35 Burst results for "Sixty Eight Percent"

Why the NYPD Is Grappling With COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy

TIME's Top Stories

01:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Why the NYPD Is Grappling With COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy

"New york city police department. Nypd is struggling to vaccinate its employees. According to the department an estimated forty seven percent of its members are fully vaccinated under nypd administered programs against kovac nineteen as of august twenty fourth even accounting for a percentage of the nypd's force who may have been vaccinated outside work and not provided details thereof. The nypd is not mandating that its employees self report their status that figure likely represents a sizeable decrease from the wider vaccination rates across new york city. Seventy six percent of all adults city residents of gotten at least one shot as of august twenty six and sixty eight percent are fully vaccinated and amid the delta variant impacting non-vaccinated new yorkers the kovic nineteen positivity rate in new york city over. The last seven days is around three percent on july twenty sixth new york city mayor. Bill de blasio said that all city workers would be required to get vaccinated or get tested weekly from september thirteenth onwards and on august twenty third the pfizer bio n tek vaccine became the first covert nineteen vaccine to be approved by the us food and drug administration fda but one brooklyn based traffic enforcement. Agent tells time they have no immediate intentions of getting the vaccine. I just don't feel like i need it yet. I spend most of my time outside. And i wear a mask. The traffic officer says for me. It's about having the choice to take it. And i just don't want to take it yet. A spokesman for the new york city patrol benevolent association. Pba the largest police union in new york city told time on august twenty fifth that they would take legal action. If there is a vaccine mandate for its workers

Nypd New York City Kovac Bill De Blasio FDA Pfizer Brooklyn New York City Patrol Benevolen PBA
This Stock Is the Gift That Keeps on Giving

MarketFoolery

02:03 min | Last month

This Stock Is the Gift That Keeps on Giving

"Got more tech related earnings. We're going to start with the chip maker. Invidia second quarter. Revenue came in higher than expected and management's guidance for third quarter revenue was also higher than analysts were expecting and shares of invidia up six percent. This on the surface looks pretty good. What does it look like underneath the surface. It's the gift that keeps on giving. I mean like the jelly of the month club. I mean total revenue up sixty eight percent here revenue for the the outlook. Like you were talking about chris. Six point eight billion you know for the third quarter of fiscal twenty twenty two that is definitely higher than analysts expected. I have been calling this a data center company. That does gaming. I'm going to say i was wrong about this. Only in the sense of this quarter because boy this quarter in video gaming business was absolutely and fogo on fire up. Eighty five percent to three point. Six billion up eleven percent from the previous quarter. This i mean it is still very much a cloud story here chris because for those who do not know invidia has arguably the top rated cloud gaming business in the world in g force now and that is now supporting over more than one thousand games on old computers in videos really killing it here now. The data center business. Chris was up thirty five percent. It's still a phenomenal business. And i think when you think about invidia it just does more stuff than you think it does like. It doesn't just make chips it makes these graphs cards that go into your gaming console. They also make servers that go into data centers. They are making a cloud gaming service that people like and are actually using. They're making software for doing ai. Tooling

Invidia Chris
AP-NORC Poll: Police Violence Remains High Concern in U.S.

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 months ago

AP-NORC Poll: Police Violence Remains High Concern in U.S.

"A new poll finds concerns about racial justice and police violence remain high a new poll from the Associated Press and O. R. C. center for public affairs research shows Americans are more likely than they were before the death of George Floyd to say that racism and police violence are serious problems facing the nation forty five percent increase from thirty six percent from a poll for twenty nineteen about half think police to cause harm are treated too leniently a majority of Americans sixty eight percent support major changes to the criminal justice system but only twenty four percent say tension on police violence against black Americans has led to change for the better seventy seven percent of black Americans in the poll said police violence is a very serious problem that's compared to thirty six percent of white Americans Jennifer king Washington

O. R. C. Center For Public Aff George Floyd The Associated Press Jennifer King Washington
US budget deficit hits record $1.05 trillion after 5 months

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

US budget deficit hits record $1.05 trillion after 5 months

"The US government's budget deficit has had an all time high the treasury department reports the federal deficit hit one point oh five trillion for the first five months of the budget year that's October through February government spending to cope with the corona virus pandemic searched at a pace far above an increase in tax revenue the deficit was sixty eight percent larger than the same period last year it easily surpassed the previous five month high of six hundred and fifty two billion that was set in twenty ten when the government was spending to try to lift the country out of the Great Recession the Congressional Budget Office has projected the deficit for the full budget year will reach two point three trillion but that does not include the one point nine trillion covered relief measure just passed by Congress Ben Thomas Washington

Treasury Department Us Government Congressional Budget Office Government Ben Thomas Washington Congress
5 Top Advertising Trends to watch out for in 2021

