35 Burst results for "Sixty Minute"

Why did Trump abruptly exit his 60 Minutes interview with Lesley Stahl?

AM Joy

01:31 min | 4 d ago

Why did Trump abruptly exit his 60 Minutes interview with Lesley Stahl?

"Trump walked out of his interview with CBS, Lesley Stahl and the White House recording of the interview ahead of its airing on sixty minutes tonight. Apparently hoping to embarrass the veteran newswoman about exactly what well that remains unclear. This. As he begs and pleads in occasionally insult his supporters at large rallies across the nation. I wasn't going. To. Have to be honest no way I was coming. I didn't have to. Can you imagine if I lose and I've done all these things I've made never have to come back here again if I get I'll never be back dammit Minnesota you'd better vote for me how the hell do you lose to a guy like this? I'll never come to Pennsylvania again. I. Hope. So turn has also revived is popular campaign promise to drain the swamp claiming his opponents are the corrupt ones. Fight for the middle class. Biden is what he does. Right I think he's fine. He's actually fighting I think hunter. Biden and his cronies. What they've done is a disgrace. Let's see what happens and now on top of it, we have the Biden deal. Pretty crazy but you know what nobody no administration listen to those listen to that sound is coming so far away.

Biden Lesley Stahl Donald Trump CBS White House Minnesota Pennsylvania
Trump's Scattershot Campaign Strategy

CNN Political Briefing

03:17 min | Last week

Trump's Scattershot Campaign Strategy

"Trump continues to behave in a way where he simply seems in search of rationale for his candidacy and a closing message. It's really an astonishing thing to observe how Erratic House scattershot his messaging has been. We know that to be true over nearly four years of covering a trump presidency that he has the tendency to do that. There's always the stories with the blind quotes of Republican allies of the white. House just wish Donald Trump would talk about the economy or would stay on message Donald Trump is who he is. We all know that he's not going. To Change, he is committed to this notion of grievance politics. That's his whole sort of reason for being in the political realm, and yet he does have a proven political gut an instinct of where he can go to find pockets of support. So it's amazing to observe him trying to throw everything against the wall and seeing what sticks this close to the election I mean that's one thing you can do earlier on. But when you are within two weeks, you've got one more debate ahead of you and then just rally after rally to try to drive home a message. You want to be locked into what that is. That is not where Donald trump is I mean just take the storming out of the sixty minutes interview or cutting short or whatever he did with Lesley. Stahl in tweeting about that, what what is that that is not going to accomplish his political goals here and here's the thing Donald Trump knows it. He knows he's in a weakened position he was in Erie Pennsylvania last night, and once again, he said the quiet part out loud before the plague came in I had made I wasn't going to Erie. I've been. Honest. Go Way I was coming I didn't have to we had this one and then we got hit with the plague the had to go back to work hello weary at least. I mean, just imagine there's the president of the United States going to eerie Pennsylvania telling them. They would never have seen him if he was in a stronger position than he is but here he is yes to actually work for it that his closing message right now today's been tweeting about the economy's who maybe for a moment he consumed some television news analysis that he really should be talking about the economy. It is the one area of strength. We see in poll after poll for him, and yet that has not been where he has centered his closing message inexplicably, and we have new evidence to show that what he's doing isn't working we have a brand new. CNN. In Pennsylvania and one in Florida in Pennsylvania a state critical to Donald Trump's success for years ago. He's down ten points fifty three to forty three against job Biden. This is the Tipping Point State folks and he is Badly behind at the moment. Now in Florida as we see across the whole Sunbelt, it's a different story. It's a margin of error race. We've got Joe Biden at fifty percent and Donald trump forty, six percent in this poll, but it is a race at the margin of error with no clear leader. Consistently, we see him behind in that critical upper midwest rust belt, and if he can't turn that around, he's in serious trouble and that kind remark, an eerie Pennsylvania that's not going to help.

Donald Trump Erie Pennsylvania Stahl Erie CNN United States Sunbelt President Trump Florida Lesley
Trump cuts short "60 Minutes" interview, claims Stahl biased

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Trump cuts short "60 Minutes" interview, claims Stahl biased

"A late campaign interview with president Donald Trump seems to have gone awry the interval between Leslie stall in president Donald Trump is there on sixty minutes on Sunday but it's unclear what the status of it is now because trump left in a Huff before it ended that is according to someone familiar with what went down but was not authorized to discuss it in public trump gave his own take on the interview and a campaign appearance in eerie Pennsylvania suggesting that he would release his own version of the interview before Sunday you have to watch what we do to sixty minutes you'll get such a kick you get a kick out of the Lesley Stahl is that going to be happy meanwhile Democrat Joe Biden did a sixty minutes interview on Monday there were no issues reported with that I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Donald Trump President Trump Pennsylvania Lesley Stahl Joe Biden Leslie Oscar Wells Gabriel
Using Meditation to Overcome Toxic Thoughts Featuring Amelia Adrien

Essential Oil Solutions with doTERRA

07:08 min | Last week

Using Meditation to Overcome Toxic Thoughts Featuring Amelia Adrien

"Amelia's thank you so much for being here to talk with us today. So welcome I'm really happy to be here. So this is a topic that I think can be intimidating for some people. So how can I approach meditation as a beginner? Yeah. I agree I think it can. It can feel like it's something that is other people who that other people don't well, and maybe we can fill that. We don't do it so well but really the the the best thing to now is you can't really get it right? You can't really get it wrong. If you would just to take one long in hand. Exhale with me right now focusing attention on that `grats. comes. Into your nostrils. and. Out. Again. In that moment in that one breath, you'll meditating you reset your body. Your brain your nervous system. Some meditation. Media simply focusing your mind on one thing, and you can meditate when anything can be positive or negative. I was looking at the definition of meditation on it's shown to be the act of giving your attention to one thing. And we associate with being common relaxed actually you can meditate on absolutely anything it could be that you meditate on your brass. It could be that you have more of an active meditation and you meditate on nature as you're going for a walk, it could be quite meditate on the beauty of a flower. So it's a thought or a study on one object. And really one of the simplest things you can do as a beginner. The simplest types of meditation that you can do is accommodating meditation and this is really what you just watch the grass just like we did right at the beginning. So you become aware of the sensation of the breath is it comes into in through the nostrils. And then down into the belly on the inhale. And then on the ex how the breath travels up and out through the nostrils. and. You just watch the breath. The sensation of the breath is it comes into the body and then as it comes out to the body and you can do this for three breaths, you could do it for three minutes. You could do it for ten minutes. You can do it for sixty minutes. It's really just you know it's really a how long is a piece of string but what I suggest people who just starting out Is that you create a little habit of meditation practice. So you make maybe a little promised yourself. You're going to do it for seven days say and see how that goes. That goes. Okay. Then maybe up to eleven days then maybe up to twenty one days and you just see how you go rather than say I can now be a meditative for the rest of my life you set yourself something that's achievable. Something that feels that you can do right. At, the way to really make it part of like a routine I find is to do at the same time every day. So then when that time of day comes around you like offices, my meditation time, and so then you kind of it almost becomes automatic. So for me, the best time for me to do it is in the morning. So it's literally get up go to the unsettled meditation cushion and stop. Don't turn on your phone tummy not definitely don't go downstairs on leading the dishwasher. You know the the world will start to come at you with many many different things to do will tell you a more important than than taking time with yourself than just taking time with your own with your own being. Prioritized baton for me the way that that works if I just fussing the morning. Now I know if if you've got little kids that can be really hard to the kids will get out probably before you now be asking and demanding for your attention. So if that's the case, then you just located in a different part of your day but choosing a time so that when that time comes around, you're like, okay, that's your trigger. So then it becomes more habitual. and. I love how simple and how really customizable you make that I think that's beautiful because I think in my mind meditation has be this very strict long. Thing that I'm. Doing. But I think it really is what fits your life and I think that's a beautiful sentiment. Yes a show. So, what are the benefits that I can gain from meditation sesame we it gives me a great understanding of who I am. It helps me understand who I am away from the different roles that I play in my life mother daughter wife friend business not helps me move away from all of these other roles and it helps me connect to that true quieter nature actually within within me. There's a quote that I really love from. Colin Young, which says the welcome ask you who you are and if you don't know the wealth will tell you. So in this way, what I love about meditation is that it's not something spaced out. It's not something dreamy. It's something very centralizing and very clarifying in in in identifying locating. Understanding more about who you really are. You're able to own your position in the world. You're able to take in an empowered way your position in the world and feels really that feels really positive and not doesn't come with your fast meditation oil second or your said even your fifty, it's something that's may be cumulative. So you might experience that end the first few times on. That's wonderful but it's something that you become familiar with like Oh. Yeah. I remember this is the calm of of me. This is who I really can be. This numerous scientific studies on the benefits of meditation and these all have great value. But I've kind of had a look there seem to be five main benefits that we can get from meditation. The first one is it calms UNAC- stabilizes us so. One of the main benefits that it can bring us is this sense of stability and calm. It can help center US stablest into this present moment rather than projecting into the future or ruminating over the past set keeps US keeps US present moment away, which then helps to common stabilize us. That's kind of a one of the fundamental benefits really of meditation. So. The second thing is it improves focus. The practice is helping us focus our attention on one thing. So we can then translate that three to many different aspects of our lives. That that thing that it seems to do is increase resilience to stress. So it's shown that meditation lessons, the inflammatory responses to those who are exposed to psychological stress. What it actually has been shown to doing studies is the dump activity in the Magdala and increases connections between the Magdala on the prefrontal CORTEX CORTEX. So both of those parts of the brain help us to be less reactive to stresses and significantly I think they help us to recover back from stress experience. It stresses pot of life. It's not something that we can eradicate or eliminate. But we can do is train on south through meditation to recover quicker from it. This becomes baseline. This becomes more who we are. Throughout the day. In in particular moments after meditation.

Psychological Stress Amelia United States Colin Young Unac
Trump goes after Fauci, tries to buck up his campaign team

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | Last week

Trump goes after Fauci, tries to buck up his campaign team

"President Donald Trump is again dismissing the coronavirus advice of his top scientific expert during a conference call to campaign workers the president called Dr Anthony Fauci a disaster later in Arizona he said sometimes he says things are a little bit off and they get built up but fortunately but he's a nice guy I like of what is called a lot of bad policy said don't wear a mask the president was quoted during the conference call is saying people are tired of hearing found she and all these idiots will he fire the government's top infectious disease specialist I don't want to I don't want her to me is been there for about three hundred and fifty years I don't want to learn about you told CBS's sixty minutes he was not surprised president trump tested positive for the corona virus after he held large events with few face coverings at Donahue Washington

President Donald Trump President Trump Dr Anthony Fauci Arizona CBS Donahue Washington
7 Laws of Podcasting

