35 Burst results for "Sixty Hours"

Still In The Saddle (MM #3652)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Still In The Saddle (MM #3652)

"The with kevin mason in a way today is kind of monument in my life. It's not a big deal. We all kind of note. Anniversaries and birthdays and special moments in our life and kind of mark them. Note them today is one of those for the mason minute. As we celebrate our tenth year. I would say our tenth year every day. But that doesn't officially happen until next week. But i started the mason minute podcast on march twenty second of twenty eleven so for the most part for ten solid years and again that first week i think three or four not seven. I've done a mason minute podcast. Each and every day. And what's amazing. If you wanted to actually listen to them back to back to back to back by the end of this month it would take your sixty hours but right now if you were to hit episode number one or go backwards in this case from today's episode number thirty six fifty two. It will take you over sixty straight hours of listening. There are some days when it seems like it was just yesterday and in all honesty. There are some days. When i thought i've been doing this for fifteen or twenty years doing it so long. It's kinda hard to believe ten years.

Kevin Mason Mason
Still In The Saddle (MM #3652)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 3 months ago

Still In The Saddle (MM #3652)

"The with kevin mason in a way today is kind of monument in my life. It's not a big deal. We all kind of note. Anniversaries and birthdays and special moments in our life and kind of mark them. Note them today is one of those for the mason minute. As we celebrate our tenth year. I would say our tenth year every day. But that doesn't officially happen until next week. But i started the mason minute podcast on march twenty second of twenty eleven so for the most part for ten solid years and again that first week i think three or four not seven. I've done a mason minute podcast. Each and every day. And what's amazing. If you wanted to actually listen to them back to back to back to back by the end of this month it would take your sixty hours but right now if you were to hit episode number one or go backwards in this case from today's episode number thirty six fifty two. It will take you over sixty straight hours of listening. There are some days when it seems like it was just yesterday and in all honesty. There are some days. When i thought i've been doing this for fifteen or twenty years doing it so long. It's kinda hard to believe ten years.

Kevin Mason Mason
The Next Evolution of Vaginal Health Awareness, Screening, Practice, and Policy;

Outcomes Rocket

04:33 min | 6 months ago

The Next Evolution of Vaginal Health Awareness, Screening, Practice, and Policy;

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here. And today i have the privilege of hosting sherry palm. She's the founder and ceo of a pops. The association for pelvic organ prolapse support. She's the author of three editions of the award. Winning book pelvic organ. Prolapse the silent epidemic a pelvic organ prolapse patient advocate battle and intimate health activists international recognized speaker pop key opinion leader and prolific writer regarding pop. Which is the pelvic organ. Prolapse will using that acronym pop Emotional social sexual fitness and employment quality of life impact. She writes on all of these things and today. We're learning more about pelvic organ prolapse how it affects folks. Why and what we can do about it so sherry. Thanks so much for taking the time to be on the podcast with us today. Thank you so much for this opportunity. So i really do appreciate the time. Share information with your following absolutely and so sherry. I'm excited for our chat to before we dive into your organization. I want to learn more about you. And we'll catch you started in this. Healthcare dernie well is a classic case of discovery diagnosis with a health condition. You've never heard of. I was a diagnosed thirty and had done everything. I could to change the dynamic of my life. I was told. Mb wheelchair-bound short timeframe. And so. I did a lot of proactive engagement with what i can do that. Optimize my health and it worked. What i've done did work so moving. Forward into my mid fifties. I started to notice symptoms. And i was a little curious what those symptoms meant not give you the condensed version of it. I'll you of tidy for your when i would go to the bathroom. I've always worked to sixty hour week. That's minority and go the bathroom to he and after about three months old noticing. A bulge down around my vaginal area got a little bit curious and god a hand held mirror out to take a look to see what was going on down there and discovered a walnut sized. And of course your brain goes to tumor right away when you think about on So i was. I wasn't freaking out. Completely because i had no pain with it. It was just something. That was weird. And i knew it wasn't normals had to be addressed so i sent an email to my buddy who happened to be a doctor. Lucky beam and she's combined. We'll do a pelvic exam upon examination. She told me very matter of factly. You help pelvic organ prolapse. I will fit you with a pessaries and if you're not happy with the past three. I will recommend a highly skilled euro gynecologist to address it surgical angle. Why never heard of any of those terms before. So i was a little coffee this to say but she for the past three. Which is actually an incredible device that you can but in that kind of like the diaphragm support your internal organs and backdrop is leaving harper's and prolapse. I is a condition. Where is the organs in your pelvic cavity. Start to move into vagina and push their way down and out. All of the vaginal canal as your pelvic muscle isn't strong enough or is damaged and cannot support those organs from underneath them anymore. So i am home from that appointment and did what most people will do by dr google. What up with that. And on tons of information about prolapse and everything that i read said the same thing. It's so common and my take away from. That was how come i've ever heard of this before. But so common so within a very short timeframe my curiosity turned to anger and frustration. To be honest with you. And i knew that if i didn't know about this condition at other women didn't know about this condition because i had been so proactive about my health so i moved into action quickly. I knew that it was only one way to really optimize getting information to women and that was during a book and have any knowledge about writing books but it just felt right so i went off in that direction and with two weeks after was for that test. Pessaries from my doctor. I realized that that wasn't going to work for me. I mean she great job you re different on the inside as we are in the outside and so what position fits omen for pessaries. Sometimes go through two or three or more tries to get the right fit with me. I was lucky. I had a great doctor. She got the right fit right. I'll shoot and i went home and i was happy. I could take it out in nighttime and embrace of insert in the morning and it worked wealth me at provided support from april. But within two weeks of doing that. I recognize that. I just didn't have time to deal with that.

Sherry Palm Association For Pelvic Organ P Sherry Marquez Harper Google
How to practice effectively...for just about anything

TED Talks Daily

04:09 min | 6 months ago

How to practice effectively...for just about anything

"Mastering any physical skill be it performing pure wet. Playing an instrument or throwing a baseball takes practice. Practice is the repetition of an action with the goal of improvement and it helps us perform with more ease speed and confidence. So what does practice do in our brains to make us better at things. Our brains have two kinds of neural tissue gray matter and white matter the gray matter processes information in the brain directing signals and sensory stimuli to nerve cells while white matter is mostly made up of fatty tissue nerve fibers in order for our bodies to move information needs to travel from the brains gray matter down the spinal cord through a chain of nerve fibers called exxon's to our muscles So how does practice or repetition affect the inner workings of our brains. The actions that exist in the white matter are wrapped with a fatty substance called myelin and it's this mile and covering or sheath that seems to change with practice. Mylan is similar to insulation on electrical cables. It prevents energy loss from electrical signals. That the brain uses moving them more efficiently along pathways. Some recent studies in mice suggest that the repetition of physical motion increases the layers of myelin. Sheath that insulates the exxon's and the more layers the greater the insulation around the axon chains forming a sort of super highway for information connecting your brain your muscles so while many athletes and performers at their successes to muscle memory muscles themselves. Don't really have memory. Rather it may be the mile a nation of neural pathways that gives these athletes and performers their edge with faster and more efficient neural pathways. There are many theories that attempt to quantify the number of hours days and even years of practice that it takes to master a skill while we don't yet have a magic number. We do know that mastery isn't simply about the amount of hours of practice. It's also the quality and effectiveness of that practice. Effective practice is consistent intensely focused and targets content or weaknesses that lie at the edge of one's current abilities so if of practices the key how can we get the most out of our practice time. Try these tips. Focus on the task at hand. Minimize potential distractions by turning off the computer or tv and putting your cell phone on airplane mode in one study. Researchers observed two hundred sixty students studying on average those students were able to stay on task for only six minutes at a time. Laptops smartphones and particularly facebook where the root of most distractions start out slowly or in slow motion coordination is built with repetitions whether correct or incorrect. If you gradually increase the speed of the quality repetitions you have a better chance of doing them correctly next. Frequent repetitions with allotted breaks are common practice habits of elite performers. Studies have shown that many top athletes musicians and dancers spend fifty to sixty hours per week on activities related to their craft. Many divide their time used for effective practice into multiple daily practice sessions of limited duration and finally practice in your brain in vivid detail. It's a bit surprising but a number of studies suggest that once a physical motion has been established. It can be reinforced just by imagining it. In one study one hundred forty four basketball players were divided into two groups group. A physically practiced one handed free throws while group. B only mentally practice them when they were tested at the end of the two week experiment. The intermediate inexperienced players in both groups had improved by the same amount

Exxon Mylan Baseball Facebook Basketball
Reddit Post Inspires Airbnb Cleaning Service

Side Hustle School

03:42 min | 6 months ago

Reddit Post Inspires Airbnb Cleaning Service

"For. Neil patrick the decision to start a side. Business wasn't just so he could quit his day job and travel the world while still having an income and that was part of it but it was also a decision guided by his desire to provide for his parents. You see for thirty two years. His parents owned video rental stores. Do you remember those. But of course the industry was on its way out in this was the mid two thousand. Ten's whatever you call that decade the mid two thousand ten's. I'm not sure but those doors weren't doing well around this time. Neil who was working fifty to sixty hours a week decided. He wanted to start a service to help parents as well as himself. He tried a number of paths as he tried different side. Hustles creating an ecommerce. Site blogging about pet hair vacuums and more before stumbling across a post on. Read it from someone who started cleaning company in that post the author laid out the detailed steps taken to get going after reading through the post carefully. Neil decided to give it a try himself in early two thousand thirteen. He established made this in los angeles cleaning. Service that specializes in airbnb and residential. Cleanings his first step in doing so was creating a website tall task because he had no technical background. You'll bought a template for about one hundred dollars researched how to host a website and published. What he said was initially pretty crappy looking site. Hey we've all been there. Y'all needed to determine how much to charge for cleaning services and find a cleaners themselves. He started by contacting local people with existing companies and asking them how much they charged and with their cleaning packages. Were looking at the competition. He was able to make sure there was enough margin built into his service to ensure he could operate successfully he puts it from the reddit post to the pricing scale. He essentially started made this by copying what other companies were doing at least as a way of getting things up and running although he had software to charge customers. You'll didn't know how to pay the cleaners at first. So after they got done with an appointment he would have them come to his office where he'd run downstairs. Get cash out of an atm and hand it to them eventually. He figured out a better way. Overall it took two months to get up and running to find customers. Neil focused on digital marketing. He says local marketing a gem because you're competing against local businesses only not the entire world. So it's a bit easier to manage. And it also cost less as i customer came about july twenty thirteen which he remembers because he snuck outside from his full time job and started dancing. Another advantage to local markets is that there are many third party platforms. Like angie's list or thumb tack and neil would charge a low price at first to attract initial customers. You also tried posting flyers and using social media although he says that wasn't an especially useful marketing tool for him since people don't usually by cleaning services that way. These days made this mostly generate sales from a combination of sco yelp and paid digital ads. Because he wanted to eventually quit his full time. Job and travel. You'll established made this so they could be operated by a fully remote team of employees which includes his parents. Total investment cost was around two thousand dollars which included his website. Those digital marketing ads and advertising for cleaners operated the business part time gig for two years by two thousand fifteen. The business was doing around thirty thousand dollars in monthly sales with twenty percent profit margin so six thousand dollars in monthly profit with a success. Quit his job and booked one way flight to colombia. The business doubled that year and he's since traveled to more than thirty five countries while scaling. What was once his side. Hustle looking to the future neal is aiming to be the millennial franchise disrupting the old school cleaning franchise industry.

