20 Episode results for "Sixty Eight Percent"

2 Questions You Must Ask Every Seller

Real Estate Disruptors

02:51 min | 6 months ago

2 Questions You Must Ask Every Seller

"Hey guys if you're watching any the last two videos you'll realize that I've got his mentor. Was Helping me kind of navigate this new environment through private money. He's gone through Julie's recessions and helping me a lot. We've only gone through one and so in the last video an email. I told you guys I was GONNA give you two questions. But you need to ask every homeowner at the equity seller at least that if you're not asking them you're leaving hundreds of thousands if not millions on the table and ninety nine percent investors forgetting to ask these questions so what are the. What are the two questions first question? What else do you have? You've already shown you can perform you can buy so. They have anything else. They're happy to work with you. And besides that they may not even think right. They're only going with their PRI- primary home. They may have forgotten about that piece of land where rental property that he might have zero interest in so by asking this question. You might open yourself more opportunities second question. Well what are you going to do with this money? Now this question. If you think about it they're gonNA get generally one or two or just one answer and it's GonNa be well. I'M GONNA pay off whatever it is. They said the reason. Why the contact you? I'm GONNA spend a little bit of my family in third and put the money in the bank. Now if you're paying attention looking at inflation looking at what's going on putting money in the bank is basically negative interest on their money right so you can't let them do that and second raising private capital. This is a credibility was not a little bit credibility one hundred percent credibility so you're sitting across from them giving them the check the money so they have absolute faith in you so this is a question you need to ask him where the conversation needs to have with them while. Mr Homeowner I don't suppose you'd be interested but if we could show you how to make sixty eight percent interest on your money. Is that something you'd be interested in? I don't suppose you notice a realized but the money we used to buy your property. Rashly paying a backer sixty percent on their money and they couldn't be happier. And at this point is Gonna. Tell you. Tell me more so those two questions alone should have hundreds should have added hundreds of thousands of at least a million Sierra bottom line. So I'm hoping all this information is really handy really helpful. You're using this. You might need to go back and re watch these last three videos and don't forget we've got two more videos. We talked about how to the three types professionals. You need to talk to in the next video email. We're GONNA show you how to get a hold of the real estate professionals the business owners and the professional licensed professionals and stay tuned. We've got the big announcement we're going to be doing. Something big please go to disruptors DOT COM SLASH PRIZEMONEY. Check it out again. Disruptors DOT COM slash private money. I look forward to seeing you on the next one.

Julie Mr Homeowner ninety nine percent one hundred percent sixty eight percent sixty percent
Do The Right Thing returns; Spreaker launches Spreaker Prime monetisation

podnews

02:48 min | 1 year ago

Do The Right Thing returns; Spreaker launches Spreaker Prime monetisation

"The latest from Pod News Dot Net spreaker have launched spreaker prime service that offers free hosting has sixty eight percent cut of advertising sold and access to speakers podcast marketing team that describe it as a white glove service research into Dutch podcast. podcast consumption has been released. Today we linked to some of the highlights in our episode notes in our newsletter notably that the most popular way of discovering new podcasts is quote from the hosts of podcasts already listened to his now day seven without any categories in apple podcast apps while the company re works them speaker. has supported them since last week. PODCAST APP player F._M.. Has Completed Integration though points out that their own categories are more Jay Jacobs media has unveiled their schedule for broadcasters. Meet podcasters multiday track of the podcast Movement Twenty Nineteen Conference in Orlando the promises to quote combined the energy and Electricity of the podcasting space with the expertise talent and reach of the podcasting world congratulations nations to Edison Research who've won an award for the infinite dial the company's media consumption study and thank you to fireside podcast hosts that offers all the features. You need needs to take your podcast to the next level for becoming our latest silver supporter. You should be like them at pod. News Dot net slash support in podcasts today. Today we mentioned loads of new podcast including do the right thing comedy panel show which returns for season seven guests will include Ashley B. Sara Milliken Miles Jupp and Joe Lisette. You have to sign up for an important meeting. No the good thing about my job is that I'm generally. It's expected that I'm quite strunk. We'll tell him so. It's been a long time since I had to be simple for a job but I mean you are a mother to seem Sopa for your child. They're fine and that's the latest newsletter. Put Us Dot net.

Joe Lisette Ashley B. Sara Milliken Miles Jay Jacobs apple Edison Research Orlando sixty eight percent
July 8th 2019

Talking Tesla

06:35 min | 1 year ago

July 8th 2019

"Pain pills for daily this sunday july eighth two thousand and nineteen for today's show we're gonna use a little bit of what we record yesterday for patrons so we do a patron show every month for sure this is like an hour and forty minutes wanna get you a sense of what we do on that show any courage you to become patrons there'll be really helpful to the show go to a patron dot com and look up to him tests and become a patron or there's a link in the show notes and so without further ado to do a let's talk to tom and roberta and do a little a token tesla patron addition but on eat alone daily so exciting when you know you're sending tweets about pedophiles thousand tweets about right but why are they doing all of this they're doing all this because he's their leader this is why they're doing it it's because of him well i think a lot of people are not happy with you still you're laying the company in spite of him yeah well it's both it's we've talked about this one million times but he's in inspiring leader and he is a forward thinking but i agree to this stuff that he does it does not help it simply does not help with the tweeting unassuming this put the twitter down and if you say well you can't have all this genius without over the silliness i would say no he's in adult he kinda like change behavior you don't need to be tweeting this other stuff out enclosing people to be anxious focus on the the thing is what you're trying to and just put down the twitter you don't have to projected to friend is next to you on the couch while you're having a bit maybe somebody needs to go into ilan's phone and open up his twitter you know put on his coat or whatever and just just click it private so he could still tweet but no season mm put him out there that's interesting wyatt li i tweeting in insanity i dunno here's but can i say coming under the next couple of days it's directly from this which is what you were just saying yeah we forget that ilam did this intensity this and everybody working they did this they had the biggest quarter they've ever had they sold the ninety five thousand they had eight three eight and fifty percent increase over last quarter last year in terms of model threes and all these incredible numbers and they did did that in the face of vodka manufacturing 'em market here in the united states which is going down so everybody else lost the reduce the number of cows and they're all making 'em so there's a downturn and they fucked these downturn with an upturn and in fact bmw head is out and this is from queen technique and others bmw without after like five years and i can't really find anybody to replace him and his name withheld krueger i think it was he's out because he has no vision basically is what they're saying and he's still saying i don't know what's gonna be the drive train of the next ten years and everybody else's like i think tesla's just showed you what the droid leggings five ten years is why can't you get your act together and bmw sales here in the united states have collapsed in the last few years because s three had destroyed the cost thing right it isn't what the customers want right it isn't well it depends i know it's a chicken and egg how many customers are buying the casinos i'm buying threes in the end they destroyed bmw and they kind of get their act together and realize oh electrification is really what people want people want cheaper cars man these cars are cheap but this is we're talking about him javascript matic's offensive were soaking in that markets it they don't get the market changed as a dime shifted we talk about from many different angles people want cheaper food does that mean commercial farms raising cattle causing enormous climate change and other degradation asians of the planet that we shouldn't have no yes no that's what it means well yeah but i don't think that's the right way to go if you want to eat meat it should be meet that's raised responsibly that's raised which sort of a carbon neutral us a process instead of these giant mccann mechanized farms somebody can't some people can't afford twenty nine dollar a pound me which is you know what some of that stuff go or twelve dollar a pound meet putin deal 'em water the water the cost what this is about paying it forward and i think i i wish we had more enlightenment among us so my point was while we a wonder with iran is the right guy it'd be ceo of this company he's the best ceos and basically olivia other manufacturers because he sees the future he's creating the future and their company in terms of sales and stuff compared to other companies right now is absolutely killing it right so we want to buy they need to catch up if tesla keeps making great causing the price of the batteries come down they are gonna be well we've said before there's been a lot of people saying that it has three three to five years ahead of everybody in autonomy three five years ahead in terms of a battery technology in so they could be crushing the mock it might be the tesla eight twenty gigafactory is because people can't keep up that phone and they said after the the delivery report they have a growing backlog of orders so there's no shortage in the demand for tesla and so yeah i mean more battery chad singlehandedly replace every car well if their cars are lasting so much longer than any other car then that's gonna probably decrease the need for more cars a single letter from humbled shoji a he said that a you probably know the tesla crushed q two deliveries that's despite all of the quote new demand bs what you might not know his tesla is usa market share grew from sixty eight percent in quarter one to seventy seven percent in quarter to despite fourteen tesla killers from the competitors like i would eat tron the jaguar i pace the bolt and he thought that was a that was a two thumbs up he sent this to me say something you might wanna make sixty eight percent seventy seven percent of electric vehicles test market share of eve ease q one twenty nineteen sixty eight percent to two twenty nineteen seventy seven

seventy seven percent sixty eight percent five years one twenty nineteen sixty eigh twenty nine dollar three five years five ten years fourteen tesla fifty percent forty minutes twelve dollar ten years
Pandemic bike boom paves way for greener streets

Climate Cast

04:33 min | 3 months ago

Pandemic bike boom paves way for greener streets

"Covert, nineteen is fueling a bike, boo. I'm NPR chief meteorologist Paul Hunter here with climate cast. The cove in nineteen pandemic has changed so much so fast one change for the better a dramatic drop in air pollution. From Europe to Minnesota cities have closed some streets to cars to accommodate the biking and walking surge. There's even a bike shortage as more people pick up cycling. Could cleaner air and emissions free transportation be a lasting benefit born from pandemic. Carlton Read Has Been Writing About Transportation for thirty years. His recent book is bike boom, the unexpected resurgence of cycling Hey Carlton Welcome to Climate Cast Hi de Paul tell us about the current Cova, nineteen bike boom, but lockdowns around the world people started buying bicycles and bike shops. Who some of them are closing and furloughing staff with thinking? Maybe we should actually open here and around the world it's just been selling out of bicycles, and I, see you know some streets that have closed right that used to have traffic zipping by, and maybe they had streetside or roadside cafes now if it's a walk, street or a bike street, that's a more pleasant experience. Isn't it to be outdoors? Yes so if you get the sidewalks buzzing with people that making cities that's making those individual cafe businesses at money at caused. They're cities money. It actually costs the money, so the real estate costs of of allowing 'cause to park by the side of the road is a men's, and it's pretty much absorbed by cities and cities. Now realizing we no longer have to absorb those costs I see this recent. European. Survey Finds Sixty eight percent want permanent transportation changes. Changes to reduce air pollution, our cities working on that that basically putting plans in place that they couldn't have done beforehand, so they assumed that people were opposed to these kind of measures, and the not finding that no people actually quite like the clean air, people can see you know from one side of the city from the other people can hear Birdsong and I think that's just opened many people's eyes both naturally and figuratively into. We can do things different. You wrote about and mentioned that seventies bike boom in the US. It didn't stick. Why didn't it stick? And what can we learn from that today? Cities promised to build lots and lots of one hundred thousand miles of bike ways. They didn't get built and because they didn't get builds people who were attracted to cycling inhumane have stuck around after fil fashion. A, lot of them fell away Carlton climate cast focuses on climate, change, climate, science, and solutions, and we know that transportation is now the biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions globally. How could cleaner air and new habits were seeing during a pandemic result in greater action on climate change very typical Ansett would be well. Just make all 'cause. Electric and then you solve your climate problem overnight. That's that's a transportation problem solved. And of course we know that's not the case. Because most electric cars, the great majority electric cars fueled remotely so there are there are power plant somewhere else having the emissions, so we have got to move at the end of the day. Two forms of transport that don't actually have any emissions, either locally or remotely, and of course that is walking a lot more cycling, just modes of transport, but actually have a health, clean egg, and many other benefits than just. This accidental of of saving the world, transportation, writer and bike rider Carlton read thanks so much for being on climate cast today poll. Thank you for having me. That's climate cast NPR. Chief meteorologist Paul Hunter.

Carlton Paul Hunter chief meteorologist NPR Europe Minnesota US Cova NPR Birdsong Ansett writer Sixty eight percent thirty years
Whiskey Quickie: Larceny Barrel Proof Batch B520

Bourbon Pursuit

02:35 min | 2 months ago

Whiskey Quickie: Larceny Barrel Proof Batch B520

"Did you see Barrel Bourbon batch twenty one when best overall Bourbon at the twenty twenty San Francisco spirits competition well, go get a bottle and you be the judge find a retailer at Barrel Bourbon Dot Com. Welcome back to this whiskey quickey we're looking at larceny barrel proof, and this one we're looking at the second release, which is be five to zero and number five means it was released in May two zero of twenty twenty. The proof on this one is one, hundred, twenty, two, point, two proof it's non h dated however, the company states that the batches usually contained in to six to eight year old Bourbon the Mash Bill is the standard Heaven Hill weeded Mashburn Sixty eight percent corn twenty percent we twelve percent multi barley and has an srp of around fifty dollars. Right love these ause releases. All right. So on the nose where he at here. Get, some kind of. Tribe Birds. Camel kind of the ground sugar kind of notes I mean, I'm always a huge fan of the barrel proof expression because I think it goes head and heels over just the standard larceny. But. We've actually done a barrel pick of standard Larsen before. So it just depends on what kind of barely get to. Breakfast. Yeah It's like you go to your favorite breakfast place and use like. Syrup. That's been like. With. Dues or something. Man. To waffle house or somewhere like wait a minute barrel. Does that I mean, it's for me I think it's another home run. I love the barrel proof expressions. They'd be coming out with not only larceny, but his walls Elijah Craig. Absolutely, let's go ahead and write this so on the knows where yet oh, sideways I mean I want a little more than I mean it's it's average the and the taste thumbs up really love the taste. Absolutely the finish thumbs up still loving it keep going. Alcohol's hugging my entire body hundred twenty, two proof just keeps going you know giving I'm getting a little hotter as we keep talking. So it's not just me and the lights not. Tan. We'll see you next time.

Barrel Bourbon Dot Elijah Craig San Francisco Larsen Sixty eight percent twelve percent twenty percent fifty dollars eight year
Employers Are Hiring For These 3 Areas!.