Marketing School

05:06 min | 2 weeks ago

7 Laws of Podcasting

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm the orbital and today we are going to be talking about the seven laws of podcasting. So Neil that I've been podcasting for about been four years now a little over four years for marketing longer if you think about your growth everywhere yeah. Longer will leveling off for for seven years on that one. So it's been a long time. So seven years. For seven laws. Right. But I guess I'll kick it off I. so before I could get off meal and I did it no this podcast was going to go and we've realized that we caught onto a trend that is still taking off right now and podcasting is just going to get bigger and bigger last year the number was about seven hundred, thousand podcast in the world has probably got a lot bigger since. Then, and there's a lot of advertising dollars going into podcasting Joe, Rogan's podcast. They did a deal as spotify for over one hundred, million dollars. So it's just going to continue to be good times. It's a nice medium for people and you know the first law will say about podcasting is you know you've got to be consistent and share story around that my leveling up podcast for the first year only nine dollars. A day off of their first year after second year only thirty downloads a day, and then from there, it started compound, and then that led to that podcast is still there and now we have the mark podcast but we've been very consistent with it on the same lesson that goes over to if you're doing youtube if you're doing blogging if you're doing any type of content at all, it just it just consistency. Number two, you need half quantity the more quantity you have the more episodes you have the more listens yoga time it really does stacking compound. So don't just think that you're GONNA do well, even if you're consistent and you're pretty senior episodes every quarter or even weekly, you're not gonNA do as well as if you just did a daily with people like us John Lee Dumas, there's quite a few players who just Do daily a is more work, but you get the listens in the Dallas away quicker if you just quit way more quantity number three. So if you look at the Joe Rogan's of the world when he does video podcast, it actually gets chopped up into a lot of different pieces. So we've often talked about Omni channel and hasn't changed air if you do a video podcast like we're doing right now and you. Can make a bunch of different pieces. One sixty minute long form interview can become six mini pieces and you can put it onto youtube. You can put onto podcast whilst now you have thirteen pieces right there and then you can make little micro content for social. There's just a lot that you can do chopping things up and you can use a service like repurpose house dot io, the adding Babbit two, hundred, fifty. Dollars a month find on a five, hundred, dollar a month plan. Eventually, you can have your own team, do it for you, but that's a good way to get started with repurposing number four. You GotTa do Keyword Research. It doesn't matter what you end up talking about. If you don't have the right keywords with the title of your podcast and your descriptions, you won't get as many listens in Dallas. So Do Keyword Research. Number five seems like a dust and but still a lot of people fail in this. I, remember back in the day I was using Blue Yeti microphone and the problem with that one was I plugged it into my USB port. What you should be doing is you should be using a mixer so both nearly have a mixer read one called focus right and you can use focus right and then we both have higher pr forty microphones and so these are high quality microphones route four, hundred dollars from the Mike and the mixer. I believes anywhere from one hundred, one, hundred, fifty dollars or so you don't need a start with anything crazy but. If, you're going to be using a blue Yeti, which one hundred dollars still make sure you have a mixer because you sound a lot better and a very important thing is the quality of your sound 'cause when Neil I used to record next each other when we first started this ambiguous when we had to turn off the air conditioner, it would get really hot but also more importantly, it was really echoey and done a terrible because we're right next to each other and people said, oh you guys sound like you're recording from the bathroom Blah Blah Blah and we started getting bad rating from it it just it's not a good user experience. Number six aspirations. If you don't ask for ratings, you won't climb the charts and you won't get as many new listeners and downloads. So at the end of each podcast, there's nothing wrong with asking for ratings. Yeah and on top of that, if you're GONNA ask for the ratings, we haven't done the best job of this incentivizing people to put a rating. You'll probably get a lot more exotic just neil haven't done a good job about it number. Seven, you gotTa know your numbers. You can use look at the apple podcasts analytics look at spotify analytics as we look at where retention is and you can see retention will tell you what episode you should be doing more of. So for example, what we do episodes Seo retention might be ninety, five percent but if we start talking about how we like to plant tomatoes than our retention might be forty percent or so so it might not do as. Well, the other thing too is when we use chargeable chart able, that's how you spell it. They will show you your thirty day performance or your seven day performance for new content that you have coming out. So now I've been looking at them like, oh, well, people really latch on what we talk about certain things and they just they totally get disinterested when we talk about other things such as I don't know whether I'm just making things up. So, use chargeable has a lot of different features. It's probably the most complete podcast analytics tool out there were not affiliated and we just use the free version, but she's been really good for us.

Joe Rogan Youtube Neil Spotify Dallas Eric Su John Lee Dumas Omni Mike Apple
Why Not Just Be The Best?

Marketing Secrets

07:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Why Not Just Be The Best?

"All right. So Last weekend was insane I duNNo. If I told you this yet private and county deep. But I chance to go speaker Gingrich Season Tony Robbins Event Tony's studio which he built a huge studio and covert hit Zoom rumors like this huge stadium, rapin zoom walls and. It was crazy scam. You saw that pitchers but it was really special and really fun and we're actually flew there in Tony's private plane, which was crazy she his house and just it was really special weekend but. Telling you too much of that. I was thinking go deeper. So many crazy. A three call talking about although haase antiquated from that. I. Will drop out to you throughout the next few episodes but. There's one thing that's interesting. So We decided women, there were six days, which is kind of cool. We had out some really cool people and just relax and take a break a little bit and you know at the hotel there's so gets the scoop massages. So we started from Sasha two different days and obviously now the Cova, there's weirdness Boise Lovato. Idaho's is different but in Florida, were at, they have different rules rights face masks more often all sorts of stuff. So go get our first massage and He didn't there and it was only sixty minute massage because that's all they had time for that day or whatever, and this comes out she puts on plastic gloves, which was kind of weird Mike wasn't my favorite by Monica. Whatever. So And It was not it was not my favorite massage. Partially because they anyway, there are a lot of reasons why I just it was. Annoyed like it wouldn't feel good. It was just like she was technically giving massage but was not getting Sasha so much. So by the end of my sixty minutes like normally get a ninety minute massage and my sixteen massage like I just wanted to be done I was like it was like the longest sixty minutes life miserable I didn't have a good time and is even thinking like I hate massage like maybe maybe changed mental like the January maybe whatever and I'm so annoyed and finally got Donald. Kevin's is over I give me out of here and I just like Laugh A. Beautiful SPA and all these like I'm done like I don't I don't do beside I don't do. Anymore despise like I just had a horrible experience I I make. ASSANGE again anime rafter. GotTa massages later and then met afterwards and and I was like that was horrible. I don't ever want to give me Josh again and he said we have booked for tomorrow. May I know him? I don't really want to go as we cancel and. anyway it was just it was interesting. So. Next I go back because they have a twenty four hour cancellation periods have to Sasha like massages. This is GonNa be ninety minutes I'm going to be miserable. Just the whole thing right. So get there and kind of bad attitude and talking to Susan she's different person in super. Nice, and we we out massages she starts. The same thing has for the plastic gloves, which is kind of annoying but whatever. Does massage and this time it is a complete experience. was like an artist like it was it was amazing. Everything. It's Chris spend the same amount of money both massages. Right and the first one I wanted to die I wanted to get off the table on the right next person was insane. They were amazing like the ninety minutes was over and I was like, are you kidding me like I want to give you some more money? I spent flip back over and keep doing this back and forth all day. Until your to your shift or whatever like it was it was it was amazing and I remember laying there thinking about how like just twenty four hours earlier massage from person CEO same same spa everything and how I hated it, and this was amazing. Why would they compete anything to continue this experience longer and I started thinking about? This right both of these people would consider themselves from sizes masseuses right Both and got paid to say May to do the job but one was artist one was great. What they do and one was just did the thing, right? And I started thinking about my life lake. Everything. I've done I've tried. I don't know I always wanted to be the best I remember when I was wrestling about this this. This tape has s tape pre DVD's. And it was. The story about Tom Terry brands were twin brothers who are wrestlers, Iowa. Remember the movie started with I tom brands he comes and says, my name's Tom Brands my goal simple going to be the best wrestler in the world. Next thing came up as Terry brant my goal simple. I want to be the best wrestler in the whole world and that's how starts and boom. It goes into training montage and stuff and I was just like, yes. I remember thinking I. Can make my name's Russell Brunson the great wrestler in the world right and so I because I didn't want to be a good wrestler I want to be like okay. I wanted to be the best in the world and obviously never got there. That was my belief because I got way for the night probably ever should've gotten my skill and talent level right? I've state champ. I was an all American second in the Nation High School into college. Rank the top ten college never place NCA but but you know I did I heard your career and which to business was the same thing I got into business I wasn't on make moody who I was like. The greatest market ever lived like if I'm doing this job anywhere might as well take the amazing it right like. and. And I was just thinking about during massage just like people have the same job title. One's amazing ones like. You know and I think about for all of us like my kids. I. Keep with my kids and I don't care. We don't care what you WanNa be when you grow up like don't be like, okay. Be The best in the world like. A how do you? How do you become amazing not just give amazing. What are you have to do different I don't know I don't know how to teach that exactly more. So than just like helping has want that desire like don't be the crappy I think about funnel building right like th. There's tons of you without teaching fungibility and doing fun bill and you can hire someone and you will they hire someone in they get a funnel in the funnel stocks and she's like. You know your federal building become the best in the world obsess about designing copying all these things that when you build someone to funnel like you handed to them, it should be art they should be away by just like you know the second has blown away like. That's experience when a gift somebody if you can't give some experience like you need to geek out more, you got to go deeper you had become better. Become the best in the world that you are in your craft whatever it is right. If I was a dentist locators dentist, but there's there's amazing dense chiropractic. I won't be good chiropractor on the best in the world.

Sasha Tony Robbins Tom Brands Tom Terry Gingrich Idaho Haase Cova CEO Assange Boise Lovato Terry Brant Donald Trump Kevin Josh Mike Russell Brunson Susan Nation High School Chris
How To Create Blank Space In Your Life by Felicia Renee

Optimal Living Daily

04:17 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Create Blank Space In Your Life by Felicia Renee

"How degree blank space in your life by Felicia, Rene of the Felicia Rene Dot Com. Daddy of creating space for what's important in my life has been my main focus lately, I really want this to be the time where I'm super intentional about where my time is concentrated and spent. So I thought discussing how to create blank space would be the perfect way to start off. Minimal. Mondays. Blank space to me are the little moments in pockets of time that you have in use them to do what's important to you because being busy isn't always a good thing. Sometimes, you just need to take it easy and focus on resting reading or doing a hobby that you enjoy. Blank space is all about paying attention to the little moments in joys in life. How to create blank space in your life, allow yourself to take breaks. Star, prioritizing the time in your life for what you want to do I'm working on creating even more balance in my life with my day job this blog hobbies exercise and resting it takes a lot of time. But as I am prioritizing at all, it's allowing me to input breaks for myself. I cannot stress how important breaks are for your mind body and soul is important to let yourself. And rejuvenate. Taken a few blogging breaks and breaks from all media. You need to get away and focus on what's important. You can't be everything everyone all the time because you stress yourself out and burn out how will be good for anyone. So don't push yourself too far. Instead take a break whether it's a ten minute break that your job gives you and you never take it or it's a fifteen minute walk on your lunch break without looking at your phone. Being stressed and overwhelmed is in good for anyone and I've learned that I'm the type of person that needs rest and take care of myself. So learn to take care of you too. So you can be the healthiest of yourself. Learned to say. No. You can't stretch yourself thin and be everything to everybody. So learn a stand up for yourself and say, no, if you don't want to do something because you just don't feel like it say no. I remember going through a period in my life when I was a people pleaser Al's miserable once I realized that I didn't have to continue being this way and I started saying no to things I didn't want to do and yes to the things I did a made a big difference. Myself as sounds sometimes you gotta put yourself I. I don't even think saying, no is selfish. You can't do it all. So take it from me because I learned that the hard way. Give yourself grace. Mice hard sometimes in too many times we make ourselves feel bad about everything we do is why giving myself grace has become a big aspect of my life. I'm the type of person as extremely hard on myself. I even wrote a post on letting go of control, which is still a struggle at times. We. All worked so hard and giving yourself time to Binge Watch a TV show or sleep an hour later on the weekend is okay. is taking me a while to feel like this I'd be myself up over the little things like I didn't exercise for exactly sixty minutes instead did fifty five minutes I mean who cares the point is that I actually took time out to go to the gym which if you know me a hate exercising. So just give yourself grace and be kinder to yourself. That is what is most important. Make time for your hobbies. My Love Hobbies, I didn't realize. I'm born they were to me until this summer especially since I started running this blog more like a business. So I got back into adult coloring books and creative ways to shoot images. I love photography, but I dismissed it for awhile. Now, I'm into it even more and I'm looking at investing in an even bigger DSL. Our hobbies are a great way to get out of your head and do something purely for enjoyment and start finding that blank space in your life he able to prioritize your hobbies more. Practice minimalism. I mean, need I say more? Practicing minimalism allows you time to focus on what you find valuable and like over the rest. When he simplify your life, you're able to prioritize your time in a way that is perfect for you. You can rest more on weekends and take part in hobbies you enjoy instead of doing something you don't care about. minimalism has shown me that I need to give myself grace. When I need a break is maybe look at everything differently in slowdown because sometimes less really is more.

