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Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Ordering online groceries has gotten easier

Talking Tech

03:09 min | Last month

Ordering online groceries has gotten easier

"I looked? At Amazon, fresh whole foods cart posts. Posts, mates, target and Walmart. Let me fill you in Amazon fresh the promises same-day delivery when you visit the website as long as you were prime member, which caused one hundred nineteen dollars a year, and you order a minimum amount, usually thirty five or forty dollars when I made by order on Tuesday, morning I was promised a delivery by one thirty, and then when I tried later on again they're all gone. Gone, but they had free delivery on Wednesday and Thursday that made me happy. Whole Foods, which is also owned by Amazon their promises free two hour delivery again with prime membership I ordered it five minutes to two, and they put a four ninety nine delivery attached to it to have the food derived by four or free. If I could wait till six, which of course I could fill out better than waiting a week. Week, which is what it took me when I was trying to do it locally from some of the markets around La target tacked ten dollar delivery fee onto a forty dollar order unless I paid him one hundred bucks for the shipped service, which is owned by target. Now they did agree to get the order over to me within two hours, which is great, but it didn't like that hundred dollars and furthermore folks. Target has a feature where they will meet you outside and put all the food into your trunk. The only problem is. If you order on your computer, you can't get that service. You have to do it on the APP, so order on the APP. Instant card instant is the biggest of all of them, and they do food delivery for a lot of local markets. But the results are different when I ordered from Ralph's, which is part of the Kroger chain? I was ordered a two hour window when I ordered from Vancouver, which is part of the Albertson's chain. There were many hours, so they said I could get it that evening. FONS wanted to charge me ten dollars. Ralph's did not so that's a little weird, and of course on top of those fees is a big tip. You WanNa. Give a tip for. For your instinct card shoppers, the person who is going up and down the aisles, getting your food for you and then driving into your house post mates is more active in online food delivery from restaurants, but they do the groceries as well and just this week. Uber said it wanted to buy post. Speights for two point six five billion dollars now when I when I tried ordering from on post, mates ordered a forty five to sixty minute delivery promise. In also a ten dollar fee finally, Walmart free delivery, no delivery charges, minimum purchase, but a two-day way. Okay But you know what two days is fine. as I said when I was trying this back in March and April I was looking at one week weights so two days one day. The bottom line is it's a lot better now than it was I. Still Way prefer the process of walk into the store and shopping I find shopping online for grocery items tough because I don't know what I want until I see it,

Target Amazon Walmart Ralph Whole Foods Speights LA Albertson Vancouver
Tales From the Dark Web

Feedback with EarBuds

03:58 min | Last month

Tales From the Dark Web

"This week's theme comes to us from Daniel Ocho and is called tales from the dark web. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says the Internet has a dark side hidden. Just below the surface, these podcasts will guide listeners through stories from the Internet's dark side where crime, drugs and murder are the currency of choice. Here are they episodes chosen by Daniel for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from the missing Crypto, Queen and called Dr Rusia. It's twenty three minutes long. Dr Rouge promised financial financial, revolution and then two years ago, she disappeared. Why. The missing crypto clean is an eight part series from BBC sounds. The next episode comes to us from reply all and is called the snapchat thief it sixty nine minutes long. This week, a super tech support after Lizzie snapchat gets hacked. Things Start Getting Really Creepy Alex investigates. The next episode comes to us from case file, and it's called the Silk Road part, one and two. The first episode is eighty four minutes long, and the second is eighty minutes long. The Silk Road was an ancient network of trade routes that started in China in the second century BC via a combination of roads and sea routes goods like silk, paper, and spices transported from the producers in Asia to the markets in Europe. Eventually, it wasn't just goods that were traded. They're also ideas, customs, religions, and even diseases. The next episode comes to us from Lizard people is called Bitcoin was created by a rogue ai with Sam Baltar it sixty minutes long. Bitcoin is one of the great mysteries of the Internet. Age who exactly created it? Where's it going? How did it blow up so fast? What the fudge is a blockchain, and why don't I have won the delightful Sam Baltar of the equally delightful podcast? Weird work joins to talk about cryptocurrency and the possibility that the J. Cryptic coin was created by. Get this artificial intelligence. The next episode comes to us from breach and is called. Caution falling rocks. It's forty seven minutes long. The Yahoo data breach left three billion users private information vulnerable for three years before the public learned about it. How did it happen? And what can we learn from the greatest known data breach in history? Those are the episodes chosen by Daniel. Ocho for this week's theme tales from the Dark Web, follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag dark web pods. Now for some podcast industry news from the inside podcasting newsletter. As always, thank you to Sky Pillsbury. Who writes the inside podcasting newsletter for allowing us to share it with our ear? Buddies on this podcast will share the top stories from this week's issue of the newsletter. I story. Sky Interviews James Kim on her podcast the inside podcasting podcast. James is the creator of the fiction podcast moon face a show. Time magazine named one of the best ten twenty nineteen. In Moon face a young Korean American man named Paul wants to tell his mom that he's gay, but they don't speak. The same language Paul Story is loosely based on James Kim's real life experiences. Next story layoffs public radio suffered a heartbreaking number of layoffs this week. Here are the details Minnesota public radio slash American public media has laid off twenty eight employees. APM has also stop production of live from here and the hilarious world of depression. Chicago public media has let go of twelve employees and has ceased production on sound opinions. Next Story. She. PODCASTS founder Jessica. Cup for men and Elsie Escobar have decided to postpone their organizations. Second Annual Conference until October twenty twenty one. It was originally scheduled to take place in Arizona later this year.