Work Matters With Ken Coleman

03:05 min | 6 d ago

Employers Are Hiring For These 3 Areas!.

"This work matters with selling author and syndicated talk show host. Ken Coleman. It's Friday October sixteen. CNBC put out a story titled Leader See. Increased hiring in these three areas following the corona virus. The research comes from consulting firm, McKinsey and company they surveyed business executives globally. About where they plan to increase hiring. So here we go eighty-three percent employer said they plan to hire for more health and safety rolls in the coming months obviously the concern about future viruses, how long coronas going to stay around keep rearing its nasty little head so there's obviously going to be new positions hired in this area. Sixty eight percent of the respondents said they expected to hire more technology and automation professionals the most sought after areas of expertise in this technology and automation. Space of work includes artificial intelligence or A. Digital customer experience. The Internet and the cloud. So those areas of your if you're somebody's going, hey, I love technology where where's that going to expand order some really good areas of focus in the technology space. Well, there you go. Forty, five percent executives said they anticipated increasing hiring for digital learning. And Agile ways of working growing roles in those. That's base. Relates to agile working, which by the way the first time I have seen this term agile working. But it is what you think it is. making it easy for a company's employees to work from different places under different environments. This is really coming from. What leaders are experiencing what they're learning from? Uncertainty and so this is really interesting agile working. It's a whole new term, digital learning training and then hr digital and remote hiring. Seven and ten I wanted to give you this extra of data seven and ten executive said they expect to employ more contractors And temporary workers. In, the next two years as a result again of the pandemic and I think going forward, how can we learn? From the pandemic and the uncertainty that brought in, apply it to maybe calmer time. So again, I bring that up because of those of you who are more open to contract work essentially worked for yourself, but you farm yourself out and then those Hugo. I I want to get back to work but I don't want to go full time temporary workers is going to be a growing growing opportunity so that is good news for you. If you like what you're hearing. Make sure to subscribe and share work matters with a friend for help on your career journey. Listened to the Ken Coleman Show podcast part of the Ramsey network.

Ken Coleman McKinsey CNBC A. Digital Ramsey network executive Hugo eighty-three percent Sixty eight percent five percent two years
How Hedonism Can Change Our Food System

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

07:00 min | 1 year ago

How Hedonism Can Change Our Food System

"That'd be surprised to learn that there is a major monopoly when it comes to seeds globally over a third of all seeds are in the hands of just three companies in this mini episode Dr Coming up on this week's episode of the Doctors Pharmacy what you just said is a front page New York Times Story. Hi I'm Kia Perot at one of the producers of the Doctors Pharmacy podcast if you ever see that doesn't have the genetics to be expressed than what are we talking about you cannot have a delicious Haute or a delicious carrot that has the point that any new variety of seed that has developed sixty eight percent sixty eight percent is in the hands of three companies is happening at scale globally and is undermining local farmers and food producers all over the world and most of them around the world are women and small is a bad seed grown in bad soil probably wasn't grown locally probably wasn't picked the right moment none of those things can happen and have a delicious jaw-dropping Zim biodiverse farms in soil and regenerate farms their all important but the seed is the blueprint for how that stuff gets into play and that's where that's why went to the seeds most people don't understand that there's a seed monopoly out there that the centralization of seed creation production and the selling seeds movement I think it's because while it may seem fringy or esoteric or on the margin it actually is putting a crack in there's dupont and then there's Kim China so there's there's three big players now I mean next time we talk that might be too but that is a frightening reality because because you can you can have the best farmer like this Guy Klaus Martins mentioned the being I went to visit the most the best rotations the most regenerative and biologically diverse soil think of food as as C. Driven you know we think too much of it actually as farm and Soil Germany even though guy we should be thinking more about small farms and diversified because if you if you do and I think you should look at seeds as the blueprint for the whole system then you're talking about these companies controlling the system is that just a see that go on the where it should be grown you know forget rotations it's not in that but that whole baked all the way to the processor is what we're talking about that's how baked in out there some of the biggest problems we have are are solvable by actually rethinking how we grow food and that's really what you've come to his chef as solving the problem of intervention I yeah there's not and that's where it's the David and Goliath story it's like that's crazy and people don't understand that because there's so much mixed messaging and because people don't it is that's a monopoly knowing what what I find most interesting is that the three companies we just mentioned are not seed companies chemical companies yeah they're creating seeds to sell their close right in like the it's what roundup ready sees the cause and what incentive do you have in that scenario to create a strong seed that doesn't need the chemical holders or formal what you just said is a front page New York Times story and I don't know why this is the the the seed industry is now consolidate and that's what we're trying to do because that's also where the healthiest seeds are gonNA come from the culture but the environment what is specific about the region soil and micro-climate that will make this seed the experience it's impossible it's so it was beautiful as it when you focus on hedonism it solves the world's problems healthier is a soil that's tickets more and more and this isn't just white tablecloth residents down for an experience that is unique to the region and and that's where the power of the culture comes into play we have to breed for that is fits all I want the seat to work the exact same in New York California Michigan Texas Canada Mexico India China and that Boyer doesn't taste good at I number it's a blueprint for how you're supposed to farm and that's what scares me is that you're you roll out everything from the amount of acreage that should Nearly seventy percent of the future of our food is in the hands of three companies choose Monsanto and while Monsanto has just been bought by the by Barry Culture meaning one crops may be grown over thousands of acres and then the same thing is growing again after harvest this depletes the nutrients in the soil and puts the farmer at risk should is this is this deliciousness and this you celebrate Tori hedonistic look at food which is so interesting because that's what cuisines and cultures have taught us over time I'm in sits down with mastermind chef and regenerative agriculture advocate Dan Barber together they discussed the importance of seeds why Dan supports a hedonistic approach to changing the way we the dumbed down the genetics to do that that much I know and flavor is just tamped down everything has tamp down but my point is if you eat the diversity that's required in the organic system the species and the obesity and diabetes epidemics and the decline of our environment and the climate change were experiencing and all the economic burden that comes from that I mean hedonism you have to go back to the farm and the seed and the soil grow food empowering message I want to go into the seed coat anything permit it because our chance at a productive harvest this doubles as a form of insurance if one crop doesn't grow as hoped there are others to fall back on Conventional Agriculture Embraces Mono mini episode of the Doctors Pharmacy. If you enjoyed this episode please share it with a friend until next time passionate about regenerative agriculture not only will our food tastes better but we will begun to shift food system and exciting and positive new directions thank you for tuning into this of our unique seed varieties this resulted in more than just a lack of selection at the market seemed diversity compliments soil diversity and unique seed varieties allow farmers and the whole agriculture system in crack in our thinking about food and when you combine that with these other huge transfer seeing which is the decline of our health for thousands of years seeds were saved and exchange as part of community self-preservation sadly between nineteen o three and nineteen eighty three we lost an astonishing ninety three percent think threatened that particular crop it also perpetuates a farmer's reliance on government subsidies by cultivating seeds based on flavor and variety and supporting growers who were it and really appreciating it through truly great food truly great flavor is one one waited to up end the paradigm that we have now we are now going out to eat you not only have this incredible array of flavors and nutrition at your disposal but you also have the regeneration of the soil which is true sustainability so that's I just think the ticket Z.. Global problem that has solutions but they start at the farm and have to rethink that

Doctors Pharmacy Doctors Pharmacy New York Times Kia Perot sixty eight percent ninety three percent seventy percent
40 acres and a bill

Today, Explained

23:35 min | 1 year ago

40 acres and a bill

"From both maybe you've heard the democratic party's shifted to the left and interesting up shot that is now you could hear these stablishment talk about things that were formerly relegated to discussion in college college class exhibit eight reparations country will never truly he'll until we address be original sin of slavery you know i think we have to do everything we can end institutional racism government fell magically discriminated against black people any foundational reparations is the word repair foundational to repair is the truth presidential candidates are seriously talking about how to make up for slavery in the united states congress and just held a hearing on it for the first time ever black people in america are the descendants of africans kidnapped and transported united states but they explicit complicity of government in every arm of the united states lawmaking in law enforcement infrastructure congresswoman swimming sheila jacksonlee is the sponsor of a bill called hr forty i spoke with their last week i think this is a moment in history that reflects the need for an assessment of america's original sin and that is a two hundred fifty years that africans were held as slaves in bondage in the united states and i really believe that the introduction of hr forty creates constructive opportunity for america to engage in thee reflection and the discussion of race and racism telling you about the bill wobbly turned forty do what it does what it will do is establish eight commission appointed by the president united states the leader of the senate and the speaker of the house along with six other scholars and advocates who been involved in the reparation studying movement over the years the deal with the dude you're in defacto impact of racism and a horrible period of slavery to be clear here hr forty is just setting up a committee a commission that will think about this in a real way that will try and get something done but so far no one's talking about you know people are gonna get payments people are gonna get bonds people were gonna get property none of that stuff happening it nothing in the legislation indicates eight check what it does say is that we're going to have eight constructive analysis of they desperately certainly period in america that has never been addressed but more importantly eight detailed analysis of slavery let me be very clear we will not be knocking on neighbor's door who happens to not be an african american and ask them for check payment this is eight governmental action slavery was enforced by the government state and federal and local and so we will be looking to the government for positive solution for those who think this was in the past and i had nothing to do with it the very fact of the prosperity in the greatness of this nation was built only original crop caught worthy to be called king truly a survey of mankind that's where we got the terminology nology cottonwood came it was a singular export to around the world is fledgling country with a few states in the deep south was made wealthy by the land itself in cotton and their ability to have free labor for two hundred and fifty years no workman's comp no salary no access to healthcare no property ownership no ownership of the prophet you had actually produced but it was sold around the world and frankly it built the banks of the north it built thee ivy league schools or some of the first institutions it was built on the backs of slaves so slaves were a part of the economic engine that this country stood on we are now coming to say let's reconciled saw with that history let's find a way to addressed in equities that still exist today to the extent that african americans are incarcerated impacted by mass incarceration on equal schools and look to what would be be substantial response is this idea of compensating people for government injustice isn't foreign to the federal government right the country's gone down this road before well to a recent examples of the response that was given to the japanese american community who were in turned in the nineteen forties a tragically and and unfortunately in devastatingly so awkward given compensation under the reagan administration the legislation i am about to sign provides furrow restitution payment the each of the sixty thousand survivors japanese surviving japanese americans of the hundred and twenty thousand who were relocated or detained yet no payment can make up for those lost years thee issue of e a rose what community in florida where they were attacked it wasn't the african american community early in january nineteen twentythree some one thousand white game the taliban when they left after about a week later rosewood had been burned to the ground no one knows for sure how many people were killed there the figures might be as high as forty a lawsuit ensued and they were able to get relief is their challenge here because so much time i'm has passed since slavery in this country that it's kind of hard to figure out who exactly should get the reparations in actuality of the time a is rather short historically you think of china and it's thousands of years 'em slavery was a little over a hundred and fifty years ago a an i just mean in terms in comparison to like say the japanese interment camps you could easily find the descendants of those who were intern or you could find the people themselves this is were talking about everyone's debt right well let let me just say that that is going to be the task of the commission i don't pretend to try and design what will be be appropriate approach but that's what we expect the commission to do a and to be able to assess says how do you deal with the german defacto which is now 'em and certainly the last century is current and as i said we're looking broadly relooking economically psychologically sociological early 'em politically scientifically a to address these questions and that means we could look at systemic changes that would impact african american population you know i think brock obama bill clinton a bernie sanders they all refused taback reparations why do you think there's so much support for this blossoming right now from mainstream democratic politicians i'd like to think it's the way we presented to the american public a there is no anger english which in our presentation a it's common sense i think he can be seen clearly now and i think in the backdrop of what i said was the uptick of lee groups of white supremacy white racism i think people can see that we've obviously never finished the discussion on race people do not understand the value of the richness of diversity of this nation charlottesville certainly was another stain in that was a recent vintage but we lost an innocent life a two people who were there out of hatred and i don't know if we want this nation to be defined as a place that relatives hatred and promotes hatred an m i even think the presidential candidates that were hesitant are now prepared to say they would sign the bill the hr forty was passed i know congress apologize slavery in two thousand nine by the senate the house of representatives gonna turn the defense of the congress is the following one apology enslavement in segregation of african americans the congress eight acknowledges the fundamental injustice cruelty brutality and inhumanity slavery and jim crow laws be but eight years later there was this marist poll found that sixty eight percent of american adults were against the idea of payments to the descendants of enslaved people do you think if americans were asked about a different form of reparations it would play better like an apology on a bigger stage like a presidential address and if so would that be enough well i frankly think we're just beginning this journey on passing hr forty it was amazing response on last wednesday when we held a hearing and we had such outstanding testimony from mr coach who wrote the centennial piece in the atlantic in hr forty this body has a chance to both make good on its two thousand non apology for enslavement and reject fairweather patriotism to save the nation is both it's credits and it's devas that if thomas jefferson matters soda sally hemmings that have dj mattis sodas black wall street that at valley forge mattis soldiers fought pillow we heard from danny level talked about his ancestors i sit here at the great grand son of a former slave memory brown was freed by the emancipation the patient proclamation on january first to sixty three i had the fortune of maybe in the small show we heard from doctor malveaux who clearly talked about these economic deprivation nation that african american population is experienced these inequity in wells when a black woman man is arrested absent wealth they lay up in jail for i don't know how many days because they don't have the home so mortgaged to get the bay on end cash bail is discriminatory will hold the tournaments what kind of school debt you go to with called the terrorist what kind of food you can eat these are the vestiges of enslavement a lot of people don't wanna so i just think we begin the journey i'm not gonna be daunted by sixty eight percent polling number of people that really don't understand the horrific the brutality of slavery in that history of sixteen nineteen eighteen sixty five so this gives another opportunity to tell our story i'm constantly hearing from people who have visited for the first time the african american culture and history museum there absolutely overwhelm is experiences it they've never had before so i expect that sixty eight percent turn around sixty eight percent in favor of passing hr forty in addressing this period in history a representative sheila jacksonlee is a democrat from houston and the sponsor of hr forty the commission to study in develop reparation proposals for african americans act congress is talking about reparations perations presidential candidates are talking about reparations but it was after the civil war that we actually saw the government tried to give something to the formerly enslaved well in eighteen sixty five there is this policy let's see known today at forty acres venom you confiscated confederate man was to be set aside for freed slaves eats family there was to be set aside no more than forty acres and then there was also the promise that the government will give you a mule on loan but of course things didn't go as planned when andrew johnson took over as president after lincoln was assassinated he rolled back that policy and so the land went back into the hands of the former slave owners rebels of united states and this is how this share cropping system came about because black people had to enter into contracts with their former slave owners in of course those contracts tracks were never meant to benefit the former slaves forty acres and a mule is the idea of reparations we've all heard about but a historian named erica coleman says the country has mostly forgotten cowley house who starting one of the earliest reparations movements callie house came from a family who wasn't slaved in tennessee and she was born in eighteen sixty one the family is freed of course to make the master patient proclamation in sixty three so she's basically an infant when she was free with her family family being enslaved for number of years she grew up hearing these stories of slavery end because of effort to maintain white supremacy end keep black people enslaved slave though they were legally free she did experience some semblance of slavery she's getting older and you know her parents are getting older and they're seeing that financially strapped because in the process of emancipation there were no set aside for former enslave to start their lie as free people at so what she does is become very active in the movement for pensions ten four x plays this whole idea of pensions which based on veteran pinson's union soldiers as well let's confederate were receiving pinton as a part of the this service in the civil war and so this was the thinking oh collie house ansi is they force to be reckon where she travels the country at season kerosene black people stand up for you right lobby the federal government for this x slave and of course the federal government is not happy about this become the target of these united states government and so from eighteen ninety nine to nineteen seventeen this woman is harassed until she is finally jailed in nineteen seventeen owned the charge of mail fraud mail fraud at this time the post office department has i i mean unlimited power those early on decided that one of their departments will be the antifa fraud departments to make sure that people weren't using the mail service for financial gain well we call today ponzi schemes schemes and so the federal government it begins to you know put her in a lot of the people associated with the organization under surveillance when she's being targeted by the government they they literally tried to ruin her reputation in in some ways they were successful at doing that but the interesting thing is that this system of targeting citizens progressive aggressive active this with really nothing new and she basically asking for reparations is that what this is this pension using the term compensated but seeing is really talking about reparations and one of the coast that she's most famous for she said if the government had the right to free a a she talking about the united states had a right to make some provisions for us and since she did not make it soon after emancipation massive pace in she ought to make it now what about this x sleeve pension caused it did that ever see the light of day frederick douglas in eighteen ninety send a letter to a democrat by by the name of water are vons and he marvel's that the federal government had failed a cop and say black people for roughly two hundred and fifty years of unpaid labor and he says to bonn deeds zips in bondsman went out with the spoils of his master and the russians surf what provided with farming tools and three acres of land upon which to begin life but the negro has not the spoils implements norrland entered day he is practically a slave under very plantation with formerly he was driven tutorial under the laugh at so this is really what get this x slave pension bill started its introduced in congress it was h r one one one one nine there was not only just a conversation but there was a concerted effort to hold the united states government responsible for slavery end sit them to make restitution but just like forty acres in the mule nothing ever happens with this pension bill nothing ever happens with the pension bell we know reparations are controversial now but you make it sound like they basically always been pretty controversial is that the case i mean this is not just the controversial issue among whites whites it's also a controversial issue among blacks remember frederick douglas supported reparations booker t washington did not he did not support black people agitating for their political rights what he wanted black people to do was to own their own develop their own economic base without the help of whites because he felt that black people has something to prove and that once we proved that we could be economically sufficient then this would win over white end racism would disappear and so i would say that they remade the feather douglas end the booker t washington camps today with this issue when we saw that at the hearing when you had time a hugely code support it and then you had combing hughes not support it if we pay reparations today we would only divide the country further making it harder to build the political coalitions required to solve the problems facing black people today we would insults many black americans by putting a price on the suffering of their ancestors and we would turn the relationship between black americans and white americans from a coalition into a transaction united states wasn't the only country that participated dissipated in the transatlantic slave trade have other countries try to work through this in any significant way in the caribbean early on in the in the new millennium they came up with a ten point plan reparations fifteen caribbean nations are mounting compensation from europe for damages course during the slave trade demands made include financial support and reforming education and raising literacy rates which are still extremely low in some caribbean communities but it's not just monetary you know they list monuments and cultural centers they missed a mental health services they were one of the earlier ones who had this very thing you know don't act like you know what we want here's what we want to talk about almost two hundred years that this country has in some way shape or form been talking about reparations do you think something is different about the conversations happening right now do you think something could actually happen i think that if we continue to have this conversation at the momentum that were happening now because this is really now developing once again into a movement that is reminiscent of the cali house movement men of the late nineteenth early twentieth century any attitude of you know a lot of people then in now is i don't even know why are we talking about this because it ain't gonna happen not the point the point is that we need to have this conversation is a taboo conversation and that the time that obama was running i mean this was considered political medical suicide and it's interesting could remember bernie sanders in the last election he called it a divisive issue but i do think that this is getting some traction and so i would just tell people they drafted seatbelt on 'cause there's gonna be a turbulent right doctor erica coleman as a historian and author based in newark delaware there'd be honest it's pretty boring here