The Ad For Good Podcast

09:17 min | 7 months ago

5 Top Advertising Trends to watch out for in 2021

"Of the world now that we've begun twenty twenty one. I thought i'd share with you. The five top advertising trends to watch out for in twenty twenty one. Do you want to stay on top of the latest advertising. Transfer this year. Do you want to know exactly how to keep your customers. Engaged whilst using innovative creative techniques and technology to promote your business and products. keep listening. I've got you covered boone. Today has looked into the crystal ball and pulled out all the necessary information that you need to note to be ahead of the game this year. So let's get started number. One user generated content. Ugc is way uses create and promote their own content for a brand on social media and it outperformed itself in twenty twenty fall beyond brand created content to be specific ads based on user generated content. Receive four times higher. Click through rates compared to average at as well as twenty eight percent higher engagement rate compared to standard company posts content is created by customers using filters that brands create on snapchat or instagram stories through tiktok videos or even to instagram orioles with the use of tagging and hashtags one of my favorite examples of a brand utilizing user generated content is by the iconic which made its mother's day campaign featuring images and footage of real mothers at home in lockdown struggling with home schooling crying children and so much more. What i love about this campaign is how it is not only unedited. Unfolded user generated content but that it is using this content to remind others. Today are not alone that there are so many people going through the same struggles as they do each day. User generated content is predicted to only saw in twenty twenty one with the use of tiktok. Instagram rails live stories are more. There are so many options for influences to create attention grabbing content. That is relatable fun to watch and so incredibly convincing it has water mouth marketing in a virtual space where word spreads faster than in the real world after all nothing says trust like content created by someone. You completely relate to an empathize with on social media number two in game advertising last march nintendo released animal crossing new horizons and it sold more than thirteen point. Four one million copies in just six weeks if you onshore. Why so many were sold. Some external research about now is advised if you are up to date as you or your son daughter niece nephew cousin parent or even dog plays this game. Twenty four hours a day. Then you can understand the hype about this game now. What is even more fascinating about. This game is what some browns have done by partnering with animal crossing for example marc jacobs release their own virtual collection online allowing users to dress avatar in the luxury clothes of the brand off so they entered a unique code. Only six of their favourite pieces were presented as they are a luxury designer brand off audible but one brown took this partnership to a whole new level. The branded gem oh in france in partnership with the agency caused beef decided that as physical shops are shocked. Why don't they opened a shop in a video game and that is exactly what they did. Their brand or ready to wear clothing was a hit in the animal. Crossing game as these types of clothes are exactly what people were buying obsessively during lockdown comfortable affordable and cozy. The video game was advertising in itself. And if you look on the blog of this article you will see the clothes referred directly to real pieces in real life role who wouldn't want a virtual shopping experience in their favorite video game. If you check out the blog page you'll see some images of the close in real life transported directly to avatars in the video game. This type of advertising is predicted only to rise in twenty twenty one number three product placement. This is thought to be the oldest trick in the book but we predict that. This trend has only just begun from stranger things to suits right down to friends. They're sneaky ways that bronze managed to incorporate their products into popular tv shows and movies. While sixty eight percent of product. Placements lasts for five seconds or less product placement is the largest in foster scoring market in the us generating billions of dollars in revenue which will only grow in twenty twenty one. The next time you sit down to watch your favorite netflix. Show look out for the cleverly place logos of brands to catch your is subconsciously. This is a multibillion dollar market in the advertising industry and it will expand to new heights in two thousand and twenty one for example. If you check out the blog page you will see that in a snapshot from the show stranger things. The logo of burger king could not have been less subtly placed in the image however other times the product or logo is so subtly placed that you might not even notice it the first time round. This is a multi billion dollar market in the advertising industry and it will expand to new heights in twenty twenty one number four nostalgia marketing the world. We live in is not only fast paced but driven strongly by looking towards the future. I also don't need to remind you of the struggles that our planet went through last year from the loss of loved ones due to covid nineteen the loss of houses due to bush fires. The loss of black lives in a fight for equality and so much else. I also can't put into words. The pain that some of us have felt during this year therefore we believe that nostalgia marketing will be boosted to new heights in twenty twenty one studies have shown then style gives our lives a sense of meaning and continuity there by having a positive effect on on mental wellbeing. It brings us a sense of happiness amid chaos and reminds people happier and simpler time thereby encouraging you to buy the product to remind you of all the happy memories nyc pepsi gucci. A mountain jew are a few brands that adopted such a strategy of marketing. And they use this. During twenty twenty. Whilst the wild was trying to navigate itself through unpredictable and unprecedented times for example cheetos included nostalgia marketing in that twenty twenty super bowl advert by introducing cheetos popcorn the advert featured the nostalgic feeling of eating a bag of cheetos up finishing with bright orange fingers. This is something that so many people who are watching the super bowl could relate to as they remember being in the yummy and messy situation when they were younger. We can therefore expect to see some blasts from the past appearing soon on your screens as brands triton transport. You back to the past with some old time favorites. This type of marketing is certainly not new. But walk goes around certainly comes back around and it seems like twenty twenty is where people can use a boost of happiness and a sense of nostalgia number five brand activism purpose driven advertising. We saved the best to lost. Twenty twenty was a year of so many surprises and filled to the brim with certainty and fair for the future. When the world was at a low point many brands were seen taking a stance by voicing their support for those that are struggling. Reebok twitter nyc vocally showed their support for the black lives matter movement through their social media pages. Some brands went even further by inserting brand activism. Into that branding. An even products for example ben and jerry's created the on fudge off future campaign in which they teamed up with the climate council and to fifty dot org australia to encourage the australian government to ditch fossil fuels and use renewable energy. Instead they created a whole new flavor of non dairy ice cream and passing allies it to address the australian prime minister directly saying day. Scott morris make fossil fuels history and a portion of the proceeds from each ice cream was donated to three fifty australia. This was ben. And jerry's way to voice that concern about their is about climate change and to use their power to drive a campaign to pressure the government to invest into one hundred percent renewable energies brand activism. Is trent that will grow to new highs. This year more and more brands are standing up for what they believe. In and this is what makes brands authentic nowadays at noon today we have seen firsthand that campaigns driven by a pappas gain not only ten times more engagement on their platforms but it also shows that browns are committed to

UGC Boone Instagram Marc Jacobs Browns Nintendo Netflix France Brown Pepsi Bush Climate Council United States Scott Morris Reebok Jerry BEN Australia
Is Processed Food Making People Angry and Stupid