Daniel Ocho James Kim Sam Baltar Dr Rusia Paul Story Murder Lizzie Snapchat BBC Chicago Elsie Escobar China Dr Rouge Sky Pillsbury Time Magazine Arizona APM Alex Founder
Governor Cuomo talks about his handling of the coronavirus pandemic

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

07:51 min | Last month

Governor Cuomo talks about his handling of the coronavirus pandemic

"Will a lot be in of conversation canceled orders with governor lately Andrew Cuomo of New York who has it's always much something to say about covert nineteen certi racial workers justice care for and there's the state no were of heard our lives of Surtees six hundred head of livestock once the epicenter all of the corona of virus Bolivia's pandemic to the coronavirus New York the now cows has one do of not the lowest care infection that forty rates in percent the nation of the milk they and produce many normally of the state's goes to governor restaurants the credit that are nobody currently knows closed but or with crowds heavily growing scaled back Andrew Cuomo nor do sees they a crisis care far that one from of the over firm's tractors the federal government broke down should that step in turns aggressively out we got a bad and computer only in on my the four state wheel drive I not owned to show it off the situation if you got what ahead you need is excellent in conversation with governor Andrew we live Cuomo it we got extra tractors I always keep as three you might for extra yes many just of the nation's to small accommodate businesses something are like facing that I big have problems no idea and for covert tractors nineteen is cost just one of them or what it costs is we'll to be hearing fix a from tractor senior contributor so a set Ted one Koppel of our tractors all to be fixed they trim that that nails had a price tag of forty can drive four thousand trucks and I provide wasn't ready the for food that I we thought eat it might be twenty they're older and younger Rodney all marine races is and an backgrounds independent trucker and he these are comes hard from times a long for line most of of truckers just about set his up father drove a truck news is as did your his one father's step father closer to becoming and your parents several of his uncles you'll probably mow the lawn Rodney does ask almost if anybody noticed all his you mow own the lawn maintenance tell people to if stay I have off to change the lawn the entire compare head it to on your it neighbor's and I'll lawn do that a and gasket complained about having pretty to mow much the everything lawn we again need to be done on top good of news the list is so it's easy to bundle home home and auto through is progressive Opel looses and save Louisiana on your car insurance so all which your freight of is slowing course business will go right is into the lawn picking up a little progressive casualty bit insurance running company still affiliates spends and more other time insurance at home discount than not is available good in for all states business or situations another low home cancel there's no personnel place like and as part of the follow me Nick carried Offerman go cheap enough as I take you on he a holds journey everything through from the soap history to of oil home refinery a quick an intimate he look hasn't at been lending houses contracts of fame for the essential goods many homes that are helping spousal some truckers Edison and has companies this study prosper and the claim tell that me haven't what owned kind a house of jobs like this you've before had over the that last required months incredible let's genius I think I've moved to loose the history and of I home panicked exclusively about six on cancel curiosity me simply stream because I would a social reduce distancing my ring tap well the and CDC I just found urges the truck you that to would avoid do it cheaper close contact so once like hugging or in shaking the last hands month there are other non you've physical only ways had to say two hello runs wave went correct you sign language salute is that smile enough to keep give the peace sign body throw open air high and five soul together do jazz hands Abbas remember truck driver stay no a minimum but I'm of six not the feet average or truck two driver arms length away I have from others and stay additional home if skills you can't I for more changed info to transmissions visit coronavirus for other people dot gov I just finished a welding let's all job do our yesterday part actually because we're all you know I hash have tag additional alone waited to together make any call brought to but you by the ad council I'm an old school trucker I seventy six say percent I came of employees to the old school to struggle way of trucking with at least and when I one graduated issue that the affected old school their they mental health locked the door and when you share close the you're school not alone when we read ask about in your the company's newspapers emotional health benefits that there dot are org slash hundreds sharing of billions property by the American of dollars heart association now that are being make made your available mornings right for small businessmen back at six Vegas at age you're with a Alan small stock businessman rush right at nine breaking news huh thought starters microservices and opinions for southern Nevada used a micro talking forty business is seventeen one that employs stay fewer connected than ten employees turning to Sunday morning since we on talked the radio Rodney got sixty eight hundred dollars in federal loan assistance but that he says won't last long so right it now happened this we're past using Friday our personal June credit to nineteenth stay in business so the I gotta celebration ask you a couple questions known as Juneteenth have you or anyone in your family it been cyclical was the one been hundred nineteen fifty last fifth two weeks anniversary now of Jenna the day cows in eighteen nail sixty salon five is open but when business major general remains Gordon Granger limited of the victorious we're only open Union at this Army point maybe proclaim two to to three the people days of Texas a week that can all you slaves stay are free afloat for this naturally involves an absolute if equality you're asking were of breaking personal even rights and no rights we're of not property between we're not former at all masters we need to and open slaves every single day but there's no demand easier right now said than done the period of relative black our freedom clientele known as is reconstruction predominantly was cut short forty five plus in eighteen seventy so seven a lot of them are still scared to be followed by they always nearly call a back century and cancel say of you Jim know what crow my daughter segregation says to hold laws off and in the I've south gotten so many of those phone and calls defacto not segregation just to complicate across things much further of the north you were on the verge of opening a second song right the still civil rights trying to open and the voting second salon rights acts of the so nineteen this is sixties my new space addressed it's many in of our those brand injustices new shopping center that's still under construction several of the much other businesses as events of says the last Jenna several weeks have under already score formed much work hearing remains that is to just be done really scary because if I don't open this business and then I lose everything through but I've it already all put Americans in of good when will you say a have lot celebrated of money June what nineteenth are you talking about as I the end dumped about of slavery like forty thousand in dollars America in two of my own money so it says it this will be is a huge loss for me people have and what's your biggest worry the biggest I'm going to worry sign an is executive just you order know today recognizing the business Juneteenth not surviving do New you York drink governor lemonade Andrew and Cuomo Arndale declared asked a holiday the mayor for state because employees this is how this past I feed week my kids while how did many I say that wrong dream of seeing the dates Hey and trying this is my to livelihood as a national holiday just stay in touch for through all the summer and see what happens David woods dairy business Sunday operates morning on on a much CBS greater news scale radio continues for about a week in April in a moment he tells Jay us Farner he here was losing CEO about of rocket twenty mortgage to twenty making five the right financial thousand decisions dollars has never been more important a day when you turned well a the rocket worst mortgage thing that's happened we is can help only guide half of you them to those so right well decisions now I when lost they matter about most eight loads mortgage rates are and near that's historic expensive lows so now hello is a great time that to is call eight a three trainload three eight of rocket milk is about and seventy if you need some five extra money hundred a cash gallons out refinance eight could loads give you that financial sixty boost thousand you're looking for gallons call of today milk at eight three three dumped eight rocket over or rocket the course mortgage of three dot weeks com to learn more call for cost information house conditions do equal not housing stop lender license producing in all fifty states because and MLS of the changing number thirty thirty market dressed millions out of hungry try stress people balls distressing and gummies you have the couple and you'll thousands feel like upon thousands upon thousands of gallons that's because stress of balls milk gummies contain a clinically that you proven have to herb throw called away ashwagandha isn't there some that becomes way more effective over time of it relieving leading stress organizations so later come your whole body and feels pick up like that Millikan street people until well eventually developed your whole that we world produce feels is light raw milk then there is to turn a your chance stress life that into some your type best of bacteria life could and become be in a it stress baller so with for us stress to balls gummy have supplements somebody come in and check our milk home would be glad to do it there's no place better hearing like it later throwing away follow me you can't Nick do that Offerman as for the I rescue take that's you illegal on a journey the challenges through the history are staggering of all but what David an intimate and look Rodney at houses and Jenna of fame have in common thank you for calling many homes shots what else spousal I can help you Edison isn't has this up study lifting the and sense the claim of optimism that haven't owned a house hello like this before I suppose that I could be required a negative thinker incredible but I choose genius not to the choose to look at the positive the history basis and of try home to be ready for exclusively the on unexpected curiosity if that stream happens hi it's you're Jamie gonna make progresses it through employee the sorry of the month to month in all a row absolutely leave because a message that's at what the we do hi Jamie we break hit down me the side Danny of the road I just had a new idea and we walk for our song six what the miles name your price tool for miles so to when get what it's we like need to tell get us back what you to fix want our to truck pay and still deliver our the problem our little was what in wine the morning and you no say one knows well the difference be fine that's coverage what we do options what to a fit modern your budget day cap then how do we wrap we just this all conversation the fingers now small of choir general goes what's the even bottom coming line at you here favorites coming at you jet know yes we're no all doing maybe the best that we anyway can so your practice tonight and I got a new lyrics of the rhetoric you know for everyone progressive to be casualty kind insurance and company everything affiliates pricing that we're coverage doing much this limited everybody by state law use their best judgment Sunday so if morning you want to come out and get your on nails the radio done then you use your best judgment on that in this time of great unease Sunday we morning wondered on what CBS was happening news radio apple continues with John after Dickerson this of sixty minutes we're about to find out from CEO Tim cook as we speak right now you're full of secrets I full of secrets and it's hard not to over flow right now but I but I I but I've been trying to well Tim cook will finally get to share those secrets tomorrow when he kicks off apple's thirty first annual worldwide developers conference we want to talk about now the next opportunity to transform the