democratic party sixty eight percent forty acres fifty years two hundred fifty years two hundred years eight years three acres
The Normal Distribution and the Central Limit Theorem

Linear Digressions

27:11 min | 2 years ago

The Normal Distribution and the Central Limit Theorem

"Katie. Hey, ben. What are we talking about today? We're talk about the normal distribution and the central limit theorem. I have heard of the I I have not heard of the second. You're listening to linear digressions. So normal distribution is your I guess your normal distribution. Yeah. Is that why they call it a normal distribution? I don't actually know where that part of the nomenclature comes from. And I actually very often. We'll call it a galleon. This is apparently what physicists call this distribution. Whereas statisticians and economists and whatnot call it normal distribution so gals, Ian, normal all the same. But it's one that we've kind of mentioned offhandedly on this podcast a whole bunch at times. I think so it's a in terms of shape. It's a bell curve. So high in the middle and low on the ends, it's got a functional form that you could look up in a book, but it's kind of a exponential type formula that it has easy to the well to within a normalization factor. It's easy to the negative x minus MU squared over two. Sigma squared. So. Yeah. It's got a couple of got two big Pramod IRS that you have to the you have to be thinking about one is MU that's the mean of the Gauss like the high point is causing me trouble right now. I'm trying to keep my cat from walking on my keyboard, and stopping my recording. It's just funny. Okay. So MU is what we what is mew meow. What is what is? So who meal? So gosh, I'm not really sure they'll saying new for the next couple of minutes, okay, meal Greek letter, and that is the mean of your Cousy and distribution your normal distribution. So that's the middle point of the curve where it's the highest. All right. So but fundamentally MU and other context is just a Greek letter, right? Oh, yeah. Okay. Got it. She's soprano here. Yes. Thank you for keeping me, honest. And then the second variable or the second parameter of a normal distribution is sigma or sometimes it's called sigma squared. I mean, they're not the same thing. Because one is the square root of the other. But sigma squared is called the variance and sigma is called the standard deviation. And this is basically how wide the how wide the distribution is. Okay. So MU is kind of like its position. And then sigma is is. Wideness? Yeah. And so with just those two premiers that can fully define your your normal distribution. And it's got some kind of nice standard properties. So very often. This is a a distribution that comes up a lot in statistics for reasons that we will get to just a minute here. But because it comes up so often statistics there's a couple kind of handy rules of thumb that eventually you usually kinda memorize about how much of the probability distribution falls within one or two or three standard deviations of the mean, seventy five ninety nine and is m I on the right track. Not exactly as a within one standard deviation to left into the right of the mean, you'll have about sixty eight percent of your sample two standard deviations is about ninety five percents. So that's a pretty standard number that you'll see in a lot of a lot of research literature. If you want to claim some kind of statistical significance of a test result. It's typically something like within two standard deviations of the mean, either above or below by the time, you get three sigma out you have ninety nine point seven percent of the distribution roughly. So it's a pretty light tailed distribution, you can get by the time you're out more than three sigma or so there's not a whole lot of probability of those kinds of events happening. God it is. Okay. Here's a random question for you. In physics when they say five sigma his that. Is that related? Oh, yeah. It is paying attention. I am. Yes. Yes. So a lot of times in physics a little bit of context here or to to unpack this for folks, you haven't been listening to this podcast for long enough to remember that? So I used to work in physics lot. And so one of the things that you're trying to do in physics is quantified. There's lots of different things that you're searching for when you're doing a physics now says and typically a very typical thing is that you're looking at some distribution. And if there is there's distribution that you can explain with background affects basically that are right. Not basically saying like, it's it is possible that what I'm seeing is not what I'm actually searching for. But it's just coincidence. It's background affects. Well, yes. So the background has a certain shape typically. And on the signal usually has a slightly different shape. And so what you're looking for is something that doesn't look like background. But the thing about background or any kind of statistical sample that you're taking is that it's prone to just fluctuations, and so those fluctuations it's very common to have small fluctuations. It's not uncommon to have kind of medium sized fluctuations. But as you get bigger and bigger fluctuations was become less and less likely to be generated just by background processes. And so exactly how quickly is the probability decreasing that something was was a background effect. That's described by a gals, Ian, or by by a normal. And so when we say a five sigma result that means it's at least five standard deviations away from something that we think is explained by background effects and that correspond to something like. Roughly one in one point four million or something I wanna say, let's just say one in a million for for references sakes. Although that's not quite exactly it. So roughly a one in a million affect something like this could arise because of because of background processes, which doesn't necessarily mean that you've found a new particle. It's a little bit more complicated than that. But it helps you, you know, it's kind of like a handy Ristic rule of thumb that that's the level of certainty that physicists are typically looking for before they claim discovery of the new particle interesting. Yeah. That's always interesting to me to see. How like I mean, there are some there some words like in this case MU could be used to describe different things in different fields or different contexts like me in in in my cat. I guess that's that's kind of a joke. I'm not serious. But. Lost you for a second there. But all right. And but, but then you have things like the normal distribution, which are just widespread, and whenever you're talking about a normal distribution or or using terms like sigma, you're often, you're you're actually talking about the same thing. Well, and that actually isn't a coincidence. So, you know, one of the things just kind of interesting about the normal distribution is us having a little bit of trouble. Honestly, trying to think of everyday processes that you, and I are really familiar with that are generated by this sort of galaxy in probability distribution or that are distributed with respect to this Cousy in probability distribution. So if you were to take I don't know, what's what's a simple example, income the income of everyone in the United States. That's obviously zoom knockout seeing many more people at lower levels. And then there's a very long tail. So that's governed by a different distribution, a probably a parade of distribution if you're into that kind of thing there's a bunch of. There's a there's a bunch of kind of bell curve shaped distributions that get close to Galveston shaped or the get close to normal shape, especially in sort of limiting cases. So if you're familiar with a by no meal distribution, which is kind of distribution that governs like the statistics of corn, flips if you were to do an exercise where you were to flip a coin a hundred times, and then you're to repeat that a thousand times, you would start to get that would be a binomial distribution is the kind of ratio of heads details, and that's going to start to look like a gals, Ian in a high enough statistics. So yo guys kind of bell curve desert approach ago soon, or is it a similarly shaped, but actually different. So yeah. A lot of these distributions like binomial a distribution. We talked about those a few weeks ago, a student's t destroy. Bution? That's a a it's kind of like a galleon. But with fatter tails of all of these asymptotically approach the gase in distribution in high enough limits. So they look kind of similar to them in just everyday life. Sometimes, and then they you can kind of mathematically proved that they all converge on the same distribution in interesting asymptotically. So they are actually the same even though in practice with lower limits. They are they kind of behavior a little differently. I mean, I had the same exactly my main point, though, is that, you know, even when you find distributions that might be that look like they're Bill curved shapes. If you once you look the covers a little bit, they're not proper galaxies. There these other, you know, it's they're more likely to be like one of these other distribution so reasonable question that you might be asking right now is will if there aren't there. Aren't actually a lot of really common processes that are normally distributed then like why is it such a big deal? Yeah. And that brings us to the second part of episode here, which is talking about the central limit theorem, which is a really important part of kind of one of the theoretical foundations of statistics. It's like the connection between probability and statistics. So that's kind of cool. So we should talk about that. This is cool. I never took stats. So that's yeah. Statistics what is statistics? And that's I I don't mean that facetiously they're different definitions of statistics that you could come up with. But for the purposes of this conversation, we'll say that statistics is basically the practice of collecting numerical data about some quantity of interest. And then analyzing. That especially if what you're trying to do is analyze that data and use that sampling of the data to infer something about a larger population. So when you're doing a statistical analysis, you have the data set that you're analyzing, but you're not just making a measurement on that day to set. But instead, you're using it to make some kind of conclusion about something that's bigger than just the data set that you have right. That makes sense. So you have this Representative sample you need to extrapolate any conclusions. You draw from that sample to a larger more general population statistics is the practice of doing so and there's a bunch of different forms of this can take but one of the ones that's close to my heart is the idea of hypothesis testing. This is one of the biggest things that you're doing when you're using statistics to do science is your testing, a hypothesis, and this introduces this idea of a null hypothesis, and then some kind of not no hypothesis. So I'll use the physics example here for a second. So are no hypothesis in physics is usually that there is no particle there that the distributions that we see in our data are generated only by background processes. That's what we call our knoll K. We do statistical analysis of those distributions to see if the data is considered. Agent with that no hypothesis, and if not how big is the is the split between the two and in particular, there's kind of two hypotheses that were implicitly testing of each other. There's the there's nothing mayor hypothesis. And then the thing that we're more interested in is the maybe there's something mayor hypothesis interesting. So so it's almost like rather than saying, okay? Let's try and perform tests to see if this thing is there, you're almost approaching it from the opposite direction is is that like you're kind of saying instead of chasing a particular result. You're checking to see whether you're deviating from there not being a result. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I think that's just generally good sciences that you you shouldn't be out there chasing results because it's really easy to craft something when there's nothing there. But instead you should be. Kind of examining multiple different scenarios hypotheses, and you're comparing each of them to the data that you've actually collected were saying which of these scenarios are hypotheses is more supported by the data that we have. And so very often it's kind of inconclusive. But in cases, where they're strong enough evidence statistics helps you understand when they're strong enough evidence than you can do something like reject the null hypothesis. And then you have an interesting interesting. I don't like saying that it's an interesting result. Because that makes it sound like null results aren't interesting, and they're actually really important. I think. And are worth talking about. But anyway, novel result. Yes, you have something that falls outside of your no hypothesis. So, but the question is then you have this data sample that you've collected like what's the guarantee that that the path from that data sample that you've collected that the path from that to some kind of generalized result that applies to everybody for to, you know, the the entire population who's to say that that is a clear path. So the question you're asking is if you have a data set that you want to that you wanted to draw conclusions from that can be generalized to to the larger population to the larger I guess the world the question is how do you know that you can do that? Yeah. So here let me just state the central limit theorem in words, and then we'll kind of tie back to this grandiose statistics thing. So the central limit theorem in its simplest form says that imagine the your innocent areo where you are collecting data about some process that you're interested in let's use an example of thinking a little bit about example. So we could have here. Let's take the example of your analyzing data about housing prices in Boston. And I picked this example because there's a very famous data set of Boston housing information. So it's the price of a house, and then a bunch of different characteristics of it. And it's a thing that you analyze in your first data science class as a regression problem. So you are trying to draw some kind of interesting conclusion about housing prices in Boston. Now, what the central limit theorem would say in this particular case just to use. This example, central theorem says that imagine you are taking repeated samples from that distribution of houses housing prices. And you are taking the means of. Of those samples. So you collect sample data about one hundred houses in Boston. You take the mean price that you measure over those hundred samples K, you take the mean, and you write that down as a data point. Right now, you take a hundred more samples, you take the mean, that's your second data point. Rotate your almost like taking your large data set in making it smaller via averaging. So you're yeah, you're not necessarily doing this to make it smaller. But what you're doing is. Yes, you're taking repeated samples and then calculating the mean of those samples, and what the central limit theorem says is that it doesn't matter what the underlying distribution of housing prices is it can be the craziest distribution you've ever seen. But those sample means as you start to collect data for that distribution. Those sample means will converge upon the true mean of the entire population of the houses in Boston. And moreover, the variance of that distribution of means is related to the true variance in a fairly straightforward way. It's like the same variants, but divided by a a number that scales up and down with. The number of samples that you've taken. So. So you can extrapolate kind of pretty easily from the the variance that you measure in your samples to the true variance. That's interesting. So that the first part, so you said two things one is that did we actually so the first part, let me just repeat this to make sure I have it. Right. The first part, you said is if you take those means of those hundred houses at a time or fifty houses or whatever at a time. And then you plot those. Then the meat that the center of that distribution of those points will be will converge upon as you get larger number of data points. The the center of the distribution of the actual data set or the the Representative the the thing that it's trying to represent. Yeah. So I think it sounds like I I might have like left out or perhaps not stress strongly enough the whole point of this, which is that. So that that distribution of the means that is a gal, Ian that is. That is normal distribution. It has a mean that approaches the true mean like with infants well infants apples doesn't make a ton of sense here. But. Yeah. As you collect more data, it will get closer and closer to the true mean. And moreover, the the variance is has this well-defined relationship with the true variance? So that that distribution of means is normally distributed. That's the reason this matters so much is that even though you might know nothing about the underlying dynamics of how Boston housing prices work. 'cause there's no guarantee that those are normally distributed or that those have any kind of well defined distribution that you could Prammer tries in some well-defined way. Once you do this sampling and averaging process, then the data that you get about them does become much more. It becomes normally distributed becomes much more well behaved, and then what you can do is you can analyze that data set, and you draw conclusions about the thing that you actually care about in this. Using the good statistics. And you use your your your values or your how many sigma way crazy? So it's really weird. This is like, yeah. So the the reason that you want to turn this into a normal distribution is because normal distributions bar more well behaved, and so you can do certain things more reliably or more easily that you wouldn't necessarily be able to do with your original data set is that sound right to you. Yeah. I don't really think of it as that. You wanna turn your data into a normal? I mean, I guess you could think about it that way. But it's kind of like just this thing that's true about probability and statistics that once you put your data through this averaging process. Like the thing that you get out is a in that it is a normal distribution. Just that's what happens, and so then what a lot of statisticians and scientists do is they take advantage of that that nice probabilistic fact. And they use it as kind of the the underpinnings of the analysis that they do so to close the loop here to like tell you an example of how you might do this for Boston housing. Let's say you're scientists and you're trying to you're running a regression at housing prices. And one of the variables that you have in your data set is whether a house has is on the riverfront for the Charles river. Like, maybe that makes it more expensive. Maybe that makes it less expensive. I honestly don't know. But let's say that's interesting to you for some scientific reason. And so a very simple thing that you might do, you know, even simpler than running a regression as you would take the data that you have for your houses that are along the front take your houses that are not along the riverfront. You might have to be careful about conditioning for other variables so that they're kind of comparable samples, the one thing that really makes them different is whether that whether they're on the riverfront or not. So, you know, there aren't other variables like crime or how size that could affect your outcome. She of two samples and. You take you do that kind of sampling mean operation on your houses that are on alert along the not along the river. Let's say you come up with some kind of mean housing price for the non river houses. And you know, because you've taken a bunch of data. That's getting close to the true. Meaning of all the houses in Boston that are not along the river. And then you start to take data points that are along the river, and you compare them to that mean. So are they falling in, you know, within one or two standard deviations of the mean? Well, then chances are the river. You're not getting any statistical support for the idea that the river is making an impact on the house price. But if you see that they're falling more than a few standard deviations away from the mean of that other just recent then you're starting to gather statistical evidence that the fact that they're riverfront. Has an impact on how expensive they are. So now, you've just and you've it's not just a heuristic. Like, oh, it looks like they're usually higher. You've actually you've done the hard statistics of showing that that's a depending like if it's desist significant result. You can get that just out of those wrong gradients that you've put in there. Now that is pretty cool. Yeah. And so that's how science works. That's how that's the, you know connection between this is kind of one of the standard ways that you do statistical analysis of data for scientific purposes because it has this really nicely to find these nicely defined properties. That are all governed by a normal distribution that we understand really well. And so you can do stuff like tester different hypotheses against each other. And see if the data supports that there's different different phenomena that are affecting different populations that you're studying or that kind of thing. And that's when you learn and that's how science works. I like it before we close out the episode. I do want to close the loop on what I brought up at the beginning. We were talking about MU. And I said that this has been a difficult episode to all say to record because my cat has been trying to walk on the space bar this whole time until I figured out what he wanted. And he wanted my water because he doesn't like drinking out of his. Own water dish. He only likes human cups. So I had to feed him some water while we were recording. And now, I don't have any water that is devoid of cat saliva. So what's your cat's name? My cat. Name is my cat's name is Robyn. And I think his full name is Robyn, Jake flu f-, and then a bunch of last names. As you're one of those people who give overly ornate names to your pets. I I don't wanna throw anyone under the bus. But I will say I was not the one who needed. I didn't. I didn't. I wasn't the one who tacked on all the names, but got it. Well, yeah, tell Robin. Thank you for contributing to our discussion of statistics today a lot better because of his efforts. I would sure our listeners could tell I would tell them that. But he's sleeping. I was gonna say he's busy somewhere else. Not carrying about. You know, he's a cat. He's not a dog. Okay. Well, you could play this episode back for him. He can learn how statistics works, and then it'll be pretty smart cat. Linear digressions is a creative Commons ever. Which means you can share or use it any way you like just tell them. We said hi to find out more about this or any other episode of linear digressions, go to the near digressions dot com. And if you like this podcast go and leave us review on I tunes. So other people get to listen to contact. You can always get in touch with either of us. Are emails are Ben at linear digression, sti-, calm and Katie at linear diggers dot com. In case, you have comments or suggestions for feature shows. You can tweet us at Lynn digression. Thank you for joining us. And we'll see you next.

