and lithium effect size one point Oh those were also the best studied of the treatments. Other, atypical antipsychotic had fewer studies behind them and smaller effects than error peppers. All those were AH lands appearing quotation? brex peppers all responded on which all had effect sizes around one point Oh and the president was a drop lower at zero point sixty five zip razan also had the highest dropout rate, but don't forget about psychotherapy. Although only ten percent of the trials were psychotherapy studies, including CVT, mindfulness and psycho dynamic, the average effect size for therapy was one point four compared to an average effect, one point two for medications.

ketamine MDA president sixty seconds ten percent
Photo tips: 4th of July Fireworks

Talking Tech

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Photo tips: 4th of July Fireworks

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com creating publish a stunning website all from one powerful platform go to wicks dot com to create your very own professional website today that's w i x dot com and stay tuned after the show here you could take advantage of special offer talking tech listeners piece that time of year already fourth of july fireworks awesome photos and video on your smartphone i'm jefferson graham with usa today once again i've got five great tips for you beginning with a bonus tip which is make sure that your phone is all charged up because as you know at the end of the day you're phone is is good is dead so get an extra charge before you arrive tip number one burst mode you new best friend and the reason i phones in galaxy phones habit cool overlooked feature called burst mode it allows you to hold your finger down on the shutter and shoot dozens of photos in zippy succession this phrase you try to get that killer shot at just the right moment keep your finger down you're gonna get it number two video mode pretty much the same thing you're gonna capture the shot if you just let it roll the differences on social media nothing is cooler then it video clip of fireworks as long as you keep it contact don't give him five ten minutes given sixty seconds annual well you're audience number three panorama one of my favorite smartphone photography tips is making use of panorama mode which lets you turn it wide angle shot into a super wide masterpiece what better time to go panorama then on the fourth of july when this guy's or alive with color remembered make it great panorama you don't need to go all three hundred and sixty degree i like the shoot mini panorama is just enough timothy original wide shot a little wider without asking my social media advanced after put their fingers on the screen inflict damage from left to right so keep your feet firmly planted on the ground in do not move move them extend your body instead from left to right and you'll get an awesome panorama adam lanza most i phones and the google pixel have a single lens that's good free medium wide in portrait's if you wanna go wider without doing the trick many companies will happily sell you a wide angle lens the screws over the smartphone camera i liked the ones from the company called moment you could also get cheaper lenses from audio clip they're not as great though final tip long exposure of my all time favorite i phone camera trick is as you've heard me talk about is the hidden feature called long exposure you could only be accessed issue with apple's live photos enabled that's the tool the throws and a few seconds of video footage on top ear photo they're fun to look at on the phone but hard to share his regular jay packed photos were on social media where they don't move but if you do the long exposure mode on something like a firework it's kind of looked pretty cool in the water you could see see the water get all dreamy in this guy's the fireworks and get all dreamy give it a try the worst that could happen if you don't like it and then you could switch back to regular mode it doesn't change the photo for you so those were my five tips if you have any questions i would love to answer them for you look man for this match shepherd steve engine listening shocking death please subscribe to the show where ever you listen to all my audio i will be back tomorrow with another quick in the world these days businesses of all sizes need an online presence whether you're an established name a brand new startup or something in between you wanna make sure people know where to find you at wicks dot com you'll find all the tools you need to create a stunning professional website you'll get access to hundreds of design elements and features that could help you grow your brand online email marketing tools and accustomed domain name a few wicks is creation without limits choose from one of their five hundred templates or start from scratch you have the freedom to build your site any way you want plus everything is optimized for any device so you'll look great on desktops an mobiles alike joined me over one hundred fifty million people already using wicks and build a professional website of you're very

five ten minutes sixty seconds sixty degree
Implicit Bias Training in Health Care [60 Sec Psych]

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

03:38 min | 11 months ago

Implicit Bias Training in Health Care [60 Sec Psych]