Andrew Cuomo New York Surtees Bolivia
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

04:30 min | Last month

The Skeptics Guide

"We've actually been getting a lot of questions about some of the science and critical thinking issues, surrounding the protests that are happening and Statistics, etc, studies that have been coming out, so we're going to address those in the email and questions section because I think that's a good way to deal with issues by answering questions are being a little bit more interactive. And since that happens to be in our sweet spot, we might as well. Dig. In Yeah, yeah, well, we definitely. And we were talking about. What should we be talking about? When all this big big world changing stuff is happening around us. We can't talk about narrow news stories. But yeah, we want to do what we do best we want to contribute. What we feel is in our sweet spot as you say. Jay, which is, let's talk about the science evidence, the critical thinking, and maybe hopefully raise the level of discourse a little bit. We can do that so the quick covered nineteen updates. Storm. It seems like it's accelerating like there's just so much so many news items within one thing. That's interesting. That I wrote about earlier in the week is that? We've had number these questions. What was the effect of the lockdown on the flu season? Yeah interest in great question. Absolutely, and now we have some data, so of course it depends on where you are in the world. The covered nineteen hit the The US at the tail end of the flu season. This flu season was a particularly bad one at the upper end of the typical range. was there an issue with the vaccinations or no? There wasn't no vaccine was actually fine. This year wasn't the vaccine. It was just a bad flu season saying. yeah, there was between twenty thousand and sixty thousand deaths in the US which. which wasn't twenty or sixty minutes? That's sounds like number, two, two, hundred, ninety, six, hundred, and fifty globally, so the reason for the range is because did kill person or not. No, no most people who get the flu. Does the flu test and so then you have heard. That's right so clinically that they have the flu. So if you count justed laboratory confirmed cases that's at the low end, and if you count probable clinical cases as at the high end, so when we have ever had a flu test I've had A. Vaccine here, but I don't think I've ever gone to the doctor and the actually test for the flu. They just say Oh you probably have the flu. The extrapolation of what was likely. Yes, so studied basic patient. If you go to your doctor and say I have the flu, and they treat you for the flu that count, even though they didn't a laboratory test to confirm it was actually. Think they should even state the low, and then because it's clearly wrong clearly. Whatever? War We want you to know? We're basically just showing the error bars at this. Is Let me get. We're actually talking about so you're right. Chose really fascinating, so if you out raff out the numbers of detected a possible. Death you know typically peaks January February and then, and then to trails off through may but this year. Basically, it ended five weeks early like. A lockdown compliance completely shut down the flu season. But Steve You don't I don't want to sound like a jerk right now, but no shit, yeah! It no shit, because think about it, you know people are questioning whether or not the lockdown was effective, and this is an independent piece of evidence that yeah, it's effective. It actually does keep viruses from spreading around not just nineteen, but also the flu season. As you say, it should have worked, but it's nice to know that it actually did yeah, and don't forget. A lot of people were saying well. You know this. If this corona virus is so bad, why don't we do take similar measures with bad flu seasons and a lot of people were thinking like. Yeah, maybe we should take it more seriously. That's. That's a lot of people that die every year and here's here's. Here's more proof than that. If we did. Take it a little bit more seriously, especially in a bad flu season, and do some something akin not full on lockdown, but just being more careful with the touching your face, and maybe even more mass re could cut that we can cut those numbers down

FLU United States JAY Steve You
Bringing a discussion about racial bias in the military to social media

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

00:56 sec | Last month

Bringing a discussion about racial bias in the military to social media

"The nation's military took a huge step forward toward racial equality this past week a step the David Martin tells us underscores just how difficult life for black military leaders has been many of you may be wondering what I'm thinking about the current events surrounding the tragic death of George Floyd here's what I'm thinking about it was that airforce general Charles Q. brown began a motional social media soliloquy on the racial bias he has dealt with all his life I think about my airforce career where I was often the only African American in my squadron was a senior officer the only African American in the room we first met general brown on a sixty minute story five years ago when he was the commander of the air war against ISIS directing strikes in Iraq and Syria not a secondary one

David Martin George Floyd Officer Commander Iraq Charles Q. Brown Syria
Why Are There 60 Minutes In An Hour Instead of 100?