Boston Ian Representative Robyn Pramod Katie. United States Galveston Charles river Robin Ben Prammer Katie sixty eight percent seven percent
Spotify - podcast listening up 367%; also increases on Deezer

podnews

01:52 min | 2 years ago

Spotify - podcast listening up 367%; also increases on Deezer

"In the latest part news. Spotify says that podcast listening on their platform is growing in Germany. Podcast, listening on Spotify, increased one hundred and fifty percent here on year growth rates globally a three hundred sixty seven percent Diese reveals to the podcast. Listening is on the increase on them, use it platform. They can today apparently access twenty three thousand podcasts. There's been one hundred ninety nine percent increase in diesels, monthly streams in the UK at one hundred forty, six percent increase worldwide, since two thousand seventeen US research company. Nielsen have released smart speaker research sixty eight percent claim to use them to listen to the news that the word podcasting is not mentioned in the reports. Press release. You k- magazine the spectator has launched an aggregation podcast, spectator radio. It contains all the companies podcasts in one feed. You can also continue to subscribe to individual titles separately. And you podcast app since which offers bite-size podcast is looking for content creators and will pay mid roll notes that effective podcast ads helped drive more brand business. They say that fifty percent of listeners exposed to an ad within a podcast clip could recall the brand advertised on aided and new audio marketplace has launched in Ireland, I believe, has inked to deal with ads ways. Podcast up breaker now supports. Chapter marks, PR and PR is merger is resulting in some changes for employees in some executives are stepping down, says current. We linked to an intriguing tweet from rob Manuel. If you just listen to this podcast, you're missing out on many stories and the links to find out more subscribe to our free daily newsletter at pod news dot net.

Spotify rob Manuel Nielsen k- magazine Germany US UK Ireland fifty percent three hundred sixty seven perc one hundred ninety nine percen sixty eight percent six percent
3 Signs of Deviant Benzo Prescribing [60 Sec Psych]

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

02:52 min | 4 months ago

3 Signs of Deviant Benzo Prescribing [60 Sec Psych]

"Today on sixty second sight, three signs of deviant benzoate prescribing. A group of French psychiatrist released two papers this month that looked at how often physicians prescribe benzodiazepines and hypnotic in ways that deviate from the guidelines. The result twenty to thirty percent of those prescriptions deviated, and the rate was even higher in chronic medical and psychiatric disorders, forty five to sixty eight percent. But what I found most useful in this paper was the definition of deviation based it on French guidelines, and whether you agree with them or not. I think it's aluminum for all of us to think about these guidelines, and how often were off the mark? Here are three qualities of deviant benzoate prescribing. One duration prescribing benzoate for longer than one month when used for sleep or longer than three months when used for anxiety. To half-life prescribing benzes with a half life longer than twenty hours in people who are over aged seventy, five or people who are over aged, sixty five, and have two or more active medical problems. Or over age, sixty five and taking five or more medications, so which bends does have a long half-life that would be die as a Pam Valium Kloner Pamplona. Pin Arousa. transgene clorox supplied librium, one of the longest half-lives quasi-penal Doro and arguably praise lamb xanax. Three, prescribing, two or more ben does at the same time. So how justified these guidelines! I agree with the one about the long half-life those do increase the risk of falls memory problems as well as the overdose risk when used with opioids, a short half life benzoate like Morozov Pam Outta van to Mazza, Pam restaurant will or one of the safest oxy's Pam Sarah is preferable particularly in the elderly, and while short term use of benzodiazepines ideal. There's at least one disorder where long term use. Use is acceptable. That's panic disorder panic. Disorder is where Benzodiazepines have the best evidence and two are FDA approved there. Unfortunately, they kind of have a long half Life Plaza Pam and I'll praise lamb, generalized anxiety, disorder and social anxiety disorder are close seconds when it comes to the best evidence for using benzes in anxiety disorders. They are controversial in PTSD and they don't work in OCD. Which is no longer classified as an anxiety disorder.