"Today on sixty seconds. PSYCH IMPLICIT BIAS training in medicine. Take it away. Josh! What practical rule do we have as mental health professionals in creating a more fair and just society, Doctors Javaid, Sucre and Chris waddling published a framework for integrating implicit bias recognition in medical education that makes a lot of sense. Here's their six point framework, point, number, one, creating a safe and non-threatening learning context. The authors recommend setting the stage by acknowledging that bias is everywhere any discomfort, guilt or resentment participants may feel is a common human experience, and those feelings can be openly addressed in a safe non judgmental learning environment. Point number two increasing knowledge about the science of implicit bias bias as a result of neurobiological mechanisms and psychological processes outside of our conscious awareness understanding, this research sets apart this kind of training from typical diversity training. You might find in corporations. Point number three emphasizing how implicit bias influences behaviors and patient outcomes, a key component of this framework is citing statistics and research on implicit bias in medical education as well as discussing the impact of internalized by Assan stereotypes. This helps to motivate learners to take the next step point number four increasing self awareness of existing implicit biases. It's time to take an implicit bias association test or AIT. Put the link to Harvard's project. Implicit version in the show notes. It's a computer based exercise demonstrates in association between groups of people and stereotypes. There are valid criticisms of. Nobody should look at their score as a definitive metric of their biased, it's simply a demonstration of the facts already laid out an opportunity to reflect and think quote biases everywhere, and to some degree I also biased. So, what can I do about it on quote? And that leads to point number five improving conscious efforts to overcome implicit bias. This is where we practice thinking about our thinking or mindfulness training as we make conclusions, we periodically take the time to interrogate the thinking behind each conclusion to determine if it's fact based or bias, based and point number six enhancing awareness of how implicit bias influences others. Now we use the awareness. We have our own bias to focus on empathy. It's time to put ourselves in our patients shoes, and in their families us for that matter. The. Authors demonstrate this by citing a research study of nurses who were shown pictures of either white or black patients with expressions of pain. The nurses who were to recommend doses of pain medication based on their best judgment, gave more pain medication to white patients. The nurses who were instructed to imagine how the patient felt recommended equal treatment, the authors go into more detail on designing specific inventions including social contact bay strategies of inviting patients who've experienced bias to speak with the learners, and I recommend taking a look at the study for more details, the key takeaways that implicit bias training can be part of everyone's medical training and there's a lot of research behind.

Harvard Sucre Josh Chris waddling sixty seconds
Exponential Infection Increases Are Deadly Serious

60-Second Science

04:26 min | 1 year ago

Exponential Infection Increases Are Deadly Serious

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky here. New York the corona virus cases are exploding. Were on the steep part of the curve. Nave probably heard about the basic reproduction number R zero or R. Naught and that's basically how many people uninfected person goes on to infect themselves. Then the other night I happened to see a tweet that showed just how big a difference there is over ten cycles of transmission between a basic reproduction number of one point three and a basic reproduction. Number of three the difference was astounding. The one point three after ten cycles infected on average fourteen other people total the basic number. Three Point Oh led to fifty nine thousand looking at those numbers with startling so I got a calculator out and I'm going to repeat this exercise that I did with the calculator and you can do it too. It's it's even a little bit fun. And it's kind of amazing so I've got to calculators because we're going to do the two different basic reduction numbers the arnauts together. Okay so the calculator on my left. I'm going to assume one point three as the basic reproduction number each person. In fact one point three other people on average the calculator on the right. I'M GONNA do two point five just to pick a number and because that looks like it may be fairly close to what corona virus number is. So we'll start with one person on each side. We multiply by one point three on the left to get one point three. Obviously we won't apply by two point five on the right to get not surprisingly two point five for cycle to we multiply the one on the left by one point three again and we get one point six nine on the right we take two point five and we multiply it by two point five and we get six point two five. That's two rounds. Let's do it again on the left. The third round multiplying by one point three. We now have two point one nine seven on the right multiplying by two point. Five or up to fifteen point six to five. So let's do the fourth round here on the left we multiply by one point three and we're up to two point eight six people on the right we multiply by two point or up to thirty nine point one on the left. One point three is our number up to three point. Seven on the right. Two point five is number rope to ninety seven point seven another round one point three we multiply by and we get four point eight on the left. Only multiply our number on the right by two point five. We're up to two hundred forty four. Let's shooting in going to multiply by one point three and we are now up to six point. Three people on the left we multiply are right figure of two hundred forty four point one by two point five and now we're up to six hundred ten people do another round multiply by one point three on the we have eight point. Two people infected multiply the right number six hundred ten point four times. Two point five. We're up to one thousand five hundred twenty five point nine but we're not done. We're going to go through this. And take ten rounds. One more on the left by one point three or up to ten point six people on the right multiplied by two point. Five three thousand eight hundred and fourteen point seven. Let's do it again. One point three on the left. Thirteen point eight. Two Point Five on the right brings us up to nine thousand five hundred and thirty seven. That's why it's so important to cut the number of people each individual can infect with the policies of social distancing.