BrainStuff

03:01 min | Last month

Why Are There 60 Minutes In An Hour Instead of 100?

"Today's question is why do we measure time the way we do at the first glance? It seems like it's a sensible thing. Until we start delving into it, so let's start with the day. What is a day? A day is just the amount of time that it takes our globe to make a full rotation on its axis, simple right, but then we divided day into twenty four parts for some reason, and then of those twenty four hours we measured those in sixty minute increments for some reason, and then we get down to A. A minute we measure that in terms of seconds again a collection of sixty for some reason, but when we get two seconds, we measure those in the most popular numerical system today, the decimal system, so we talk in terms of a hundredth of a second, Ori Millionth of a second, but why? How do we even start measuring days in dividing them this way well, the Babylonians were measuring time in what's called a sexist decimal system as opposed to a decimal system. They were based on sixty instead of base ten so earlier, we said the decimal system is the. The most popular and it makes sense right because the vast majority of human beings have ten fingers. It's very easy for the human species to count to ten. So why would you use something that relies on sixty? Or why would you use something that relies on twelve well? When we look at the Babylonian System, it actually makes some sense. There is some method to this ancient madness and here's why if we use the base ten idea ten to one hundred, the notation that we would have to make measure a specific time of day would become ridiculous very quickly. Quickly and complicated as well. The thing is that sixty has some advantages because sixty. If you just break it down is essentially five times twelve, then it has both the advantages of a ten and twelve as a system, so that is why it makes sense for us to use sixty seconds and sixty minutes, but the big explanation that no one's figured out yet is how this spread around the world did it happened because it was an accident of history. Did it happen because it was really the most efficient way that human beings have figured out how to measure? And one last thing we're all familiar with a PM. AM stands for Anti Meridian, and PM stands for Post Meridian. These are terms that came about during the Roman era when they used to divide the entire day into two things just am and PM. This was so important in fact that they used to have these people whose Job was to wait until the sun crossed over, so they could run to the forum and say everybody. Okay, it is noon. It is officially he am and the reason. Why is because lawyers were required to show up by new?

Post Meridian
Lockdowns trigger dramatic fall in global carbon emissions

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

Lockdowns trigger dramatic fall in global carbon emissions

"With so many factories shuttered in planes and cars idle there's been a dramatic drop in climate warming carbon dioxide emissions around the world Stanford university's rob Jackson says their study found emissions were down seventeen percent last month at the height of the lockdown we see that historic drop in greenhouse gas pollution carbon dioxide emissions will fall this year at a rate we haven't seen since World War two perhaps ever cities around the world have clear skies around Dadi ruin lives in India which is home to seventeen of the world's most polluted cities he told sixty minutes when it's normally like in Delhi when normally it is dystopian you know it especially in the winter months sometimes that smog is not just outside your house is inside your house and suddenly religious seeing blue

Stanford University Dadi India Delhi Rob Jackson
Stock market: Dow up 900, Moderna positive vaccine data, Powell says ‘no limit’

CNBC's Fast Money

02:53 min | 2 months ago

Stock market: Dow up 900, Moderna positive vaccine data, Powell says ‘no limit’

"Off the big market rally that kicked off the week the S. and B. Posting. Its highest close in over two months down almost four percent its biggest gain since the start of April. The Nasdaq now at three percent. Twenty twenty six percent away from its all time high a far cry from where we were just a few weeks ago. But do you believe in this rally guy. Well High Mill High Guy so I mean no. You know the answer that with me. I don't believe in it at all but also been wrong now for the last couple of weeks in this move from twenty. Eight hundred to current levels has me scratching my head. And you know again could tim who has said consistently the paint trade is higher. But you know I think not only was the hope of vaccine in the in the in the blanket of a phase. One promising trial part of this. But you know the sixty minutes piece last night with Jerome Powell. Which was you know for somebody like me? Just stomach turning asked. Where are they getting this money from you just pulling it out of thin air and his answers? Well that's one way of putting it. I mean that was a lot of this as well. So listen I see what happened today? I get it I understand. People want to be hopeful but now I really think we're ahead of ourselves. Mill in his previous testimony also says effectively that they are far from running out of ammunition That of course coming much later in the day Tim. The question is though how much of this rally is actually baking in the realization of that vaccine guide mention. It's pays one. There's face to their space three. There's a lot of times still ahead. Yeah Yeah I think if you're if you're backing the rally on the news is it's something that you have to be really careful about When you think about what Powell was saying that which was turning guys stomach the fact that he's saying hey let's not have Washington worry about this. We'll worry about deficits later. We've we've always been a netspend her. That's actually that is bothersome because I think to assume that this is the same context in which the US has run. A deficit is their apples and oranges. Having said all that think about the market has done since ten. Am Thursday morning. We've rally seven percent on the SNP so think about all the periods we've had During this chaos this crisis one nineteen. This is about as strong as a move as we've had and we've taken it right back up to that twenty nine fifty level cars later in the show. Let the charters talk about this but if you think about where we are in terms of fundamentals where people are trying to do and they did it today with value over growth at a time. When Friday's news on Google Antitrust Huawei on Friday China retaliates overnight? Or at least. The jawboning on that has only escalated. So it's been kind of a driver for these industrial names and these underperforms in these these value names if I may Late cycle cyclicals that have actually outperformed over the last couple of days. So extraordinary relative to this market move. And I don't think it's just about Madonna

Jerome Powell TIM Google Mill United States China Washington
Trump attacks whistleblower Bright as 'disgruntled employee