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

05:45 min | 7 months ago

Is Processed Food Making People Angry and Stupid

"Heireann droop wrote here host of the green podcasts. When it comes down to what we're made of so much of it is about food. Food literally builds us brick by brick cell-by-cell that means what we eat provides. The building blocks that make up the entire body which means unfortunately for a lot of people. They're made up of junk. Our poor food choices gravely impact our brain health resulting in behaviors. That leave us. More lonely anxious depressed illness prone and more overweight than ever before my guest on today's minneapolis owed doctors. David and austin pearl mutter and shawn stevenson talked to us about how our health our relationships and even our thinking have been damaged by our western processed food diet. They discuss how our lifestyles and diet. Impact our brain function and our ability to make good choices as well as how we interact and show up for our relationships. Let's listen in starting with my interviews with doctors. David and austin parameter. I want to read a passage from the book. Our are being gravely manipulated resulting in behaviors. That leave us. More lonely anxious depressed distressful illness prone and overweight than ever before. So we talked about those two aspects which is how do we help and support people to actually make these decisions and implement change in their life to achieve to achieve whatever goal that they wanna focus on. But let's start off with what is actually hijacking. Our brand that. It makes it difficult to do. So can you describe the landscape landscape and the state of threats that our brains are under today. Sure we'll start with one of the most important and probably most straightforward of the its food. We need food. We need to eat food to keep going. But what is it that we're putting into our bodies. A recent study showed that sixty eight percent of the foods that people eat and buy in. The store have added sugar. We know sugar isn't really a good thing for us but the question has to be. What is it doing to our thinking. What is it doing to our brains and is the question that i think were now able to answer but we haven't been looking into nearly enough. What is sugar doing to our brains. Will sugar fosters inflammation which listeners know is not good for the body. Chronic inflammation has been implicated in variety of problems. Things like heart disease. Things like alzheimer's disease. What we're understanding now is that inflammation this process that sugar up regulates changes are thinking. So let's let that sink in. It's not that it changes are thinking in the long run. It changes are thinking right now. Inflammation has been shown in several recent trials to bias our decision making towards short-term impulsive thinking so to put that into context if you're eating a diet that increases inflammation you're going to make more short term or decisions like eating diet that increases inflammation choosing the wrong foods to be eating and that transcends just diet it gets into other things if you're somebody who struggles with all nine shopping. Now you have a diet. that increases inflammation. You're going to be picking the short term reward and that means your your shopping. Cart might be filling up online with things that you don't need so again. Food is one of those entry points. It's something that has been made incredibly palatable over the years and while that means it might taste good. We need to appreciate that. It is activating these circuits within our bodies within our brains that are making our decisions more impulsive more short term oriented and in the big picture taking us away from the decisions that will lead us to health and will lead us to happiness and let me add Before we move on from food and because it is It is a very important topic because we recognize that in a simplistic model there to areas of the brain. That are involved in decision. Making the prefrontal cortex which is the more advanced area. If i may and the more primitive if i may amid della and you know there's a balance between the two we tend to With inflammation unfortunately have more input from the primitive and magdala and as such are decisions are not really looking at the future as opposed if we can reconnect to the prefrontal cortex and that is the area of the brain that allows us to participate in a process of thinking of the long term consequences of our actions today s to be more empathetic. It allows us to be more compassionate has to tamp down this sense of us versus them. That comes from the amid bella. So we're trying to reconnect to the prefrontal. Cortex and in a as per our discussion of food and inflammation inflammation absolutely threatens that connection and i have to say that A thought came to me this morning while in the shower some of my best thoughts come to me and shower and having read the new york times this morning they had an interesting article about what's going on in brazil with reference to deforestation the amazon. Not a good thing. I think most people would agree with that but that said what has happened to the thought process around the globe. is influenced by the globalization of the western pro inflammatory diet. That as this western diet a finds its way to every corner of the globe. It's changing how people across our planet think and behave

Austin Pearl Mutter Shawn Stevenson Austin Parameter Alzheimer's Disease David Minneapolis Chronic Inflammation Heart Disease Inflammation Inflammation Della New York Times Brazil Amazon
Union approves deal with Chicago schools to return to class

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 7 months ago

Union approves deal with Chicago schools to return to class

"I'm Julie Walker the Chicago teachers union has approved a deal with the nation's third largest school district to get students back to class during the pandemic this ends the possibility of a teacher a lockout or strike the deal which was passed by sixty eight percent of voting members includes more teacher vaccinations and metrics to allow school closures when corona virus infections spike some say this could be a model for other cities around the country to reopen schools the first wave of Chicago public school students in pre K. and special let are due back Thursday students in K. through eight will return in the coming weeks for limited classroom instruction no plans have been set for high school students will continue online learning I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Chicago Teachers Union Chicago Public School
Biden pushing new stimulus bill regardless of Republican support