Steve Mirsky Nave New York sixty seconds
'Rectenna' Converts WiFi to Electricity

60-Second Science

01:53 min | 2 years ago

'Rectenna' Converts WiFi to Electricity

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata. One of the biggest drawbacks too wearing a smartwatch is. How often you have to take it off to charge it? But here's an idea. How about charging it with a power source? That's pretty ubiquitous nowadays wifi. Why signals all around us and most of them are just wasted shoe? John an electrical engineer at MIT writing in the journal nature. He and his colleagues describe a device called a wreck Teno designed to capture energy from wifi signals and turn them into direct current electrically. The tenant consists of a small golden Tanna about the size of an ST card which converts variety of wireless signals, like wifi bluetooth and cellular LT into an AC signal next three atom thick layer of molybdenum dice fide converts that AC signal into usable DC electricity. That layer is called a Rectifier slap it on the antenna. And the result is the wreck ten. The devices flexible, and using typical home wifi signals it spits out about forty micro. Watts enough to light up a simple LED display or power a biosensor. It's not enough juice for power, hungry, smart, watches and smartphones. Jess yet, but Jong says their next goal is to build an array of wreck tennis to power larger devices. The scientists also envision a smart city where buildings bridges and highways are studded with tiny sensors to monitor their structural health each sensor with its own wreck tenor. So it never goes dark. We can in some sense ring intelligence to almost area object around us, and that kind enable ubiquitous sensing because his smart city becomes a lot less intelligent when it runs out of juice. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Yata John Christopher Don MIT Watts engineer Jess Jong Sixty seconds sixty seconds
Infrared Light Offers A Cooler Way to Defrost

60-Second Science

02:26 min | 2 years ago

Infrared Light Offers A Cooler Way to Defrost

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds signs. I'm Adam Levy torture molecules can arrange themselves to much larger structures take intricate snowflakes which form all by themselves in the right conditions. Well, now, researchers have created some delicate water structures of their own in the form of microscopic ice maze with a little help. From light the team took some sugar water and kept it a temperature where is crystals and water happily? Coexist, they then expose the H two infrared light of a frequency that is absorbed. Much more easily by the ice crystals than his by the water without it something interesting will happen when you illuminate is which absorbed more than water because they once once the ice is melting then it's become a liquid water, and then it's absorbed less. So you have kind of negative. Beck and situation. And we did not know what will happen with this physicist e Dobroslav ski from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem the heating caused by the light melted. Tiny holes in the crystals these holes sometimes joined up to form channels, and the research has watched as a labyrinth like pattern gradually formed over the course of an hour. And at some point we suddenly saw a whole spectrum of 'em patents that appear and there were holes that they're open and closed channels that was emptying altogether. We realized that we found the new phenomenon which was not observed before the research is published that findings in the journal science advances and cool is all this may sound that may also be some icy applications for this technique defrosting may make you think of microwave ovens but heating ice with microwaves has some drawbacks. The microwave actually warm the water, but not the ice. So here we have a system, which we. Warn, the is even more than the water, and because the shorter wavelength infrared light wombs the ice more than the water the technique could come in handy for Kathleen unfreezing delicate, biological samples that have been kept on ice, which would be a good thing to say and to have Thole, thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Adam Levy.