Neil Patrick Neil Reddit Los Angeles Angie Flyers Colombia Neal
One Priceless Lesson We Often Forget About Love and Life

Optimal Living Daily

05:14 min | 9 months ago

One Priceless Lesson We Often Forget About Love and Life

"One priceless lesson we often forget about love and life by Mark Chernoff mark and Angel Dot Com. Everything, we need. Jose's wife Maria was born in a one bedroom stand alone home on the outskirts of Playa del Carmen Mexico. was a fine little home, but her father Oscar wanted a real house. So he worked two jobs a sixty hour week factory job, and then another twenty hours or so a week as carpenter. Oscar say fifty percent of his income for over a decade to build his family of four bedroom house like the ones in the better parts of town he put half his family savings and a low community bank and he talked the other half away in a safe he kept hidden on their property. On the morning Oscar plan to break ground on his family's new house, the local community bank shuttered stores just hours after law enforcement declared the bank was running an illegal and uninsured Ponzi scheme ninety percent of the deposits Oscar made were lost. Then the very next day. The little home was robbed at gun point in exchange for his family's safety Oscar for the rest of the money he had hidden in safe. In the short window of thirty six hours, the family lost a vast majority of their savings from years of hard work the night for the first time as Mother Olga watched Oscar cry. She approached Oscar with their infant daughter cradled and rocking in her arms and said, it's just money minister just a house. We've so much more than that. We have a truly loving home. Oscar looked at Olga, dried his eyes and nodded his head in agreement. He spent the rest of the night with his baby daughter holding her tight to his chest reminding himself that he might not be able to give his family, the house he dreamed of, but he can continue to give them a truly loving home. And for the nine years that followed Maria grew up in that small loving one bedroom home. After the first year, a sister Andrea joined her after the third year brother Roberto showing to the memories share of that time are truly heartwarming for example, everyday. Of Maria Early Grade School years she remembers her father coming home from work just before dinner giving her and her siblings, individual hugs and kisses, and then asking them to questions. More you loved. Do you have love in your heart? All three shoulder would nod their head smiling then he'd gather them all up in a big group. Hug and call out Metoo we are blessed. We have everything we need. With that house. Even. Though Oscar sincerely believed what he said to his children. He was still pursuing his dream of building a larger and more comfortable house for his family and nine years after losing all of their savings Oscar. Once again, saved enough money to begin building that new house twenty feet behind their little one bedroom home he started with framing out the foundation of the kitchen them Ria's mother had always quietly dreamed of. One Cement Block at a time paycheck by paycheck. Slowly, but steadily built a house he'd come. So close to building nearly a decade beforehand I a kitchen, a large family room and two bathrooms than a master bedroom bedrooms for each of the children and a nice covered front patio. In two thousand, two, win Jose Maria and start falling in love with her Oscar was still building that house. Soon. Thereafter, he put the last few finishing touches on it. The, entire family celebrated for weeks on end and Nowadays Oscar Olga still celebrate holidays and special occasions at the House with all three of their children and their children's families several times a year. But, the stories prizes lesson has nothing to do with that house. Just, a bonus the first day Jose met Marie his family. He noticed how sincerely loving and happy the whole family was. He praised Oscar for the beautiful family. He had asked him what the secret was. Oscar. Spent hours sharing interesting heartfelt stories about why his family was the luckiest one in the world. Never, shared all the details about how their house was built. In fact, after years of knowing Maria and her family traveling with them and even living with them for a short time, no one ever thought to tell Jose about how their family's house came to be. They ask questions about the construction few occasions and he received replies about the construction it until after Jose Maria got married and close on their own first house in Miami. Florida that Oscar took Jose for a long walk. He s does a about the details and Jose excitedly shared information about their new neighborhood in the House Oscar listened intently smiled and then finally he shared the story you've just heard. My daughter does not need a house Oscar concluded she needs a truly loving home and when you fill that home with children, your children will need exactly the same. If you that no matter how big or small your actual houses, your children will WanNa come home to you. The rest is just bonus. I know all of this because Jose ms one of my best friends and just this morning over coffee. He asked me where I was going to write about today. When I told him I hadn't yet decided. He smirked said Mama story for you, and then he proceeded to tell me the story I just told you.

Oscar Jose Maria Mother Olga Maria Early Grade School Mark Chernoff Carpenter Ponzi Scheme Playa Del Carmen Mexico. Metoo Andrea Roberto Florida Miami Marie
Open source developer and Gitcoin creator Kevin Owocki discusses modern fundraising

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

04:49 min | 9 months ago

Open source developer and Gitcoin creator Kevin Owocki discusses modern fundraising

"To jump right into it in the world, of Crypto, currency money is important depending on your view bitcoin itself is or aspires to be money in a very real way and without question, the craziest time Crypto have surrounded or even just been entirely about fundraising for projects. This has always been positive though in the later stages of the initial coin offering praise it seemed like raising money became the point rather than what it was being raised to accomplish in its aftermath. It's become increasingly obvious that what's being funded matters at least as much as how you get the funding but how you get the funding is important to. A couple of weeks ago Andrey's, and I were talking about an open source project. He'd actually used get coin to fund is, can you tell that story can here? Yeah absolutely. You know every now and then I come across an idea or find a gap in the court system where I think it would be really useful if we had a software gizmo to do X. Y. or Z. and even though I can code myself I don't have the time to embark on these little projects. So as I've done in the past I looks for way to funded developer to do this work and this time I decided to use bitcoin I've been Aware of it and looked at it in the past. But now I had a real project to sink my teeth in. So the projects was to develop a plug in or changing the wizard of the electron import in order to enable it to discover derivation paths, and I'm no monnet craze that has been used in a different wallet where the user doesn't know what the derivation path is and keeps having difficulty recovering funds. This is a problem, a lot of newbies have. And so I put up a he basically and a bounty is a pot of money in this case denominated in the stable coin die so that it's the equivalent value and I put up a one thousand dollar bounty for about forty to sixty hours of work approximately I estimated to develop this capability I wrote a specification as a get hub issue and the I thing. About Bitcoin is that it integrates directly into get hub. So I could take the issue where described the desired feature in detail and then attached the bounty directly to that, and then have developers come and pitch to take on that bounty and executed. It was completed a couple of weeks ago paid out and it's a feature that's being merged into hopefully the next version of Elektra. Now, that tool that you had created actually you and I had a little back and forth about it because turns out that you don't necessarily a Newbie to run into the problems that you were trying to solve their and we actually wound up using it to solve a big problem. I've been working on for a couple of months, but that's going to be another episode. Entirely, today we're talking with Kevin Kevin, can you just kind of take us through the basics of bitcoin was kind of the goal and how is it operating? Let's just start off with the most basic question for people who aren't familiar with the project. Is there a bitcoin or is this something that builds using as Andrea saying die or other types of Tokens as a reward? Yet, that's a great place to start. There is no bitcoin token bitcoin is a place where you can get coins. If you're a software developer in exchange for doing software development tasks, we have unfortunately from a branding perspective gotten swept up with a lot of the projects. Did do ICO's IOS in two thousand seventeen even though we never did in Seo. So. Take us back to the beginning kind of what was the thinking about this project in general what was the problem that you were trying to solve, and then how did you end up solving? So I've been working in web startups for the last thirteen years pretty much ever since I graduated from school and every software project that I've ever worked on has been an open source software projects. So whenever I start a new start up I will use python, which is an open source programming language. I will use an open source database server, I will use an open. Source Web server, and so every time I've built a start up all the stuff that you see in tech crunch are standing on the shoulders of giants of open source software and basically every time I've built a software startup I've been using open source software and open source software crates, billions of dollars of value for the world, but there's good way for software developers to monetize. The work that they do in open source software, and so that was sort of founding reason why I created Bitcoin, which is a double sided market connect software developers to the people want to fund their work in open source software in the sort of insight is that now using the blockchain space, we now have billions of dollars of capital that's going to open source software. Whereas before in the old financial system, all of the money that goes into it goes to some back office on wall. Street. So what if we could build a marketplace where the software developers they can sort of be the routing mechanism for the money going to software developers and have it the blockchain native project? That's what get coin is and that was the genesis of Bitcoin.

Software Developer Developer Andrey Kevin Kevin ICO Andrea
Should I Let My Little Brother Move In With Us?

Ramsey Call of the Day

06:26 min | 11 months ago

Should I Let My Little Brother Move In With Us?