Felicia Rene Dot Com Felicia AL
How to Prevent Problems in Your Business Before They Happen

Marketing School

05:04 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Prevent Problems in Your Business Before They Happen

"Super committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer just remarking school listeners. All you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su and I'm Neil Patel and today we are going to talk about how to prevent problems in your business before they happen. So in the early days of business, correct me if I'm wrong Neil I think for most people it's you're finding that you are constantly putting out fires you're dealing with the important and urgent. Now, the problem with that cycle is that more fires will pop up and just continue putting. them out and you never get to solve what is actually urgent or not urgent but important, and these are the long-term foundational things that will help the business and a couple episodes going and the odd turn it over to you knew you were actually just mentioning something about the number one way to scale your marketing. So I think that actually applies here is while they want to kind of go over that again. Yes. So we talked about the number one. Way To scale your marketing we broke down a lot of is process oriented as you're doing things that worked out really well create processes from sin. The way anyone can take him over and continuing going forward with it and scale it up for the things that don't work well document. Why didn't it work hypothesis numbers data backing everything up so that way people know hey, for all the towns that are working event, you'll have a ton of processes that people. Can take over and continue scallop for the stuff that's not working. When they're try new experiments, they can use the data on. Hey, why did this thing work in the past? Would we learn from that as for the stuff that worked? Hey, what were the processes what worked on that and how we can we apply those to these new towns were considering going after? Yes I'm GonNa get specific with these processes so if you are looking for every single companies have Operating System. Once you have a couple of employs you need to be thinking about can I be using traction, which is the entrepreneurs operating system or can be scaling up which is a when you're when you're falling traction. Make sure you by the right traction book. There's two of them don't buy the wrong one. I've had too many people that worked with by the wrong. Oh Yeah. So that's a good point. Gino Wakeman is the author of of this traction. And Scaling Up is from Verne Harnish, who is the founder of Yo entrepreneurs organization, and there's a lot of these different types of operating systems. But these are just two books that I've read but these will teach you how to set a cadence for your company each week. So week, let's say your leadership team you get together you talk about a scorecard that you're going through a real quick. You're talking about you know different rocks or objectives and key results that. You may have set and you are then going to spend a lot of time solving issues, right so maybe sixty minutes of the time, it's ninety minute meeting is ideas identified, discuss and solve, and you can do that. Once to get certain size, you might grow pass this Eos operating system and start to move scaling up or you might create your own version of it right now, the whole idea here is that yarn effect talking about these long term issues And putting a solution in place so you can actually solve that problem and not let it happen again I think in these books as while they also will give you a cadence for what is your quarterly planning every ninety days you do a quarterly planning, what is your annual planning look like as well? Also, there's a book called the three Hag way. So that's a three year planning. Okay, and then you have a be hag which was attended twenty five year. Outlook Right. So you have all these. Right and I think it's also really important. Every quarter what you're trying to do is you ask yourself, Hey, guys, what should we start doing? What should we stop doing and what should we keep doing right? So you have all of these systems in place denise point processes important process will help you scale. You have all these systems in place where hopefully anybody can run the business. Right? Let's say to see you maybe quits leaves whatever or get sick or whatever. You can just plug someone and you're good to go. Right you WANNA make your business defensible and that's what a real businesses otherwise at the end of date once the true business value. There Neil and another thing that you can end up doing to prevent problems I learned this from watching a lot of interviews online and funny enough walking the interviews is kind of similar to the advice that I got from watching Egon must and Elon Musk ended up saying look there's so many CEO's over the years business concepts principles haven't really changed too much. So there's a lot of books on tape of all these successful CEOS from like the IBM CEO to muster whatever it may be people talking about that airs mistakes they made read from, learn them and try to avoid the mistakes that they break down because he's concepts and principles are very similar. and. The moment that you start making the same ones that other people used to make you're going to not succeed really right. But if you avoid making mistakes that other great people have made before you, you're much more likely to succeed because although be left to the stuff that you should be doing. That's a really good point I think learning from CEO interviews or even joining peer groups like you know entrepreneurs organization or wipe yo or visages a lot of these different peer groups that are out there I know for me when I was about twenty seven when I took over single grain, there's a lot that I didn't know and you don't know what you don't know and. These people will guide you because they've been there before you know they'll talk about things that you would have never

Neil Patel CEO Verne Harnish Eric Su Gino Wakeman IBM Elon Musk EOS Founder Egon
Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

Outcomes Rocket

06:24 min | Last month

Why Dr. Kumar is Changing The Wellness Game

"Welcome back once again, see the outcomes, rocket podcasts where we chat with today's most successful and inspiring health care leaders. I really WANNA. Thank you for tuning in again and I welcome you to go to outcomes rocket dot health slash reviews where you could rate and review today's podcast because he is one outstanding individual and healthcare is name is Dr Rajiv Kumar he's the president and chief medical officer at Virgin Pulse during medical school he realized that many of the worst health problems we face as a nation diabetes heart disease cancer hypertension. Et, CETERA. I related to the collective unhealthy lifestyle, and so he has pledged to make a difference in this industry. He's done and as a frontline physician and now through various different companies, some amazing things and so what I WANNA do is open up the microphone to Raji to fill in any of the gaps of the introduction and then a so we could get into the podcast. Reggie welcome to the PODCAST. Think saw glad to be here. So Rajiv, what would you fill in in your intro that I that I left out? I think that was pretty comprehensive. Just, a little bit about virgin pulse. You know what? I think that may not be familiar name to a lot of folks on your that are listening to your podcast. We are an employee wellbeing company. We work with large employers all around the world, and our goal is to help them activate their employees to lead healthier lifestyles which had to kind of go around the healthcare system a little bit, and go direct to the employees and figure out ways to motivate them to inspire them and to help them sustain behavior change over time, and it's not just about healthcare cost reduction. It really is about how do we help people be? Healthier, happier and more productive at work in their personal lives. So that's really what our mission is. That's beautiful and listeners for those of you who haven't connected the DOTS virgin pulse. One of Sir Richard Branson's Virgin Group companies. So you know with the gentleman like that behind something like this and and Rajiv as part of the executive leadership team, you can imagine some great things are happening. It's an exciting time for us. We definitely are inspired by Sir Richard Branson leadership in his philosophy is if you take care of your employees, they'll take care of your business, and so we're trying to empower employers to take better care of their employees. So strong, and and you know it's really interesting that you guys are tackling this employer perspective of the entire health career equation because costs are soaring and aside from labor costs, it seems like healthcare cost is oftentimes double digits in that front. What are your thoughts on what should be on every medical leaders agenda today? Well, I'm biased but I think it has to be a behavior change remember too often looking for a magic pill or magic device or something to kind of stem the tide of rising obesity, diabetes and heart disease in our country and at the end of the day, there's so much. We can do to actually change people's behavior a lot of what we're facing as a result of our diet, our physical activity or lack thereof the stress that we have in our lives just how we how we treat ourselves and how we don't take care of ourselves, and so I think it's not necessarily a hot topic I. Think it should be and and I wish there was more focus on it is the perennial that if we can change behavior, we can prevent a lot of disease and we can produce significantly greater outcomes and Reggie. What would you say right now at at at Virgin? Pulse. Is an example of how you guys are improving health outcomes. Well, I think we really tried to think outside of the box I think traditional health interventions and and health and wellbeing platforms have largely been ineffective and they've been around for decades. So we sat around and we said what if we took a different approach rather than making people feel like they're failures rather than telling them that they're sick what if we actually make them feel successful what if we make them feel good about themselves right off the bat what would that do for self esteem for their motivation and for their ability to change. Most of what we see in our industry is a heavy focus on screening, and so employers asked their employees to take health risk assessments and do biometric screenings and so forth, and the problem with that is they take a health risk assessment tells them you're sick. You know you have high risk, your unhealthy needs to do more change your lifestyle, get your biometric screening results and you have high blood pressure. You may not like the results that you get back and that can be very demotivating, and so we've said is, is there a scientist out there? Is there a behavior change model that focuses on success? We found a scientist by the name of Dr Bj fog out of Stanford University and Dr Fog is sort of a new guru of behavior change and he's come up with a behavior change model that he caused the fog behavior change model and it's very simple as model is is a formula to it is called B. Equals M. A. T.. Equals motivation times, ability times a trigger, and so what he means by that is to get somebody to do a behavior that we want them to do or they want to do. First of all, they have to have the motivation to do it. Second is they have to have the ability to do it, and a third is you have to trigger them. To trump to do that behavior and too often in the in the kind of behavior change space, we ask people to do things that require either too much motivation or too much ability. So we say something like go to the gym four times a week and exercise for sixty minutes. Each time you go that takes a lot of motivation and some people may not even have the ability a really know how to do that where to get started so forth so Dr Fog says, well, motivation is hard to change. Your motivation waxes and wanes on a daily basis on an hourly basis, we can't really change somebody's motivation that easily what you can do is changed the behavior you're asking them to do to make it easier. You can change the ability to perform the action, and so the idea is if you take a behavior like washing your teeth and you break it down to the smallest tiniest thing that somebody could possibly do like floss one tooth and you ask them to do that they can actually do. That very easily, it doesn't take a lot of motivation is very quick to do, and if they do that and you celebrate the fact that they did it, you can help them build what we call success momentum, and then they're going to feel better about going to the next step and try something harder and so in our entire approach to behavior change, we break behaviors down into their simplest most basic action we ask people to do that would trigger then and then when they do it we. Reward them make them successful. We give them social status. They might get some kind of points or some kind of reward, and then we ask them to do something harder the next time around and stuff feedback loop that builds up momentum, and it changes behavior in a very sustainable way in a very habitual way, which is really the key to behavior changes creating habits.

Dr Rajiv Kumar Virgin Pulse Sir Richard Branson Reggie Dr Fog Scientist Virgin Group Dr Bj Fog Raji President Trump Medical Officer Stanford University Executive
What's the Difference Between a Toxic Employee or Manager and a Difficult One?

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

03:53 min | Last month

What's the Difference Between a Toxic Employee or Manager and a Difficult One?