Adam Levy Beck Kathleen unfreezing Thole Hebrew University Jerusalem physicist Sixty seconds sixty seconds
Invisible Killers Hitchhike on Native Plant Seedlings

60-Second Science

02:17 min | 2 years ago

Invisible Killers Hitchhike on Native Plant Seedlings

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd Yata when wildfires ripped through a landscape firefighters have the first and most immediate job. But then that burned moonscape often passes into the hands of restoration ecologists who yank out invasive species and plant native seedlings in their place. And we try to artificially gave a start to these communities that Choon resemble the community were there prior disturbance Matteo Garba lotto, a plant pathologist at UC, Berkeley, the problem. He says is that microscope killers, sometimes hitchhike on native seedlings grown in nurseries. And that's happened at restoration sites in the San Francisco Bay area where restores hope that nursery, grow natives called toy owns and sticky. Monkey flowers could be reintroduced planted colleges were looking at them and thinking, oh, why yards toil jahns die here? Aligarh dis Tiki monkey flowers dying. Numbers and distribution site. So it happens that each one of those plans PC's was reintroduced in a restriction effort, and it had one or sometimes multiple of this pathogen that belong to the genus fight after which incidentally is the same genes of the pathogen that causes sudden death, and it's also the same genus of the pathogen the 'cause the Irish potato famine Balado in his colleagues surveyed five native plant nurseries for the fight off their pathogen and found that more than a quarter of the plant sampled were infected. They also discovered in separate work that it common. Chemical used to suppress the pathogen in nurseries can actually breed resistance. The passage of this strange through this production facilities, sometimes it can make them. More aggressive a reported their work in the journals, plus one and plant pathology, but there is a solution to root out these invisible killers a year long regiment of stricter sanitation at native plant nurseries like. Pasteurizing pots and soil appeared to eliminate the pathogen and disease free. Seedlings means damaged landscapes have a better chance at bouncing back. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Christopher Dodd Christopher Don San Francisco Bay Choon UC Berkeley Aligarh Sixty seconds sixty seconds
Kid Climate Educators Open Adult Eyes

60-Second Science

02:58 min | 2 years ago

Kid Climate Educators Open Adult Eyes

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds signs. I'm Adam Levy. Avoiding the west affects of climate change will require action. But it's hard to take action. When you don't even know there's a problem around the world only half of adults understand that humans causing crime it change through activities that produce greenhouse gases, but the picture is different for kids. Previous work has shown that children are more engaged and more knowledgeable than adults about climate change. The question is can this be honest to make a difference? We come across this idea that kids are capable influencing their parents. And when we say influence really mean just teaching them Daniele Lawson a social scientist at NC state university. That's what we set out to really investigate. Can we design things in such a way that kids are able to teach their parents about climate change? And because of the fact that it's someone's child seeking them instead of just a adult on the street or a different climate communicator, our parents willing able. To listen to their children to test idea Lawson setup wildlife based climate costs for kids, this approach was based on previous courses. But the team added a twist involving the parents first parents were invited to come along turn event formed apart of the course, and that's not all so we also had students interviewed their parents. And this interview never mentioned climate change, the civically, but it had questions like how have you seen the leather change over the last five to ten years. Do you believe the sea levels rising? How do you think that could impact our communities? The study showed that the coolest did indeed increase concern about climate change, not just among the kids, but that parents to and though was some surprising findings in the results this process of children teaching their parents, it really was most effective among those parents who were previously the least he -cerned about climate change. So that was conserve. Tive and fathers. And then what was also really exciting was that the treatment was particularly effective if the child that was doing the teaching was a daughter the study is in the journal nature climate change, these findings come into time when more kids becoming climate activists and Lawson says her study shows just how persuasive young people's voices can be kids are really powerful. They are having an impact, you know. They are taking over the news. They're not letting us not talk about the issue. It makes me really excited to see how much of an impact kids can have. And I think kids can just have the power to bring us together. In a way that we haven't seen yet when it comes to climate change. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Adam Levy.