"It's of Tuesday and this is the Ramsey call of the day part of the Ramsey networks. Lincoln Nebraska Dylan is Pie Dylan what's up? So. Excited to talk you. Know. I'm calling because I'm currently in baby step two with my husband. And we originally started at twenty, five thousand and we're down to about sixteen thousand. And my parents are going through a really bad divorce and my sixteen year old little brother would like to move in with me and my husband We're kind of at odds about it because. I want to let him move in but my husband. Wants to stay get intense and he's concerned. It will be too much of an expense if we let him move in. Are. You do you live near where he lives now? No they live about forty, five minutes away from Moscow I guess not too bad but he would stay in his same school community as a car. no she would transfer to school here in mine town. About forty five minutes from here. And what is the financial condition of your parents? Very poor they've filed bankruptcy and they are still even after the bankruptcy twenty, five, thousand and. What's your household income? Sixty five, thousand. What costs are associated with bringing him in food. food he would be would have to help him get a car because he doesn't have one and with daycare with my son Conflict with school scheduling. Bus Doesn't run front of Your House. You sorry. There's a bus not run for the school in front of Your House. No. But he he could. He could walk for a while it would just be hard one turn you really cold. How Far Away is it? About, a mile here That's not bad as nice little hike. uphill both ways and snow right You could tell his grandkids about it some day. It sounds like things are pretty miserable for him I want to help him. Me Too. So how is he miserable enough to? Take on some other forms of misery in order to get out of there like for instance, when he moves in with you, he starts he starts a job immediately and I saves up right quick and gets him a thousand dollar car. And he pays for it. He would be willing to work I I'm just concerned it would affect his grades. I'm concerned that he's living in a cesspool and he needs to get out. I'm not, concerned. About his range. He needs to work. If I'm your husband and you came to me and said, look, he'll take a job and he'll work this many hours and make much money He'll pay US fifty bucks a month for food and he'll save up to everything else and beyond a budget the way we teach him in order to save up and pay cash for his furlough thousand dollar car that we're going to help him get. We could be saving his life please let's do this for my brother. I think that's a regional thing. But if your little brother wants to move in there and sit on the couch and eat Doritos, all afternoon and suck. And play video games and sit on his butt. And then gripe because he ain't got a car that you gave him that he's entitled to because he breathes air this is different animal you following me. So I'm just I if he is as desperate to get out of that mess as it sounds like he is then he's desperate enough to do some crap. When he hits the road overture housing, it's get his life straightened out. I'm sorry for him. It's a tough road. He's at such situation. He's in his parents are both completely unplugged. Basically emotionally have abandoned him financially of abandoned him and he's sixteen years old. Let's talk. I'm. heartbreaking. But. If I'm your husband, your husband, he doesn't WanNa take a project on. He wants to bring in bring in someone that he can be a blessing to. If I'm your husband that's what I would be sitting on and so I think you can lay out some guidelines and then talk to your little brother and say these are our conditions if you will meet those, you're welcome. And of course, when you live under my roof, you live by my rules to. Come home drunk at sixteen years old. You're not doing dope it sixteen years old you're not doing you know out I just fill in the blank right? On Sunday. We're going to church or this is what we do at our house. Okay. If you live in my house, you do what we do at my house. You don't WanNa live there. It's okay. You don't like that that's live somewhere else. But when you're under my roof, this is high works. That's kind of old school. Should we did have a basic savings account for the car? Yeah. Just help him. I don't care if he puts it in a fruit jar. Just won't even I just wanted to sixty hours a week and go get him thousand dollars. Right? Quick. Okay sounds good. Just Bust I. Mean I just want him bust his butt man I want he's got a lot of emotion. He can burn off a bunch of it working. Yeah I agree I think that he's definitely willing to do what it takes anything more I just had reservations about forcing him to work so much I don't I don't have any reservations about it at all the best thing ever happened to him. He he won't die from it when you're working really really hard right before you pass out, she went to worry about work killing you won't kill you. So it's okay. You're going to be. All right. That's going to be the best thing ever happened to him. You're giving him safe emotional environment to live in someone that loves him and actually cares about his well being you're a good person. You're good sister. Well done. Just put some guidelines on it. So your husband feels like he's participating in. Process it's helpful and not enabling a bunch of crap.

Your House Lincoln Nebraska Dylan Pie Dylan United States Moscow
Should I distribute a new private label product myself?

Side Hustle School

03:21 min | 1 year ago

Should I distribute a new private label product myself?

"Hey Chris this is Chad from rock. Ledge Florida love the show and I think I've pretty much taken it about every episode to date. The problem with that is all I do is listen to you and I take action so this year. Twenty twenty Changing all that. So here's my question. What is the best way for small private label product idea to start with packaging and distribution logistics for their product? A first order will require about five hundred units. But I'm stuck on making decision. Should I attempt to bring those all home and distribute from my house or jump right into a fulfillment center I see positives? And negatives to both starting off bringing in fulfillment center into the picture as a lot of additional research. Decision Making in costs for an unproven brand. But obviously you save me personally a bunch of time. I work construction putting in fifty to sixty hours a week. So time has always been my excuse any suggestions on how to help me push through my indecision. Thanks Chris and keep up the fantastic work by John. Thank you so much. Thanks for listening and even though. I appreciate your listening to every episode I agree. It's time for you to take some action So well done in your twenty twenty plan now. This question has three key variables. Mrs How you make this decision. The variables here our time money and viability by ability. I mean you know of the idea itself of this particular private label product which doesn't actually mention what it is. That's okay because it allows us to answer the question in a way that can help multiple people so viability whether it's GonNa work then of course time and money pretty self explanatory. So when it comes to outsourcing fulfillment or doing it on your own as you say Chad there are positives and negatives each way. If you knew for certain that this new idea was going to be a hit then. I think the answer might be different or at least it would be very clear. Maybe then you'd work from the beginning to have someone else handle the ship now assuming that you don't know that this is going to work Which is normal like. It's your first private label products. I believe personally I would lean toward doing some version of the fulfillment myself at first. Let's say you want to have to bring in five hundred units to fulfillment center and then have them sit on the shelves forever? Other things they'll charge you for storage and it can also just feel disheartening to have gone through that process without much to show for it now. As soon as I saw clear evidence that it was working. However like say I'm doing it. Fulfillment myself then. I would move to that next stage and the thing is you can't just flip a switch. That's why you don't do it in the beginning because there's a lot of research involved in bringing in film at Center you have to talk to different companies. You need to document your process. Depending on what the product is there could be some additional steps or something specific That might be different from the other products shipping and so on the point is it's a bit of work plus. It's better that you know how to do everything associated with your product. Even if in the long run you don't end up doing it all that way it will be easier to show somebody else how to do it and also easier for you to pick up or hand off to a different person or company if something goes wrong so that's how I would handle that myself. I know Chad your fifty to sixty hours a week. Not trying to add a burden to you. They're just WanNa make sure your best setup success and I should say this is also the kind of question that could have more than one answer so ultimately it really is up to you most important take that action. Let us know what happens and thank you again

Chad Chris Center Twenty Twenty John
Hollywood in Crisis: Producers, Theater Workers, Crew Members Brace for Coronavirus Fallout

The Frame

06:15 min | 1 year ago

Hollywood in Crisis: Producers, Theater Workers, Crew Members Brace for Coronavirus Fallout

"Around the globe. Hollywood is shutting down the production of scores of movies and TV series and that means a huge number of crew members are suddenly unemployed. Many of those who lost their jobs are assistance and writer's room studios in agencies who might not qualify for pay or health benefits during a shutdown. Liz Alpers TV writer and a former assistant. She's the creator of pay up. Hollywood and I asked her how her organization started half. Hollywood is an organization that started in response to a lot of these system abuses and low wages that were going on in the entertainment industry and our goal is to shine a light on some of the abuses and outdated practices that have been going on and do whatever we can to fix it and bring assistance and other support staff up to a living wage while also radically aiding the abuses they're still going on in the workplace. So let's talk about what's going on in the workplace right now. More than seventy TV and film shoots so far. Shut down but when you add it all together probably looking at thousands of people below the line who are suddenly out of work. Do you think that's about right? I think that number's rising every day. So some of those people might be full-time studio employees. They might be casting directors or maybe somebody who works in post production. But I'M GONNA have to assume the majority are freelancers. They go from show to show kind of the backbone of Hollywood's GIG economy how might that latter group B. added disadvantage if they're laid off especially for the freelancers who are not part of any of the unions. These are people who don't have any sort of Cushion to fall back on often. They're living hand to mouth often. They're being paid lower than anyone else on the crew and they are paying for their own health insurance. It's not provided through union. They're the ones who went stuff like this happens. They don't really have anywhere else to turn. There are also ten ninety nine employees Who Don't get to pay into unemployment insurance and so they don't receive unemployment benefits when you major shutdowns like this happened even though it's never really happened before in the event that movie is cancelled or TV. Show ends what they have in their bank account is all they have to survive on until their next GIG. I have read that some of the things that have been considered our pain. People compensation for a couple of weeks but based on a forty hour work week. But there's almost no such thing as a forty hour work week during production. A lot of the compensation is tied to overtime when people are working sixty eighty hour weeks so that extra pay which can be huge if that goes away even if you're getting a paycheck for a couple of weeks it would be a fraction of what you might typically take home correct. Yeah that's connected honestly. Most people who work in production are given sixty hour. Workweek guarantees so by saying that we will pay you for a forty hour workweek. You're taking away. Twenty guaranteed hours if you're making say minimum wage of fifteen dollars an hour. That's about an additional three hundred dollars a week that you're losing and that's a huge difference. That's the difference between being able to pay your rent. Pay Your bills. Maybe you know by your kids food. If that money goes away you have nowhere else to turn and especially in a situation like what we're facing now where everything's uncertain. No one knows when production's going to be coming back you're essentially digging a financial hole and you don't know when you can stop we're talking with Liz Alpert from pay up Hollywood about unemployment in Hollywood. Your organization has helped start a crowd funding campaign. What kind of people do you think are most in need of help? You know honestly I think across the board. There are just people in need of health. It's it's the workers if the production folk we're focusing on the support staff because that's who our organization is fighting for but beyond the support staff. There are there crew members. There are studio assistants. Are Office Workers? Who have been laid off without pay. So it's really everybody. And even though we started this go fund me we're still urging the studios in the employees in the entertainment industry to continue compensating all their employees. Because right now the employees are the ones that needs to be taken care of and the businesses profit because of the hard work of their people so right now they need to be stepping up and offering financial protection and support throughout this time of uncertainty. It also feels like this is a moment where income disparity in Hollywood and probably around the world could be brought into much sharper focus so we have studio heads and CEO's who make tens of millions of dollars. Disney's Bob Iger may nearly fifteen hundred times. What the average is the employee makes and whole foods which is owned by Amazon. The richest man in the world. Jeff bezos worth. A hundred billion dollars has been asking it staff to donate their time offer others who might be sick. And I'm wondering if we're to step back might be a conversation that could follow after this is all over. You know. This is a conversation that's been had for years so it's not that these conversations haven't happened. It's that the world hasn't taken notice yet. And so what I think needs to happen is for the public at large to understand that we are facing a severe income disparity where the people at the bottom ten to pay the most in situations like this and who are at the most at risk and get their situations never change. They're they're never give an ounce of relief instead. They're told that they simply have to work harder to dig themselves out of these financial debts that they've accrued.