KYW 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Trump attacks whistleblower Bright as 'disgruntled employee

"In three tweets late last night president trump leveled the quote fake news label and CBS's sixty minutes someone he calls a disgruntled employee quote creep and democratic supporter was spotlighted the president didn't like what he saw on sixty minutes last night Rick bright formally a virus expert at the national institutes of health who claims he was demoted for warning against using Cork when treatments Mister trumpet been promoting was interviewed a couple days earlier bright testified to a house committee he's filed a whistleblower complaint with the president tweeting Sunday night this whole whistle blower rack it needs to be looked at very closely it is causing great injustice and harm he also called on CBS news the fire or demote the people involved with the bright interview the whistleblower complaint and a domino effect that led to his

CBS President Trump Rick Bright Mister
Powell says a full economic recovery may not happen without a vaccine

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:17 sec | 2 months ago

Powell says a full economic recovery may not happen without a vaccine

"Federal reserve chair Jerome Powell expressed optimism yesterday that the U. S. economy can begin to recover in the second half of the year assuming there's not a big second wave of the corona virus but he tells CBS's sixty minutes the full recovery likely won't be possible before there's a

Jerome Powell CBS
Fed Chair Jerome Powell says economy will recover, but it could take a year or more

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:26 sec | 2 months ago

Fed Chair Jerome Powell says economy will recover, but it could take a year or more

"Fed chair Jerome Powell says the economy will start recovering wants to corona viruses under control in an interview with CBS's sixty minutes Powell predicts the U. S. economy will not recover until people feel confident they're safe he knows the sooner the virus gets control the better than the sooner the economy can reopen Paul believes there will be improvement in the economy in the second half of the year but he worries a second wave of the virus could cause more

Jerome Powell CBS Paul
Powell says US will recover, eventually

First Light

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Powell says US will recover, eventually

"The world a loosening of restrictions as the number of coronavirus cases reaches more than four and a half million here in the U. S. almost a million and a half people have been infected and nearly ninety thousand have died from covert nineteen that in addition to the thirty six million Americans who have suddenly become unemployed fed chair Jerome Powell telling sixty minutes that the U. S. economy will recover eventually in the long run I would say because US economy will recover will get back to the place we were in February we'll get to an even better place than that I'm I'm highly confident of

Jerome Powell United States
Fed Chair Says Economic Recovery May ‘Stretch’ Through End of 2021

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Fed Chair Says Economic Recovery May ‘Stretch’ Through End of 2021

"Federal reserve chair Jerome Powell says the U. S. recovery could drag through twenty twenty one Powell told the CBS news program sixty minutes the economy will recover steadily through the second half of this year but he said a full recovery depends on people being confident and that may not happen until a vaccine is available it's going to take awhile for us to get back but I I would just say this in the long run and even in the medium run you wouldn't want to bet against the American economy this economy will recover it may take awhile it may take a period of time it could stretch through the end of next year we really don't

Jerome Powell CBS
Fed Chair: Recovery may begin by summer, will likely be slow

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:07 sec | 2 months ago

Fed Chair: Recovery may begin by summer, will likely be slow

"At federal reserve chairman Jerome Powell tells CBS's sixty minutes he thinks the U. S. economy can rebound in the second half of

Jerome Powell CBS Federal Reserve Chairman
Huawei accusing U. S. of using cyber security rules to safeguard its own dominance

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

01:39 min | 2 months ago

Huawei accusing U. S. of using cyber security rules to safeguard its own dominance

"Huawei is accusing the U. S. of using cyber security rules to safeguard its own dominance of the tech industry it comes as the White House tightens rules to prevent chipmakers form supplying wall way China says that the move may threaten the global supply chain I given the restrictions the K. reports that Taiwan semiconductor has stopped accepting orders from the Chinese tech giants meanwhile fed chair Jay Powell says the US economy will recover from the virus but the process could take until the end of twenty twenty one and depend on the delivery of a vaccine pals but see CBS's sixty minutes Mr Carney will recover it may take awhile it may take a period of time it could stretch through the end of next year we really don't know Powell's remarks follow warning the asset prices could see significant declines if the virus crisis deepens meanwhile Japan's economy cyclol schools are falling into recession is only likely to deepen not says household limit spending a company's concept best mid production and hiring GDP shrank and unutilized three point four percent for the three months that analysts see on over twenty percent contraction for Japan in the second quarter Emirates may slash around thirty thousand jobs as it looks to cut costs to whether the virus crisis the cuts would reduce the carries payroll under the five thousand by around thirty percent with the travel down to an expected to last for years the world's biggest local carrier has already raised one point two billion dollars in new financing and is seeking more help from the Dubai government interesting okay those are top stories this morning let's get more on the spread of the coronavirus what's happening in Europe

Huawei White House China Taiwan Semiconductor Jay Powell CBS Mr Carney Japan Europe United States Dubai
Fed Chair Jerome Powell says economy will recover steadily this year, barring second wave

WBZ Afternoon News

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Fed Chair Jerome Powell says economy will recover steadily this year, barring second wave

"As for the economy fed chair Jerome Powell will tell CBS's sixty minutes tonight I mean there's not a second wave of of of of of the corona virus I think you'll see the economy recover steadily through the second half of this year for the economy to fully recover people have to be fully confident in that that may have to await the arrival of of of a vaccine nearly eighty nine thousand have died in the

Jerome Powell CBS
Can the US economy recover from coronavirus?

KYW 24 Hour News

09:28 min | 2 months ago

Can the US economy recover from coronavirus?