Pam Valium Kloner Pamplona Disorder Pam restaurant Pam Sarah lamb Doro FDA Mazza sixty eight percent thirty percent sixty second three months twenty hours one month
Are indoor vertical farms the future of agriculture? | Stuart Oda

TED Talks Daily

10:40 min | 9 months ago

Are indoor vertical farms the future of agriculture? | Stuart Oda

"This ted talk features urban farm innovators Stewart Oda recorded. Live at Ted Salon. Rethink Twenty nineteen. You can get enhanced security for your home wifi network with Xfinity X. Fi if it's connected it's protected now that's simple easy awesome go to xfinity dot com call one eight hundred xfinity or visit a store today to learn more restrictions apply what if your email l. let you see a projects entire history and not just the messages sent to you. Then it wouldn't be email at all slack. Choose a better way to work. Get GET STARTED AT SLACK DOT com. So if you who live on planet earth and you're one of seven billion people that he's food every day. I need you to pay attention. Because over the next three decades we all need to address one one of the most critical global challenges of our generation and I'm not talking about climate change. I'm talking about Food and agriculture. In twenty-fifty twenty-fifty our global population is projected reached nine point eight billion with sixty eight percent of US living in urban city centers in order to feed this massive assive population. We won't increase our agricultural output by seventy percent over current levels. Just to put this into perspective we will need to grow more our food in the next thirty five to forty years than the previous ten thousand years combined put simply not only is our global population becoming bigger bigger. But it's also getting denser and we will need to grow significantly more food using significantly less land. Resources complicating our our current efforts to address. These major demographic shifts are the challenges facing the Agricultural Industry today globally one third of all the food that we produce is wasted acquitting to one point six billion tons of food that spoiled on the way to the market or expired in refrigerators or were simply thrown out by supermarkets and restaurants at the end of the day every single year. Up to six hundred million people will get sick eating contaminated terminated food highlighting the challenge that we have a maintaining global food safety and maybe unsurprisingly the agricultural industry is the single largest consumer of freshwater accounting for seventy percent of global usage. Now you'll be relieved to know that. The agricultural industry three and that the global movement by universities companies and NGOs is putting together a comprehensive research and developing novel technology to address us all of these issues and many have been doing it for decades but one of the more recent innovations in food production being deployed in industrial parks in North America in urban city centers of Asia and even in the desert of the Middle East is controlled environment. Agriculture controlled environment. Airman Agriculture is actually just a fancy way of saying whether or climate-proofed farming and many of these farms grow food three-dimensional in vertical racks as opposed to the two dimensions dimensions of conventional farms and so this type of food production is also referred to as indoor vertical farming. I've been involved in the indoor vertical farming space based for the past five and a half years developing technology to make this type of food production more efficient and affordable indoor vertical farming is a relatively recent phenomenon phenomena commercially speaking and the reason for this is that consumers care more about food safety and where their food comes from and also the necessary technology to make this possible is more readily available and lower cost and the overall cost of food. Production Globally is actually increasing making this type of food production more competitive. So if you want to build an indoor vertical farm you will need to replace some of conventional elements of farming with artificial substitutes starting with sunlight in indoor vertical farms natural sunlight is replaced with artificial lighting like led's while there are many different types of led's being used. I the one that we decided to install here is called full spectrum which was optimized for the type of vegetables that we were growing also in order to maximize is production. Forgiven space indoor vertical farms also utilize in install racking systems to grow vegetables vertically and some of the biggest facilities ladies stack their production fourteen to sixteen floors high now most of these farms or hydroponic or aeroponics systems. Which means that instead of using soil they a US a substitute material like polyurethane? sponges biodegradable Peat Moss and even use inorganic materials like per light and clay pellets. Another unique aspect about these farms is that they use a precise nutrient formula that circulated and recycled throughout the facility. And this is pumped directly to the vegetables root zone to promote plant growth and lastly these farms use a sophisticated monitoring and automation system to significantly increase productivity the efficiency and consistency and these tools also provide the added benefit are producing food that is more traceable and safe some some of the obvious benefits of growing food in this way is that you have year round vegetable production you have consistent quality and you predictable output. Some the other major benefits include significant resource use efficiencies particularly water for every kilogram of vegetables grown in this away. Hundreds of liters of water is conserved compared to conventional farming methods and with the water savings come similar savings in the USA fertilizer. One of the highest I yielding farms grows over three hundred and fifty times more food per square meter than a conventional farm and weather proofing means complete control troll of incoming contaminants and pests completely eliminating the need for the use of chemical pesticides and not to be mistaken. These farms can produce produce enormous amounts of food with one of the biggest facilities producing thirty thousand heads of vegetables a day however as with any new technology or innovation. There are some drawbacks. As you would imagine. Growing food in this way can be incredibly energy-intensive also these arms can only produce a small variety of vegetables commercially and the overall cost of the production still is quite high and in order to address these issues. Some of the biggest and most sophisticated farms are making significant significant investments starting with energy efficiency in order to reduce the high energy usage there are efforts to develop higher efficiency. Led's these to develop lasers optimized for plant growth and using even fiber optic cable channels sunlight directly into an indoor vertical farm during the day to reduce the need for artificial lighting also to reduce the labor costs associated with hiring a more sophisticated more urban and also more high skilled labor force robotics and automation is used extensively in large scale facilities. And you can never really be too resource efficient building building. Indoor vertical farms in and around urban city centers can help to shorten the agricultural supply chain and also help to maintain the nutritional content in vegetables. Also there are food deserts in many countries that have little to no access to nutritious vegetables and as this industry matures it will become impossible to provide more equitable access to high quality. Highly nutritious vegetables in even the most underprivileged communities and finally only and this is really exciting for me personally. Indoor vertical farming can actually be integrated seamlessly into the cityscape to help repurpose idle underutilized and unused urban infrastructure. In fact this is already happening today. ridesharing services have taken hundreds of thousands of cars off the road and they have significantly reduced the need for parking under utilized. Infrastructure is not simply limited to large-scale civil engineering projects projects and they can also include smaller spaces like idol restaurant corners. This is an example of a farm that we instilled directly into the partition of a hotel L. entrance in order to grow fresh herbs and micro Greens onsite for the chefs. Honestly if you look around you will find underutilized space everywhere. Everywhere under around and inside of urban urban developments I get to be a part of all these cool projects and and working in the agriculture industry to improve improve access and affordability to fresh nutritious produce. Hopefully soon by anyone anywhere has been the greatest joy and also the most humbling mm-hmm and intellectually challenging thing. I've ever done and now that I've convinced you that agriculture can be quite sexy. You'll be surprised it shocked to know that I still have trouble fully articulating. How and why? I decided to work or and continue to work in the agriculture industry. But a couple of years ago I found a rather unique answer hiding in plain sight. You see I read an article about how your name particularly in your last name can have a strong influence on everything from your personality to your professional career. This is my Japanese last name and the characters. Translate literally into small-farm thank you what if your email was organized by project and not by date would if everyone looked at the same thing instead of their own inbox. Then it wouldn't be the email at all forget. Your fragmented jumbled box and make the change to channels in slack spaces dedicated to individual projects topics or teams all. Your communication is neatly organized. Everyone on the same page slack. Choose a better way to work. GET STARTED AT SLACK DOT COM

Agricultural Industry US Ted Salon Stewart Oda Middle East US North America Led Asia seventy percent sixty eight percent ten thousand years six billion tons three decades
The death of the universe - Rene Hlozek

TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing

04:34 min | 1 year ago

The death of the universe - Rene Hlozek

"<music> looking up at the night sky we are amazed by how it seems to go on forever <music> but what will this guy looked like billions of years from now. A particular type of scientists colder cosmetologist spends her time thinking about that very question the end of the universe. I is intimately linked to what the universe contains over one hundred years ago einstein developed a theory of general relativity formed of equations that help us understand and the relationship between what our universe is made of and its shape it turns out that the universe could be curved like a bowl or sphere we call this positively curved or closed or it could be shaped like a saddle we call this negatively curved or open or it could be flat and that shape determines how the universe will live and die. We now know that at the universe is very close to flat however the components of the universe can still affect its eventual fate. We can predict how the universe will change with time if we measure the amount what's or energy densities of the various components in the universe today so what is the universe made of the universe contains all the things that we can see like stars gas the planets we call these things ordinary berry on commander even though we see them all around us the total energy density of these components is actually very small around and five percent of the total energy of the universe so now. Let's talk about what the other ninety five percent just under twenty seven percent of the rest of the energy density of the universe us is made up of what we call doc meta doc matter is only very weakly interacting with light which means it doesn't shine or reflect light in the way that stars and planets planets to but in every other way it behaves like ordinary matter it attract things gravitationally in fact the only way we can take the stock meta is through gravitational interaction action how things over to round it and how it baynes light as it curves the space around it we have yet to discover dot particle but scientists all over the world are searching shing for this elusive particle or particles and the effects of dark matter on the universe but the still doesn't add up to one hundred percent the remaining sixty eight percent of the energy density of the universe is made up of dark energy which is even more mysterious than doc mata- this doc energy doesn't behave like any other substance we know at all and in acts more like anti gravity force we say that it has a gravitational pressure which ordinary matter and dark matter do not instead of pulling the universe together as we would expect gravity to do the universe appears to be expanding a pot at an ever increasing rate. The leading idea for doc edgy is that it is a cosmological constant that means it has the strange property that expands as the volume of space increases to keep its energy density constant so as the universe expands as it is doing right now they will be more and more dark energy dark matter and beranek matter on the other hand don't expand with the universe and become more diluted because of his property of the cosmological constant the future universe will be more and more dominated by dark energy becoming colder and colder and expanding foster and foster eventually the universe will run out of gas to form stars and the stars themselves will run out of fuel and burn out leaving the universe with only black holes given enough time. Even these black holes collaborates leaving a universe that is completely called an empty that is what we call the heat death of the universe what it might sound a person living in a universe that will end its lifetime cold and devoid of life. The end fate of our universe actually has a beautiful symmetry to it's hot fiery beginning we call.

doc mata einstein commander twenty seven percent ninety five percent one hundred percent sixty eight percent one hundred years five percent
Fathers Day is just as special

Dreas Point of View

06:07 min | 4 months ago

Fathers Day is just as special

"If you haven't heard about anchor is the easiest way to make a podcast Lemme explain it's free. There's creation tools that allow you to record an editor podcast. Right from your phone or computer. Anchor will distribute your podcast for you so I'm going to be heard on spotify apple podcast and many more. You can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. Everything you need to make a podcast in one police. Download the free anchor APP or go to Anchor Dot FM to get started. Greetings my friends and podcast land. Thanks so much for tuning in his point of view I am your host. And each week I'll be bringing topics that I. feel passionate about. In ten minutes or less. And I'll be doing that with absolutely no co host at all that way, I can bring you A. Interrupted form of dress. Point of view at being Sadler jump right into this week's topic. Father's Day is just as special. and. It shouldn't even need to be said because it is whether you want, admit it or not. Fathers are just as important as mother's it, takes a father. To get you here, yes, the mom Carey's you, but it takes a dad to get you here if you're still blessed to have yours in your life. Then, make him feel special. One day out of the year would not kill you. I've been thinking about this for years though it's always a big deal, made guys really do get the shaft on Father's Day? Really do it's always a big deal. May Autumn Mother's Day? Treated! It's Christmas. Flower shops and restaurants are packed and it's like a national holiday. It I think people honestly pay more attention. Make more of a big deal out of Swedish Day depending on where you live then father's Day, and I think that's. Pretty Sad. I read somewhere that more women get called directly on that on their day while the men get collect calls. What's what's that all about? Make, your dad feels special. Especially in what you do for him what you give him, okay. I've heard so many times, guys. They get socks or you know they may look out and get a tie. You know or they might be might get a card, but they don't even get half as much as. Women do. People spilled altogether. Billions of dollars are spent on mother's Day, but guys are lucky to get. If you don't know what to do, even ask them. What do you want for Father's Day? Obviously I don't expect you to go out and get the same things. Jewelry ear where always I'm trying to remember I've always given the same amount to my mom and my dad. We always went out to a nice restaurant. I can't remember as far as like. What are no I? I like giving give so. I don't really do small stuff, but something like a SPA day would be nice. You know guys like massages. You could send them to get a pedicure manicure. There's one place I can't think of. I can't think of the name. There is one place in l.. A. They have I want to hammer and something a hammer nails, whereas uh, specifically men go there to get your flat screen. You got your alcohol, just men. Are In there and they're pampered. Just like women are in their salons. A Guy with like that. Get something monogrammed. You know get cufflinks, or you know just something that shows you put some kind of effort into it whether than something that you just have as put together. Make them feel special. Everybody wants to feel special on their day on your special day. Whether it be your birthday, you'd like to feel special, and that's up there in your life. Obviously, they haven't been doing Jack then. Of course, you may not want to do anything for, but I don't know. I just I I really do. It really bothers me how? Father's Day is looked over in June. You know get the start of summer in June. If NBA is going on, you got the play offs, and then you've got June teens, but nobody relates off too much about Fathers Day. You know get some grooming items a nice hat. Something that you know, he will appreciate and just so the to appreciate him. I, I read something and says there's a sense as it came out and twenty fifteen cents fifty seven percent of women. They as far as deadbeats. Because women can be deadbeats to. Fifty seven percent of the women pay child support only compared to sixty eight percent of men. I know that's hard to believe, but that's what the Senate says. Just may I mean father's Day is just such. It really should be more of a big deal than what it is so to all the dads out there. Giving you? Hugs all around I. Really Hope you are made to feel special on this day and every day. That being said I'm going to give you the information that you need to make sure that you. Listen to more episodes of mind. Follow Subscribe share I'm on Instagram Dre his point of view Raya Point on twitter. You can listen to me on Google podcast, apple podcasts, spotify anger and more. Love you for listening. This has been Dreyer's point of view.

Jack spotify editor twitter Sadler Carey Dreyer Senate Google NBA apple Fifty seven percent fifty seven percent sixty eight percent ten minutes One day
BBC pulls podcasts from Google Assistant and Google Podcasts

podnews

02:11 min | 1 year ago

BBC pulls podcasts from Google Assistant and Google Podcasts

"The latest from pod news dot net. This is the BBC. I don't have access to that podcast anymore. The BBC have blocked access to its podcasts by Google and BBC podcasts and no longer available on Google podcasts. Google assistant and Google. Search our special reports, which will linked to from our show notes, and our newsletter notes that this may be the beginning of the end of free and open podcasting. Sixty eight percent of podcast listeners believed that the medium contributes to their intellectual growth. A new podcast called note. Cast allows listeners to capture snippets of podcast conversations as digital notes and lets them annotate them further. Listening to podcasts on Amazon. Alexa, isn't always a great experience. Gear brain has written up better ways to do it on your smart speaker willing to that from our newsletter and from our show notes as well as a new podcast app pulled crypt which enables you to automatically or manually. Donate to. Verified podcasts based strictly on time. Listened the service uses crypto currency and pod news is on the service. And our theory of ide- is in our main description as requested Stitcher have announced a raft of new podcasts. Joining the network is actor and comedian as if man v husband and wife GIO devali and codeine Ellis and Bill Nye the science guy. Transcribe meow is an app to help podcasters transcribed their podcasts right meow, and congratulations to Morris Wheeler who is Hubbard broadcasting's new manager of corporate podcasting strategy in our show notes in in our newsletter. We highlight a bunch of different podcasts, including Catholic sports radio. And always three words that go together between two mikes the podcast from squad. Casts co founder Zach and rock and this from ABC in Australia, I met Bevin. And this is Russia. If you're listening, the focusing on Robert Mueller this time around and thank you to heart cast media for coming a pod new supporter, and that's the latest from our newsletter at pod, news dot net.