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

05:03 min | 8 months ago

Biden pushing new stimulus bill regardless of Republican support

"It is a tale of two parties one's governing and the other star really clear what the other party is doing. Republicans are destroying themselves from the inside consumed with feuds over how loyal they can be to a former president. Who incited an insurrection. And fighting over what actions to take about the dangerous conspiracy spewing congresswoman marjorie taylor green meanwhile democrats want to pass laws and help americans who are hurting from the pandemic today. Joe biden made it clear he will pass his covid relief. Package with or without the support of the other side. A lot of folks are losing hope. And i believe the american people looking right now to their government for help to do our job to not let them down. So i'm going to act and i'm going to act fast. I've told both republicans and democrats. That's my preference to work together. But if i had to choose between getting help right now to americans who are hurting badly and getting drier bogged down in a lengthy negotiation or compromise on a bill. That's up to the crisis this an easy choice. I'm going to help. The american people are hurting now. Economic relief should not be a partisan issue. It's clear people hurting. But why helped. Millions of out of work americans when you can instead. Try to oust liz. Cheney from her republican leadership position because she got a case of morals for a moment and voted to impeach donald trump. There is so little talk of solutions from the gop. There hasn't been talk of it for four years. They're so little. Talk of helping the american people. It's just about them and their petty little internal dramas. They barely have ideas of their own and yet they refuse to endorse solutions. That are broadly supported by the american people. Sixty eight percent of americans support president. Biden's covid relief package. According to a brand new quinnipiac poll. Seventy eight percent are in favour of fourteen hundred dollar stimulus payments even sixty four percent of republicans support the stimulus payments. The white house knows that republicans are on the losing side of this. They even released a video about it. My message to our republican elected officials is to put our country first. And i think there should be a bipartisan effort to step up and try and assist these people and it's imperative act quickly before things get worse. Entered the better gives. A lot of people are hurting and need the relief as soon as possible. So i'm rooting for them. To get that done. Here is far deeper problem at the center of this thing. We don't actually know what republicans stand for anymore. They don't support popular legislation or offer solutions of their own now to be fair to republicans. It's hard to juggle ideas and solutions when your focus is pulled toward a dangerous conspiracy spewing freshman congresswoman from georgia whom you will defend at all costs for some unknown reason marjorie taylor. Green was stripped of her committee assignments this week for indicating support for the execution of prominent democrats with whom she now serves. Seems like a fairly reasonable action. Take but republicans balked. They spent more time talking about how unfair it was to the conspiracy speier than they ever have talked about helping americans in need. What do you stand for if you defend a woman who incites support for political violence. Our next guest democratic congressman jimmy gomez says removing marjorie. Green from committees isn't enough her city and her terrifying effect on the republican party require her removal from congress. According to the congressman but republicans would rather focus on feuds than see the obvious danger of keeping marjorie green or donald trump for that matter in office the very very small group who have condemned marjorie green or donald trump are paying the price republican congressman. Adam kinzer is being censured by illinois county republicans for taking actions quote contrary to the values of the gop contrary to the values of the gop. Senator ben sasse might be censured for the second time by nebraska republicans for not being deferential enough to trump. You are welcome to censure me again. But let's be clear about why this is happening because i still believe as you used to. The politics isn't about the weird worship of one dude. The weird worship of one dude. The republican party is not that familiar anymore. Doesn't have a set of values or principles defends a man who incites an insurrection and defends a woman who supports political violence and it barely utter a peep about the millions. The millions of jobless americans struggling just to survive through no fault of their

Marjorie Taylor Green Donald Trump Joe Biden Marjorie Green GOP Marjorie Taylor Cheney LIZ Biden Jimmy Gomez White House Speier Adam Kinzer Illinois County Republican Party Senator Ben Sasse
AP Analysis: Racial disparity seen in US vaccination drive

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 8 months ago

AP Analysis: Racial disparity seen in US vaccination drive

"I'm Julie Walker a racial gap has opened to the nation's covert vaccination drive with black Americans in many places lagging behind whites in receiving shops the gap is deeply troubling to some given the corona virus has taken a disproportionate toll on blacks and Associated Press analysis of the state's releasing data for example North Carolina shows black people make up twenty two percent of the population but only eleven percent of vaccine recipients while whites are sixty eight percent of the population and eighty two percent of those vaccinated similarly in Maryland blacks are thirty percent of the population and get sixteen percent of the shops while whites are fifty five percent and sixty seven percent of those who have gotten shots experts say there are several factors for this disparity including inadequate access and just trust because of a history of discrimination I'm Julie Walker

Julie Walker Associated Press North Carolina Maryland
Milankovitch Cycles

Everything Everywhere Daily

06:44 min | 8 months ago

Milankovitch Cycles

"To understand millan kovic cycles. We have to understand each of the cycles which the earth goes through individually. There are several of them. And it's gonna take a bit of visualization to get the concept via podcast where there are no visual aids. But it shouldn't be too difficult. We'll start by going through the cycles that the earth itself goes through to understand these need to think of the earth as a spinning top when the top spins. it's usually not perfectly upright. The top will be tilted somewhat just like atop. The earth has a tilt to rotation currently the earth tilts twenty three point five degrees. And that is what is responsible for the seasons. However that tilt known as obligatory isn't static it actually wobbles back and forth between twenty two point one degrees and twenty four point five degrees right now. We're in the middle of such a cycle. The time it takes to complete one full cycle of going from twenty two point one degrees to twenty four point five degrees and back again is forty one thousand years the greater the tilt the more sun the polar regions will get in the summer and the more extreme the seasons are the next part of the cycle is axial procession if you can imagine the spinning top again as it. Spinning the axis of the top is rotating. Circle isn't just tilting. In one direction on the earth the direction of our access in the north currently points to the north star players this temporary over the course of twenty five thousand seven hundred and seventy one point five years. The earth's axis will go in a circle that means that not only will the north star. Not be the northstar at some point but twenty five thousand seven hundred and seventy one years from now it will be the northstar again while the earth is going about it cycles on it's wobbling and spinning access there are also things happening to the earth orbit itself for this part instead of a spinning top. I want you to visualize a spinning plate. The edge of the spinning plate would be the orbiting. The earth and at the center of the plate would be the sun the first orbital cycle is the orbital eccentricity cycle the orbit of the earth around. The sun isn't a perfect circle. it's slightly elliptical the shape of that ellipse changes over time. And how much it deviates from a circle is known as eccentricity the eccentricity cycles between point zero zero three four which is almost perfectly circular two point zero five eight which is more slightly elliptical the changes due to the gravitational pull of large planets like jupiter and saturn. This cycle takes about one hundred thousand years. The next cycle is called app sill procession. If you can imagine that played again this time imagine it. As more of an oval plate as the earth is going around its orbit around the edge. The plate itself is rotating that means be closest and farthest point that the earth is from the sun will change over time. This cycle is about one hundred and twelve thousand years. Finally there's a cycle for orbital inclination. That rotating plate isn't flat and actually tilts and the tilt changes over time as well. This cycle is about one hundred thousand years as well and is very close to the same length. As orbital eccentricity cycle each of these cycles involves relatively small changes over long periods of time however they can compound each other or they can mitigate each other all of these cycles have been known for a while somewhere known back as far as antiquity and others were more recently discovered in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in one thousand nine hundred eighty s serbian astrophysicists named bulletin. Millan kovic put all the pieces together. He realized that these cycles closely followed the patterns of ice ages in particular three of these axial tilt eccentricity and procession all affected the amount of sunlight that would fall on the northern hemisphere. These cycles could either cancel each other out to moderate the strength of seasons or they could compound each other making the seasons even more powerful in particular. What really mattered was the amount of sunlight falling on the northern hemisphere. In the summer why the northern hemisphere that is where most of the land is sixty eight percent of the land on earth is in the northern hemisphere land. Can't store heat as well as water. Which means that ice can form on it. Easier ice reflects sunlight which can cause further cooling during an ice age most. The ice accumulates in the northern hemisphere in the south is can only accumulate to a point before it hits warmer water and the ice will cleave off to form icebergs. Glaciers depend on how much of the ice melts during the summer when the earth is at its maximum tilt more sun is hitting the northern hemisphere in the summers if the orbit of the earth is such that it's at its closest point to the sun. When this happens summers will be very intense and ice will melt when he opposite happens when the tilt is at a minimum and the earth is farther away in the summers ice will not melt as much and glaciers will grow. All of these factors individually are rather small at its closest point to the sun which currently happens on january fourth. Remember back to my episode on why we celebrate new year's day when we do there's only about six percent more solar radiation hitting the earth than when we are at the farthest point likewise the axial tilt of the earth only changes a few degrees however these effects can be big enough when they work in conjunction to cause an ice age. The observed strength of ice ages is usually found to be stronger than the millen kovic cycles would suggest leading some climatologists to think that there might be a positive feedback mechanism at work. Something which causes the planet to cool faster than expected. The timing of ice ages is still being worked on. Kovic predicted that i would be about forty one thousand years apart and that was true up until about one million years ago since then ice ages have come at about one hundred thousand years which corresponds to the eccentricity cycle. Milne kovic cycles aren't just unique to earth like the earth. Mars has all the cycles. I just mentioned except that the timing and the extent of the cycles are different. Researchers estimate that mars has had between six and twenty ice ages over the last eight hundred million years. The martian milankovitch cycle might bring about an ice age every four hundred thousand to two point one million years. Some of you might be wondering if mellon kovic cycles are responsible for the recent climatic changes measured over the last several decades and the answer is no milakovic's cycles take thousands. If not tens of thousands of years to change their effects. Camping noticed over periods short as a decade so the next time you think about the earth as a spinning ball in space realize that the spinning the orbit isn't a static unchanging thing it's always slowly changing and there are cycles within cycles within cycles