"When it comes to managers we've all had difficult managers and we all had demanding managers, but with the fines demanding manager from toxic one. Is it demanding manager? is going to have expectations that are big maybe bold, but they're realistic. A toxic manager is going to provide expectations the he or she knows are unattainable. And in North Dakota Mechanism for unrealistic expectations. What's that? Do not care. The. Only way we as human beings deal with unrealistic expectations which we know are created so that we can't obtain achieve them is to not. And we all know those employers. Don't come to that conclusion and just share this dragon into the woods and they just have a miserable life in and outside of the workplace. So for manager, we look at real except realistic expectations for general employees. Let a when their behavior and performance becomes motive driven beyond the job responsibilities at the. Position and finally I think we all know this. That quite often toxic employees are also involved by people in power. Think of CEO's nephew senior executives, golfing buddy or worse yet, the employees have released an appropriate relationship apparently, that's not appropriate relationship with someone of influence. So it's bad when you're with a toxic employees, it's really not good if we have a toxic man for. Like when they're connected to people in power, they're just unapproachable and run free and create, sustain, and expanding toxicity and the whole culture. One person we've all seen this one CEO one executive. Even one employee. Who is truly toxic? Can have a tremendous impact on the culture of any organization. Yeah I'm afraid a lot of people have experienced it, but somehow you know it's real easy to have your own insecurity say well, maybe it's just me you know maybe I need to do X. or I need to do why and it takes some time for people to wake up and say now this is just plain wrong and they're not privileged to do this. There's just it's just not right. It's not fair. You mentioned something earlier about. Looking for toxicity in the hiring process because it seems like that would be your ideal weeding out spot. What kind of things do you look for? That would make you say okay. Yeah. On paper this person has terrific experience great credentials but then in the inner reprocess, something just is off what are those things that you would be looking for in an interview process that would suggest that maybe this person could be toxic. I have. Several clients, we have a service where I'll do finally vetting. And I just come in at the very end. And, just spend some time currently with the situation now on. US. And I just come in. As. A person to look at the person. I'm not immersed in these organizations that I support clients I don't know them in and out and up and down, and that's a good thing because I'm not carrying my filters in the organizational biases come with being entrenched in an organization I'm just looking at the person. You know my goal is what my Andro tells us. You know when someone shows themselves believe that? Anybody can anybody can get through a thirty sixty minute interview my role my job is to. Get them into the most comfortable south. Try to get them to reveal themselves beyond simple interview questions. Most people when they do interviews the

CEO United States North Dakota Executive
Why Pioneering Journalist Maria Hinojosa Put Herself in the Story

Latina to Latina

05:42 min | Last month

Why Pioneering Journalist Maria Hinojosa Put Herself in the Story

"Maria I loved the Book A. So, good I told you. I was texting with you I devoured it and I want to jump in in the middle. You tell a story about writing a television script for Walter Cronkite what was the assignment? It's a juicy story. So I love 'cause nobody's asked me about this one yet short story is that I am the first Latina hired NPR. And then very quickly I'm like. This feels weird and I go and work for a Latino public radio in Spanish and San Diego and I experienced. Deep my cheese more there, and so I end up working kind of miraculously back in New York at CBS News in the Radio Department. And, I was doing fill in work the summer, and then I was asked to stay on through the end of December to produce a segment from Walter cronkite they asked me to write his end of the year commentary. And so. I was terribly nervous as a Latina journalism in the mainstream and being the first I was terrified most of the time. I write this piece and I go in I, show it to my boss Norman and Norman Light Me Norman hired me. But he saw this piece he said, Walter Cronkite is not going to read this and I was like no, he's like because it sounds like you wrote it. And I can't remember if he said and you're a little bit of an angry Latina I, don't think we talked in that way but it was almost like as he didn't have to say it he was like because it sounds like you wrote. and. I said well. Let's take it down to the FISHBOWL and have one of the evening news writer writers, read it and see what they think. Something just said. Stand up for yourself. You really hard. You actually worked on this you talk to other journalists. This shit is good. and. You're angry in this piece because every American should be angry at what is happening in the United States of America in the year nineteen, eighty seven. and. So I said, let's onto the fishbowl the people who edit the evening news with Dan Rather. We walk toward the writers who did not know me and he's again this is good. Yeah he'll read it. Yeah change this one word. and My boss had to eat his words eat pro as it were and I was like damn and so the point of the story is that as journalists of color as journalists conscience. When we are the first or one of the few in many newsrooms. We have to battle for ourselves. The way we see the world as journalists is as valid as Walter cronkite sway of seeing the world or Katie couric or Dan Rather we're journalists just like them. There are so many pivot points on your journey from intern to staff producer to on air from Spanish English. Is there one moment that stands out to you as the moment where your career to turn and where you really started to set out on your journey as a journalist? Well, look to decide basically that you're going to walk away from a steady Gig because you want to become a correspondent, you want to try to become on air that was pretty risky move and I feel like I did that in one of those moments where I was like you just have to do this. Like there are no Latinas. There are no Latina voices out there. And you have done radio, you have a voice, you know how to use it Noah. So that was a turning point. I think when CNN recruited me, that was another moment. It was very scary because I had never done television much less live television. But to answer your question, I feel like it really like. Like really came to fruition once I moved into doing now on PBS, which was long form investigative close to sixty minutes in terms of its style and production and deep investigative, and that led me to then doing documentaries and led to the front line which happened at the same time that I created my own company football media and I just WANNA shout out. The book. News for all the people which is was written by Juan Gonzalez and Joe Tories once I read that book I was like, okay. All of this suffering of being a journalist, a Latina you know woman of Color Immigrant. All of this is there is a reason why and it is because you have a responsibility to be part of this long arc. Of Responsible Journalism in the United States. You right I had heard rumblings at NPR some folks that I got too close to stories. I know all about you and your agenda one of my editors a nice middle aged white guy said to me agenda I said, what are you talking about? Maria come on you and you're Latino agenda. How did you respond in that moment? I said so does that mean that you've got a white guys agenda and he was like, no, it's not the same thing and I was like the same thing I'm able to tell you those moments because they were few and far between when I was just like ski is. Key you know like the same in Mexico is style plateau. SAMANCOR will plateau no one mass when I would just like suddenly rip something out and just be like that. But a lot of the times as you know, you're mostly just like dodging dodging you're doing a we've you're doing another we've and then sometimes you're just like a skin nope Wilma's I'm GonNa answer back. I hope that a lot of journalists read this book journalists because. You do have to be incredibly strong willed, and I would hope that they understand that this is not a job it is in fact, a mission that we're lucky enough to love. We need them.

Walter Cronkite Maria I United States NPR DAN Norman New York Mexico Cbs News Radio Department CNN San Diego Katie Couric SKI Writer America Intern Juan Gonzalez
How the Sober Spring Challenge changed my life

Goodbye to Alcohol

05:13 min | 2 months ago

How the Sober Spring Challenge changed my life

"Twelve whole podcasts. My name is John Garang I'm the foundry weld without wine and I'm your host for this podcast. Thank you so much for union. A series. Two of the podcast is all about taking a break from all coal just how beneficially this to take a break how important it is to test salt dependent regularly this ties in nicely with also spring challenge which starts on the first of September. We're going to be interviewing people who done also spring challenging in the past last week we interviewed Kawhi, who did sobers spring two years ago he hasn't added drink since. He didn't do it because he wanted to stop drinking. So we also interviewed Lebeau who used it to moderate for awhile, and finally she decided that she felt so much better when she wasn't drinking that she was going to ditch moderation technique and give up drinking completely. Today's interview is with a lovely lady called KRYSTAL. Nine christel sober spring in two thousand and nineteen. She had me on the radio tasting alcohol-free wines. And when she had the conversation, she had a bit of a light bulb. Moment. Because she reflected on her own drinking habits and she decided that for her, it was more about the ritual. than the old coal. So perhaps, all coal free wines would work for. Assaulted our conversation by asking Christo to tell us about himself. On, crystal I'm forty five years old I live in Pretoria. and. Got One son, he turned to any one the other day a couple of weeks ago, and I'm married to my best friend for twenty five years in November now been married congratulations. When did you first start thinking that you'd like sued maybe change your relationship with all did you first start thinking? The might be a problem have. As you all know that drinking wine we need. It's the first loss that is the bugger because. When it's the first laws, it triggers, you have another glass and then I must finish the bottle. So and that started bothering me and I think I've signed up for wilt without wine the city day challenge in January and I think I lost it about sixty minutes. You know what you get those days way you wake up two o'clock in the morning. Your heart stopping and it's jumping out of your chased and you get this feeling. Then you think what have I done lost not did I feed Musonda my husband? Did I MAKE Can't remember and then you start negotiating with yourself said, this is this is Scott to stop you know. This is not happening again until six o'clock when you start making food and. Outcomes the bottle of wine and. You have to stay in the. Pit was terrible. So you did this. As all Robin ugity minutes of the thirty. That's. What I wasn't greedy. I've got a fitbit. What really triggered. Me was my resting. Offbeat at some stage August. Last year it was eighty four they win I started with the spring. It actually came down to the low sixties now. So it's it's really it was that was the main mission was for health reasons I what you said about you've got to be ready because some you obviously weren't ready when you signed up for the he is but nevertheless you you reflected a lot before you signed up, you pay full challenge Saturday you can't in the water in year than you ran away from the freezing water again but then said, you saw the Cyprus spring challenge. So what made you think Oh let's give these guys another try. You know what? What's fantastic just before that I heard you over the radio. On radio to and actually drinking the last one and having a taste on the radio and saying how it tastes like my husband was in the patroness me that much and I told him I said listen to this. I can actually do this for me. It's about the habit I love having mom gloss and my bottle WANNA open it, pull the drink, and then that's for me. That's that's my kick that I get out of IT I. told him I said, I'm sure I can do it because I know that it's not the Elko that I'm often it's the Heb it with the Al Khalid steerable because I can't stick to one drink because they ll kicks in any poisons, your audie entities with the colossal one I was so

Kawhi John Garang Christo Lebeau Robin Ugity Elko Al Khalid Musonda PIT Pretoria. Scott Cyprus
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | 3 months ago

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
Ordering online groceries has gotten easier

Talking Tech

03:09 min | 4 months ago

Ordering online groceries has gotten easier

"I looked? At Amazon, fresh whole foods cart posts. Posts, mates, target and Walmart. Let me fill you in Amazon fresh the promises same-day delivery when you visit the website as long as you were prime member, which caused one hundred nineteen dollars a year, and you order a minimum amount, usually thirty five or forty dollars when I made by order on Tuesday, morning I was promised a delivery by one thirty, and then when I tried later on again they're all gone. Gone, but they had free delivery on Wednesday and Thursday that made me happy. Whole Foods, which is also owned by Amazon their promises free two hour delivery again with prime membership I ordered it five minutes to two, and they put a four ninety nine delivery attached to it to have the food derived by four or free. If I could wait till six, which of course I could fill out better than waiting a week. Week, which is what it took me when I was trying to do it locally from some of the markets around La target tacked ten dollar delivery fee onto a forty dollar order unless I paid him one hundred bucks for the shipped service, which is owned by target. Now they did agree to get the order over to me within two hours, which is great, but it didn't like that hundred dollars and furthermore folks. Target has a feature where they will meet you outside and put all the food into your trunk. The only problem is. If you order on your computer, you can't get that service. You have to do it on the APP, so order on the APP. Instant card instant is the biggest of all of them, and they do food delivery for a lot of local markets. But the results are different when I ordered from Ralph's, which is part of the Kroger chain? I was ordered a two hour window when I ordered from Vancouver, which is part of the Albertson's chain. There were many hours, so they said I could get it that evening. FONS wanted to charge me ten dollars. Ralph's did not so that's a little weird, and of course on top of those fees is a big tip. You WanNa. Give a tip for. For your instinct card shoppers, the person who is going up and down the aisles, getting your food for you and then driving into your house post mates is more active in online food delivery from restaurants, but they do the groceries as well and just this week. Uber said it wanted to buy post. Speights for two point six five billion dollars now when I when I tried ordering from on post, mates ordered a forty five to sixty minute delivery promise. In also a ten dollar fee finally, Walmart free delivery, no delivery charges, minimum purchase, but a two-day way. Okay But you know what two days is fine. as I said when I was trying this back in March and April I was looking at one week weights so two days one day. The bottom line is it's a lot better now than it was I. Still Way prefer the process of walk into the store and shopping I find shopping online for grocery items tough because I don't know what I want until I see it,

Target Amazon Walmart Ralph Whole Foods Speights LA Albertson Vancouver
Tales From the Dark Web