Hollywood Liz Alpers Writer Jeff Bezos Liz Alpert Bob Iger Amazon Disney CEO
Arthur Noriega Becomes New City Manager For City Of Miami

The Sean Hannity Show

00:38 sec | 1 year ago

Arthur Noriega Becomes New City Manager For City Of Miami

"Miami city leaders are hoping a new top administrator will lead to new beginnings new Miami city manager art Noriega is hitting the ground running saying he's expecting at least sixty hour work weeks really significant conversations we need to have to understand what the priorities are the now former Miami parking authority had says he's going to raise the bar for city employees we are going to have a customer service focus at the city of Miami at every level mayor Francis wars hopes this morning's unanimous approval of Noriega will bridge a divide I think this is a great opportunity to turn the page and out work with someone who is committed to being a professional and moving forward our collective agenda aircraft against newsradio six NW I or D.

Administrator Art Noriega Miami Francis Wars
Paul John Christmas Edition 2019 Whisky

Sips, Suds, & Smokes

03:04 min | 1 year ago

Paul John Christmas Edition 2019 Whisky

"So we're going to have harm. Tell us a little bit of background on Paul John Distillery and lead us into that one. Thank you Bob. The Paul John Distillery. It was established in one thousand nine hundred eighty two and go on the west coast of India along the Arabian Sea. The distillery was founded by Mr Paul. P John mentioned that the chairmen of J. The L. One of the largest spirits company in India producing its flagship brand the original choice whisky which sells over ten million cases year holiday in India Mr John Warner to create a true single malt whisky so was born. They Paul John distillery their traditional style of copper. Pot Stills was designed and constructed in India in Gujarat state state where Mahatma Gandhi was born and there. I don't know why that was put in there. Is that people know about India Mahatma. Gandhi was wondering because you had to put that in there. Bob Thanks yeah for their. You'd complain if you're hung with a new rope. Keep going feel being tied up for their for their unimpeded malt. They use one hundred percent Indian ground six row barley source from Punjab Rajon another parts of northern India in previous shows we've discussed discuss six row barley versus two row barley using Scotland and the the traditional Scottish partly is to row which has a distinct has a distinct taste the six row barley. It hasn't more citrusy taste. So this barley malted outdoors in multiple facilities then ground and blended with water and distillers yeast and then fermented for sixty hours before double distillation for finally V. of sixty point five percent the Paul John has two main aging warehouses. The smaller one is located in an underground facility which she's lost tomato cooler year round temperature however the second larger warehouses above ground due to high temperature The region around around go on the evaporation rate is or the angel share for the barrels stored. There is typically between eight to twelve percent unlike Scotland which averages about two percent per year and because because of the higher evaporation rate most of the whiskeys as between three to seven years and compared to Scotch. Whiskey tastes much older. The Finnish whisky is non show filtered and the color is added to the bottle on site. And it's and it's bottled on site. Sorry and All the details combined to create a very distinctive Indian malts and so we're tasting today the Paul John Two Thousand Nineteen Christmas edition which is bottled at ninety two proof or forty six percent. Ab the expression is a blend of petered and unimpeded finished. whiskies that are finished in Pedro Jimenez casks and while the color and this this is like a burnt orange. The nose to me right away. I get walnuts now. It's with airs turning PECANS which I didn't get earlier Oranges Oranges Like burnt orange. Honey that six row barley character. I talked about earlier Raisins and The Pallet disqualifies along with that were engine honey and cinnamon raisin and it's just luscious and mouth coating and let me take

Paul John Distillery India Paul John Mahatma Gandhi Scotland BOB Mr John Warner Mr Paul Arabian Sea Punjab Rajon Pedro Jimenez Gujarat J. The One Hundred Percent Forty Six Percent Twelve Percent Five Percent Seven Years Sixty Hours
#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

The Frame

06:44 min | 1 year ago

#PayUpHollywood Attempting To Change Pay And Working Conditions For Entertainment Industry Assistants

"Assistance in the entertainment industry are overworked underpaid and and often have to run personal errands for their bosses even after they leave for the day. That's according to a new survey of more than fifteen hundred assistance. It was released this this week by the grassroots movement called pay up Hollywood. The campaign started as a twitter Hashtag back in October and has been gaining momentum since then Katie kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter where she covers labor and she explains how the Hashtag grew out of an episode of script notes. A podcast asked about screenwriting. A assistant wrote in saying you know I think one of the big issues. That's going to be coming forward in the next few decades in Hollywood is that we're gonna I have to talk about the low pay. That assistance are facing in how that is related to rising cost of living in Los Angeles and from near the hosts which cacus Craig Mason. Who are both really powerful writers in Hollywood? Read that note and ask for more people to talk about their stories of being an assistant in Los Angeles they just got an overwhelming matic. Email and a writer named Alber who is on the board at the Writers Guild of America started Hashtag called Hashtag Champ. Hollywood so a couple of days before Thanksgiving script notes facilitated a pay up Hollywood town hall where assistance had a chance to talk about some of the issues. And here's what one woman who didn't provide. Her name had to say about burnout. We almost have like three jobs at once. Like not only. Are we working our day. The job for forty to sixty hours a week and not making enough and then therefore doing work on the side like babysitting driving etc but we also have the work of our own careers. I and I think that is what leads that burnout. Because we're not only expected to have this day job that puts all these things in place for us to move forward and then on top of that we're expected to have like an hour to write a day or or to fund their own short films and make them on the weekends like that is just like impossible. I think impossible's inaccurate word word for what she's describing. What some of the other issues that came up around the Hashtag and around the town hall so I think a big one is the question of access? Hollywood has been talking talking a lot about its diversity issues wanting to get more folks into the pipeline of diverse backgrounds. But what we're looking at. Here's the situation where you have to to be able to afford to be an assistant in the first place to get that first leg up in the industry and so Paige Hollywood has just released a survey of one thousand thousand five hundred fifty one assistance and they found that seventy percent of the people who were surveyed were white and that fifty two percent were receiving financial -sential aid from family and friends to make ends meet as they were assistance in Hollywood. So I think we're seeing that this industry in order to diversify does have to become more accessible or economically manically accessible to folks who aren't coming in with with that aid so that to me was notable as well as the fact that a lot of assistance were also talking thing about this sort of demeaning conditions that were expected of them. Hollywood has pay your dues culture and I think a lot of folks remember at its in difficult conditions when they or assistance and so sort of expect. There is a lot to go through that as well. But in the survey it showed that one hundred and four respondents had an object thrown at them in the workplace. So I think that we're looking at conditions assistance or not only being pretty badly paid but also they are facing conditions that are pretty rough. We're talking with Katie kilkenny at the Hollywood reporter about pay up. Hollywood there are other things that really jumped out to me. One is that almost ninety three percent of those. The people surveyed said they work more than forty hours a week and fifteen percent said they were working more than sixty hours a week and hero's something that was really troubling. Almost almost a quarter said that they had reported an increase in substance abuse. So it sounds like the job is really taking a terrible terrible toll on the people who are in this line of work completely. I mean I think these numbers sort of show something that assistance have been talking to each other about for a long time and so I think for a lot of this is not a surprise but this survey really shines a light on some of these issues and the fact that things need to change and it sounds like some show runners are actually saying this is unsustainable and maybe even immoral absolutely so I talked to a few folks. We'd been vocal on twitter with their support and basically found out talking to them that they were advocating for higher wages on projects that they're currently developing and these are Adam conifer who Folks might know true. TV's Adam Ruins everything. David H Steinberg. who was a CO show runner? Netflix is no good nick. And the writer producer producer Creator Ayelet Waldman who was an executive producer on Netflix. Unbelievable Waldman in particular told me that she was trying to get her assistance twenty dollars an hour plus benefits and hover was saying that he was trying to just various aspects of the job to make it more. Tenable you said in your story Lori that you had reached out to the major studios and talent agencies for comment and let's just say they weren't flooding the phone lines calling back. have any of them. Had anything anything to say. One Agency is doing something and they didn't provide comment for the story. But you know I heard via sources that for which is the talent agency that represents spoke John August who helped movement as well as Liz Alpert who coined. The HASHTAG has conducted in anonymous pace survey of their assistance. And and I will also be receiving and looking at the results of the pay up Hollywood survey and I imagine that in weeks to come others will speak up more but for now they our remaining mum and even if the hours are horrible. The working conditions aren't great. A lot of people want these jobs right because it's so hard hard to get into the business and this is one possible path for people who want to become creative people in Hollywood definitely. They're extremely competitive jobs and often a line that is used with assistance to speak up about work. Conditions is that you know there were thousands. That will take place but it's gotten to the point where the wages are the same as they were twenty years ago in some cases That's what we're hearing from. These stories while the cost of living in Los Angeles has skyrocketed. And so these assistance missiles argument is that the situation is untenable at the slain. Katie Kilkenny is an associate editor at the Hollywood reporter. Katie thanks so much for coming on the show as much for having me

Hollywood Katie Kilkenny Paige Hollywood Los Angeles Reporter Writer Twitter Associate Editor Writers Guild Of America Unbelievable Waldman Netflix Craig Mason John August Alber Lori David H Steinberg. Adam Liz Alpert Executive Producer
"sixty hours" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Like the sixty hours will fly by any of this from you don't like which probably saved you fourteen weeks your life could you probably wouldn't be able to have the interest to go through a program are you in the Chicago area exclusively right now is that where you're looking for veterans and operating the program so we have two components to our program one is in person that's right downtown Chicago easily accessible and then we have a remote program which is attached to the in person program the students attend by a live video feed the same instructions same instructors they get to work with you in person students same support structure it's interesting chose to work with military spouses to you hear a lot from them in terms of their work opportunities that they need some sort of flexibility of my husband or wife is employed or deployed I should say that they're easy sometimes is difficult in the work force for the military spouse as well and imagine that's why you're looking at them also to enter the pro they can come into the program that's right that's right we expanded our mission to include military spouses little while back in we did this because we saw that we a first of all other non profits are doing the same thing I think widely recognizing that to support the veteran you need to support the family structure and the spouse is just an integral part of that and you're right the outlaw the spouses have very different needs they need to be able to move with her husband there might be deployed we have a woman who was actually in London and her husband was deployed right outside of their she went through a program now she's want one of our great success stories working a full time remote job so we're very pleased to be able to serve that part of the community as well speaking of success stories were gonna come right back and talk with Michael Dorsey he is an alumni of code to tune the program we've been talking so much about and we'll be back with rod levy and Michael Dorsey coming up here after break or maybe he's not the holidays with a cozy as gifts on sale up to fifty percent off storewide today with styles from just four Bucks and frost free Popper jackets from just twenty five box he gives it a flash game in two hours with buy online.