Millan Kovic Aids Kovic Milne Kovic Mellon
AP-NORC poll: Virus, economy swamp other priorities for US

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

AP-NORC poll: Virus, economy swamp other priorities for US

"A new poll shows the corona virus and the economy are top priorities as a new president is about to be sworn in the poll conducted by the Associated Press and O. R. C. center for public affairs research shows containing the virus in repairing the damage is done are the top priorities for Americans is Joe Biden prepares to become the nation's forty six presidents overall fifty three percent of Americans name Colbert nineteen as one of the top five issues they want the government to tackle this year sixty eight percent mention the economy twenty four percent of Americans cite race relations as a priority that compares with ten percent excited a year ago my camp in Washington

O. R. C. Center For Public Aff The Associated Press Joe Biden Colbert Government Washington
How Do Volunteers, Donors, Funders & Sponsors Work with Creating IT Futures

Technologist Talk

04:38 min | 8 months ago

How Do Volunteers, Donors, Funders & Sponsors Work with Creating IT Futures

"Let's start by refreshing our understanding of the creating futures mission. Have you made any alterations. Have you tweaked in ways has evolved. We believe that technology careers should be open to anyone who has an interest in the field and you know every study ever about diversity says that a lack of it leads to a lack of productivity leads to a lack of innovation so there's a real incentive for the industry and for businesses themselves to take the ship issue had on this been a consistent problem in the it field for so long. Just just trying to do what we can to fix that. That's really our mission. And we have programs for youth programs for adults for women for people of color veterans. So that we can change the landscape. That's really think of the crux of our mission at creating anti futures. There's no shortage of the unemployed underemployed and underrepresented demographics who have an interest and a real talent for the work. They just need an organization to give them a leg up and that's really what our mission is. When we say that these careers should be open to anyone. Who's interested in it. We recognize there are some barriers that may be preventing those groups of people from entering the field. Could you elaborate a little bit more on that. I know there's been some research done by com tia and by creating future that illuminates this point. One of those stats. That stuck out to me right away. Is that sixty. Eight percent of organizations have had challenges in building a diverse workforce which includes retention right and a majority of these organizations that say that they'd be willing to try new approach with these organizations are willing to try new approach. Well we have great proven approach. Ready to go our. It ready program is two-thirds people of color in the program. Assesses at trains certify provides placement assistance. So i'm the programs were there. It's ready for them to use. And the second reason that i'd say our mission is more important than ever is is that there's a pipeline problem right with it regarding diversity. Everybody kind of knows this like women people of color. They're discouraged by our culture from pursuing a career in. It often even by the time they get to high school. So programs like tech roles are directly combating this pipeline issue that companies are facing now and i think by targeting middle school age kids. They're tackling the problem before it can even take place. Let is an excellent segue to bring alicia into the conversation here now expect most listeners. Understand the meaning of being a tear in quotes giving of their time to support a cause but sometimes terms are tossed around donors sponsor and partner and they seem to be used fluidly by some organizations alicia in your outreach for tech girls. How do you pitch volunteering. How do you help. Tech professionals see programs such as tech shops tech. Todd's as different in a very very full and robust field of opportunities to give back especially as we close a challenging year and start a new one with shirley more hurdles to come. How have you volved your pitched volunteers. How do you help them see the light. Volunteering with tech roles is very rewarding and it always has been rewarding previous to you know the hurdles of transitioning virtually as well And we see that feedback directly from our volunteers that participate in our programs. Just serve first time getting involved. They're like wow. I realize the impact. I was going to have in being part of a program such as tech roles but just getting to actually see how inspired the girls are definitely gets them even more excited. And that's why we always say being nervous to volunteer for something like this and working with youth Can can seem like a challenge in itself but jumping in. you'll see that you're inspiring and empowering the next generation of women to explore the possibilities in technology but in addition to that rewarding feeling that you get As a tech professional you're also given the opportunity to build your marketable skills like public speaking teaching and techno know-how and also expanding your network wild teaching these fun hands on workshops alongside others in the tech industry and there's many ways to volunteer and we really feel like that helps with our pitch and engagement with new volunteers across the country.