Feedback with EarBuds

03:58 min | 4 months ago

Tales From the Dark Web

"This week's theme comes to us from Daniel Ocho and is called tales from the dark web. Here's why Daniel chose this theme. He says the Internet has a dark side hidden. Just below the surface, these podcasts will guide listeners through stories from the Internet's dark side where crime, drugs and murder are the currency of choice. Here are they episodes chosen by Daniel for this week's theme along with short descriptions of each episode. The first episode comes to us from the missing Crypto, Queen and called Dr Rusia. It's twenty three minutes long. Dr Rouge promised financial financial, revolution and then two years ago, she disappeared. Why. The missing crypto clean is an eight part series from BBC sounds. The next episode comes to us from reply all and is called the snapchat thief it sixty nine minutes long. This week, a super tech support after Lizzie snapchat gets hacked. Things Start Getting Really Creepy Alex investigates. The next episode comes to us from case file, and it's called the Silk Road part, one and two. The first episode is eighty four minutes long, and the second is eighty minutes long. The Silk Road was an ancient network of trade routes that started in China in the second century BC via a combination of roads and sea routes goods like silk, paper, and spices transported from the producers in Asia to the markets in Europe. Eventually, it wasn't just goods that were traded. They're also ideas, customs, religions, and even diseases. The next episode comes to us from Lizard people is called Bitcoin was created by a rogue ai with Sam Baltar it sixty minutes long. Bitcoin is one of the great mysteries of the Internet. Age who exactly created it? Where's it going? How did it blow up so fast? What the fudge is a blockchain, and why don't I have won the delightful Sam Baltar of the equally delightful podcast? Weird work joins to talk about cryptocurrency and the possibility that the J. Cryptic coin was created by. Get this artificial intelligence. The next episode comes to us from breach and is called. Caution falling rocks. It's forty seven minutes long. The Yahoo data breach left three billion users private information vulnerable for three years before the public learned about it. How did it happen? And what can we learn from the greatest known data breach in history? Those are the episodes chosen by Daniel. Ocho for this week's theme tales from the Dark Web, follow along with the discussion of this week's podcast episodes by using the Hashtag dark web pods. Now for some podcast industry news from the inside podcasting newsletter. As always, thank you to Sky Pillsbury. Who writes the inside podcasting newsletter for allowing us to share it with our ear? Buddies on this podcast will share the top stories from this week's issue of the newsletter. I story. Sky Interviews James Kim on her podcast the inside podcasting podcast. James is the creator of the fiction podcast moon face a show. Time magazine named one of the best ten twenty nineteen. In Moon face a young Korean American man named Paul wants to tell his mom that he's gay, but they don't speak. The same language Paul Story is loosely based on James Kim's real life experiences. Next story layoffs public radio suffered a heartbreaking number of layoffs this week. Here are the details Minnesota public radio slash American public media has laid off twenty eight employees. APM has also stop production of live from here and the hilarious world of depression. Chicago public media has let go of twelve employees and has ceased production on sound opinions. Next Story. She. PODCASTS founder Jessica. Cup for men and Elsie Escobar have decided to postpone their organizations. Second Annual Conference until October twenty twenty one. It was originally scheduled to take place in Arizona later this year.

Daniel Ocho James Kim Sam Baltar Dr Rusia Paul Story Murder Lizzie Snapchat BBC Chicago Elsie Escobar China Dr Rouge Sky Pillsbury Time Magazine Arizona APM Alex Founder
Governor Cuomo talks about his handling of the coronavirus pandemic

CBS Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley

07:51 min | 4 months ago

Governor Cuomo talks about his handling of the coronavirus pandemic

"Will a lot be in of conversation canceled orders with governor lately Andrew Cuomo of New York who has it's always much something to say about covert nineteen certi racial workers justice care for and there's the state no were of heard our lives of Surtees six hundred head of livestock once the epicenter all of the corona of virus Bolivia's pandemic to the coronavirus New York the now cows has one do of not the lowest care infection that forty rates in percent the nation of the milk they and produce many normally of the state's goes to governor restaurants the credit that are nobody currently knows closed but or with crowds heavily growing scaled back Andrew Cuomo nor do sees they a crisis care far that one from of the over firm's tractors the federal government broke down should that step in turns aggressively out we got a bad and computer only in on my the four state wheel drive I not owned to show it off the situation if you got what ahead you need is excellent in conversation with governor Andrew we live Cuomo it we got extra tractors I always keep as three you might for extra yes many just of the nation's to small accommodate businesses something are like facing that I big have problems no idea and for covert tractors nineteen is cost just one of them or what it costs is we'll to be hearing fix a from tractor senior contributor so a set Ted one Koppel of our tractors all to be fixed they trim that that nails had a price tag of forty can drive four thousand trucks and I provide wasn't ready the for food that I we thought eat it might be twenty they're older and younger Rodney all marine races is and an backgrounds independent trucker and he these are comes hard from times a long for line most of of truckers just about set his up father drove a truck news is as did your his one father's step father closer to becoming and your parents several of his uncles you'll probably mow the lawn Rodney does ask almost if anybody noticed all his you mow own the lawn maintenance tell people to if stay I have off to change the lawn the entire compare head it to on your it neighbor's and I'll lawn do that a and gasket complained about having pretty to mow much the everything lawn we again need to be done on top good of news the list is so it's easy to bundle home home and auto through is progressive Opel looses and save Louisiana on your car insurance so all which your freight of is slowing course business will go right is into the lawn picking up a little progressive casualty bit insurance running company still affiliates spends and more other time insurance at home discount than not is available good in for all states business or situations another low home cancel there's no personnel place like and as part of the follow me Nick carried Offerman go cheap enough as I take you on he a holds journey everything through from the soap history to of oil home refinery a quick an intimate he look hasn't at been lending houses contracts of fame for the essential goods many homes that are helping spousal some truckers Edison and has companies this study prosper and the claim tell that me haven't what owned kind a house of jobs like this you've before had over the that last required months incredible let's genius I think I've moved to loose the history and of I home panicked exclusively about six on cancel curiosity me simply stream because I would a social reduce distancing my ring tap well the and CDC I just found urges the truck you that to would avoid do it cheaper close contact so once like hugging or in shaking the last hands month there are other non you've physical only ways had to say two hello runs wave went correct you sign language salute is that smile enough to keep give the peace sign body throw open air high and five soul together do jazz hands Abbas remember truck driver stay no a minimum but I'm of six not the feet average or truck two driver arms length away I have from others and stay additional home if skills you can't I for more changed info to transmissions visit coronavirus for other people dot gov I just finished a welding let's all job do our yesterday part actually because we're all you know I hash have tag additional alone waited to together make any call brought to but you by the ad council I'm an old school trucker I seventy six say percent I came of employees to the old school to struggle way of trucking with at least and when I one graduated issue that the affected old school their they mental health locked the door and when you share close the you're school not alone when we read ask about in your the company's newspapers emotional health benefits that there dot are org slash hundreds sharing of billions property by the American of dollars heart association now that are being make made your available mornings right for small businessmen back at six Vegas at age you're with a Alan small stock businessman rush right at nine breaking news huh thought starters microservices and opinions for southern Nevada used a micro talking forty business is seventeen one that employs stay fewer connected than ten employees turning to Sunday morning since we on talked the radio Rodney got sixty eight hundred dollars in federal loan assistance but that he says won't last long so right it now happened this we're past using Friday our personal June credit to nineteenth stay in business so the I gotta celebration ask you a couple questions known as Juneteenth have you or anyone in your family it been cyclical was the one been hundred nineteen fifty last fifth two weeks anniversary now of Jenna the day cows in eighteen nail sixty salon five is open but when business major general remains Gordon Granger limited of the victorious we're only open Union at this Army point maybe proclaim two to to three the people days of Texas a week that can all you slaves stay are free afloat for this naturally involves an absolute if equality you're asking were of breaking personal even rights and no rights we're of not property between we're not former at all masters we need to and open slaves every single day but there's no demand easier right now said than done the period of relative black our freedom clientele known as is reconstruction predominantly was cut short forty five plus in eighteen seventy so seven a lot of them are still scared to be followed by they always nearly call a back century and cancel say of you Jim know what crow my daughter segregation says to hold laws off and in the I've south gotten so many of those phone and calls defacto not segregation just to complicate across things much further of the north you were on the verge of opening a second song right the still civil rights trying to open and the voting second salon rights acts of the so nineteen this is sixties my new space addressed it's many in of our those brand injustices new shopping center that's still under construction several of the much other businesses as events of says the last Jenna several weeks have under already score formed much work hearing remains that is to just be done really scary because if I don't open this business and then I lose everything through but I've it already all put Americans in of good when will you say a have lot celebrated of money June what nineteenth are you talking about as I the end dumped about of slavery like forty thousand in dollars America in two of my own money so it says it this will be is a huge loss for me people have and what's your biggest worry the biggest I'm going to worry sign an is executive just you order know today recognizing the business Juneteenth not surviving do New you York drink governor lemonade Andrew and Cuomo Arndale declared asked a holiday the mayor for state because employees this is how this past I feed week my kids while how did many I say that wrong dream of seeing the dates Hey and trying this is my to livelihood as a national holiday just stay in touch for through all the summer and see what happens David woods dairy business Sunday operates morning on on a much CBS greater news scale radio continues for about a week in April in a moment he tells Jay us Farner he here was losing CEO about of rocket twenty mortgage to twenty making five the right financial thousand decisions dollars has never been more important a day when you turned well a the rocket worst mortgage thing that's happened we is can help only guide half of you them to those so right well decisions now I when lost they matter about most eight loads mortgage rates are and near that's historic expensive lows so now hello is a great time that to is call eight a three trainload three eight of rocket milk is about and seventy if you need some five extra money hundred a cash gallons out refinance eight could loads give you that financial sixty boost thousand you're looking for gallons call of today milk at eight three three dumped eight rocket over or rocket the course mortgage of three dot weeks com to learn more call for cost information house conditions do equal not housing stop lender license producing in all fifty states because and MLS of the changing number thirty thirty market dressed millions out of hungry try stress people balls distressing and gummies you have the couple and you'll thousands feel like upon thousands upon thousands of gallons that's because stress of balls milk gummies contain a clinically that you proven have to herb throw called away ashwagandha isn't there some that becomes way more effective over time of it relieving leading stress organizations so later come your whole body and feels pick up like that Millikan street people until well eventually developed your whole that we world produce feels is light raw milk then there is to turn a your chance stress life that into some your type best of bacteria life could and become be in a it stress baller so with for us stress to balls gummy have supplements somebody come in and check our milk home would be glad to do it there's no place better hearing like it later throwing away follow me you can't Nick do that Offerman as for the I rescue take that's you illegal on a journey the challenges through the history are staggering of all but what David an intimate and look Rodney at houses and Jenna of fame have in common thank you for calling many homes shots what else spousal I can help you Edison isn't has this up study lifting the and sense the claim of optimism that haven't owned a house hello like this before I suppose that I could be required a negative thinker incredible but I choose genius not to the choose to look at the positive the history basis and of try home to be ready for exclusively the on unexpected curiosity if that stream happens hi it's you're Jamie gonna make progresses it through employee the sorry of the month to month in all a row absolutely leave because a message that's at what the we do hi Jamie we break hit down me the side Danny of the road I just had a new idea and we walk for our song six what the miles name your price tool for miles so to when get what it's we like need to tell get us back what you to fix want our to truck pay and still deliver our the problem our little was what in wine the morning and you no say one knows well the difference be fine that's coverage what we do options what to a fit modern your budget day cap then how do we wrap we just this all conversation the fingers now small of choir general goes what's the even bottom coming line at you here favorites coming at you jet know yes we're no all doing maybe the best that we anyway can so your practice tonight and I got a new lyrics of the rhetoric you know for everyone progressive to be casualty kind insurance and company everything affiliates pricing that we're coverage doing much this limited everybody by state law use their best judgment Sunday so if morning you want to come out and get your on nails the radio done then you use your best judgment on that in this time of great unease Sunday we morning wondered on what CBS was happening news radio apple continues with John after Dickerson this of sixty minutes we're about to find out from CEO Tim cook as we speak right now you're full of secrets I full of secrets and it's hard not to over flow right now but I but I I but I've been trying to well Tim cook will finally get to share those secrets tomorrow when he kicks off apple's thirty first annual worldwide developers conference we want to talk about now the next opportunity to transform the