Daniele Lawson Adam Levy NC state university scientist Sixty seconds sixty seconds ten years
Remembering Murray Gell-Mann

60-Second Science

02:11 min | 2 years ago

Remembering Murray Gell-Mann

"This is Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Steve Mirsky. Nari galman was one of the great physicists of the twentieth. Century historian, a physics Graham farm, low Nobel laureate Gilman. Died may twenty fourth. He was eighty nine I smoke with farm, low may thirtieth at Princeton's institute for advanced study the morning after a symposium related to his latest book the universe speaks in numbers. How modern math reveals nature's deepest secrets Gilman appears in formulas book, more, I think that anybody else in the nineteen fifties and sixties he helped to take us we human beings deep into the heart of atomic nuclei, the core of atoms and help us understanding, the bewildering variety, those sub nuclear particles, it was looked like a complete mess, but with Gail man's physical intuition, a mathematics, he. He's surefootedness. He enabled us to organize our understanding of those particles. And it was that, that laid him and, and a an another colleague, George vied to identify the Kuok, which is a particle that is a constituent of these strong strongly, interacting parties like the proton a neutral. So he was a really big vicar, a tremendously powerful a theoretician. He liked to stay close to data as well. That's really import this was a I think, if it to say that he was pretty much unrivaled as, as someone who could interpret these weird particle. Tracks of what have you and somehow see the fundamental patents of the universe in terms of those particle tracks to speak yell man was was admired by everyone feared by some people because he's lacerating wit his poisonous put-downs on what have you. But he th there was no doubt. There was absolutely no doubting. His intellectual quality. Gail ma'am, will be remembered as one of the great theoreticians of the twentieth century. For scientific Americans sixty seconds science, I'm Steve Mirsky.

Gilman Steve Mirsky Gail Nari galman Princeton George sixty seconds
A Landmark Adoption Study [60 Sec Psych]

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:03 min | 10 months ago

A Landmark Adoption Study [60 Sec Psych]

"Today on sixty seconds psych a landmark adoption studied. Over the past. Forty. Years Ken Candler has reshaped how we think about genes and environment one adoption study at a time. His latest compares biological siblings were was adopted and the other raised by the birth parents. The study which involved nearly ten thousand children was conducted in Sweden, which matters because in Sweden families that weren't to adopt are carefully screened for their stability mental health, educational attainment, and economic security. So the families that adopt are very stable and that's a stark contrast to the typical home life of birth parents who have to give their child up for adoption birth parents tend to be younger poorer and have higher rates of mental illness and divorce. So even though adoption is a stress of its own, we might expect children reared in these more stable adoptive homes to have lower rates of depression and they did the stable home life had a protective effect reducing the rate of depression by twenty three percent. But, what if despite careful screening those children were adopted into a home with a depressed parent or an unstable environment specifically one that was disrupted by parental death or divorce during childhood or adolescence. A subset did in those cases, the protective effect of the adoptive home disappeared. And here's what it means for patients. Parents who worry that they'll pass down their depression to their offspring can be reassured. They can reduce that risk significantly in at least two ways one by treating their own depression and to by providing a stable loving environment for more tips on parenting skills that lower the risk of depression checkout, our March two, thousand, nineteen interview with Maria.

Ken Candler depression Sweden Maria twenty three percent sixty seconds
Cats Recognize Their Names--But May Not Respond

60-Second Science

02:16 min | 2 years ago

Cats Recognize Their Names--But May Not Respond

"Scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jim David. Almost any cat owner will testify to the felines apparent indifference to humans when we call their names. But according to a recent study cats do recognize their names, or at least that we are indeed addressing them. It's just that they still may not respond techs associate talents of the names with summary laws or punishments. Suco syto a behavioral scientist and so fear university in Tokyo site. Oh, previously demonstrated that cats recognized their owners voices in the new work. She and colleagues investigated the reactions of cats to hearing human say their names, the study included, seventy eight cats from Japanese households and from a cat cafe a business where patrons can interact with felines Sitel. And her colleagues had owners say four words that sounded similar to their cats names until the animals bitch elated to those words and stopped responding next. The owner said the felines actual names. And indeed the cats had more pronounced responses moving their ears heads tails or meowing than they did two similar words or two other cats names. This study is in the journal scientific reports. The researchers also had people unfamiliar to the cat speak the names, although the felines responses were less prominent than when their owners called them. They still appeared to recognize the words when spoken by strangers. But does that mean cats know they're being called by name, very smell evidence? That cats have the ability to recognize themselves like us, so theoretical nation above van names is different from ours. But side Toews says she thinks we might be able to teach cats to recognize other words in addition to their names, our colleagues investigating whether cats Reaganite of cohabiting kids names, could this knowledge mean that humans could eventually train cats to respond to voice commands the way dogs do her. Her taps. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans sixty second science. I'm jim.