Chicago London Michael Dorsey rod levy fourteen weeks fifty percent sixty hours two hours
Twitter War Fuels Rush on Popeyes Chicken Sandwich

Business Wars Daily

05:51 min | 1 year ago

Twitter War Fuels Rush on Popeyes Chicken Sandwich

"This episode of business wars daily is brought to you by sent pro online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk is never been simpler than with sent pro online from pitney leabeau's. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit p._b._a. Dot com slash b w daily in <music> from wondering i'm david brown and this is business wars daily on this tuesday september third. I just can't help what myself a twitter war between popeye's and chick-fil-a is made some people just as bad as wet hands okay now. That's off my chest seriously. If you haven't heard about this twitter award. Let me get you caught up on august twelve popeye's debuted a new chicken sandwich called simply the sandwich. It was the fast food chains biggest launch of a new menu a new item in thirty years and as many observers have noted popeye's chicken sandwich seemed an awful lot like chick fil a.'s classic delicacy crunchy batter fried chicken pickles and spicy or bland mayonnaise squished you know brioche bun to some it was outright fast food plagiarism and two others. The popeye sandwich was just <hes> finger licking good on twitter one. This jato tweeted popeye's spicy chicken. Sandwich is the best thing i've ever had in my entire life. Clearly that couldn't stand not if you're chick-fil-a in a very mild case of poultry peak aac chick-fil-a reminded the twitter verse which fast food chain rightfully owns the chicken sandwiches storied legacy. The company posted a math problem bun plus. The chicken plus pickles equals all the love for the original. Get it you saw it here. First chick-fil-a wanted to remind everyone politely of course since since chick-fil-a must protect its reputation for stellar customer service it wouldn't do to be snarky well as twitter wars do this one blew up feeling thing henpecked twitter's had to respond and they did in huge flocks so popeye's which originated in louisiana and is now headquartered in florida fought back with just two carefully chosen southern words words which in other circumstances could inside a schoolyard brawl over a re tweet of chick-fil-a fillets math problem popeye's asked y'all good and with that as buzzfeed wrote the gauntlet was thrown twitter became a buzz as it is wont to do and for a few minutes there the heat was not about political fights but about who makes the best fried chicken sandwich naturally lesser chicken sandwich sellers wendy's shake shack rush to join the fight and every poultry player benefited gaining likes re tweets and followers but none more so ban popeye's which picked up twenty five thousand new followers in just a few days c._n._b._c. reported in the real world popeye's was loving this twitter war and the sales it spurred knowing that a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. Some customers tried to sell their sandwiches for hundreds of dollars. The washington post reported popeye's ran out of chicken sandwiches in some locations and began warning that they could soon become as scarce as hen's teeth then had happened. They ran out store by store and they had to post handwritten signs on their windows. Telling anxious diners that there were no more of the sandwiches by august twenty six six just fourteen days after launch there was nary a popeye sandwich to be found from coast to coast and that of course spark yet more tweets by customers clucking clucking their disapproval to that popeye's tweeted it will soon bring back the sandwich permanently this time now this being twitter in two thousand nineteen the controversy he did spark a lot of serious discussion and a superbly written piece in vox about the health of factory farmed poultry the labor conditions on those farms and in fast food restaurants and the exhaustion of popeye's workers toiling sixty hours a week because of our love of batter fried birds and it spawned a lot of other political talk to along with discussion about the racial racial differences in the markets for chick-fil-a popeye's but we won't get any of that here instead for the final say or we should call it the final cluck perhaps we'll turn to food writer and soul food scholar adrienne miller who says i thought it was a very fun food fight and nothing deeper than that although like the thousands on twitter miller miller couldn't resist weighing in i've had both sandwiches. He says and i give a slight nod to popeye's from what i've read. This is business wars daily. Now we cannot resist which sandwiches your favorite tweet us business wars. We really want to know hey. Thanks so much for listening. I'm david brown back with tomorrow. This episode is brought to you by centro. Online from pitney bowes shipping and mailing from your desk has never been simpler than with sen pro online online from pitney bowes with wpro online is just click sand and save for as low as four dollars ninety nine cents. That's right four dollars. Ninety nine cents a month. Send envelopes flats packages right from your p._c. And you were back to business in no time. Try it for free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale but only when you visit p._b. Dot com slash v._w. Daily that's p._b. Dot com slash b w daily.

Popeye Twitter Chick-Fil-A Sandwich Pitney Leabeau David Brown Washington Post Adrienne Miller Buzzfeed Miller Miller Centro Louisiana Writer Florida Four Dollars Thirty Days Ten Pounds Fourteen Days
Boeing Moves A Step Closer To Resolving 737 Max Problems

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:16 min | 2 years ago

Boeing Moves A Step Closer To Resolving 737 Max Problems

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from US's online MBA ranked number one by poets in Kwan's, NPR listeners, reap the benefits of a prestigious USC NBA, find out if your if it more at USC online, MBA dot org. Boeing says it's one step closer to resolving problems with. It's seven thirty seven max planes. The company says it's now finished developing a software fix for the jets. But as NPR's David Schaper reports, it still may be months before the airplanes are cleared to fly. Again, aviation authorities around the world grounded 737 max two months ago after the second of two crashes that investigators linked to Boeing's automated flight control system on the planes, the crashes in Indonesia, Neath, opiate killed a total of three hundred forty six people in both cases, a faulty sensor caused the system to repeatedly forced the planes nosedives as the pilots tried to regain control. Boeing has been working on a software fix for the system since the first crash last fall yesterday. The company released a statement saying the software upgrade has been completed the first step Clint bay logs a professor of aeronautics at Embry riddle, aeronautical university. Boeing is following the right path there. Doing the right things to make this system. Better lawn six is at the system will now rely data from two sensors instead of just one that along would have prevented either of these accidents from occurring. The changes will also make the system, repeat. The nose down action less often in less forcefully making it easier for the pilots to take back control. Boeing statement indicates the upgraded software as undergone extensive testing, including more than two hundred test flights over three hundred sixty hours Clint bay, log says that's a lot for software. I think that's very indicative of how seriously Boeing taking this situation and that they are determined to get this fixed, right? The first time, of course, Boeing has been under enormous pressure. Since the crashes pilots complain. They were never even told about the new flight control system until after the Indonesia crash whistle. Blowers accused Boeing of rushing, the development of the max, cutting corners along the way, while safety advocates say the FAA didn't provide proper. Oversight in certifying the plane. The FAA says the company still has not formally submitted the software fix for review when it does acting FAA administrator Daniel L well told lawmakers and a hearing a Capitol Hill this week, what will happen next. We'll do test flights. We will do thorough and robust safety analysis, we will determine based on the software fix. They give us we'll determine what level of training will be required of Seventy-seven, max pilots. The bottom lines has L. Well, is this, we will not allow the seven three seven max to fly in the US until it is absolutely safe to do so. And we will use every tool every day to gathering capability, we have to ensure that's the case. The review of the seven thirty seven max could take months and regulators in other countries. We'll have to sign off to airlines have canceled hundreds of flights as they've had to remove max planes from their schedules for much of the busy summer travel season. David Schaper NPR news.

Boeing David Schaper Clint Bay Indonesia United States FAA NPR Usc Nba USC Embry Riddle Kwan Blowers Professor Daniel L Administrator Three Hundred Sixty Hours Two Months
Boeing says 737 Max software update is ready

The Opening Bell

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Boeing says 737 Max software update is ready

"Chicago-based Boeing says it software fix for the grounded. Seven thirty seven max jet fleet is ready company said it hoped to have the sought for fixed on in about six weeks, but it took them fourteen. And now. They must wait for the FAA to approve the software fixed before the jets can begin flying again. Those jets were grounded after two international flights crashed killing nearly three hundred fifty people. Boeing says it has run more than two hundred test flights with the new software with about three hundred sixty hours of flight time software fixes aimed at correcting a problem over how the jets reacted when it's data indicated that the engine had stalled or that the plane was perhaps going into a

Jets Boeing FAA Three Hundred Sixty Hours Six Weeks
Why Doctors Work Long Hours

Curiosity Daily

02:45 min | 2 years ago

Why Doctors Work Long Hours

"There's a good reason why doctors have very long shifts, and when I say, long shifts. I am not kidding on average US doctors work almost sixty hours a week. And a lot of the time younger residents work up to eighty hours and have to deal with grueling twenty four hour shifts. We wanted to cover the research behind this today because at first glance, those long hours might deem a disaster waiting to happen. I mean, delivering medical care is stressful highly demanding work and doing it on little sleep seems like it would result in people getting hurt. But there is a convincing reason why doctors prefer to keep working instead of. Ending their patients off to another doctor. And that reason is that it can save lives. This relief to me because when I moved to Chicago, I lived with my good friend Blake. And he was a medical school the first three years we live together. And. Yeah, his hours. Brutal. I have never understood why they did this, and I'm so happy to know now. Well, yeah. Clearly saving lives is a pretty good reason. And this is backed up by a lot of research that has shown that even when training shifts in weekly scheduled hours for doctors are cut back. There haven't been significant changes in the number of lives saved. So what gives one of the major reasons for this is the risk that goes along with changing a patient's doctor. This routine is known in the medical profession as a patient. Handoff handoffs require a lot of clear communication on every detail about a patient's condition prognosis and treatment when you multiply this by the number of patients usually under a doctor's care. It's pretty much guaranteed. The details will be lost without a robust and organized method in place. For communicating them up to eighty percent of serious medical errors can trace their origin to miscommunication during patient handoffs. That's why sleep deprived doctors who have firsthand experience working with particular patients are less likely to make serious errors than doctors who are wide awake. But who were never told about a patient's allergy or another complicating factor? I mean, you know, when you show up at the hospital and the doctor asks you, okay, what have you been feeling what are the symptoms and you talk to them for like twenty minutes about something while. Yeah, I mean that doctor may not be able to repeat that twenty minutes of conversation for two hundred patients to the next doctor. It makes sense. These days hospitals, typically enforce strict patient. Handoff procedures and the implement their own fatigue mitigation strategies that can actually include scheduling plans naps strategically using caffeine and keeping staff involved when designing work schedules. The future should be brighter. Since trials are still underway to find the perfect balance for work hours shift. And sleep policies. But for now, it's worth remembering that there is at least one good reason why doctors work such long hours.