Google BBC Alexa Robert Mueller Russia Hubbard broadcasting Morris Wheeler Stitcher Amazon GIO devali Bill Nye co founder Zach ABC codeine Ellis Australia Sixty eight percent
China: Why Now? - Advisor Podcast

The CIBC Private Wealth Podcast

10:21 min | 1 year ago

China: Why Now? - Advisor Podcast

"Welcome to the c i bc private wealth management by their podcast you don't have to be a savvy investor know that china is a big deal china's growth has surpassed u s for more than a decade in fact most experts believe china will become the largest single economy in the world clipping the uss within the next few years but for all the good news you hear about the country there's other reports pointing out that china's growth has slowed in recent years so is china a safe bet or risky gamble learn more we spoke with a couple of experts first up matthew sharer cf eight portfolio manager in equity analyst what's the first thing that potential investors need understand about china is important to remember that you know china is the number to economy in the world it soon gonna be you know the number one economy in the world in it is certainly growing faster than you as an it's important to remember the as are clients and think about where they're investing for the next five ten fifteen years you know you're you're seeing economic growth you're seeing investment you're seeing delays you have the right demographics band delaney managing director antiquities portfolio manager roger agrees but stresses that people need to understand the differences between china and the you here's one one either lie right so it's a command economy right is governed by if it's if not a democracy and while we liked democracy here in the usa authoritarian governments have certain luxuries that that work well in certain situations right authoritarian government sort of has obvious capital projects to do when they're trying to grow their economy and there were things like road road construction airport construction housing construction hospital construction 'em and so that can drive a lot of activity in has in china is really improved alive of of people there and it was activity that sort of this happened in storage area in government where they get it done so it makes sense that in some instances the government able to make decisions quickly in unilaterally could have a positive effect any economy at least initially but another thing to keep in mind is china's communist government doesn't apply the same policies all over the chinese have big country right and we as americans in westerners talk about it as one giant monolithic bloc but it became very apparent to me in talking all these different companies that there's almost to china's a you know an economy that exists in their special economic zones a these fire zones a largely on the coast that have had preferential treatment from a liberalisation is asian of of marketing perspective where the last twenty years you know those were very distinct economies from what you find in the interior of the country safe in later to develop or not developing from an economic perspective because the governmental system there is still a fully authoritarian versus what you find in special economic zones where the governmental system is more relaxed and more capitalist andy's more capitalistic areas have a disproportionate impact on the country's overall gdp p if you look at the math and just all these little areas where they've liberalize like it's a tiny fraction of the of the country it's a it's a meaningful portion of gdp 'em it's about thirty percent of gdp like it's produced in the special economic zones 'em buddy there rational portions of the country from geographic perspective you know they do grow like listen instead of growth last generally but it's it's a very different mindset when you move out of them which is one of the earliest special economic zones and quite often when you're when you're there it feels like san francisco you know it's just vibrant you know you move out of these areas where you know sort of capitalism is more frowned upon in the party infrastructure really determines in off the castro failure it's it has not been as a sort of a tale of two cities a little bit you know in does it look like there may be less authoritarians control enjoying his future a you don't see it really changed in fact you could argue it's a little bit other direction in recent years when you know a heavy hand of the government even in the special economic zones a by more than one of the chinese trade folks that were at this conference were actually arguing the point that it actually does need to change the rest of the country needs to move along the same path a the special economic zones moved along a quite some time ago and that you know for the continued for the country and continue to maintain high economic growth rates that liberalisation needs to occur in other areas so we'd be authoritarian control directly related to china's recent economic slowdown one of the things that's going on on in china has been self inflicted the country as the the government there is done as slower growth rate intentionally you know over the last ten years is all they want is transitioning economy from sort of an infrastructure infrastructure export lead economy the one that is more consumer oriented a more along the lines of what we have here in the united states and when you create that consumer class you basically create an economy that's more self sustaining less reliance on these big capital projects and less reliant on exports growth 'em and you also you know make alive severe citizenry more a livable better healthcare and better access the consumer goods but the big problem with that transition when he's shift away from infrastructure i mean there's some research out there that a dollar spent on infrastructure has an eight times multiplier on it it builds growth in the economy because you know when you build a brand new gotta buy steel cement it's gonna hire laborers union backhoes you need like this whole chain of inputs they're going to be capital projects like that 'em drive economic growth at a faster rate conversely service economy or a service industry a multiplier effect on one dollars fences about three times nighttime so it doesn't benefit see economy as much as a result you desire just slowing growth with this top down guidance of economic transition for the nation the country's leaders are employing a number of tactics what's important now as we sit here in early twenty nineteen is we've seen the government man be pretty aggressive and starting to stimulate you know we've seen tax cuts we've seen some support for the auto industry reserve requirements be lowered so you know with that in mind you know it's really good growth is slowing last year for multiple factors actors they've they're already moving into reverse one of the main factors that resulted in a slowing economy last year overall china's economic growth remains significant andy routine the unique set of circumstances in scenarios affecting that group but when you compare gdp trends overtime with that of other past emerging economies you see real similarities if you were in a plot gdp per capita and then gdp growth what you would see that china's tracking very closely to the same i'm sort of area path if you put in japan south korea a you know a few others sort of developed asian countries together and you know as a current gdp per capita be economy shouldn't be growing in that sort of sixty eight percent range right where it is growing so i think and and you know as you if you've ever categorizes that gdp growth is gonna slow it's just the natural evolution of it of an emerging economies was developed economy that we've seen over and over you know across the world so ultimately is china rape foreign investment or should we be looking elsewhere seventy five percent of the world's economic activity happens outside the u s china makes up a big portion of that seventy five percent and you think about the things you own your home whether it's you're tv you're hi you're car you know so many of these things are portions of them are are made in china that to ignore that sort of pool of economic activity an innovation is just sort of foolish and you layer on top of that this whole growth rate discussion of you know we can pick already whether it's six five seven nine in china but it's true a heck of a lot better than two and a half i would layer on top of that you know valuations also obviously look quite attractive given how difficult is banning but more importantly than anything i mean i think client this is a big part of of the globe of the global economy is one of the fastest growing parts of the economy and i think it's an area where you know clients are gonna over the of course of the next decade you know wanna have exposure and then this is not gonna be in emerging economy in in five years and the one gonna be the largest economy in the world and but all that being said there are still a ton of a very bad companies badly run you know not run for recognized profit not run shareholders in china and it's just so important that you have portfolio managers who are focused on understanding you know what parts of economy are interesting seen you know what management teams you wanna be teamed up with it and finding finding those stocks to represent you're china exposure to learn more about investing in china and other topics check out the latest tradition of ian visor at private dash wealthed dot u s c i b c dot com cnbc private wealth management include cnbc national trust company cnbc delaware company and cnbc private wealth of bugs incorporated all

china seventy five percent five ten fifteen years sixty eight percent thirty percent twenty years one dollars five years ten years
M 11 Vertical Videos Win

A Doctor's Perspective Podcast

02:28 min | 1 year ago

M 11 Vertical Videos Win

"Take. Doctors live at Joan train station. Yeah. Just traveling around in a bunch of these at the same time. If you haven't figured it out at a subway sandwich Pizza Hut. KFC hazelnut coffee. Yeah. That's the kind of western food that I get when I travel can't get a good steak so and we're live, all you can get like a sandwich. So like go out on lands. I indulge things this time, it's social by buffer does vertical video do better on the out some stats and not gonna be accurate. I'm not taking that many details. I'm going to say like, you know, bigger smaller, but square outperforms landscapes, they've already figured it out, because it captures about seventy percent. More real estate. You get about thirty five percent more views and a hundred percent more watching as huge so that I will that's compare vertical videos to square video, and what they found is vertical does drive more views for less expensive by sixty eight percent on Facebook compared to Instagram. But Facebook stories. Fifty percent less cost for click, but they did actually cost more for your generic feed. So I guess you gotta keep that in mind, depend on. What your point of the advertisements four verticals, again, got more views and long interaction on the Instagram feed, but it was cheaper on the story. So did you catch that story's was more getting more clicks for cheaper on Facebook, but it was more expensive to give us on Facebook and Instagram? The feed got more views in longer Instagram, and it was cheaper than stories and they also found out looking all of this organic produce videos, like shooting it from your phone, of course, vertical now square vertical, but technically verticals winning produces more views at less cost than a highly produced intros and good transitions. But in another study showed no significant difference between professionally produced are the average guys video. So that's good news for us, just like to do it. And don't have the ability or desire to spin. At the time and money to make them super crisp nowadays. They do have some apps on your phone, where if you did go to fiber and get like a five second intro, you could probably just add it to your videos, real fast. Before you actually post are the like a call to action. Okay. Dr Justin trust there. We just went hashtag behind the curtain.

Facebook Instagram Joan train station Pizza Hut KFC Dr Justin sixty eight percent thirty five percent hundred percent seventy percent Fifty percent five second
The Space Station is Filthy and Glowing Frog Bones

SPACE NEWS POD

07:46 min | 1 year ago

The Space Station is Filthy and Glowing Frog Bones

"The tech me. M- ride home is daily news podcast drops every day at five PM eastern standard time. It's got all the day's tech news headlines, but also context and conversation around what happened each day in the world of tech the show post every single day with weekend bonus interview episodes. This is silicon valley's water cooler podcast. It's how you stay in the know if you care about technology, so search your podcast app for right home. And subscribe to the tech meme ride home podcast. Three two one. We have ignition and liftoff. Hello and welcome back to the space news pod. Your daily source for space science and tech news. The international space station is disgusting. It is filthy dirty as a gym. And that is because there's a new paper that just been published in the microbiome journal in its titled characterization of the total in viable bacterial info, Google communities, the societas with the international space station surfaces. That's a long title for a paper. I mean, they could have just said the space station is gross in here is why. Well, there's herpes on the space station dirty toilets things like that. And the researchers for the ISS while they're from NASA. And the basically said that the things that live on the ISS or the same things that live down. Here on earth. They presented a complete catalogue of all the bacterial communities thrive aboard the ISS end of these bacteria's on the I s s well, they're known to cause horrible infections in humans. You ever heard of staph infection? Will that makes up twenty six percent, the bacteria that causes? Staph infection makes up twenty six percent of the bacteria aboard the international space station in the author of the study used a postdoctoral researcher at Washington state university who collaborated with NASA GPL on the paper said they're not sure if these strains will cause diseases in humans, and they said whether these opportunities bacteria could cause disease in astronauts on the I SS unknown this would depend on a number of factors, including the health status of each individual. And how these organisms function while in the space environment, but these bacteria didn't come from space. They're not born on the space station. They've come. Earth. They've come from the things that we send up to the international space station. They come from the astronauts that are on the international space station living there, and they're just passengers that have traveled to the ice s from earth in sixty eight percent of the bacterial. The team cataloged are present in the human gut microbiome, but many of these bacteria also dwell on the surface of our bodies. So when the astronauts touch things in the ISS that could be transporting them from their bodies onto the surface of Sega keyboard, or, you know, something that they work with on a daily basis, and when you're on earth when he working on earth, normal human being this on earth, your immune system can usually fight these things off at a day to day basis, but in space, the these odds are stacked against us in a natural cycles of light and dark that kinda messes with things it upsets, you circadian rhythms, which can lead to health complications down the road. And more evidences making it clear that our immune system can't handle these kind of conditions and microgravity in the lead study, author said the specific microbes in indoor spaces on earth have been shown to impact human health. This is even more important for astronauts during spaceflight as they have altered immunity do not have access to the sophisticated medical interventions available on earth in so far these bacteria haven't been known to harm to humans on the international space station yet, but they're gonna monitor them in. They're going to make sure that they stay safe for humans into a quick break and say, thank you so much for supporting the podcast. Thank you. Everybody on Stitcher. There's been a really big turnout on Stitcher lately. They appreciate you all for hanging out in listening to cool space. Science tech news. So make sure you subscribe. If you like the pod because I do it every single day of the week. Oh, yeah. We've reached a huge milestone to seventy thousand plus people have listened to this podcast. And it's all because of you. Thank you. Thank you so much this next segment is called down to earth. It's about things that happened on our home planet in this one is a pretty cool one. There's a frog with glowing bones. Yeah. You heard me, right. Glowing bones the bones glow in the dark. They glow. Blue under ultraviolet light this little frog it's smaller than a nickel, and it's called the pumpkin toilet in his from Brazil. It's bright orange in its deaf to the meeting calls of its own species. And scientists have long wondered why they can may like how do they do? They talk to each other when they're going to meet, and they think they figured it out the pumpkin toilets back in head collude blue under Oltra violet light in the UP late show could help. These toilets find love in the dark. Researchers still need to figure out whether the frogs can actually see it though in the glow comes from a surprising source mitch's the fluorescent skeleton shining through translucent patches of the frog skin. And if the pumpkin total it can't see you be light. Well, the researchers have been speculating that the glowing bones may serve to warn off. Predators of the toilets toxic city. Sandra gout who is the post-doctoral associated NYU Abu Dhabi who led? The study said the fluorescent patterns are only visible to the human eye under a UV light and in nature, if they were visible to other animals, they could be used as intra specific communication signals or as reinforcement of their episode Matic coloration warning potential predators of their toxic city, and they go on to say, however, more research on the behavior of these frogs in the predators is needed to pinpoint. The potential function of this unique luminescence, pumpkin towed. This live in Brazil's Atlantic forest, which is one of the most degraded in danger, natural regions of the planet and as little as three point five percent of its primary forest remains his vast tracts have been cleared to make way for soy cattle and sugarcane in the pumpkin toilets. They're not really endanger. Quite yet. The inhabit. A portion of the Atlantic forest along the coast that has largely escaped deforestation due to a network of protected areas that means that there should be plenty of these toilets to study in the future. So they can figure out why they have glowing bones. I want to say thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend a here with me on the space news pod. I appreciate all of your support. And if you want to support the show more financially, you can go to patriot dot com slash space, news podcast or just keep listening to the show the best way to support it. Subscribe in listen, this has been the space news pod. My name is will been your host. And I will see you soon.

staph NASA Brazil Atlantic forest microbiome journal Google postdoctoral researcher NYU Abu Dhabi Sandra gout mitch Washington state university twenty six percent sixty eight percent five percent
Season 2 , Episode 1 - Tackling The Holidays - The Lead Off