Alicia Todd Shirley
Japan 2021 Olympics in Doubt

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:13 min | 8 months ago

Japan 2021 Olympics in Doubt

"Now. Japan's government is holding firm at the moment in its view that this year's olympic games should go ahead. They've already been postponed once. But there's a growing number of cases of corona virus and also calls for tokyo twenty twenty one to be shelved while tokyo bureau. Chief fiona wilson joins me now. Welcome back thank you very much tokyo. Twenty twenty one is pretty ambitious. They want to call it to tokyo. Two thousand and twenty there is this insistence. Isn't there in the government to to stick with the plan for it to go ahead but the has been an enormous poll suggesting that lots of other people think otherwise. Yes you're absolutely right. In fact i was out in chablis very busy central tokyo that usually very busy and slightly sad looking tokyo. Twenty twenty flags still flowing. They're looking a bit faded and they're not changing the year. It's going to be tokyo. Twenty twenty even if it's held and twenty twenty one but things are not looking good for the olympics at the moment For many reasons. I think you know the surging Virus numbers obviously very difficult to contain at the moment. And you know they started a big public cole and eighty percent of people said they would like the games to be either postponed or cancelled outright. So there's not very Warm feeling for the olympics at the moment and it's it's really difficult moment to ask people to think about welcoming styles ends of people into the country. The moment and i think many people just think it's too much of a distraction at the moment. I mean from from the outside. This does look like somewhat of a mess. Doesn't it given the fact that like you say a sort of a cool clear head would suggest that Welcoming thousands of athletes and tens of thousands of visitors to tokyo when we are still in the teeth of a pandemic isn't necessarily the most sensible of ideas. Oh absolutely and i really have to wonder why the conversations behind closed doors. It's hard to believe. The prime minister soga is going over. All those options for cancellation really. My guess is that they probably don't want to announce today it's really definitely not possible to do it in. Of course everything's a bit delayed with the vaccination program here. It's not really going to happen until the talk about late february but the idea that everybody will be vaccinated in time for the olympics is extremely ambitious. And i think just that alone is making people pretty nervous. So i think it's. It's not looking very promising and more kind of message Does this convey from the government when they are still standing firm in. What does it say about the way that you're shahida seekers reputation as being saying well. I think when you look at that poll that was was negative about the olympics of the moment along with those those side eighty percent against the olympics. At the moment his own ratings have really dropped quite substantially. they were down nine percent in a month And over sixty eight percent of people said they were dissatisfied with his handling of the pandemic in japanese. Public is pretty critical. They're very of our overall. If you look at numbers they're really not as bad nowhere near as bad as as most country so in japan overall dump pretty well but the population is quite tough on elitist. Here there's a feeling that he's authored. Called a state of emergency for tokyo in the surrounding area and a lot of people have been saying for a couple of weeks. You know you. It has to be called now. They felt it was a little bit too late. So what we're expecting tonight. There's a press conference at seven o'clock tokyo time and it looks like seven. More prefectures will be added to the list. So that state of emergency will be spread across japan mostly to the west of japan and expecting you know all soccer yoga kyoto. An down to coca and even you know beyond also in kyushu. The governor of komo motto is said. We'll come we big did we. We want a kyushu state of emergency. So i think it looks like more and more people will be coming onto this State of emergency umbrella. Not as tough as the sort of lockdowns. We're seeing in the uk but it does Impinge on people's behavior. And i think that many people are saying you know we've got to do it now before numbers Get to more than can be contained

Tokyo Olympics Chief Fiona Wilson Soga Shahida Olympic Japan Cole Kyushu Coca Soccer UK
What happens to all the other COVID-19 candidates when the first one is approved?

Science Magazine Podcast

09:45 min | 11 months ago

What happens to all the other COVID-19 candidates when the first one is approved?