Blake United States Chicago Caffeine Twenty Minutes Twenty Four Hour Eighty Percent Eighty Hours Sixty Hours Three Years
FDA approves first postpartum depression drug

Reveal

06:06 min | 2 years ago

FDA approves first postpartum depression drug

"There was a significant development in the medical world this week for the first time the FDA has approved a drug for postpartum, depression, the treatment is extremely expensive. And at the moment requires days of inpatient care to administer but it also works faster than traditional antidepressants. And that's just one reason many are applauding this as a significant breakthrough for the one in seven women who experienced depression during pregnancy, or after childbirth we wanted to talk about this with someone who knows firsthand what that's like. So we've called to Wong. She experienced postpartum depression after the birth of her daughter Scarlett, and she wrote a book in graphic form about her experiences. And it's pretty well. Graphic it's called dear Scarlett, it will be out later this spring and Teresa Wong is with us now from the studios of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Calgary Theresa thanks so much for talking with us. Thanks for having me. Did you? Did you fear that you would be that you would experience this when you were pregnant when you wrote in the book, it's very funny about it. Like, you wrote about how well, you know, didn't really think that much about having kids you said, well, what if my kids hate me? What if I don't like them? You know, what if they grew up to be terrible. All that stuff going on in your head. But I think I I was I was anxious about having children. But you know, what I did not expect to have depression. And I don't know why maybe it's because so much of the time that you spend during your pregnancy in the doctor's office. It's it's almost all about the baby and very little about you. And so it never crossed my mind and actually until after when it actually happened when did you realize that something was really wrong? I think I knew right away. And but I- blamed it on the circumstances of my daughters birth. I had some complications around her delivery. And so I wasn't really awake or conscious after she was born for a number of hours, and I thought well, it's because of that I don't feel connected to her. I haven't really bonded to her yet. But when I got home, those feelings were still there and stay just grew day by day, and the more that I spent time with her, especially alone, the more I realized that something was really off can can you describe what it's like just going through the day when you're experiencing postpartum depression. It's a very long day. You don't have the energy to deal with anything. And so mostly I kind of laid on the floor. It's also very quiet because a lot of your feelings are numb. And and so you just kind of go through the day like a bit of a robot like the numbness is what really stands out for me in the way, you described this one of the scenes that you write about in the and there are a number of them. Like, this is that you were you're still in the hospital you were so exhausted that you had to get the lab tech to help with the baby back in the bassinet. But you've for help, and it was hours before somebody came to help you and your husband got there. You were sobbing uncontrollably and nurses. So see mama's little emotional today. It just would seem that the very people who should have known that. You really did need help in that. There was something significant going on with you didn't. And that's a little scary. I mean, did you find that like the medical personnel? Did they seem to grasp that postpartum depression is really a thing that this wasn't just baby blues? I feel like the when I finally got help the medical community was very serious about it. I think the problem was maybe the delineation between baby blues and postpartum depression, isn't all that clear because people do expect a little bit of crying and kind of just hormones wreaking havoc on your system. And so perhaps they don't take it as seriously if you bring that up early on after having a baby, and maybe we do you need to look at how to take mothers who kind of know themselves and know that there's something more serious going on. To take them more seriously. So what was your reaction when you heard that? There was this new treatment recognized. You're not a doctor you are a writer. But I just I did wonder if this news meant something to you, even though you've passed through the worst of it for you. Right. Well, I had kind of two reactions, and the I was just feeling encouraged that the medical community is seeing that postpartum depression is a big enough deal that they need to focus on treatment. But my other reaction was kind of to the cost and the time involved the cost. I read was something around thirty four thousand dollars and a sixty hour kind of IV infusion, and I just don't know very many mothers who would be able to take that kind of time at that kind of expense. We are starting to hear more about postpartum depression. I mean, a number of celebrities have come forward in recent years and described their experiences with it. I I wonder if you still feel that there's a stigma around it around postpartum depression, or do you feel like is is anything getting better? I do feel like it's getting better. I I mean, I've seen it in storylines on on television shows now and having people a Chrissy Teigen and Adele, kind of come out, and at MIT that they been struggling with their moods after having babies I feel like we're coming to a point where awareness has grown. I think it could go even further. Really, I think we're on the cusp of something. That's Theresa Wong who spoke to us from the studios of the CBC and Calgary

Depression Teresa Wong Scarlett Calgary Canadian Broadcasting Corporat Theresa Wong FDA Chrissy Teigen Writer MIT Adele Thirty Four Thousand Dollars Sixty Hour
"sixty hours" Discussed on Pardon My Take

Pardon My Take

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on Pardon My Take

"Yeah, I'm pretty sure New Year's was like a couple of days ago. Right. New Year's Eve was like three days ago. Yeah. Before we get going, by the way, how how long are you happy New Year's guy because I famously like to do it for the entire month. Gene, just do one day one day out. I'm not I'm not hitting gold stars. Besides that. It's happy jumps who January. No, you see me. You see me at Starbucks. I'm saying happy new year till? January. Jan thirty doing jumps in January. By the way, was probably the best thing that we've ever done January. I is like I don't care what day of the week. It is it's always a Sunday. It feels like a Sunday and the rest of your years coming up, you're dreading it. But when you realize that it's jumpsuit January you get that little pep in your step. Yes. Something to look forward to for the whole year comfortable's wearing right now. Laurie is this velvet or if we ever did it feels like just a lot of like angels. Massaging me. Yeah. We sound comfortable on this because we're in jumpsuits and not to say that people should send us free jumpsuits. But check out Twitter will put out our sizes in our address. But yes on this for you still media. Yes, I'm an act. Double excel work. No XL. Okay. I'm on the diet. It has started. If you're listening to this right now, I have not had a carb this entire all year from January second on you. I it's like it's still basically you're in the demilitarization. Yeah. If you don't go to sleep on New Year's Eve, you get to eat whatever you want till you. All right. So we got catch up. We have a ton to get to. We have so much football that we watch actually wrote down. Exactly how much football. I watch crunch the numbers. How many hours I watched? I now we concern since the last show. Yeah. Okay. Since last show into current. So it doesn't count when I'm watching three games. I'm not counting all three of the games. Right. Those are quality hours. Yeah. But they're still just went out. I watch twenty bowl games. Okay. That's concurrent. How much twenty bowl games total? Some of those happen to the same. I'm gonna guess you watched. Sixty seven hours of close say, sixty hours, seventy six hours of football. Nice seventy I a couple there's a couple of days on December twenty seven to twenty eighth. I missed the early game. You should get the presidential medal of freedom for that was pretty cool. My eyes started to to burn by day four. I was like, you know, what this is just the new living like I just eat all day. I also found out that you can get addicted to cookies cookies like five cookies in the morning. Yeah. I just found that out so much football. And it was so great. I will say though that Thursday and Friday of this week their major crash days. Yeah. There's absolutely no football yoyo. Listen, a DVR a couple of Browns preseason games. Yes. Tied yourself over play. Another Madelene play the MAC tournament on Thursday Friday, because yes, when we when we get off of the football there is that day is probably around December twenty ninth where you wake up, and you're like this is life. Now, we wake up we watch football day. We gamble all day. We go to sleep. We wake up we watch football game all day and to have that jolted away from us, it sucks. I'm still reminding myself. We have the whole month of January NFL playoffs. Can I say something scary? Your pinkie finger might be. We'll get to that. We've twelve football games off. That's fine twelve as that's a lot eleven NFL games that high on my finger. Okay. All right. All right. We we have twelve football games. All ten of my shall we talk about some NFL playoffs. So we're gonna do this. We're gonna go NFL. Plus, we're gonna talk. About coaching them. We're get to bowl games and go from the star of the Saturday. Okay. I love Saturday wildcard game. I do too and classic to the colts. And texans. Thank you to the NFL for honoring the yearly tradition of either. Having the Bengals or the Texans are usually both play in that early..

football NFL Gene Starbucks Twitter Laurie Browns colts Bengals one day Sixty seven hours seventy six hours sixty hours three days
"sixty hours" Discussed on The Candid Frame

The Candid Frame

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on The Candid Frame

"Forty fifty sixty hours a week shooting. Three products was pretty mind numbing and going. I'm starting to hate photography because it's becoming just a technical exercise. And it was just an antidote. I started walking around my phone just going on. And I'm going to go on a walk every evening and just shoot a few images on my phone force oneself to post one Instagram a day just to myself goal. And I started doing that. And then I picked up a Fuji x one hundred which just fell in love with that little camera. I think a lot of people fall in love with them. They're amazing and just that kind of very tactile old school way of changing your settings and doing about something that felt a lot simpler and more in touch than like, you know, having to worry about multiple strobes DS laws, and again that kind of took the streets be up another jump and that thirty five million quivalent focal lengths that if I I'm quite shy get in people's faces on the streets. I'm sort of more of a stood back street photography sheet, more for kind of space and light than than than faces or anything that people are in the frame. It's often more for. Scale. But so that kind of thing and that that really maybe full-back in love with photography. And I think the future for me is probably going to be some combination of the portrait in the street. I mean, my my dream job would always have been to go and be a journalist photojournalist and tell stories with photography, but to do that nowadays is incredibly hard because the magazines and newspapers locking all that stuff down that getting rid of most of those jobs that crowd sourcing imagery from people, and it's very very hard to make a career in that. But I've got the next phase is starting to lineup few projects that a longer term which includes import you, and some environmental stuff that will work together is specific stories, and I'm hoping in that I kind of find my very very specific niche if that makes sense. That you've succeeded in doing having a Hughes Instagram felling, and I'm wondering how that sort of colors your perspective, not only about yourself. But. Your work what I feel guilty about that Instagram falling because it's not from Instagram it's from YouTube just come over from YouTube. So I don't take overly seriously. I mean, my photography hasn't got a lot better since my Instagram, go bigger, and I take all that stuff with a massive pinch of Rennes with a couple of hundred follow as much benefits artifice than me. And there are cats on the internet with followers. It really doesn't matter. I mean Instagram is far more than for me as a as a bit of accountability to keep shooting into keep posting. So I still try impose one image day doing that..