Not A Single Fork

33:34 min | 1 year ago

Season 2 , Episode 1 - Tackling The Holidays - The Lead Off

"Suggestions always okay because that's what this podcast is all about it's season two and were tackling the holiday here we go. I'm so how's the cooking going now that we broke it all down pretty good I'm feeling pretty good more comfortable and we'll organize put together yeah we'll d still feel like obligations and the running around well at sixty eight percent is crowds and long lines about now they've they've beat we beat the dead horse again the Horse but the holidays are coming listen there's always something to talk about okay that's interesting okay so number two is gaining weight that's number one number two on on this on this list read about Jim now or if you walk out in your neighborhood or if you do any of those exercise routines just keep fucking doing it yeah but I think people there excuse though is that well I was reading the other day because it was trying to come up with maybe what people dude right about the holidays and just like everything else there's a big list read Black Friday Shit Oh my God house I don't I don't either I'll do the cyber Monday yeah I'm not leaving the house nations maybe just the fact that everything is such an obligation if you're running around everywhere and if you're married or if you're whatever then you have to go this family's House and that family's house and that's what makes it stressful would you guess would be number one okay on why people dread the Hallway people dread the holidays I would say that the you know what else but you end up drinking more also yeah yeah and that just adds cower that's true but it's guys you can still if you go to the holiday season I don't know families I just think they're just every just obligate here comes season two and I'm sure people were wondering what in the world are they going to well I am I am I found it in consumer reports this is now this is from twenty sixteen but I think everything's still applies personally so we'll see okay uh-huh and we hope that you are in any of the dumb asses in our lines because God help you don't worry yeah okay so that that's number one holiday yeah they're afraid they're going to gain weight. I mean I get it the food that we eat is like more comfort food well there's lots of candy I always have something to talk about but now the holidays we have to stay focused you know it's hard for us we get hollowing go all over the place but we're going to talk about Yeah that does suck I mean if you think about having to shop for gifts I know just in general groceries it's much money none of us on feel like and even last Christmas we saw this with our classes and stuff I think people are more aware of even giving gifts because you know that's when people start bake baking they start making fun of Carl banks I mean baking cookies making fruitcake next is just gift shopping just in general just the stress of finding something for someone yeah I mean but you would think you know there's so many Oh smart and keep this for Christmas and be like Oh this reminds me of so and so or even for you like I'm like Oh this reminds me of Kane's I'll get this and I'll put it in my closet you small so that was a huge issue but I can imagine that with really big families that it becomes a problem yeah so so that's number three on the list being through the holidays I have a regular workout routine and I don't do it I don't feel great you don't feel good you don't want to start your day you don't want uh-huh and frankly I've mostly gone to online stuff at the holidays it's way less stressful than being around a bunch of dumb asses in line yeah be around people anyway let's move on so so okay so that's number two gaining weight number three is going into debt people you have to be okay here's what I do okay I'm ready I do that all year round and then I hide things for myself thinking that I'm going to be being is always going to be the next best thing so you know I I like activities I mean I like spinning quality time with people to that's kind of my that's lightening the kids are out of school and bouncing off of all over the place yeah side I think there are probably a lot of things that are stressful about the holidays but that's the first thing that comes to mind well give it to her for her birthday so anyway that's what I do yeah well I think there's a lot of people actually that that they like shop after Christmas go next am I think for the holidays so going into debt is not something that worries me but I guess a lot of people their kids want this or their obligation ought all this all this stuff that upsets their schedule and I get that stain and I get that too but also you've got to think like okay so I don't know if any of you guys did that at but here's my thing you know and maybe it's because as I've gotten older and my kids are older too we just don't spend into and then the bigger your family gets more extended get that because I hear that from friends all the time that it's like where do I stop like who am I obligated the by this gift for and so mayor seen me but I don't I'm not a skinny like Oh like Oh does Jim like I'm super skinny I go to the gym for Mental Health I don't murder people things out there but that just goes back to the whole life just buying device shit thing yeah I know you know 'cause if you see something that it reminds me of somebody and then by forum you know oil I've suggested we own that you for that Iraq those of you that are still alive keep going help your help your mental wellbeing by this route baby joe do I have to buy from you know whatever else do how does that work and it gets kind of yeah yeah in our family inappropriately again I'm going to dodge him or like and now with all the political shit going on and you know you never know what if what you're GonNa say the holidays because some people love them and some people don't some people dread him yeah so what do you think people dread the most about the whole the whole spat are more like doing gift like a like this so we can go cook together I'm going to buy you this we can go I don't know do something else together yeah as opposed I'm just Bein shit to buy shit yeah because really we have we are and materialistic society this face at bet you know the next best thing this is one of my favorites seeing quote unquote certain relatives. Yeah I really kind of those maybe number one yeah I know don't fucking what is it look a gift horse in the mouth exactly yeah I mean even if it is a stupid gift purcell they put some thought into don't even do Christmas music until the week before Christmas out I really enjoy Christmas music at sometimes the first Christmas music I listen to is putting up the Christmas tree six Oh really really called that was higher up yeah but but no now here's the next one let's see I have rules about this so that I don't get sick of it but it's the how many closets and I'll give it going to be perfect I never fucking find it and then I'll find it in like March I'm like oh I'll keep it car or a piece of jewelry or something like that now now granted in my immediate family we do kind of and we're very very this was again yes yes so fun okay so gift shopping is stressful for people okay traveling on the live running around trying to see everybody and Louis Seasonal Music I have rules about a two what are your my rule is no Christmas music until after Thanksgiving one hundred percent I almost aw spent their money on it you know in yes it can be disappointing especially if you if you had your heart set on getting something and then and you take your cross cut saw right okay I'm the one I'm I'm okay okay so the next one is disappointing gift open about it because it does get harder and harder especially when you're buying clothes for somebody or you're buying something and I'm like look if you don't like it it's no big deal all let's go back together and pick something else yeah but maybe talk globally so Well first of all drink before you go all always no matter where if you really hate it that much or re gifted yes yeah thanks we give to the same person that gave it to you thank you Seinfeld for regifter yeah don't I mean the whole crowd staying on number one yeah so bad so I get it I get the traveling thing now this one I love this is uh-huh on their donkey not that old travel get being in the airport even get something entirely different I mean I guess it's kind of like the the husbands who give their wives backyard cleaners so do that yeah but it's not always convenient and I think also because of you know all the things that happened with political correctness and all that as well but some people have to you know go by playing yeah our war I was GonNa say you're going to able bride buses witch sometimes is the day before it gets close at least a week earlier it gets like three I'm like Oh shit I'm GonNa Treat yes go get let's go out 'cause I'd rather than have something that they love and that they want that they wanNA keep but if it's a friend or if your holiday Christmas party or you know whatever just Tuck it up and take it home Nathan always use it in the you know you could use it in the re gifting or white elephant or some of those things so is going to spark some nasty gone so one's drunk and full and whatever yeah so I get that one too yeah yeah I've really would have thought imbalance yeah yeah oh yeah the blood center the bus to go tree okay okay that stuff is that there are not as many of those kinds of parties anymore Christmas office parties call it's Christmas anymore not just that but just that you know all the inappropriate things that have in the past I believe happened in office parties yeah and then it's also fun when I get down decorations because I have no idea what I have because I bought it brand new yeah it's like a nigger Chris because I guess I guess again this goes back to what I said earlier about obligations I think the only ones that you really kind of have to maybe attend are like work ones nice to other people fifteen percent of the people who were asked don't want to be nice to be nice to maybe this the final one on the list is holiday tipping you said that earlier and I was like what what does that mean yeah well I think back to the dumb asses in the lines crowds I don't know but just people in general I mean even a special case at Christmas yeah I don't I don't know NASA that one so after that it's having to attend holiday parties and events does everyone stressed the fuck out especially the people working yeah the people that are working for those lines in front of them or that are waiting tables. The office parties run as rampant as they did seventies eighties. Oh I've heard about those party trick guys is the party I don't care if it's not the holidays if you go into a birthday party in July drink before you go also what happens holiday is that there are multiple and that's that's kind of low down on the list and then then this is kind of this is kind of funny I think is that one thing that people dread is that they have to be Cassia which I just I'm not that I'm organized I'm not that Oregon I do that for decorations Oh yeah because they're really good time don't know how to exactly give them an extra twenty bucks now I know they deserve more than dissolves so I don't agree with exactly everything on this means is that if you have like a hairstylist or you have a guy who cut your lawn or whatever that you tip after back to school here comes all Halloween decorations really all the Thanksgiving and Christmas and long I think that's Kinda grow is is two plus I mean first of all most people give you a gift receipt if you don't get a gift receipt you can fucking take it back friends are having parties and you're having this you're having that if you book them all on the same day then you can only stay at one for like ten or fifteen minutes and then you have to go to the next one yeah and I mean it happens and they still have to be nice to you so just fucking be nice to them yes just stay with us on guess when you drink before you go try that trick yeah yeah I have no idea that doesn't cause I think that would be near the top personally so cooking is not on this list and that's just what we are so the question why is cooking on here or like the fact that twenty thousand people come to your house and you have to cook for them and then they leave Goddamn mess when they go home that's a good ns calmly Natalia Danjaq and this is not a single fork another podcast about food and cooking yeah but we're going to keep it real when you're at their party yeah and then get the fuck out okay just do that our bathroom yeah nobody's ready trick is not only drink beforehand go see the people you want to see say hi the people that you have to say hi to so that they see so and so's coming and then your cousins stop by or your whatever and then it's like I don't know how much food I'm supposed to make what can I make that's going to last I don't know when the the work or Christmas Parties Office party here's what I do not I'm not gonNA I can't I can't do it again if I told people what I do oh yeah you probably org that are in any kind of retail they want to kill themselves they hate being there the holidays they hate everybody in that line the family in the beginning that's what I meant there's always that you know creepy uncle Bobby's letter all touch me we're going to show up or who's spending the night or you know and then you've got a buddy so many questions and I feel like that's pretty stressful you just can't they're they're so careful and not that that's and that's not a bad thing it's not a bad thing at all it's just that you know I I don't think that the Minnesota you should probably especially at the holidays and not because it's Christmas or Kwanzaa or Hannukah or whatever the fuck but certain about well and I think that's wrong because how many times I mean that's what I hear a lot to the holidays like okay so you've got a combination of things happening oh aunt pity says and she's having a panic attack and there's an here's something that happens in addition to all of that is that right uh-huh you like double up while I kind of Christmas as their yeah just to say thank you for doing that those fucking people are doing should that you don't want to do the audience coming in from wherever I don't know where these things yeah and her husband and dog and you know because they bring their animals and then so how's your we- we've run across lawns anyway yeah we won't talk about that anymore okay so walk in you're sweating your ass off because it's one hundred ten you have your swimsuit on underneath your clothing your way out of the pool and here's a Goddamn Christmas tree well yeah paraphernalia and everything and I mean I get it shoots out before then I feel like a lot of times it isn't something news I'll check out the girl can cook at the girl can Cook School Dot Com. I know that there's this whole thing about Halloween and being I don't like to be scared I don't like the scary Halloween haunted hey writes in the woods for me I love Halloween and I know a lot of people don't like Halloween but I- decorate for Halloween it gets me all prime for the holiday season and here's the thing week in November and so black Friday is November twenty nine it's almost in each town here's what I do when I'm afraid I punch I know yeah so I would then get in trouble for punching some twelve year old boy coming burning season Oh my God so it happens around here all the time that has nothing to do with punching small children that are dressed for backup for so we go Halloween Allen's always you know October thirty first but this year Thanksgiving falls it's the last in through all these holidays and working on our podcast is that did you know that the Canadian thanksgiving is October fourteenth is is it that okay so there's just all this confusion about there so many holidays and they're all over the place so Christmas this year well let's listen awful it really does and and I think that what people fear is that the Halloween ball gets rolling and then the next thing they know they're wiping especially this year Gal so that is a lot of disruption in your regular routine but all crammed into like Dan One holiday at a time we're GonNa have some fun just like we always do we already are and for step is Halloween it's your favorite i December so people are going to lose their people are going to lose their mind so you know you end up in a frenzy because the retailers they got a cell cells slid off their Chin from a wild Valentine's Day and they've missed everything Jesus didn't even think to stop it Thanksgiving or harvey time and I think there are holidays in there or maybe not holidays but like we've talked about before the harvest and that kind of thing gets lost oh yeah gets lost in that's an old song this is the new song you need to calm down yes it's GonNa be okay we're here to help we're going to break it all down again sell so what we're trying to say is I like to use in this instance the words of Taylor Swift no have thanksgiving I don't know why then I thought well maybe it's after Christmas but no that's boxing day right right okay the day after Christmas is boxing early every year I mean I'm not Canadian so I don't know that I don't really understand I got a cell after our thanksgiving I shouldn't even think they did Thanksgiving oh ops now because we're trying will like you said about all the obligations so we're trying to meet everyone's expectations but you know one of the things I was looking at us I was looking with a chainsaw industry mass yod that's kind of like that that SNL apple picking whom I did following are trying to scare you yeah it's more like a harvest st like full thing that yeah it's it's so should watch it have this like magical idea of what it should be like and it's there's another word that's not magical but I like it which I just think is hilarious my my mom grew up here I'm going to bring my mom in again my mom grew up on a farm and and Fed ranch hands and you know it's just like wonderful experience and really never ends up that way no I don't think so and and here's the other thing is that in a weird oh you really should because it's this whole thing about picking apples and being in nature and wonderful how great it is that you get to take home a ten Mr Christmas or Hanukkah or anything else like that but I again I get it it's all within like a month base again Oklahoma thank you you all know that and Oklahoma a lot of it is very world there are a lot of farms and ranches and you think it's going to be this this innocent lovely saying that maybe you missed out on as a child picking apples I don't know and so you're going to go out and have this oh quick and throwing it through an open window on this dirt road note to kids the anybody nobody's out there there's not even another car I'll get worth of apples and that you pay fifty dollars for because you get to go out in the orchard but it's tricky because you're trying to do some saying and you try and you think we all good since we didn't get peaches let's go out and fuck and steal their corn and pick their corn crop a slide two months yeah yeah yeah so so we get it but we also need to like soften enjoy it the you know and I think we don't get to do that as some kind of like a like in Florida there was a come festival because come quits growing there and so it's all I love come class and it's fun to say and they are they're good one end boss they're getting aggressive like I was gonNA offer minute aggressive now to or they'll like touch you and shit I swear to God I was on something like that and someone retailers in this is weird and I cooked it cooked all put it on the table like I was looking at my harvest Oh my God wow and for some reason the city folks around here are fascinated with farm animals well and just going out lean and I I always loved I have two daughters and one in particular love to do the whole trick or treating thing so you know somehow there's nothing glamorous about it folks let me just tell you just a lot of hard fucking more I do have to tell you a funny story though because we have so there there I think I think everywhere does home I'm like oh my family's coming over for dinner tomorrow I'm GonNa make all these corn it's going to be so delicious Oh my God I picked that fucking corn that you make like we've got the peach peaches grow here blueberries strawberries whatever so atoll a story on myself to the peach festival it states trick or treating I did not so she's going to tell you what happened to her another another story another story many stories about what happened to me some reason food heavy holiday I mean it's a lot of candy and stuff like that and we're going to talk about but there's a little parties that happened come into that so we're GonNa talk about that in the next episode but you were telling me because you may or may not know know Talia did not grow up in the all the mothers always ended up taking the kids around trick or treating and the DADS would sit and get get drunk giving candy out at the House for lunch the next day but it was really funny because it's just not a thing but what we do do we do yes is fifth of November don't forget right don't forget what is there's a there's a little jingle and I can't remember but it's Guy Fawkes night and so I do remember this twenty five heads of corn I was so excited your whole year whatever see through it in the car like I was like stealing gold like I was like who's looking what's happening audited kinds of corn yeah I didn't know there was corn you can't eat I guess is my point was really disappointed I cleaned it all I got all the caterpillars caught there's lots of yeah but this okay so I'm I grew up in England and Alouine wasn't a thing I had a are still have but step dad who's it's fucking massive and you just go out into field and you watch this burn okay and you have a party or everyone's like having a good time and length drinking and spilled corn that you don't eat yeah that you give to the cow livestock gasoline now too yeah whatever idea there were two different kinds of courtroom sure there's there's that's not good corn no wasn't good corn that's my talk but that okay so wing is late this year so that'll give you extra time to prepare for Turkey day but less time for field bonfire like a big giant bonfire with a man at the stake not a real man of like a scarecrow man more like a in the fact that you just have a party and used to have a good time and yes we're gonNA talk about logistics coming up next time but how lean kind discredit ton of corn here of Corn Festival student we from the yeah the porn-fest yeah yeah and I was like Oh my God look at all that corn and it looked so Smith's so unless you're really organized once you arise from the food coma of Thanksgiving you're going to go oh shit what do I do now because I've only got I don't think we've got beaches I ran out of peaches and I was like I keep I came out to the peach festival and you ran out of pizzas so on the way home we pass all these the months of the year it's always this time of year or so I don't know how it sneaks up on us but we're gonNA give you all kinds of shows like what's wrong with this picture but how lean is fun I mean it's just a fun holiday there's lots of part party yeah I mean it's not it's doing a wire knocking at the door in the middle of night and so maybe like one or two people they were like Oh and of course then they had to go to their pantry and give me like a twix that they were gonNA have American so he was like oh well let's go out to trick or treating he wasn't my Stepdad at the time but anyway that's another story which we got out trick or treating nobody knows what the fuck winner's getting them on the table with the least amount of pensioners parties whatever whatever the logistics there is is happening for that you know you pretend like a person that you burn at the stake in only talk about a giant bonfire like bigger than your house it stacked up talking to you about over the next season coming up and one of those things is we have a super cool product for your kitchen that we wanted Louis like two hours of being in nature in there good but then they wanna like experience it as if they're they're a part of it Klay so we're we're going to be heavy on pour yourself a glass of wine put on some good tunes get comfy tips and tricks we're going to have some Ranson Raves I can assure you were going to have some rant and rave through it all and we're going to help you get ready we're gonNA help you with planning the whole season always does you know it's the beginning of the year and you're like Holy Shit it's going to be Christmas before we know it and it is here to every year yeah it's always the last dancing in fire naked yeah but the thing I love about Halloween besides the fact that all these stories and the trick or treating and the and let the cooking happen yes it'll be okay it's GonNa be okay are we talking yourselves that or the people that are listening I think both it is going to be and it will take care talk about it organizer for your kitchen and for your cooking emese applause to the Max I'm on everybody it's GonNa be okay just come along with us now I'm going to switch gears a little bit because we have some very fun stuff that we're going to be he had the kitchen at the time and we are going to stock our kitchen with them by November I yeah we're GonNa roll them out tell you about and it's called Prep Dak you may have seen it online a bat and actually we did a facebook live on the prep deck that we about getting all your little bowls and all that shit out to do your Meson plus it's all in one spot in the prep decks so you can read about it end of starts getting you primed and Organiz for the heavy food holidays that are coming up yeah it just does that like we were saying Thanksgiving so so keep a lookout for prep deck and we'RE GONNA be talking more about that later on yeah excited to have that in the kitchen yeah for sure so very well thought out and they're so good looking they really are they're really good looking to yeah yeah so if you don't have you know we talked about in last season because that's not right but we'd have big we had big big parks in England too and so you'd know where they're doing this and you know whatever and you go out and have a nice night when every year and this is gonNA sound wise in this year earlier is only really fucked up yeah but we go out we go out into a big people learn how to cook real food and have fun while they're doing it located in beautiful downtown broken Arrow Oklahoma historic rose district the girl can cook do you read the reviews we love their reviews please do that so that we can do this more and more and we love to hear from you so also check out our new membership page more because I'm GonNa put a little Lincoln there that if you want to check them out you sung Arbizu like you said it's on our facebook it is on our facebook page short video yeah out our website not a single fork dot com you can find our show notes there and leave us a comment yeah so you're listening already but if you would subscribe and review we the time where we're time and we've got many other episodes to do so we'll be back with more tackling the holidays holds recreational cooking classes during the week and private classes and parties on the weekend personalized catering and y dinners to fit almost any occasion are also available not watching man burden and a ps we are not which is just thought I'd throw NTN`er party and it's people you don't know like it's you know it's like the apple picking yet so it's like I don't see your neighborhood park they only want to do it for like an hour or two and yeah they don't WanNa live on a farm and not when it's raining or alive here with the weather yeah if it's hot it's bad I think it's just like the because it's like three weeks or three weeks it's crazy I hate it when Thanksgiving Donald's this late I think you're stressing everybody out oh this is not the point okay. I've stopped patriots on you can read all about what that means in our show notes as well so join us next time when we talk about Halloween gotta get the spirit quickly and some people I mean you get panicked about it because you think Oh my God I'm going to run out of time well yes especially when you see all that stuff out at the same time uh extra listening to not a single four with candace and Natalia if you like our show and you want to know more check there's in the summer so let's let's go back did digress a little bit disciple it's like apple picking it talking like that so so how means we now stay fresh holiday bags not a single fork is made possible by the girl can Cook Cooking Studio and kitchen where real this is not the plan but let's start now let's start thinking about that kind of stuff now so that when that does roll around and sneak up on you which thank once more we have sent all there is to say I have more to say well okay yeah but we've been yeah we're way.