"Now we have staff writer John Cohen. He wrote a story this week about an interesting question what happens to all the other covid nineteen vaccine candidates when the first one is approved. Hi John. Hi. Sarah. How are you? I'm good. He could be let's be honest. We're both sick of the pandemic. Yeah. Absolutely. Let me leave my house that my child leave the house. That's all I want to normal. Yeah. Normal. Let's talk about vaccine candidates. How many are in studies now under study now and what does the trial landscape look like at this moment? Know they're forty two in human clinical trials according the WHO list? The World Health Organization doesn't update list that was as of October second in there about two hundred in development. Of, the forty two in clinical trials tanner in the last stage of efficacy trials, the phase three, we're going to be mostly talking about what's going on in the US those numbers reflect worldwide vaccine development that's global. The US has four efficacy studies underway right now, and these are all part of what they like to call warp speed all part of operation more speed. Yeah. Yeah and so they're going through trials going through all the same steps, but that could change once one of them gets. Approval, why would something changed about? You know what's going on with the other CO bids scenes? The concern is that the mediocre might be the enemy of the better or the best the way that we've set things up in the United States the food and Drug Administration has a mechanism called an emergency use authorization. It's received a lot of attention because of hydroxy chloroquine because of rim, Desa there, and because of convalescent plasma and because of diagnostic testing, all of those have used this pathway for. Approval and authorization essentially is short of a full approval and it says, Hey, were in an emergency we only minimal data that gives us an idea of this stuff working and then we'll let it be used widely. So why are we worried about the other possible covid nineteen vaccines? If for example, one gets a UA by November I the FDA has said in a document issued in June that the EU a could be issued for fifty percent efficacy. That's a pretty low standard to begin with. As. Soon, as you authorized the use of one vaccine, first of all, this is an ongoing study because they're going to use data for an e you a most likely from an interim analysis someone of axion efficacy trial is scheduled to take six months. An Independent Safety Monitoring Board looks at the data at certain pre scheduled time points in the case of these efficacy trials they look at. The data early based on what they call? It's are basically the end points of the study. The studies are primarily asking the question. Do they prevent symptomatic disease that the number one question they're asking? So that's an event. If somebody gets a symptomatic disease and these trials are scheduled to have one hundred and fifty events to reach their final conclusions, but they're going to take peaks at the data. At fifty events, a net one, hundred events roughly at fifty events a company. If it had strong evidence that the people in the vaccinated group as opposed to the Placebo group were doing better, they could seek you a based on fifty percent efficacy at that moment they ethically in a quandary because the people who are still in this trial, blindly a receiving either vaccine or placebo ethically you could. Argue you've gotTa Blind and tell the people who are receiving. Placebo. We've got a vaccine that looks good. Do you want to get it? So you've undermined that study from reaching it's real and points of one hundred fifty events What's more? Every other study underway has to let the participants know that the US has issued and ethically you have to give people the option of taking a vaccine. The FDA's blessing. People might walk out a trials who are in trials. If you were staging a new clinical trial, you may well have to compare your vaccine to the one that has received the authorization. Well, it's much easier to prove that something is better than nothing. But what if you have a vaccine that's fifty percent effective and that becomes the competitor not a placebo well. Then, this new vaccine let's say it has sixty two percent efficacy. You're comparing sixty two percent to fifty percent not fifty percent zero. It's really hard to see that small difference or even if they're equivalent, let's say they're both fifty percent. So you need a much larger study and it needs to go on for a longer period of time and it costs a lot more money we. Don't have. It's not likely that people involved in trials for other vaccines or even the people in the placebo arm of the one that does get approved would have access to the sack seen. That's a critical consideration. If supply doesn't meet demand, then we have an easy you were only giving outlets twenty million doses to the top priority people healthcare workers then for the people in other. Clinical trials they have no other option. Then the issue is not this great ethical dilemma, but remember were speeding things up with operation more speed in order to pump out three, hundred, million doses of vaccine from one company by as early as the end of January. So this problem, it's not here today because supply doesn't meet demand, but it sure could be here in late. January and. February march April who knows what we're going to have in terms of efficacy data and who knows what we're going to have in terms of trials in their enrollment. Remember we have a couple of trials that have been stopped because of side effects. When you put a trial on hold that means it's not going to reach its end point for even longer and that's happening right now with two of the warp speed vaccines. In your story, we don't want just one vaccine. There's some good reasons to continue to investigate and to look further afield even after one is approved, can you talk about some of those? For one thing we may need different vaccines for different populations. The elderly we know with influenza, they need a much higher dose because their immune systems don't work as well as they age we may need one that's tailored for pregnant women. Pregnant women are GonNA, tolerate a risk factor much much lower than everyone else. You might need a vaccine that simpler to deliver for some parts of the world that doesn't have a cold chain issue or you need to keep it at. MINUS SEVENTY DEGREES CENTIGRADE. You might need a vaccine that's cheaper for many countries even though it's maybe sixty two percent versus sixty, eight percent effective, it might be a better deal at the end of the day because more people can get it for the amount of money you have on top of all that we want a lot of vaccines because more vaccines means more supply we have an insurance policy of something goes wrong at a manufacturing plant. If a side effect crops up when it goes into wider use, we have this backup of other vaccines. So there are loads of reasons why we want a whole portfolio vaccines ultimately to prove safe effective. That's the. Case that you have to make to participants people who might be involved in trials. Do you think it's going to be effective? Do you think people are gonNA still volunteer to get a vaccine or not vaccine that hasn't been approved? You put your finger on a really important issue and that's who enrolls in a vaccine trial why it's not like you have cancer that's going to kill you and you're enrolling in a trial because you've exhausted all medicines and you're hoping beyond hope that this new treatment will work and Save Your Life. That's a completely different motivation to join a trial. Then a vaccine when you are healthy, you're joining this to prevent something from. Happening so ethically, you can argue that well, that person most of these people are doing it for altruistic reasons the really doing it to help other people and you can ethically approach people in a study and say, Hey, look this one vaccine got EU a based on the early data that it's fifty eight percent effective. We'd like to keep you in this trial and it's a blinded study and we promise at the end of the study is one of the bioethicists I interviewed said we promise at the end we're going to give you the better vaccine, but will you stick with this for a while so that we can figure out if the vaccine that isn't For us is worth pursuing going back to your cancer example. There are cases where a clinical trials is happening the people in the treatment group are doing so well that it's no longer ethical to continue to deny that treatment to the placebo arm. That's not what's happening here. It is a different equation, some ethicists. That, even in a vaccine study, a person has a right to know if they're a participant whether they're receiving a placebo vaccine if there is convincing and compelling evidence that the vaccines working but keep in mind too and this is something that I think a lot of people have a hard time getting their heads around wearing a mask and social distancing goes a long way toward protecting you from this virus maybe even more than fifty percent effective vaccine 'cause then you're walking around. With none of this protection or you're not taking it as seriously exactly and that's called behavioral inhibition. If a vaccine leads to behavioral discipline habituation and people dropped their guard, stop wearing masks stop social distancing they may be putting themselves at more risk even though they have a vaccine in their bodies

United States FDA EU Sarah Staff Writer World Health Organization John Cohen Chloroquine Influenza Independent Safety Monitoring Cancer Drug Administration
Designing Your Work Life