Andrew Cuomo New York Surtees Bolivia
The Skeptics Guide

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

04:30 min | 4 months ago

The Skeptics Guide

"We've actually been getting a lot of questions about some of the science and critical thinking issues, surrounding the protests that are happening and Statistics, etc, studies that have been coming out, so we're going to address those in the email and questions section because I think that's a good way to deal with issues by answering questions are being a little bit more interactive. And since that happens to be in our sweet spot, we might as well. Dig. In Yeah, yeah, well, we definitely. And we were talking about. What should we be talking about? When all this big big world changing stuff is happening around us. We can't talk about narrow news stories. But yeah, we want to do what we do best we want to contribute. What we feel is in our sweet spot as you say. Jay, which is, let's talk about the science evidence, the critical thinking, and maybe hopefully raise the level of discourse a little bit. We can do that so the quick covered nineteen updates. Storm. It seems like it's accelerating like there's just so much so many news items within one thing. That's interesting. That I wrote about earlier in the week is that? We've had number these questions. What was the effect of the lockdown on the flu season? Yeah interest in great question. Absolutely, and now we have some data, so of course it depends on where you are in the world. The covered nineteen hit the The US at the tail end of the flu season. This flu season was a particularly bad one at the upper end of the typical range. was there an issue with the vaccinations or no? There wasn't no vaccine was actually fine. This year wasn't the vaccine. It was just a bad flu season saying. yeah, there was between twenty thousand and sixty thousand deaths in the US which. which wasn't twenty or sixty minutes? That's sounds like number, two, two, hundred, ninety, six, hundred, and fifty globally, so the reason for the range is because did kill person or not. No, no most people who get the flu. Does the flu test and so then you have heard. That's right so clinically that they have the flu. So if you count justed laboratory confirmed cases that's at the low end, and if you count probable clinical cases as at the high end, so when we have ever had a flu test I've had A. Vaccine here, but I don't think I've ever gone to the doctor and the actually test for the flu. They just say Oh you probably have the flu. The extrapolation of what was likely. Yes, so studied basic patient. If you go to your doctor and say I have the flu, and they treat you for the flu that count, even though they didn't a laboratory test to confirm it was actually. Think they should even state the low, and then because it's clearly wrong clearly. Whatever? War We want you to know? We're basically just showing the error bars at this. Is Let me get. We're actually talking about so you're right. Chose really fascinating, so if you out raff out the numbers of detected a possible. Death you know typically peaks January February and then, and then to trails off through may but this year. Basically, it ended five weeks early like. A lockdown compliance completely shut down the flu season. But Steve You don't I don't want to sound like a jerk right now, but no shit, yeah! It no shit, because think about it, you know people are questioning whether or not the lockdown was effective, and this is an independent piece of evidence that yeah, it's effective. It actually does keep viruses from spreading around not just nineteen, but also the flu season. As you say, it should have worked, but it's nice to know that it actually did yeah, and don't forget. A lot of people were saying well. You know this. If this corona virus is so bad, why don't we do take similar measures with bad flu seasons and a lot of people were thinking like. Yeah, maybe we should take it more seriously. That's. That's a lot of people that die every year and here's here's. Here's more proof than that. If we did. Take it a little bit more seriously, especially in a bad flu season, and do some something akin not full on lockdown, but just being more careful with the touching your face, and maybe even more mass re could cut that we can cut those numbers down

FLU United States JAY Steve You
"sixty minute" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

94WIP Sports Radio

08:47 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on 94WIP Sports Radio

"With a ton of confidence and he's coming off a great outing he was the guy that was there to give us like right confidence in coal or all right other other than that how do you like the movie Mrs Lincoln I know here's a look like does it and that right it's just it's it's unbelievable so to see all this nonsense that goes on the team I'm I'm already fried with them and I I think it's so over it's ridiculous but if these if these games are going to impact them making a trade you got to pay attention who's gonna make the trade to if you go to bed you gonna have you gonna fire Kapler bringing Jordy well that next year yeah I've you could you believe me now you're already just do it now as a free agent just pain now to say Hey let's see what how this goes use a lot of money if you don't like it at the end of the year we always yeah yeah four million a year for me yeah you should yeah it's a big market team has high expectations you want to win a World Series alright then pay manager pay manager's going to establish the culture that's going to push the guy's going to have them you know actually scoring runs at the age of this team just can't score runs well that's what they were supposed to do all those years when they had the great pitching they couldn't score now they got the great hitting and they still can't score yep you know some days it just happens it's exhausting hi I got a couple of things tonight gun first of all I talked about this last week when they had the two hour and thirty seven minute rain delay yep and basically I think like if you're going to do that after one hour make a mandatory sixty minute rain delay then at the sixty minutes games over you got to call the game and this way if your if your the fan and you're sitting there now when they call the delay you've got a clock you know the area sit there all night hoping you start this game and if they do start to give situation like the Dodge ram when can they come back and you want to do it F. to sixty minutes you get a cop you will walk in and if you if you were the stay or go at the sixty minutes they'll be at the gate and then you have to come back so that this way you're not stuck there the game and they should do that that should be the role if you do have a concert still in Jersey that a concert of Florida Georgia line at the art center so what happens is the starts raining in the idea of lawn seats people rush to their cars then they leave and there's about two hours the band shows goes back on stage and those people get screwed they gave him cops but if you have like a rainout rule which basically said you know okay we're gonna call the game your rate would it would stop the game at eight o'clock if the game's not going on at nine o'clock we're done go home Hey we do bring it back you get a company way well the problem is it's more can in giving you for the team to be like all we're going to reschedule this game and whatever so they don't wanna do it they just did the you know it and that's the actual look at themselves over the fans just how it is and so I think ultimately is a lot of money what the fed does play a lot of money the fan get screwed and I I feel bad for fans to get stuck in that spot I've been there once or twice words been a rain delay your there for like three hours it's just it's horrible to wait like that and not know but ultimately the issue is that with all the games they play in baseball and how reluctant they are to cancel a game or reschedule the game they're gonna have retractable roofs on every single state in every single one needs will be great but barring that after one hour we're not saying give the money back because I understand you got to pay for all these expenses but after one hour at nine o'clock I go to I go to the gate give me a Cup I'm leaving yeah or give me a common thing give me a Cup yeah has or have some sort of knowledge at least that say all right we're playing this game tonight but we know that Hey by nine thirty it's going to rain so we're gonna play so much of the game tonight we're just gonna cancel it once the rain comes in we know it's not going to work and then from there were gonna play the rest of it tomorrow here's your ticket show up tomorrow you can't do that because you've got it was the of the game tomorrow if they have a day off because in the teams of travel depending on how you do it you couldn't do that but I would say come up this way because now you know what it could be in the upper deck for the other game you've got so many of the games that use a may not selling out every night well but if you do that now you you've got a clock because you know what you sitting there for hours and hours of you bring kids know much money that cost you the keep kids entertained and fade and by always somebody souvenirs you can buy am I what's the worst radio game was the worst whether you've ever witnessed the gaming men I was a game last year of the Phillies game last year it was like just ninety eight degrees of just raw he and people were passing out everywhere I mean if the second I walked in the stadium it was like it was like some sort of virus movie I mean people were just it was just the medical people run around carts and sirens in as soon as I walked in the door there was somebody that was sitting against the wall like you know like fifty years old not not horrible looking shape just totally drained and exhausted this is the first inning of the game I mean it was catastrophically bad and I would sit I spent most of the game not even in my seats just standing under the bleachers trying to be able to watch the game from the from there in the shade because you just couldn't stand the heat they finally break through to finally rain or anything now is just hot all day it was horribly hot why would you call it because I'm an idiot yes that's why I am the dumb I meant a lot to say that yes set that up for I mean I'm not Dave Gelman who insults as quarterback and what school you went to Dave get amid back into the conversation yeah hi I'm not it's Yvonne Trinity it's of law yes I give I give you one more have you seen the Mister Rogers trailer I did I did see the trailer actually great casting which of the great casting he's amazing yeah Tom Hanks is played so many people are so many ask you of all the biotic movies that you've ever seen who played the character the best who is who in the name the actor who played a bio who did a biography played a character the best well I'm actually gonna go into the future for this one is Kanye west wants Danny McBride to play him and that was casting old final but it's a great is scheduled to go back go back because because you know it's so hard because you when you play somebody the public has an idea of who that person is so if you're going to get really really lost in the character your honor is that like you know like when John Travolta as gadis oaks or decals you know judge of all the dresses got well do you know yeah you will pull the girl how you doing but I mean like who the K. I do you know who who did a bat who gave the best biographical performance on site I'm not gonna waste your time I got nothing right now it like and I'm from Jim Carrey is Andy Kaufman man on the moon okay that was a good one I you know what the more I look at Tom Hanks as Mister Rogers and when you see the two of them side by side with them close yeah because not only do you have the you know do they have the image because like thanks a great actor you know look look at it for a Troy Wilson he played the astra and and the Apollo movie I forget the guy's name but every time he takes on a character he becomes somebody completely different Christian bale as Cheney other uses Batman but yes well it was great as well you're gonna compared to Adam west the guy at the exam I don't know you Jane Christian bale was great as Cheney was really go through a little bit after all right that sounds like fun lets the Charlie's Wake Island Hey I'm shy yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah whatever whatever have fun with Daniel Jones I'm very weighted vest if you want to keep up with me you can follow me on Twitter and it's just another big win that's all one word it's Vince Quinn I want to thank the people are generally is on the show tonight Alex to fix of Billy Philly mad okay monies to fix yeah I'm gonna give you a second bag I get you right in the face right so you come down there did Tony could still from Philly Philly influencer he'll show I'm gonna for you what I'm going to the video height yeah get get out of here Cesar Wednesday thank you for producing the show Tom Kelly who gave the update process right for for putting up with his goon to drive down here all my god how do you do what you're saying like to thank the academy yeah I'm getting the hell out of here I'm done let's go my mom does.

Mrs Lincoln sixty minutes one hour ninety eight degrees thirty seven minute sixty minute fifty years three hours two hours two hour
"sixty minute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Heating and cooling, sixty minute man. Guys never asked. You don't mind weekend. Those are we got a haircut. Correal. Almost got tacked at the drive through. It does look very high tight. Yeah. So the other forty seven hours forty five minutes of the weekend. Fifteen includes two stories on a tip, and walking and walking you go shampoo, the offer that. Casher. They offer that for me. I don't know. You're good, right? You shampoo your, your scalp as well as your. Oh, okay. Anyway. That's my weekend. Your top six six the massive capital, construction plan that was approved by Illinois lawmakers two billion dollars for roadwork on. I eighty that's the I eighty bridge. We're talking about Ryanair the disastrous. I eighty bridge to replace hopefully two bridges on the display river bridge, including that one. So the one really bad one those people talk about them. And that's the good old gas tax. It's going up is going to be paying for that. Hopefully understand if you're taking a bridge out of, you know, the by way of construction, how do you how do you go, where you need to go? That's good. That's going to be some alternates posted there because they're going to, to. I think they're going to probably maybe do it slowly. Hopefully, you know do one lane at a time. And it depends on how bad the foundation part Steve. It's they do it all. Or there's just a detour you have to go to another bridge. This is a case. That's my family in southern Illinois dealing with, with flooding over the Ohio river, there's a bridge out and they have to go an hour and a half out of their way to go across the bridge to the groceries places that they go to. Yeah. That's a lot. Yeah. They don't replace purchase very, Steve. I just want to let you know, there's a huge spider.

display river bridge Illinois Steve Ohio river two billion dollars forty five minutes forty seven hours sixty minute
"sixty minute" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Assault of off duty firefighter on the upper east side, Saturday night. Investigators say the thirty eight year old victim and his girlfriend were walking near east eighty six and second avenue Saturday night, when they ran into a group of teens five boys and two girls taunting another couple when he told them to stop one of the teenagers slugged him in the face. He wound up with five broken teeth a mild concussion. We'll have the photos and video posted up at ten ten Winston -ccomplish anyone with information to contact crime. Stoppers wins news time eight fifty one. From the ram trucks, traffic center expanded traffic for your commute. Here's Karen Stewart. Here's what you need to know about the bridges and tunnels. It's the inbound Holland. That is really nightmarish. We've got this sixty minute delay and the turnpike's extension eastbound no longer has the shoulder available for travel, which is throwing everybody for a loop. Route nine is absolutely Pat, as his seventy eight one nine from four ninety five out into the tunnel. Traffic circle is jammed. I mean it's an hour, you know. So not one approach better than the other. If I had pick one other than locally seventy eight might shave off about ten or fifteen over the inbound side of the Lincoln. It is a forty five minute delay. Route three still has delays go back now beyond the meta the Meadowlands Parkway, excuse me. They go back to route one twenty and Paterson plank road. Inbound GW bridge is a twenty five minute wait for both levels, and you're jammed down the Henry Hudson onto the west side highway to about seventy nine street, and then the west side highway is packed southbound from west sixtieth all the way down to west. Chelsea alternate side of the street parking is in effect today. And if you're travelling through Nassau County, route.