Jim purcell apple Allen candace Natalia three weeks one hundred percent sixty eight percent fifteen minutes fifteen percent fifty dollars twelve year two months
The Chris and Joe Show: Quick takes from a 31-26 loss in Detroit

Big Blue View

17:33 min | 1 year ago

The Chris and Joe Show: Quick takes from a 31-26 loss in Detroit

"Cantor from Cox has all your favorites all in one place and with the contour remote you can use your voice to fund them on live TV on demand and streaming APPs like netflix prime video and more see Cox dot com for details Tim after those first two drives for the giants one other thing that also helped out with his performance now saquon Barkley didn't have some miraculous performance on the ground rush for a sixty four yards and averaged three point four yards per carry so non incredible day but still having some established run game also took a little bit out sometimes you're able to muster some incredible comeback but it's just not going to happen every single time statistically the odds into more after we watched the film but just looking at his stat line he had sixty eight percent completion percentage three hundred twenty two yards and four of pressure off of him you also pointed out the good receiving day that Barkley had being able to get the ball out to him and using him as a dump off I also thought his in this four-game stretch no football team can win football games if you're playing from behind trying to play catchup weakened in week lives from the performance and kicking things off Daniel Jones had a very good day now he was not perfect there were some issues which will probably be able to dive had the giants let themselves fall behind early in that kind of proved to be as struggled to really make up the distance and we're discussing the fourth straight loss for the New York giants as they fell thirty one to twenty six in a game that we were just saying they let slip away from they were hanging around in most of the game they were really really there and time essentially ran out on them I can't think of a better way to describe it spend now granted the lions don't have much of a pass rush even though they were able to get to Jones it wasn't consistent basis and it really wasn't until later they did against Tampa Bay but they're just couldn't keep the lions down long enough and get enough done on offense to really Ryan Stat line would show the giants offense playing well this was probably their best all around performance of the season even though they didn't score as many points as passes getting the ball into those tight windows and ultimately that's why he threw for sixty eight percent the only bit of a caveat that but it looked as though the lines were really devoting any coverage to saquon Barkley out of the backfield and having that quick and easy dump off really helped Jones placement was very good today which is something that we are always pretty positive about when he doesn't have good performances but it shine today especially on the four touchdown not in your favor if you're playing down that often like we always do folks in the mix we're going to be talking about the positives and the next I think just having that safety blanket the guy who was always going to be there catch the ball in able to make something happen after the catch I think that really touchdowns you might be able to attribute that to having a bit of a cleaner pocket to buy lars pass protection was much better than in my Chris Foam and as always on every single Sunday after a giants game we're going to be providing are quick reactions to the game and this time around it has to go with it is there were instances where he almost was picked off and those are things that rookies are going to are going to do and get ahead they were in the game basically from I whistle till the two minute warning in their defense played better than the Freddie bring pressure towards the end of the Game Jones had a really efficient day kind of help and I I definitely want to check this when we go back and watch the tape put this one away take it away from Detroit the big thing that you said there Chris is that they were down early and it's been a reoccurring theme in these losses they're not always going to be one hundred percent clean in every single thing that's really something that happens with every quarterback every quarterback is going to have questionable throws we saw Matt Stafford just almost closes is in he wanted to double coverage came up as an interception for the giants and other than that he was why did you do that or maybe not your best choice those happen to everybody after the early backwards past that he had I almost assume that he was going to rookie quarterback because sometimes we have a tendency to see young players fold in crumble because they're dealing early but he was able to bounce back he was able to face adversity head on and be resilient which is an incredibly positive sign have another downhill performance because as soon as he came back on the next drive he seemed a bit off he seemed already rattled because of the contact he was facing in New England and one okay performance against Arizona that he didn't let the mistakes snowball and with an adverse situation the fact that Jones is coming off of really three will say subpar performances too bad ones against Minnesota didn't let him let them get him down that I think is a really good sign probably even better than his stat line against the lions which again not it really good fitting fitting the ball into tight windows and getting ball into his receivers hands even when the giants had good coverage there's thrones where you look at it and go on offense can't follow along with them but this reoccurring theme is that the pass rush is the best unit on this defense they had four sacks today coming defense that he was facing is towards the bottom of the league and we spoke about that in the preview show it's just good to see that he was able to come out and perform the way that you would expect from Grand Haley Marcus Golden Dalvand Tomlinson and the Renzo Carter so another good day from them just not getting any backup from the secondary in the linebackers quarterback to against a a bad defense the other positive that we acknowledged and it's something that I feel like we say every single show and it's a shame that the rest of the d. up and then for the second time in two or three weeks he uses that Really Nasty Jab step crosses the face of the center continues to be a bit of a surprise performer he has five sacks so far in the year before the after the halfway point ultimately window and I have to shot to guide Alvin Tomlinson in my weekly things we learn post I had actually written the section on him and if the secondary can support them in play better defense can be very good as a whole we're going to discuss the negatives now up next five six is not some incredibly astounding number but it's still a good performance from a pass rush that was very very poor last season before he got his sack and I noted that he doesn't get consistent pressure but he's still a really good defensive tackle that pretty much any defense would want to have in their line they have some playmakers now hopefully they're able to get some additional young pieces to add to that arsenal of pass rushers comes up the middle unblocked basically unblocked and gets the sack so yeah I just have to throw throw it out there for him for a for big four we do that we're going to take a very quick commercial break hey I'm Spencer Hall I'm Holly Anderson I'm Ryan Nanny I'm Jason Kirk and we're the hosts of the odd casts or in your favorite podcast APP as in any loss there are going to be negatives tackle he's got I think I'll really underrated amount of quickness it was nice to finally see our Guy Delvin Thomson come home and get the sack in marcus golden a Greek defence One of the worst defenses in the league and they are gown to starters from where they were a week ago in secondary so I think the fact that Jones the early and unfashionable pants that coaches where now if you want to take college football exactly as seriously as it should be taken subscribe for free on Apple and surprisingly there were not as many as we usually have especially in this past four game losing streaks throw a long way from just weird arm angles and then his receivers ability to catch the ball cleanly even in traffic new let it let those mistakes those early mistakes way on him is even better than the yards and touchdowns he threw four it is worth acknowledging though that the the able to stop a team that can throw the ball downfield as well as they can especially in any third long if team is able to complete those passes really honestly pretty amazing and you have to talk a lot of it up to Matt Stafford his arm strength is ability to be accurate down field one point I had the lion's having having five plays of five perceptions of at least twenty yards I'm going to have to go back and go through the play by I end up again because it feels like they

Cantor Cox netflix sixty eight percent three hundred twenty two yards one hundred percent sixty four yards twenty yards three weeks four yards two minute