Jim David Toews behavioral scientist Tokyo sixty seconds sixty second
How Effective is Esketamine [60 Sec Psych]

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

01:37 min | 1 year ago

How Effective is Esketamine [60 Sec Psych]

"Today on sixty seconds side. How effective is as ketamine taken away? Dr I can. It's been a year now. Since the release of S Ketamine brand names proviso for treatment resistant. Depression and the numbers are in Leslie. Sa- Trauma and colleagues pulled together three trials to calculate the number needed to treat harm in this industry sponsored paper from CNN spectrums. Here's the results and remember that when we talk about number needed to treat less than ten is decent and smaller is better but for number needed to harm. We WanNA see big numbers me. Need to treat a lot of people to have a bad outcome. The number needed to treat was eight for response and six for remission. That's in the range of most therapies for treatment resistant depression but how many patients are harmed by a ketamine. The number needed to harm was five for most side effects. Meaning about one. In five patients will have the side effects. Those side effects were dissociation vertigo and nausea while dizziness and altered taste. Were a little less common with a number needed to harm of seven to nine s? Ketamine did a little better. When it came to long term prevention there. The number needed to treat was for people to prevent one relapse. Long-term dropout rates were also good with only one in one hundred seventy eight patients choosing to stop maintenance s ketamine.

ketamine S Ketamine Leslie Depression CNN Dr I sixty seconds
Good Advice for Hypochondriacs [60 Sec Psych]

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:09 min | 1 year ago

Good Advice for Hypochondriacs [60 Sec Psych]

"Today on sixty seconds side. Some good advice for hypochondriacs study was a randomized controlled. Trial comparing a self guided online therapy to face to face. Cbt for health things. I Eddie now. Even if you're not a therapist stay tuned for a practical takeaway at the end. The study enrolled two hundred and four patients with Hypochondria Asus. Actually they did not have hypochondria assists because that word is no longer in the DSM it's been divided into somatic symptom disorder where their symptoms plus anxiety about the US and illness anxiety disorder where there's just excessive anxiety about the the bottom line. Internet based therapy worked just as well as in-person CBT. This wasn't tele therapy. I'm talking about it was an educational website with CBT exercises and minimal feedback from a real therapist by email and until that website becomes available to all. Here are the top techniques. You can start using today one. Have them practice? Mindfulness ten minutes a day you can teach yourself for. They can learn it online. There's a podcast from UCLA or check out our podcast. We did last fall on good apps for mental health to response prevention. Ask The patient to limit their reassuring behavior. Such as I will check my pulse. No more than five times a day or they can insert a pause like. I will wait at least thirty minutes before inspecting my skin in the mirror when I get the urge to do so have them practice this daily and track their progress. The full therapy also used exposure exercises like watching a film about a deadly disease. But I'd wait on that. Exposure is best done in the context of regular therapy. The other two steps should be helpful for anyone who is anxious about their health which these days may include all of us.

US Eddie UCLA thirty minutes sixty seconds ten minutes
Bonus Episode | Dr Rangan Chatterjee's 3-4-5 Breath

The Emma Guns Show

02:46 min | 2 years ago

Bonus Episode | Dr Rangan Chatterjee's 3-4-5 Breath

"And. So here's a little bit of a standalone snippet bonus episode with Dr Ron Jackie we're going to be doing special breathing. What would you call it? A breathing. Exercise breathing exercise little tip and in sixty seconds. You can have a proven physiological impact on your body that will lessen your stress level. Absolutely. There's something I'll use all my patients called the three four five breath. I'm basically you breathe in for three you hold with forty five. We do it together. Let's do it too. And then we can explain as well. So with breathing into our nose and outworn as if we can nor essential just in and out so Brennan for three. Hold for full. C three full. And that breed off a five. Three four five. How'd you feel after one of the nice? Yeah. It's basically the idea is anytime you breathe outs for longer than you pre. Then you help to activate the we like sation popular system and switch off the stress side as if you do that. That's it's twelve seconds. Why you do that five times some minutes in just one minute. You can we change the information you'll giving your brain in terms of how stressed you feel and I've got patience. He feel nervous anxious students kids school kids who get knows before exams using this as a tattoo needs to help them de-stress before the game into situation. So yeah, I think it's a witty sorts that people can even do on the chew on the train. Well, that's the thing. We've talked about meditation all these different things that you can do in finding space and time to do it. But this is anytime anywhere. Isn't it? Really that easy dead. Simple. And the reason I came up three four five is just super easy to remember. And that's the whole. Where the want to come up with is actually inspire people to make change. And I think it's so easy to remember that actually people are going to do it. Okay. I'll count as you do it. So green for three one two three hold for four one two three four for five. Three four five it is instantly calming. It takes it brings you off the ledge. It's pretty it's thank you so much. My pleasure anytime.