Pat Assault Karen Stewart Nassau County Henry Hudson Holland Chelsea Lincoln twenty five minute forty five minute thirty eight year sixty minute
"sixty minute" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Usually Google de oh, she's sporting curves. Wow. Back. Sorry. Are we still recording? Judge judy. I know man. Wow. Live your best life Ma not mad at you. Anyways. I can I really got thrown off g G I. I. The judy. This is the tongue. Astute. I do buy that though that like this like by the sound of that ski instructor like, it's a real like celebrity culture. Like, you got in Guinn way, bro. Right. I totally see that shit happening. America's such a star fucking culture the. Yeah, it's true that I'm surprised that. There was a quote that the guy like poked him away his ski pole fucking poor. I can pull fuck out Gwen its way. All right. Well, another thing that went did this week is helped legitimize the presidential consideration or campaign consideration of Howard chill out. She did not fucking cont. Let's review Howard show. He was on sixty minutes at the beginning of this week. And he claimed that he was going to run as a third party candidate to represent the silent majority like literally quoting Richard Nixon's racist campaign right about how the silent majority of this country is like scared of people of color, basically. And then he had a campaign stop where somebody just shouted at them. Don't help elect Trump you egotistical billionaire go back to being ratios on Twitter asshole asshole. Oh, did he don't censor that? Yeah. Well, somebody's censored it. Because the oh, really? Yeah. At the Barnes and noble thing. No all at another event in the quote that I'm reading from being at peace coffee. Never enter. Yes. Someone asked him a question about what he tax the rich. And he was like let them want to get into hypotheticals. But what I would do if like, bro, that's the whole fucking point of running. Nobody's fucking with you then. Yeah. Like why it's also just you're supposed to answer those questions. When people ask you those questions about what you would do as president matter. What the fuck is subject, you slippery. Don't be slippery already proved that you know, what the fuck you're up to he called the Medicare for all their un-american. But then you had to walk it back because everyone like he realizes like oh shit people want. Then he goes on the news. That's the thing. He's learning. He's learning the people actually want it's happening because he goes back. Oh, I just want to clarify my statement on that. I didn't mean it's it's not American. I mean, it's not affordable. Right. Okay. My and then he's like we have Starbucks gave people insurance which is true. Like, he did help part time people get insurance or whatever. But then to act like you're the king of like woke healthcare policy. She's being like Unimar. 'cause then. Yeah, he was on morning Joe. And they're like how much is a box of cereal eighteen hours box of Cheerios, and he's like, I don't eat Cheerios. Yes. And they just let him get away with that. Okay. What cereal? Do you eat that? That would be the follow question. No. They were just like, oh, it's three forty. They're just like my cereal, right? In the name when he's like a shrew hoops. Circles. Red circles the colored circles, so this is where we get to Gwyneth Paltrow because she has a podcast a goop podcast to improve lads of women everywhere with pseudoscientific. Yes. And as a testimony to just his decision making a acumen. He decided that that would be a good follow up to his sixty minutes. Hop on the glut zoo podcast, and to let people know that he means business, you know, like, you might think he's an idealistic like kind of full of shit CEO billionaire millionaire because just because he thought that he could fix racism by writing. Let's talk about racism on people. Starbucks coming out was and asking his baristas that did solve race owes medically right problem with racism await now the story before this. Oh, okay. Good try though. But anyways, so he went on there. And when Paltrow and he talked for awhile about how divisive the rhetoric on both sides of Oley, political divide are and Gwyneth Paltrow's worried about how that rhetoric will affect her kids. And he was like that's why you need me in the middle. What? Yes, they talked about hateful rhetoric that defines the contemporary political debate issue worried though because for her kids. That they're going to flame her kids for her axe. Right. Because he was like what your apple? Yeah..

Gwyneth Paltrow Joe Starbucks Richard Nixon Barnes Google judy Howard Guinn apple America Twitter Medicare instructor Trump president Oley Unimar CEO sixty minutes
"sixty minute" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"More. Sixty minutes. Issue because every moment. Two. Hanging on the way. We know it. Why?.

Sixty minutes
"sixty minute" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on KFC Radio

"And you say yes, or no never had to molest Sasha sixty minute. And if you pass out what they're supposed to be rubbing you by ninety minutes song. Don't you go in there and you pay by the song? You don't say that you by the song? Yes. But you don't say, hey, I'm doing three songs you're just in there. And when you're supposed to be on track of the songs, that's where they get you. This is. How many find close pass out one, man? I probably would I think that's I think that is. That's where that stripper like there's karma. This stripper, comma. For doing that what Shima lesson? Fuck. They work. I don't believe that. If they did he didn't pass out the strip club again. Right. Right. Drinking problem. Still exists like Jared teach guide out to drink. He this guy not to pass out in the champagne room of shift club. Congrats. Just low. I mean, maybe maybe maybe you're right. Maybe like legally strip club etiquette rules, whatever. Okay. What if like come on? What if he's meditating also ought to check his pulse. Not doctor. I'll tell you what I wake up with that. And she charges me for hours and be like like check to Timestamps. I wanna know how which songs played how long the minutes were. I'll do the before anti phone timers. Like when they. Yeah. Like when you go in there. They'll phones. Clubbing? I've never seen that. Oh, yeah. That's a facial shit. Yeah. Strip club you've ever venture. They do that. No. This is this is just the okay, we have breaking news quicks created his masterpiece over on Advil stool, we just re tweeted it, what is it? It's just go see for yourself. What is it like?.

Jared Sasha Advil ninety minutes sixty minute
"sixty minute" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

03:26 min | 1 year ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"Like, I said I can do it in an hour and a half generally short chapter, right? But for me, it's not even a chap. Yeah. You know because right milligram. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. But the other thing I think as a writer, you can save yourself is give yourself a time. Limit for the actual outline or germination of the. The idea before you start writing, but but with the time limit and then set your dates from there. So that part of your say two months, you have to write your draft does not include all of the thinking that goes on otherwise, you're just going to be floundering. And you're, you know, you're always use that analogy that I liked about painting the lines over again, you can't you can't do that and expect to get a draft unto months, which is when you write five pages, and then instead of picking up page six the next day, you go back and your writing page one again and rewriting rewriting rewriting. And then starting you'll only get to page six instead of dupage ten which is a bad one is actually much more of a problem in books that in futures because it takes an hour to read the book. If you have to you can reread it, but you you sort of can't. But I'd rather give a draft done and then start with the revision process. And even if that means that I'm not correcting things as I go then to keep working on the same thirty pages for a month. I would say that the first Japan finished was baptised internet universal. And it seemed like, you know, I was working fulltime job. So how to have time to do it. But the thing is I had a completely mindless job. I was like filing papers and required. No brain usage at all. Of course, the day. And so I would come home and still have a tremendous created energy. So I would spend those nights handwriting pages in an type them up during my lunch break the next day. And I got a lot done time. So if you have a kind of, you know, BS job that's an advantage of that. Because people always ask like, oh, do I need to get a job at the industries and things like with connections on stuff. Like, those are great. But it's very hard to find time to do the stuff you need to do if that's the kind of job you had king union. I'm thinking time. Yeah. One last thing. I will say is that a thing I've done a lot more of over the last couple of years when call sprints, and so you have basically spring because you're trying to get for, you know, four of your most compat- is done in an hour and a half. Yeah. I have sixty minutes. Princeton. So I'll just I'll set sixty minutes hit the clock. Start the timer and for sixty minutes. I'll do nothing. But right, and what's nice about the sixty minute rule. Is it creates boundaries for myself? But also creates boundaries for other people. So I go saying like, hey, can you dislike like, I get back to you in thirty seven minutes. And you know, it's clear off it's like putting up little stop signs headache. I'm not gone forever. I'm just gone for the next little bit here. I've seen you do that on Twitter, and there's no run up to it. You say I'm going to do a sixty minutes in two minutes. I'm like, why would have done it. If you give me some notice I'm trying to do better with that. So I usually do the start of the hour. I'm trying to get at least twenty minutes. Yeah. Yeah. That I'll do it at some point with you. All right, cool. I'll listen to talk to you professional realism. So this came up this morning because Sloan Crossley had a piece in the times. She's the author of I was told there will be cake, but she points out that when she was working as a book publicist. She would see her job portrayed in films. And it was really crazy. Inaccurate on that didn't resemble reality much at all. And she points to things like the proposal and the TV show younger good examples of this. And dare was thinking of you because you have a show..

Sloan Crossley Japan Twitter writer Princeton sixty minutes thirty seven minutes twenty minutes sixty minute two minutes two months
"sixty minute" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Sixty minute delays in and out of New York. Penn station, only WCBS has traffic and weather together. Every ten minutes on the eighth and breaking news when it happens age. There are some pretty strong storms. Moving into Rockland county right now, traffic and weather from New York's most experienced news team WCBS News Radio. Eight eighty. It's nine thirty eight. Traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the eighth Andrei peril. Kind of slow in Rockland county here we have some problems they're going to call from Steve on the Mavis discount tire. Traffic tip line. You could do the same two one two nine seven five eight hundred eighty eight and sure enough the southbound through right around exit thirteen and exit fourteen is a crash involving a truck, and that's causing major southbound delays as you approach the Palisades Parkway heading towards the Palisades mall. So look out for that again in the southbound direction of the throughway or you could call it also eastbound eighty seven now if you're heading over by the George Washington Bridge, still at our inbound delay just ridiculous. Obviously a lot of that traffic has to do with the game over at MetLife stadium. Now, if you're traveling northbound on the western spur right by the Vince Lombardi that's very slow as well. In better, the Lincoln to still be at least at our the Holland's a little bit better. Maybe forty five minutes there. I got a call from my man, Steve also on the Mavis discount tire. Traffic tip line. Actually, this was Dan. He was telling me about this delay in eight mile delay eastbound on seventy eight it's all the way in the Beth. Lehem area, Pennsylvania. But those traffic or that traffic is actually coming towards New Jersey, obviously, it's an eight mile delay and lots of delays there you want to avoid that by using route twenty two our next traffic update it less than ten.

Rockland county Steve New York Mavis Penn station MetLife stadium Vince Lombardi George Washington Bridge Dan WCBS New Jersey Pennsylvania Holland ten minutes forty five minutes Sixty minute
"sixty minute" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

MYfm 104.3

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on MYfm 104.3

"Sixty minutes. Nonstop one zero, four three FM Shake Jackson Wait Yeah No Shake, shake, shake Overdue I go to make me We don't be mad hey Leesville.