"Nation last week another three million Americans filed for unemployment retail sales and factory output recorded record declines silenced the economic damage from corona virus tonight on sixty minutes Scott Pelley talks with the most powerful man in the finance world federal reserve chairman Jerome Powell here's a preview what economic reality to the American people need to be prepared for well I I would take a more optimistic cut it that if I could and that is this is a time of of great suffering and difficulty and it's come on us so quickly and with such force but you you really can't put into words the the pain people are feeling the uncertainty there realizing and it's going to take awhile for us to get back but I I would just say this in the long run and even in the medium run you would want to bet against the American economy this economy will recover it may take awhile it may take a period of time it could stretch through the end of next year we really don't know can there be a recovery without a reasonably effective vaccine assuming there's not a second wave of of of the corona virus I think you'll see the economy recover steadily through the second half of this year for the economy to fully recover people will have to be fully confident and that that may have to await the arrival of of of a vaccine scuttle interview the fed chairman airs tonight on sixty minutes we go now to Gary Cohn he's a former director of the national economic council under president trump he joins us from Long Island New York good morning good morning Margaret you just heard of a federation chairman say and know full recovery until there is a vaccine thought is the logical extension of that that there will be widespread unemployment well into next year so first five by chairman Paul did a very good job of summarizing the economic situation with some optimism and saying look if we don't get a second outbreak in the fall which is just predicted we don't know if that will happen or not we we we will continue to grow our economy and our economy will continue to have a natural recovery so and he was quite optimistic and and I am quite optimistic the U. S. economy is quite resilient and I and I have to remind people that we end up in this economic situation by necessity we made a conscientious decision to shut down our economy and have everyone stay home to flatten the curve was the right decision but we created this economic situation we can on wine this much more quickly than some of the comparisons that we're making in time where were were there were situations where our unemployment data happened over a long period of time because I think the climbing employment declining sales I think counter to that is there are people in immediate and severe pain now I mean the fed revealed this week that forty percent of people making under forty thousand dollars a year lost their jobs in just one month in March we were hearing that food in security the fed chair pointed to Congress and you just turn the speaker of the house say time is of the essence do you agree with her that more emergency aid needs to happen now or can you wait as Republicans want to do so I I think I agree with fifty percent of what the speed with the speaker saying so part of the heroes act was to get money or is to get money to the states the state local government and I do think that is very important to stay local governments have been hard hit the last thing we want to see a state local governments in our time of need having to lay off firemen policemen teachers first responders frontline people that were relied upon for everyday life that would be the complete wrong outcome here so the federal government does have to step in and help out states just like that help small businesses and big miss Bates big businesses they should help the states that doesn't mean they should respond return the states to perfect financial condition on the other half of the bill eight you did ask me about that there are some things in there that are much more aimed at a a recovery then the current position we're in in addition to that if we really want to get the people back to work that the chairman Powell was talking about we need to reopen the economy those people earning less than forty thousand dollars a year are very important and we rely on them but think about the health care system healthcare system is twenty percent of our GDP if we get our healthcare system back up and running a lot of people in the lower wage bracket end up working in the healthcare system we need that to happen if if we get people going back to work think of what it means to go back to work you get are you did it's not it's not an either or it's a half right and part of what Congress should be doing is figuring that out policy wise the administration is floating the idea of a payroll tax cut slashing the corporate tax rate suspending capital gains on assets but between now and the end of the year how does any of that help the people who are in pain now what we have to decide where we are are we responding to the crisis we trying to stimulate recovery Hey look this is a very difficult situation because the federal government sits on top and then each state is going to decide what we're doing if we're trying to respond to the crisis were right and this is where I agree with the speaker we have to get the state's money to help them respond to the crisis if we're trying to stimulate economic growth which would be the second half of the equation we would use a different set of tools to stimulate economic growth and we have a huge tool box of tools we can use to stimulate economic growth but but those specific proposals payroll tax cuts lowering the corporate interest rate does that do any of what you're talking about will a payroll tax cuts puts money in the pockets of people who are working right right now we're talking about the unemployed people exactly all tax cut doesn't help an unemployed person so I'm not in favor of the payroll tax cuts so what are you saying are you back to work okay are you also saying more direct aid to people because one of the the questions around extending unemployment benefits as they are now this unintended consequence of people actually sometimes making more on unemployment then if they take the option to go back to the employer that maybe for low down so what's the solution there the market look I think you just had a very important concept when we first started the enhanced unemployment benefits we did it for a specific person purpose we wanted to and we needed to get people out of the economy we needed them to stay home so we changed the definition of unemployment we said look stay home don't look for a job we don't want you to leave your house now I think we have to go back to the more traditional definition of unemployment if your unemployed you get benefits but if you need to be looking for a job if you get offered a job you should have to take that job and you should come off of unemployment benefits we need to transition out of the extraordinary measures that were justifiable sixty days ago ninety days ago into the the real world of what it is they they they continues definition of unemployment to think that do you think equity markets are behaving rationally and are you accepting the idea that the tax cuts that you personally helped usher through from the trump administration may have to disappear as so many on Wall Street are predicting to pay for all this first I have I have said it I'll say it again we now understand that we have to be in position the federal government to spend two to five trillion dollars in a moment's notice to support our infrastructure support our economy that said we need to sit down look at both sides of the equation we need to sit down and look at the revenue side of the equation and we need to look at the expense side of the equation so I would say yes the tax situation United States has to be readjusted everything should be on the table but remember at the expense side equation everything should be on the table as well as far as the stock market goes remember the stock market so you're talking about your name you accept would likely have to go I said so I think everything is on the table Hey remember remember my market I think the tax cuts are completely misconstrued we get a big tax breaks too to lower income earners and we taxed higher income earners in fact in the heroes bill you'll see they're trying to roll back the SALT deduction the salt production it was a way that we tax most of the higher earners only the top thirty percent of earnings really use the SALT deduction they're the ones that own the big homes and pay the big real estate taxes and pay big state income taxes than they're using that deduction rolling that deduction back does not make sense right now when the federal government needs money in in this environment I'm a stock market like a stock market very forward looking and I think the stock market like chairman Paul is fairly optimistic of where we're going to get to an end and there is a path forward and I want my people it's also it's made up of the largest companies might occur and a lot of those companies have actually become more essential to our daily lives today not less essential your current index a small local businesses I think that index would be trading at depressed

Scott Pelley
"sixty minutes" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"Sixty minutes. Nonstop. Yeah. So clean. Thank you. So you it's how. Good enough. I'm not bad. Thank you. That. A bad. The. Control. Two. So you. Thank you. That. The. Clinton. Pretty good. He said, she said. Maybe somewhere. his f._m. l. as number one hit music station they play one or two point seven kiss on iheartradio okeydoke Happen. Close. View on your own..