Brennan Dr Ron Jackie twelve seconds sixty seconds one minute
206: Prospecting with Cohesive Messaging - Jason Bay

Daily Sales Tips

05:33 min | 2 years ago

206: Prospecting with Cohesive Messaging - Jason Bay

"<music> you're listening to daily sales tips podcast. I'm your host scott ingram today. Jason bay from blissful prospecting is back with another another really great prospecting tip. Here's one of the big trends that i see a prospect and right now. Is everyone talking about multi channel and multi touch prospecting expecting using two or three different mediums whether that be phone email social you know direct nails a big thing right now and i really believe that what's getting lost is the message so don't get me wrong the number of touches in the channels that uses extremely important because that's just what it what's required to breakthrough prospects these days but what is getting lost in translation here is is what the message says because if you send something that doesn't relate to a prospect it doesn't matter how fancy the video is or how much time you took to handwrite a direct mail piece. They're just not going to respond. They might appreciate the personalized effort and that sort of thing but if it doesn't address a challenge that they're having when you don't have a strong value prop or thought personalized in a way that really resonates with them and they're just not going to respond so i don't want to talk about is the importance of message message over medium so we really believe will prospecting that the message that you give as much more important than the medium that you give it in in that message is something that can be re purposed. The best to an email komala can be in a personalized video. That's forty five to sixty seconds and it can be used when cold calling too so how you talk about what you do how you relate with the prospect of commu used in voicemails and that sort of thing so what i want to focus on here is making the message cohesive so what that means is essentially the whole message is connected so i did a past episode that's linked in the show notes for the reply method someone talk about the pieces of a cold outreach message that are important in needed and then how you can connect those so the reply method the r. stands for results so your value prop results you can get for the prospect the e._s. for empathy so what challenges the prospects having how they speak about things in their own language the peers for personalization so what are you picking out about the prospect birther companies something that's unique. That's different from every other prospect. The ells for laser is our focus so how that applies here is. How long's the email is it three or five sentences or less as the video thirty to sixty seconds is the voicemail less than thirty second consid- cetera and then lastly you have the y. Which is use making it about the prospect so the way that we structure this is we lead with personalization. We follow that with empathy so that's the challenge then we share the results that we can accomplish and then we have the call to action action which laser focus part so what i want to do is give you a very tangible example of a client that we're working with and how all this comes together so this client sells dell's cpa an accounting services specifically to marketing agencies under fifty employees to forty to fifty employees in their primary persona is agency the owners so big challenge agency owners have when they're hiring is maintaining their profit margin says what we're going to focus this one so that first piece of personalization could be picking out companies on lincoln in filtering by companies that are hiring that have active job post right now so the personalization in an email or voicemail might sounds like hey noticed. You're hiring for content. Marketing managers sounds like things are going really well so the personalization is connected to that challenge of if hiring and maintaining profit margins so the next piece in the messaging is the empathy so you might say something like you know hey hirings and exciting time the the water agency clients tell us also worried that costs could get out of control especially if they don't have a way of tracking profitability down to the employee so personalized the personalization is connected to this empathy challenged piece that i just shared. It's related to hiring now. We're going to get into results piece. We help agency owners by providing the same insight insights that they would get from a fulltime c._f._o. You'll learn how to budget for new hires. No-win those new hires will be profitable and most importantly how to track their individual profitability ability to you know if you might need to let them go in the future so the results piece against connected to hiring so the call to action here at the end is also connected with love to share a few strategies are agency clients are using make sure they maintain their profit margin cystic grow. What's the best way to get some time on your calendar right in that call to action will differ slightly depending inning on if you're sending an email a video or leaving a voicemail be you can see that the personalization is related to hiring it connects to the challenge it connects to the results that you're telling them that you can get in your call to action is also connected so make sure that your message is cohesive and make sure that you're really focusing on what it is that that you're saying and then looking at the mediums which you're gonna say it and next in you'll find that you will definitely increase your reply rates and you'll get more prospects telling me things like hey yeah. I definitely resonate with what you said. You know. Let's chat if you're getting as much out of jason's tips as i am. You'll want to do what i just did and sign up for his email newsletter. Just click over the daily sales dot tips forward slash two six for a direct link. Thanks for listening and be sure to swing by tomorrow for another great sales tip.