Leesville Jackson Sixty minutes
"sixty minute" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on WGN Radio

"So we don't have Miller lite Oh Reason Do you have my favorite craft beer dogfish had sixty. Minutes it is on to have beautiful because nobody has. It I can't find him There you go How do they how did how how? How do you? How do you how do you balance that between the middle of light? And, the dogfish well I do Miller lite about ninety five percent, of the time but every once in a while when a venture out and be a little, crazy dogfish Doug why can't say that dogfish head sixty minutes, is my favorite have, the ninety minute but it's, like you're drinking it's. Way too heavy and then they have one, hundred twenty minute which is basically like drinking bourbon or, something like that but sixty minutes, at? Sweet spot right. They're very good All right so we have something for him, that's my point is there's always, gonna? Be somebody comes One hundred thirty beers on tap nothing you want Don't have it all right well thanks. Again twenty five. Seventy, seven north Clark street hop cat, dot com Chicago if you want. To slash Chicago they're hot cats and other places there. Are, sixteen hop cats across the, midwest right now wow where to. Start Grand Rapids Michigan just. Over ten years ago that's. A big beer town there's a ton of stuff how many? Grand Rapids products do you have. On. Your tips I don't know the exact number right. Now, I know that we've got, a dozen really great Bruins up. There I love number of. Founders breweries are beers on. Tap right now we've got bereaved Avante on tap right now We're always pouring the motherland at. Hopkins yeah I could see what's going on I can try That'd be actually they'll write a song about it and if people get drunk, late at night and then the next thing notes in a movie fifty years from, now hop cats ABC Kent international beer day going, on right now stop. By half cat anytime, over the weekend don't tell the kids from Walla because they'll just make the place And if they're on, the molly's we too many choices for them to figure out which Get caught the is. The whole. Thing too. Bad deal all, right. Thank, you so much, thank you very much, thank you thank you all right back right well, first of all sign up from Judy what's coming up at the, top of the hour a busy day for governor Rauner The album Dan Ryan is tied up at seventy ninth street there's an, accident blocking the two right, lanes it's forty minutes from the circle tonight fifth seventeen minutes, back in southbound tristate is backed up as well it's an hour now from the Jane Addams tollway to the Stevenson thirty, six minutes back north and the, Kennedy is heavy. In..

"sixty minute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

04:43 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Few questions from sixty minutes what is your goal for america to meet people he told us just to meet with them i think we're more current now than we were in past years but values and the standards that we live by are the same as they were the very first broadcast went on the air in nineteen sixty eight i'm mike wallace some behind the scenes footage of the taping of that first broadcast his survived well done it began with harry reasoner getting rid of a cigarette it was after all the sixties sixty minute volume one number one new opening take one good evening kerri and mike wallace thought the introduction was perfect but in the control room don hewitt wasn't happy with the way mike was sitting famous end is always don don once he was a brilliant man who not only came up with the idea for the broadcast but ran it for thirty six years new opening take to it on this day they roll the tape again and roll the dice on don's grand experiment this is sixty minutes it's a kind of a magazine for television richard nixon and his entourage and the very first story set the tone for what was to come sixty minutes had the only camera in the room is richard nixon and friends watched the vote at the republican convention it gave him the nomination for president and get to work how does richard nixon if elected by majority interviewed by mike on the second program candidate made a remark that history would note the most important thing about a public man it's not whether he's loved or disliked but whether is respected and i hope to restore respect to the presidency at all levels by my conduct we moved into this place is virtually all of the presidents of the last half century of fielded questions on the broadcast you didn't anticipate all these questions are you really going to build a wall yes liz league on the first television interview with donald trump shortly after he won the two thousand sixteen election are people going to be surprised about how you conduct yourself as president conduct myself in a very good manner he was thoughtful he answered all my questions but are you gonna be tweeting i'm going to do very restrained if i use it at all and i thought okay he's not going to tweet anymore we're going to see something completely different at that wrong we interviewed barack obama eighteen times afghanistan employment problem healthcare bill want me to keep going yeah very smart man always a pleasure to interview i think it's fair to say steve that if money just finish the thought that he was always in the moment thoughtful and relaxed what else you got okay i don't kid myself the reason he did so many stories with us was because of sixty minutes not because of me because of the power and the influence of the show called bald mountain mike get known ronald and nancy reagan for years the of course was a dear friend of mine okay he'd worked with her mother in his early radio days even so mrs reagan gave as good as she got in their interview hi come on now you're putting words in my mouth my can take them right ronald reagan and then the two thousand six interview mike had no use for the idea that mister reagan was a lightweight baloney he knew enough to bring an end to the cold war yeah tape rolling interview for the clinton's nineteen ninety two when he was running for president let me just say one thirty four million people watched as the couple fielded questions about jennifer flowers she's alleging the twelve year affair with you that allegation is false you know i'm not sitting here some little woman standing by my man like tammy wynette i'm sitting here because i love him and for added drama alight fell off the wall in nearly hit them on average person mary and joseph no one was hurt it was a close call it was president occurred to me an unusual presidential interview recalling dark car scott pelley george w bush on air force one on the first anniversary of nine eleven i can remember sitting right here in this office and realizing was a defining moment in the history of the united states a new we're at war this is the center of the.

america sixty minutes thirty six years sixty minute twelve year
"sixty minute" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

05:03 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Movies what's not acting is his new special tambourine is really good okay directed by bo bo burnham to bridge yet not a thing to do with about it doesn't involve kris kristofferson i've always been a fan of christmas work figured i'd direct this netflix sixty minute or you said you love the descendants go on password what's great about you as we finish each other's sentences oh yeah how about that that's kinda street impressed color me impressed you should be jealous chris rock's whole bit in this movie is he's trying to impress danny glover because he's actually secretly married don't see so much for that fucking come rodri that failed look back we'll get it back just mulligan but this opens the door for riemann better gay panic oh why is this guy being so nice to me i think he's good good gay it's so weird because the original concept was that the character was gay so imagine how much worse it would if they actually executed that idea wow yeah maybe it's just like it's so bad and like i know it was an all them but this one specifically it's bad because it's old man yes it's very much like i don't care it's that thing which almost sounds nice at first i don't care what you do and then it's get the fuck out yeah it's like you do whatever makes you happy fine just don't spiking bar just don't expect me to agree with all the local news exact don't ever do it near another human being he's awfully scared he's he's really in a panic well you know tr trish didn't help him get set up for that part of life he's very insecure apparently so trish poor put a she's at what line in this movie has to be a bigger character because they hinges on that joke that she's ebony whatever ebony clark a romance novelist which is very bizarre because i was watching these movies throughout like it's fucking crazy that murtaugh has a palace i'm like he's got all this money's kids up to watt zoom does he but is are they like affluent anonymous reports all those kids after after high school see all these movies just be like that's a cop salary just you know everyone has copy you have to compare it to his mother fucker that lives in a trailer on the b right deal lives on a trailer by the beach this fucking lunatic here's the thing first of all if you have that kind of real estate you don't move it you just build should on top of it if there have been additions made trailer it's ready player one like a triple stack and there's a deck it's fucking crazy but when they have breakfast early on in the film and rene russo brings a plate of food out there like platelet donors and whatnot i was like that's living that's fucking i'm sorry that's living you always smell like the beach everywhere you go you go nice restaurant you're smelling like the beat there's worse things dismantle like well shoe or do toilets and fucking mask that shit up a little bit man trying to say before is that the evidence clark line in this movie tries to wreck con his yes i'm sure they got shit for it like that was early internet days they start hearing it but also he has all these boats i mean he's got a fucking fleet sprint five bedroom house in los angeles county's got a building addition and he's got a boat in like every move a different boat and what kind of he named it after a code for lunchtime yeah like code seven or something were just relaxing crack a beer by the way crack a beer at breakfast and we're talking about there are two heinekens on the table i don't know i don't know if they're both for mel gibson she's drinking while pregnant or rene rousso that's right that's good call steve lorna is drinking for two because she's like a hard scrabble whatever right like she's where she cop she was internal affairs oh that's right that's how they mean because the bad guy in the jared was a crooked cop and their cases but it up against each other and mel gibson through like shit fit someone else would be involved in a case i really love when they're they're cleaning up this beach scene or whatever this is this movie felt to me watching it.

bo bo burnham kris kristofferson sixty minute
"sixty minute" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on Channel 955

"This is a sixty minute non stop please now nine five five dirty looks from your mother never seen you adjust it's a special occasion not glad made it john begging you can you can we talk for a moment these feelings holding on wasn't trying to get wasted more than three or four sater's all those times thank you.

sixty minute
"sixty minute" Discussed on The Morning Toast

The Morning Toast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on The Morning Toast

"Shows i watch their like from rules housewives we'll know what real shows no those are real shows like sixty minutes sixty minutes minutes of real house i i want want to to be be awesome jewelry dreyfuss as might everything i would give my i would give my left leg to be with her same actually my left leg to selina meyer her character or like elaine venice that's fair but like jail jail ethic and she's i love how brave she's being through her battle with breast cancer and how she sharing like a decent amount of it on social media because she's really not that public of a person no hornet message i really like she's the queen she could do something terrible and it'd be like it's important that she's doing it just like she's really had a strong message with the messages like go good for you okay story number for i'm breezing to stories because i need to dedicate like half the shower to just talking to darren and also another story i truly cannot get less mac miller is arrested on dui and hit and run charges after rei guerande split he's not taking it to you really don't care about like driving accident team unless it's like a paul walker like he was a travesty like he died basically the dui like get your life together i don't want to talk about you on my procedures morning show yeah and i don't understand these people like three d was learn the first time at the firt i'm like it but it's not like okay you could kill yourself kill other people i don't care like you're going to be reckless with yourself cool don't take it out on me and my fellow civilians correct thank you do it like bella hadid when when you was reveille hills she got a dui and she learned english never got it again exactly it's also you're rich just get a driver get right jenner driver kover by that i know one is allowed to have to you is anymore ever since uber was like not no excuse and hopefully we self driving cars will be a radical that's true i don't think i would trust the self driving car i mean like okay but better than car accidents happen all the time on the roads true true but like if someone to blame when there's well that's true yeah.

elaine venice breast cancer miller paul walker selina meyer darren bella hadid jenner sixty minutes
"sixty minute" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on Channel 955

"Number one this is a sixty minute nonstop playlist on channel nine five five he's vein history honest john.

sixty minute
"sixty minute" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

The Adam Carolla Show

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on The Adam Carolla Show

"Pass he wouldn't get past week or because trump's crush affect trump is become trump like howard stern's howard stern like snoop dogg snoop there them yeah they're tyson yeah they're they're who they are now they can do anything they want all right you see you can find that beaker mio guy speak rem can't find he did a whole long interview on sixty minutes was it sixty minutes i watched it i thought it was could have been real sports oh ooh you might feel like i think it was real sports gyco man everyone's got the to do list how about you add save hundreds of dollars concurrence at geiko dot com just go in there and spend about fifteen minutes and see if you could be saving fifteen percent or more on your auto insurance extra money put that in your pocket gets shelves from yoga pants fellas not just for the ladies geiko dot com spent a few minutes how much you could be saving on your auto insurance any beaker yoga guy become chowdhury no oh god stoppage lawler making it ner they felt sexually violated by you lie lie and lie i don't need to do that rape or sexually also this on if i need we women i can make lying the most beautiful famous rich women in the world women leap by thousand everyday she fails in women a day wanna sleep with that hair and that shirt photo you're saying that four different women for different each kill themselves because you wouldn't have sexual.

trump howard stern rape tyson sixty minutes fifteen minutes fifteen percent
"sixty minute" Discussed on Deal of the Week

Deal of the Week

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"sixty minute" Discussed on Deal of the Week

"Well it vices is a is a complex sale because it's very difficult in a thirty or sixty minute bake off to really convince a client of your ability to give advice and to give advice in water typically longtailed assignments that are quite complicated an elaborate so like like the business itself it's really an apprenticeship driven model and it's experiential model meaning it may be difficult in sixty minutes to know what good advice is but if you've been with a trusted adviser over a project from beginning to end and you've had many twists and turns you come out the other end knowing whether or not you've been wellserved or not whether the banker as your best interests at heart whether the banker is easy to work with whether the banker has relationships around the globe to get things done when things need to be done whether they have gravitas and credibility in the board room and on and on and on so for those of us who have been in the business a long time it's really a a lifetime a professional lifetime of experience that has has helped forge ones the skill set and i think what you're getting in the boardroom typically with those have been doing this for many years is a very broad experience sat and you've seen so many different situations that with things do take the wrong turn or they become more challenging you've seen it and you know how to react.

sixty minutes sixty minute