Instagram Fuji YouTube Rennes Forty fifty sixty hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on Raised by TV

Raised by TV

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on Raised by TV

"Sixty hours of TV show and then your hero. The genius is undone by flushing something. And I also think like I I was not taking that in because I was going like how long is this ending? Like, why is he I was so confused, and I almost couldn't take any clues to help me. I almost thought it was going to I thought it was going to end in a very cheesy way and that he was going to die. He's going to walk in his patients are going to be there saying thank you, or whatever and stead it was the even cheesier even worse choice. No actually wouldn't have been upset if he actually did die, and they talked about how we may even glorified him. And then somebody somebody's like don't glorify him. He was an asshole which is kind of what his friend was about to. And I liked that enough. Like, I like I like a final ending to something. It's kind of nice. I know the show is over what is the benefit of having him right off into the sunset like why? Or if you want them read off in the sunset never have him die. Well, yeah. And I never found the body or something like what did they who's bar? Do they bought the heroin addicts? But like they are all he says, I switched the dental records. That's why I thought it was still a hallucination because I was like where who what what did you do this a head of time? Like he knew that that guy was going to die in the fuck. And that was his plan makes me should we have watched the second to last. Well, he'll should watch one hundred seventy seven. Well, here's the thing for any listeners who actually watched house, let us know if you had like finale blue balls, or you thought it was great like let us know what how that finale actually resonated because that's another thing about watching just the intro finale. You're like this feels like a letdown to me, I couldn't imagine it. How would feel if you dedicated a hundred and seventy hours we'll same with Veronica Mars because it was like they purposely left it not finale ish, right? Didn't want it to be the ending. And so as as you're where you're like, I don't know when the next time I'm going to get more of this is I want something kind of like tying it up. You could always bring something back later if you wanted to make house reboot if you in their head they're like I wanted to be rebooted in two years. You could still have him die in that finale. And then be like he was not actually dead. You could make the whole thing. Like, I don't know. I just hate the rug pulling out of that eliminates stakes. Yeah. It's a thing. It's the thing that turned me off from comic books back in the day. Like, I used to love reading comics. But then it started. Being like time travel, alternate realities. I think there was not so now no one can die. Right. There's nothing that's permanent. And I'm like, oh, well, then this is stupid then..

Veronica Mars heroin seventy hours Sixty hours two years
"sixty hours" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Actually, there's a wonderful organization and the name escapes me this early in the morning without the aid of enough coffee right here in the twin cities that will rehome birds that and they are so good. No, it's not that. I didn't want it. I could not care for it. Because I had ended a relationship. I was alone to work like sixty hours a week. Yeah. Would have been torture for that bird. So I was able to bring it to a sanctuary where it was going to fly around with other birds would be happy. Yeah. I had a sugar glider and their nesting animals, and they get they can die of loneliness. They don't tell you that when they sell them to you at the pet store should have exotic pets. No Matteo was too sad. Live by herself. She ended up being a girl. Yes. What? Told us it was a boy. Stonecrest. No. Oh, they're so soft. Okay. Para? Oh. Tell us about. Okay. Paragon is a paranormal convention. It's huge. A lot of the big stars come out for it. And some of the lineup like on Saturday. We're going to have Dwight from the Walking Dead there. Nick Groff who is a huge paranormal investigator. He is from ghost adventures and paranormal lockdown, formerly of another show. He doesn't like to associate with anymore called ghost adventures. Ghost hunters people on here, we have mediums chip Coffey, who's a very famous psychic remedium. We just have all the big names from Mythbusters just destination truth it is in. What is this? It's shooting star casino Minoan monoment. So it's like four hours away in the middle of nowhere. They're like thousands of people come that's investigators from all over it's fun because you just jump in. It's like jumping into a pool of, but you know, like like my friends. Really? It's just like you get to be totally nerd Centric eight for a week, as you know, we have all of us that have are in paranormal groups we have booths and we have our evidence playing and then you can go around and look at all the teams from. You know, I know this in here's the thing. You guys know that I have issues with ghosts. But this I have so many questions, I'm such a delightfully interested skeptic person. No good. First of all what the question I have for you. Dawn is how do you spot because you know, a convention like this is going to attract some people who just want to make money you as a paranormal person?.

Nick Groff Paragon Minoan monoment Matteo Mythbusters Dwight Coffey Dawn investigator sixty hours four hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Wall Street, we've really been all over the map today. Now, we're up on the NASDAQ after being down about ten minutes ago. We're up about three points on the NASDAQ down still on the s&p five hundred about three and the Dow Jones is down forty four in other news. The Trump adminis-. Station is now planning to do maintenance on healthcare dot gov during the ObamaCare sign up period maintenance, schedule is the same as last year site will be offline for maintenance from twelve am to twelve pm each Sunday during the period, that's a total of sixty hours officials say that's the maximum possible downtime and last year's off hours were significantly less than what was scheduled a Dutch court upholding a ruling now ordering their government to cut greenhouse gas emissions by twenty twenty cheers rang out in the packed courtroom. As appeals judges upheld, the landmark two thousand and fifteen ruling that the Dutch government must cut the country's greenhouse gas emissions by at least twenty five percent from one thousand nine hundred levels in two years time. Government officials say they will study the judgment before deciding if they will appeal, but they say that the cuts are feasible, and they will implement them as Lauren Komeito in Amsterdam. Now, the decision comes one day after an international panel on climate change calls for drastic preventative actions by all governor. Around the world in Oklahoma cleanup under way, now after after a tornado tears through the town of Fairfax national weather service has confirmed an e f zero twister struck the town on Sunday with eighty five mile an hour. Winds only minor injuries reported, but a number of businesses along the town's main street, suffered minor or major damage and nominations are out now for the rock and Roll.

Dutch government Lauren Komeito Oklahoma Fairfax Amsterdam twenty five percent sixty hours ten minutes two years one day
"sixty hours" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To repair the damaged onto his and other drivers incomes he says he already has difficulty making a profit it's almost impossible to work at least sixty hours a day which that's islamic asleep the blasios had an opportunity to cap right held vehicles three years ago but backed down after an aggressive lobbying campaign from uber partly sunny today highs near seventy three degrees some clouds tonight lows around sixty two degrees little warmer tomorrow highs near seventy eight degrees with mostly sunny skies it's morning edition from npr news i'm rachel martin and i'm steve inskeep germany's government formally asked the us ambassador to explain himself some german politicians want to do more than that they want richard grenell removed president trump's choice for the job did something unusual he gave an interview to breitbart the right wing site and instead of keeping out of the politics of the host country is an ambassador normally would rennell said he wants to empower rightwing europeans npr's psoriasis are haughty nelson reports on the german response the meeting richard grenell was call to yesterday at the german foreign ministry was a routine one for newly arrived diplomats shepherd is always naturalists german foreign minister heikal moss told reporters the subject matter of the meeting was anything but routine grenell who is a fifty one year old cancer survivor and trump's first openly gay appointee was asked to explain a recent interview he gave to breitbart the ambassador's quoted by the conservative online new site as wanting to.

rachel martin richard grenell trump psoriasis german foreign ministry heikal moss npr steve inskeep germany us president breitbart rennell nelson seventy eight degrees seventy three degrees sixty two degrees fifty one year sixty hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on BE Podcasting

BE Podcasting

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on BE Podcasting

"Well the he spends up to sixty hours for one episode of podcast credible i think some valleys would find that quite surprising if they think he met doing a podcast i probably think i'll just a few hours recorded in a way you go but ben really going to a lot of effort a lot of planning preparation agent every episode he produces and it certainly comes out in the quality of podcast produced doesn't does this ryan and the fact that he spends that much time on each episode and continuing to produce the podcast obviously show is that he's getting a return on the time he's putting otherwise what would you do it a lot of podcast is do it for five or six and thinking oh that's enough am i really getting any traction but obviously yeah you always he's kpi's very realistic he talks about brand awareness being part of a conversation and then forming relationship with those leases and hopefully that will turn into work down the track so i think having those released kpi's he understands that the benefits will come if he keeps that and he's providing something of significant value to he's native the us industry that's ron and just on those outcomes again in that nation they're writing i like the comment that he said that more people at least ning to the podcast them would turn up to a conference and i guess again from a market as point of view conferences are expensive and can only cater to the people in the room whereas podcast is is going to a wider audience than that and he's probably having a a more in depth conversation because he's having it on a on a regular basis with them so well done this episode if i can jump in nick.

ryan ron ben us sixty hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"And you know you people you know get banged up sick injured yep it's one hundred miles if sixty hours to complete the the different twenty mile loops the runners collect pages from books to ensure they follow the correct route so you have to navigate as well and run but you're doing three marathons right almost three marathons in you have how many hours sixty hours almost four marathons four marathon yeah what's twenty six so yeah okay little little less than four four marathons yes we have an ultra marathoner of in my group of friends and it always takes you back in touch what did you do this weekend oh i ran seventy miles in a marathon finished you know four what did you do even kind to cut the grass gate on all the way out do the front tomorrow i have friends who run and then you know like saturday they'll do seventeen miles and i'll go that sounds so boring and they'll they'll drive out on the course and put water there and then when they get to certain places don't seventeen miles as they get ready for some marathon around the country and i i just couldn't like the sheer boredom of that well and the physical toll i couldn't do it but just boredom when you're running near alone with your thoughts their effort or you get that runners or joggers high they talk about so i guess that must be something to it where you're able to keep on going and not be so bored of their mind that they gotta go there's ways to get high running i don't need to run a lot of guys i sit i can have an edible play fortnight to sit there.

sixty hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

Mostly Lit Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on Mostly Lit Podcast

"Yeah you went from like extreme arrogance extreme humility in a short space time while yeah 'cause i ride with with sixty hours worth of recorded interviews of just content and i sort of edited and released that four hours of play and i just thought this shit is fascinating to me let alone of british audience people gonna fall in with the city's crate you know exit of ahead of like new worker the national theatre like here put that shit our like year get a pop and and then we met for chat and it was like okay i'll never with you i've never read anything like this before this is this like i've read scripts for the last sixty years of worked i've worked in theatre traveled i consider myself relatively well knowledgeable i've never read like this is just mind boggling however this play lacks dramatic momentum cool what is dramatic minutes you know when my knowledge in terms of theater how plays work out to build suspense began to and i wrote fourteen drafts barbershop rentals fourteen different versions of play that's when i that's when it became a play when our lives just just the meta things regarding storytelling especially when his through dialogue and that's that's the got to love alone is just like fences whereas one location and like three or four this was about sixty different characters in like seventy countries thousand uphill struggle so to learn the basis of theater and think about how would play across various economic social that was just mind boggling.

sixty hours sixty years four hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on The Joe Budden Podcast

The Joe Budden Podcast

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on The Joe Budden Podcast

"Rogge worship room finally finally someone tells the truth incomes claim finally someone is fighting the good for us they word even a gather uasc collect still talking were because they work together more she lied la issues what happens women why why did she think they were together we will fund you watch fucking twelve seasons of fucking law and order would somebody may think you've got a thing as well loyd who has lord lord order is jeff you might be in a relationship crazy that's how kid that's how you that's how you get the relationship started law and order what roy sixty hours let's watch them sexual assault skin us in the moon in and a to be as view put it could be how can you live first labour has boom it was obviously a set up for me because i was the one away blood that to achieve let me let me let me say this because men this this is a big problem too often often at times the right thing to do as a man in a break up is to still protect the lady still let her exit gracefully like a lady keep the dirt keep the secrets you know keep it to yourself linnet anger fog about none of that he put that right on first use your idea use trying to get hot we both have projects carbonell.