Jason bay scott ingram dell lincoln sixty seconds thirty second
Sisanie Was Caught Outside With No Pants On

On Air with Ryan Seacrest: The Post Show

04:00 min | 9 months ago

Sisanie Was Caught Outside With No Pants On

"Post Malone circles about to start paying these bills ten past the hour. That's the goal. and. Then tomorrow we do it all day. It full and then Friday, we do it all day too. So that's good news. Well, let's not prolong the waiting. Apparent we know we know the outcome you're on your lawn, your underwear, but we don't know why. And, this is last night. Just. So you know I'm never at home. In my underwear unless I'm about to go to bed like into my actual sheets because whatever just so we know thank you for just we know. I'm usually always wearing like yoga pancer some like shorts last night. But not last night course. So maybe the heat. Yeah. Maybe it's the heat and whatever but I was wearing like an oversized Scher. Wearing kind of like a granny panty booty underwear guess he would call it but it's underwear not so far a lot of. Yeah, I'm just painting a picture for you. So I'm just doing some work on my laptop kind of just thinking about the show for today and all of a sudden I'm on the couch and I hear a loud crash. I Love Pretty Quiet Street. So for any noise to be happening outside in the front, it's you know alarming and it was a lot crashes definitely a car accident of some sort and a hear a car alarm going off. So I opened my front door still not realizing I'm not wearing pants and I see that it's Michael's car. He was parked in the struts what somebody banged like crashed into his car like just boom the whole side of it. So I panic and I'm yelling at Michael on the kids are sleep. So we're like. This is crazy. So I tell him to run outside and try to get the licensed bags looked like the car was driving away but really it wasn't. But this is just all within seconds. So I'm Ow I run out I'm on my friend driveway and just my underwear and my sure neighbors are coming now and then I looked down and I realize I'm not wearing pants and so I run back up I have stairs go up to my porch to get inside the House and I'm screaming I'm like Oh my God I don't have pants on and like pulling my shirt down one of my neighbors across the street he's like don't worry we won't look. Like I think we'll wait what about the person in the other car where they hurt? Yeah. No, they were not hurt. Thank God they got distracted I mean. They did stop. Information was exchanged and insurance is handling it now but I mean the takeaway was like I guess in a in a panic, an earthquake or not carquest. About it, you just run outside. There's a lot of takeaway here when anybody says, we won't look they're gonNA look. Another takeaway thought is. I sleep just with the t shirt on. I say. T shirt and that's I'll tell you why and this is why interesting takeaway to. This is I worry about it because if things like this happening, right? So for example, if you know. If someone were to run into the car and run outside at least you had your underwear on some of us. Are Less restrictive when we're. Sleep. Yeah I guess. But the panic that sets in when you hear the sound of that metal popping crashing. In really does it takes over your entire body like my heart was researching for a long time after that you know it's Just, glad nobody was hurt but. Could be getting out of the car somebody could have been in the car, but it's you know I. We're all guilty of wanting to pick up our phone and just seeing all look down at the screen one more time or. You just can't do it. Can't do it take away is not be walking around your house and underwear always be prepared for an incident. I guess give it to me. I'm like the one day I'm trying to be somewhat cute around my husband and just little booty shorts around the house. This happens and what was his reaction to your attempt to be cute he didn't even notice. This is marriage that's what that is. There's another takeaway. Normal. Glad you're okay and K, and we're gonNA tell the story again every hour. Sixty seconds away from Santa Bill.

Michael Malone Scher Santa Bill Sixty seconds one day