Clinton Sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

KIIS 102.7

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on KIIS 102.7

"On the the comparing all the girls who are but we get you We all got crowds to come. He needs. Sixty minutes. Stop point seven kiss. FM. The. I. Okay. Food. Time. I claim to so proud and. I may. Two. I almost. Guess I was. So. Need a favor? Please explain black Meriden to me, just started binge-watching, and I have no idea what's going on. What's the show about anybody just take their time and explain it to me? You do that it is jail Graham and Twitter..

Twitter Graham Sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Usually Google de oh, she's sporting curves. Wow. Back. Sorry. Are we still recording? Judge judy. I know man. Wow. Live your best life Ma not mad at you. Anyways. I can I really got thrown off g G I. I. The judy. This is the tongue. Astute. I do buy that though that like this like by the sound of that ski instructor like, it's a real like celebrity culture. Like, you got in Guinn way, bro. Right. I totally see that shit happening. America's such a star fucking culture the. Yeah, it's true that I'm surprised that. There was a quote that the guy like poked him away his ski pole fucking poor. I can pull fuck out Gwen its way. All right. Well, another thing that went did this week is helped legitimize the presidential consideration or campaign consideration of Howard chill out. She did not fucking cont. Let's review Howard show. He was on sixty minutes at the beginning of this week. And he claimed that he was going to run as a third party candidate to represent the silent majority like literally quoting Richard Nixon's racist campaign right about how the silent majority of this country is like scared of people of color, basically. And then he had a campaign stop where somebody just shouted at them. Don't help elect Trump you egotistical billionaire go back to being ratios on Twitter asshole asshole. Oh, did he don't censor that? Yeah. Well, somebody's censored it. Because the oh, really? Yeah. At the Barnes and noble thing. No all at another event in the quote that I'm reading from being at peace coffee. Never enter. Yes. Someone asked him a question about what he tax the rich. And he was like let them want to get into hypotheticals. But what I would do if like, bro, that's the whole fucking point of running. Nobody's fucking with you then. Yeah. Like why it's also just you're supposed to answer those questions. When people ask you those questions about what you would do as president matter. What the fuck is subject, you slippery. Don't be slippery already proved that you know, what the fuck you're up to he called the Medicare for all their un-american. But then you had to walk it back because everyone like he realizes like oh shit people want. Then he goes on the news. That's the thing. He's learning. He's learning the people actually want it's happening because he goes back. Oh, I just want to clarify my statement on that. I didn't mean it's it's not American. I mean, it's not affordable. Right. Okay. My and then he's like we have Starbucks gave people insurance which is true. Like, he did help part time people get insurance or whatever. But then to act like you're the king of like woke healthcare policy. She's being like Unimar. 'cause then. Yeah, he was on morning Joe. And they're like how much is a box of cereal eighteen hours box of Cheerios, and he's like, I don't eat Cheerios. Yes. And they just let him get away with that. Okay. What cereal? Do you eat that? That would be the follow question. No. They were just like, oh, it's three forty. They're just like my cereal, right? In the name when he's like a shrew hoops. Circles. Red circles the colored circles, so this is where we get to Gwyneth Paltrow because she has a podcast a goop podcast to improve lads of women everywhere with pseudoscientific. Yes. And as a testimony to just his decision making a acumen. He decided that that would be a good follow up to his sixty minutes. Hop on the glut zoo podcast, and to let people know that he means business, you know, like, you might think he's an idealistic like kind of full of shit CEO billionaire millionaire because just because he thought that he could fix racism by writing. Let's talk about racism on people. Starbucks coming out was and asking his baristas that did solve race owes medically right problem with racism await now the story before this. Oh, okay. Good try though. But anyways, so he went on there. And when Paltrow and he talked for awhile about how divisive the rhetoric on both sides of Oley, political divide are and Gwyneth Paltrow's worried about how that rhetoric will affect her kids. And he was like that's why you need me in the middle. What? Yes, they talked about hateful rhetoric that defines the contemporary political debate issue worried though because for her kids. That they're going to flame her kids for her axe. Right. Because he was like what your apple? Yeah..

Gwyneth Paltrow Joe Starbucks Richard Nixon Barnes Google judy Howard Guinn apple America Twitter Medicare instructor Trump president Oley Unimar CEO sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"More. Sixty minutes. Issue because every moment. Two. Hanging on the way. We know it. Why?.

Sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on Channel 955

"Fewer commercials and sixty minutes nonstop sixty minutes of all music channel nine five five dirty looks from your mother never seen you adjust it's a special occasion not in that but i'm glad i made it on john i'll do it we can we talk on a moment these feelings wasn't trying to get wasted then three or four yup all those times thing attend.

sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Sixty minutes nonstop three shake right wait now money blow no shake shake redoing shuffling.

Sixty minutes three shake
"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Sixty minutes nonstop four three my fm you you me.

Sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Sixty minutes nonstop four three somebody.

Sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"With the shape of you four three sixty minutes nonstop back three monday don't you.

four three sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Sixty minutes nonstop four three this no song without me you'd say now are you smell this this.

Sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on The Morning Toast

The Morning Toast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on The Morning Toast

"Shows i watch their like from rules housewives we'll know what real shows no those are real shows like sixty minutes sixty minutes minutes of real house i i want want to to be be awesome jewelry dreyfuss as might everything i would give my i would give my left leg to be with her same actually my left leg to selina meyer her character or like elaine venice that's fair but like jail jail ethic and she's i love how brave she's being through her battle with breast cancer and how she sharing like a decent amount of it on social media because she's really not that public of a person no hornet message i really like she's the queen she could do something terrible and it'd be like it's important that she's doing it just like she's really had a strong message with the messages like go good for you okay story number for i'm breezing to stories because i need to dedicate like half the shower to just talking to darren and also another story i truly cannot get less mac miller is arrested on dui and hit and run charges after rei guerande split he's not taking it to you really don't care about like driving accident team unless it's like a paul walker like he was a travesty like he died basically the dui like get your life together i don't want to talk about you on my procedures morning show yeah and i don't understand these people like three d was learn the first time at the firt i'm like it but it's not like okay you could kill yourself kill other people i don't care like you're going to be reckless with yourself cool don't take it out on me and my fellow civilians correct thank you do it like bella hadid when when you was reveille hills she got a dui and she learned english never got it again exactly it's also you're rich just get a driver get right jenner driver kover by that i know one is allowed to have to you is anymore ever since uber was like not no excuse and hopefully we self driving cars will be a radical that's true i don't think i would trust the self driving car i mean like okay but better than car accidents happen all the time on the roads true true but like if someone to blame when there's well that's true yeah.

elaine venice breast cancer miller paul walker selina meyer darren bella hadid jenner sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Sixty minutes nonstop one oh four three my fm hundred were fought june games you green nothing is there things.

Sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

02:31 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"It's incredible yeah the levity of it is incredible and i think you know you said a lot of your listeners might say i don't hear about this a lot you know that's the biggest problem about this stuff is ida honor reported it is as big as as we are showing people it's just that people don't see it on the mainstream and it's not a topic people really want to talk about airy it's horrible the foreign it almost seems impossible for this kind of evil to be going on in our society but the fact is it is happening and if you take some time and you look at the evidence you will see it for yourself when inspect in some respects the lame stream fake media tries to it goes beyond under reporting they try to misrepresent the problem by that i mean i think you know where i'm going to get to in this i'm i'm continually confronted with the fact you know i saw that sixty minutes story on pizza gate and well that sixty minutes said that this is all just this is all just made up so i i really discount all of his ed melissa do a deep dive do a dissection on sixty minutes pizza gate in this whole issue of it's all bogus because of what sixty minutes quote said well it's very powerful to to people to have a story they can fall back on of course so they don't have to look at the reality of the situation and not take accountability for not standing up and say about it but sixty minutes you know any of your dc major periodicals you've got your cnn the reason trump is always saying you are fake news fake news is because the actual stories here are being suppressed heavily my censorship heavily by discrediting and disinformation i mean you want to take a look at the guy who walked into the the comet ping pong place you know i wasn't ruined for this guy we didn't know who he was doing he wasn't a part of our research community but he did have an i n d page and he did somehow miraculously after just taking one bullet shot to the war later on it is said that he actually shot through a wall and destroyed the hard drive that was just reported to.

cnn sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Pass he wouldn't get past week or because trump's crush affect trump is become trump like howard stern's howard stern like snoop dogg snoop there them yeah they're tyson yeah they're they're who they are now they can do anything they want all right you see you can find that beaker mio guy speak rem can't find he did a whole long interview on sixty minutes was it sixty minutes i watched it i thought it was could have been real sports oh ooh you might feel like i think it was real sports gyco man everyone's got the to do list how about you add save hundreds of dollars concurrence at geiko dot com just go in there and spend about fifteen minutes and see if you could be saving fifteen percent or more on your auto insurance extra money put that in your pocket gets shelves from yoga pants fellas not just for the ladies geiko dot com spent a few minutes how much you could be saving on your auto insurance any beaker yoga guy become chowdhury no oh god stoppage lawler making it ner they felt sexually violated by you lie lie and lie i don't need to do that rape or sexually also this on if i need we women i can make lying the most beautiful famous rich women in the world women leap by thousand everyday she fails in women a day wanna sleep with that hair and that shirt photo you're saying that four different women for different each kill themselves because you wouldn't have sexual.

trump howard stern rape tyson sixty minutes fifteen minutes fifteen percent
"sixty minutes" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:47 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on WRVA

"April seventeenth this is the glenn beck program read a great article on medium the other day that i wanna share parts of it with you because it is it is the problem and the solution you know we we always just we live in a world that is run by a pendulum i think you know the the da during the early enlightenment believes that there was a god but he was watchmaker and he assembled the watch and then he walked away he set the time started going and then he walks away from it just running like clockwork and that's that's the role that god plays well let's use that analogy here for a second because in some ways it does work that way the the system does work that way it's a it's a clock and it just it doesn't change no matter how much you want it to change you know i need another hour doesn't matter it just continues to take and is sixty minutes is never rubber it is always sixty minutes and we as a society always are on a pendulum and when we get too far on the outside it's it's crazy unstable and it's never good it's when that pendulum is just right towards the six o'clock if you will right at the bottom that it's the strongest in the best right because there's extremes where where where we are being pushed to those edges and right now the extreme is being pushed so far to the left and it's so far to the to the collective that the individual doesn't matter anymore it's all about the group my group and yet that group is getting smaller and smaller and smaller until you're going to eventually range you're going to land on the individual again my group by group by group is my group is a birkin's well not all asian americans asian americans whose family is come here in the last two generations but not just any last two generation asianamerican asianamerican generation that migrated from china and they came here because they were all missing one left foot at eventually you get to just you and your case because if you noticed they're all starting to eat each other now i mean when ru paul is called out by.

china glenn beck sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"You know sixty minutes is awesome sixty minutes is awesome a lot of people watch it every sunday night and they have sports usually as lead in which helps them definitely but we think that we know that are that are audience want something like that that they can trust that diverse that's from the ground up that finds the people that you know sixty minutes and all these other broadcast and cable news channels are not finding and tells those stories and if we deliver on that there's a very big business here and we're ready seeing it so that's that's our focus and it's you know it's it's a i think it's probably very different than a lot of other digital media companies absolutely chris thanks so much thank you brian and thank you for listening this podcast is produced bay descend go if you liked our show and i hope you did please subscribe we're on itunes stitcher google play and now also on spy fi anchor dot fm i don't even know an anchor dot fm is but you should find is there and while you're there rate us and leave a review this i'm told helps people find the podcast and i personally like to read reviews for instance i want to thank zuo perman who left a review recently for us and said quote name better media podcasts go ahead i dare you i have nothing zoo obermann nothing and d bowman twentyfive who says quote quality stuff informative entertaining insightful about the industry without all the boring stuff okay thank you both superman and twentyfive we appreciate your time and your views and we'll be back next week with a new episode.

zuo brian sixty minutes
"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minutes" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Sixty minutes nonstop four three my fm no yeah oh man.

Sixty minutes