loyd assault Rogge roy sixty hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on Talk 1300 FM

Talk 1300 FM

02:27 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on Talk 1300 FM

"Stop it i it is uh it's too soon to talk about un control it's not about gun control it's about mental illness it's about the course of our society it's about having metal detectors outside of schools it's about it's about it's about and uh so my personal take is it's about us and our culture in the united states of america that an end to end that there is no remedy to this problem that would be a sweeping the be all and end all to the fact that on regularly scheduled interview intervals we have these terrible tragedies occurring you know it sounds the beginning of the year michael every sixty hours here has been one of these events similar money even talked about anymore every sixty hours in historical perspective on average since january 1st this sort of thing is taking place well the dow did you think that i'm smart enough to have the answer to uh to solve your smart enough to have a you've you've just said what i said and i was criticized by one of the stations that carry my j jb programme because i i nor it well he said egg nor did i didn't ignore it the news that you carry i said this team you have a news cast on your station and it came from cbs the news focused for a ninety seconds on the event and you want me to come back regurgitate it and talk about it from the perspective of what i said last time it happened and the time before that basically what you just i reiterate what you just said there is nothing new and what am i going to do i like to think that the program that i do weekdays is aimed at solutions to problems them i can't find a solution to this problem so i don't wanna talk about it because it's frustrating it's annoying its angering it's sad they're all kinds of alleged tubes i can use to describe my feelings but i am also pissed off that we can't come up with a collective way of dealing with the three issues that are mental health that our guns in the availability of guns that we don't need to have a news he was there what who you to say i.

united states america michael sixty hours ninety seconds
"sixty hours" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

1150 AM KKNW

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on 1150 AM KKNW

"Line between coral springs and parkland right but but i just wanted to say that the community of course springs is protected per glenn offer this one nice easier called the teen political forum for the last ten years and all the elected officials in the area sit on the stage have listened to kids and this is a really big tradition gustin kids who been raised to interact with their political this and all the time i worked on the hillary campaign most of the people working weren't big people you know take beautiful adults a lot of them were children yeah you know my daughter worked sixty hours a week for the hillary clinton campaign yeah she was fourteen yeah kids don't live here or more politically active their extremely articulate as you can see yeah no we very useful community if like i was told i could move anywhere i moved here because i was told why greek community this was for kids and then you know i i mean again i'm confident you know obviously cautiously about 2018 but you know you're absolutely right is that that should inspire confidence listening to these kids could you think of 19 school shootings just this year and we're in february but you think of all of those kids that have been traumatized unit don't tell me they're not going to do something if we don't about about gun legislation or you can register to vote i'm just letting in everyone now you can register to vote in the state of florida when you turn sixteen all these kids they're gonna not not that you can register and what that means is the second you turned eighteen you're on the roles yeah now that you can register to vote by email yeah uh you think republicans like one of the big lunar suppression techniques is not disturbed the african americans for young that are going to change those ninety can't about where you are you know college applaud you i civics we need to bring brexit exists gas on like i said people don't even know how to interact i applaud these communities for this at this kid on cnn saying you know.

florida cnn gustin hillary clinton sixty hours ten years
"sixty hours" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Of new england wbz news time three nine t clouds in boston forty nine degrees good afternoon i'm jeff brown and here's what we're tracking in the wbz newsroom today a bipartisan group of senators claim there's an immigration deal that would save several hundred thousand socalled dreamers in the united states president trump is called governors across the country to a white house meeting tomorrow to talk about prison reform and a national jim chain with facilities in massachusetts is changing the channel on the treadmills no more cable news wall street has a nice bounceback today the dow up about one hundred sixty points leading the charge nasdaq and sp 500 also in record territory in the final hour of trading to people are accused of using a dating app lure laura man into a motel with the intent to rob him of authorities say daniel o'malley of worcester and caracalla hurma utica of holden tried to pull the stunt on stephen miro of rhode island this happened in september police say the suspects armed with a handgun stole monroe's wallets both pleaded not guilty yesterday a child labor scandal unfolds in north carolina members of a socalled alternative religious group including 67yearold john mccollum are accused of having children as young as nine work at a seafood bark it outside fayetteville north carolina cumberland county sheriff's lieutenant shawn swayed logo to work forty sixty hours a week and they're not being anthony mccoy is familiar with those of the religious group goes to thriller the work force will police were tipped off after they were contacted by a teenager who fled the religious cal pound jim krasula cbs news greensboro north carolina felony charges now being dropped against eight protesters accused of knocking over a confederate monuments in north carolina last year but they're not completely off the hook prosecutors say they will be tried on misdemeanor charges instead of the eight originally charged with felony in the episode which took place following the deadly white nationalist protest in virginia after today's hearing two of the defendants said they believe the taking down the statue was the right thing to do and not a crime wbz news time three twenty one a lot of rain on tap farrah's and that could cause some problems with flooding we've got details traffic and weather together coming up in just about.

anthony mccoy cumberland county caracalla hurma utica worcester nasdaq president united states wbz jeff brown farrah virginia north carolina jim krasula england shawn john mccollum monroe rhode island stephen miro holden daniel o'malley dow massachusetts trump boston forty nine degrees forty sixty hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on KGO 810

"Lending pomegranate mandarin orange pine clothes and seen an amber understand proximate burnt time fifty to sixty hours i mean risk give a daves getting that as the elephant gift just the that's all good for you dave you're going to get dad has the is like wait what did i just too all right so wait a minute what we talking about like beauty products and stuff here we've done some fire experiments we're going to talk to a board certified ophtalmologist it what is this mike droplet facelift is that what this is calm he invented this thing that you wanted to get more research on you know plastic surgery our youth kneeing yeah i'm just curious procedures creates an i lived reduces the apparent all right we're gonna talk to the doctor here in just a moment jal hates and for ethic from the not about a traffic deaths can ambulances responding to an accident between venetia amcor dealy aware car flew off the road at north found six eighty north of perish i don't see a delay there as yet i do see delays for counter cross the county north and southbound at six ad approaching sick more valley are heavy because you're down a lane in both directions for some road work and northbound eighty there's something stalled in though roadway uh the disease be hasn't said what exactly and there is heavy traffic from ninety eight th avenue up toward fruit veil into san francisco that's improved the metering lights are all green now as you travel westbound into the city however very heavy at traffic from treasure island into town and then northbound wanna one leaving the city that is heavy from says are chavez getting to east eighty and the baybridge you northern cap a foreign independent booksellers bring you traffic everyone gets a book this season that's a friendly shopping suggestion from your local independent bookstores here in the bay area indy bookstores have a book to match the interest of every person on your gift list let their booksellers help you wrap up this holiday season visit everyone gets a bookorg.

daves san francisco jal chavez indy sixty hours
"sixty hours" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on WLAC

"Sixty hours and we're not done yet this thing doesn't move very fast and it keeps bouncing around like a pinball so there is still more rain to be dropped we have a mandatory evacuation in place for all residents of inverness four as subdivision all the streets north at king's bridge road including east and west green broke derive an ken chester dr due to the extremely high and rising levels in cyprus creek the enron is forest a levy might over top or breach there is also a possibility of electrical or mechanical failure at the pump stations so you are urged to evacuate as soon as possible well i don't know if he's still there but i suspect this weighs heavy on uh mayor sylvester turner's mind because that's where he used to live he grew up fifteen minutes after six now we're doing traffic and weather every fifteen minutes traffic now katy london allow religious trying to look at some of these places where you've been asked to was sheltering plays jorgensen need the evacuation zone laporte inshore acres that whereas asked shelter and plays her on 225 at one forty six separate hartmann bridge is close to seen a lot of car stock on the bay town side of the bridge because they are unable to come across and there have a turn back in the ah acres homes area that we've been mentioned to forty nine can get you out toward the beltway or as shepherd south of the loop and then you can take that to 290 or it to you i ted travel is highly discouraged but we realized that there are some people still trying to evacuate their homes that window is that quickly closing also on that gold and acres side if you're trying to maneuver on the beltway that is pretty much impassable between a 45 at yana 225 a lot of that is just completely shut down and if you're trying to weigh traverse some of those side roads in an neighborhoods you just got to use your best judgment and as some good sense to work to get out there 'cause you have no idea of their flooded or how deep they're really gonna be so you some caution i'm getting london in the gulf has when does dial tom 24 hour traffic center.

inverness cyprus creek sylvester turner jorgensen hartmann bridge gulf ken chester ah acres shut down fifteen minutes Sixty hours 24 hour
"sixty hours" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"sixty hours" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"In forty fifty sixty hours a week you don't have the opportunity to spend the money so much as you will when you have some time on your hands now some people understand what they're going to do it they they've already built in a reasonable number for what they're going to do they've got a good idea they've got enough vacation time they know how to do things other people have no idea what they're going to your retirement so spending wise it yeah and that the idea of spending could vary by 50 percent a lot that has to do with big ticket items uh some healthcare issues usually happen later in life but they would consider buying a car in the full amount of an expense and that is an expense and we have to take that into consideration so when you're doing your strategy you have to build in enough flexibility and a to be able to do things that unfortunately come out of the blue and you know one of what a lot of spending projections and plans at put together somebody spending projections and inflation and all that stuff and trying to give you may be a two three four percent raise every year i don't know what it is called two percent per year raise oftentimes at that that tens of overestimate how much are actually going to be spending in retirement and it can kind of yup from a plan extent all specially if they can do a constant inflation factory year in and year out yeah from sixty five to ninety five for the most part with the exception of healthcare which again usually hits hardest in the last couple of years you don't have a nice little geometric progression of two percent inflation every year three percent inflation every year they may go up a little bit at the beginning or a lot of the beginning but then it tends to taper off as you get older not that inflation goes down it's just that the number of items that you're buying gene tends to go down now i'm not talking about the difference when sixty five and sixty nine sixty seventy years of age talking about the dims we'd seventy and eighty 75 an eighty five ninety even um gentlemen i know his father just a hundred won the other day you're not much that gentleman is spending on an annual basis i should say nothing thing is that all not.

two percent sixty nine sixty seventy years forty fifty sixty hours two three four percent three percent 50 percent