Good Life Project

05:29 min | 1 year ago

Designing Your Work Life

"Let's give a little bit of context just to who you are and how you came to work together because you come from sort like different walks of life and somehow ended up originally teaching this course together and trying to figure out. Okay. What is this thing called design thinking and why is it being used in this one domain but we're not really applying this process this way of thinking to actually creating a better life. So how does the marriage I happen here? Under the origin and through to you in spring of two thousand. So. Going all the way back to when I was a Stanford Sophomore here seventy five thousand years ago when they retire on the plaza and struggling with the question, what do I do with my life? I found most of the grown-ups were supposed to be helpful not helpful at all and I found it really difficult to figure my own life and get into my career and apple in the early days and find myself on the first corporate culture. Committee was Steve In one, thousand, nine hundred because we're worried about what makes apple won't be apple anymore someday, and over the subsequent thirty years noticed everybody's got this question particularly workplace about I wanted to many for work on to work for you. Want, it to work for me. I want this to be generative used language with that's what they were looking for and with. So everybody's got this question fast forward many years. Later I'm having coffee with a guy named Randy over at Berkeley and he says Gosh have you should teach a class on this. So minor problems I'm not of the Faculty don't of a PhD don't have any contacts there I can solve everything but the lousy commute I said deal. So I taught a course experimentally one student said, are you teaching in the spring because my roommate wants to take I said sure I made a deal the universe of the kid show up I'll show up so fourteen semesters later. I'm teaching this class of Berkeley called finding your vocation and then how platinum David. Kelly get together an event. This thing called the D school decided to invent the school, which is where we are now and in order to focus on that David Kelly s this Guy Bill Burnett run the design program, and so in two thousand and seventy heard bill was coming here to run the design program said. Hey. Bill Gates. This kind of stuff he cares about students in Stanford's a lot less terrible from me. Let's have lunch and so we had lunch in two thousand and seven in the spring, which was the first of ten lunches over a year talking about this ambiguous idea of students find their way and about a minute and a half bill goes after great idea it's a huge problem. We should totally fix it design. Thinking is the way to solve this thing. So take all that stuff you're doing and flip it ended design give me a proposal will teach it. It will prototype at the summer we'll teach at this fall. Let's go I gotTA gotta run so it was a two minute meeting and I guess an appointment we gotta go. So what are the few times the bill talk faster than I do and so then we start that spring thinking of ideas and that fall teaching design students, which eventually teaching author students. But in particular design thing really did work why West go? Why did design work? Design is inherently human centered. The way we teach it and both of you and I have been working with students for longtime I started I finished my masters in eighty two I started teaching part time eighty, three I'm doing this for like thirty. Six years or something. And in office our after office hours after office. Our really smart capable students going I don't know what to do. I. Don't know how to launch. is working to suck as much as everybody tells me. How. Will I find something that I want or I like or might even be meaningful people keep asking me stupid questions like what's my passion and I don't know. So wrong broken. With me professor and it's nothing wrong with you. And then Dave, this experience over Berkeley and you know basically the class happened because he wanted a shorter commute and I wanted to. Free up my office our time but no, it's a real. It's a really big problem I. Mean you look around look at the data around the world sixty United States sixty, eight percent of the people say I'm just engaged from are highly disengaged from my job. I hate my job eighty-five percent worldwide people hate their jobs, right? So the students you know we started with students and then pretty soon after we pick kind of gone all over the university and by the way now we and we give the class to any university that wants it. We're not being taught at one hundred, fifteen, some universities and courtesy of that wonderful woman over there Gabrielle. Runs our studios. Everybody's got the same question like life be meaningful. Will this be interesting? What's work? How does work it into this big thing called life? And it's essentially a human problem because we're trying to. But designers do is make things that have happened in the world. You know, hey, this is an iphone never happened before how do you do it while you build lots and lots of prototypes and figure it out because you can't get any about the future. So when you want to do something in the future that's brand new. You need a process design thinking process it works over and over again if you apply to your life, well, what are you trying to do something new in the world your. Future. Right you've never you've never been there before you don't know what it's going to be like you probably are a little anxious or you're at a point of change we started working with thirty and forty something. I. Have This career thing but it's not exactly what I didn't really work out the way I thought or it's okay to go faster. So everybody's got this problem. How do I invent the future? Well, design thinking and design is a wave in Benton your future. I tell the students you I wanted to choice. Whether Students Twenty launching a thirty in board or fifty, and thinking about their own career you got only two choices the futures coming. You don't get to choose that. You, get the default future stuff happens in you react to it. or You design it, you put your intention in the world and you try to make the world do things that you're interested in and

Berkeley David Kelly Apple Bill Gates Bill Burnett Stanford Bill United States Randy Benton Steve Professor Gabrielle Dave
Coronavirus relief bill negotiations continue as benefits set to expire

The Young Turks

05:41 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus relief bill negotiations continue as benefits set to expire

"Unless Congress takes action, millions of Americans are likely to be evicted from their homes. Berry soon, and this problem is more than just a crisis. This is a crisis that the American people are dealing with, but there's also a crisis when it comes to Congress and how utterly? Our lawmakers are when it comes to providing the economic relief that Americans desperately need so there have been numerous stories published about the number of Americans who are likely to be addicted, but these numbers keep ballooning so for instance last week, the Federal Moratorium on Evictions and also on federally backed mortgages expired, and so there are some states that have implemented their own addiction. Moratoriums but you have to keep in mind. Mind that some states have not done so and we still have tens of millions of Americans who are jobless who lost their healthcare coverage as a result of being laid off in the middle of this pandemic, and then you also have Republicans who refuse to extend the unemployment benefits that were provided under the cares act. That was the additional six hundred dollars a week. That Americans would receive if they filed for unemployment. Unfortunately it seems like there are some members of democratic leadership who were going along with the lies and deceptions that are being message to the American people. So before we get to that I want to share some statistics with you. The Urban Institute estimated. That provisions covered nearly thirty percent of the country's rental units and I'm talking about the Be Moratorium on evictions by one estimate. Some forty million. Americans, could be. During the public health crisis, and of course, this is the most unsurprising part about all of this minority. Groups are the most. Vulnerable when it comes to fiction, so people of Color, according to CNBC are especially vulnerable, while most while almost half of white tenants say they're highly confident. They can continue to pay their rent. Just twenty six percent about african-american tenants could say the same around half. Hispanic tenants said they have little to no confidence. They'll be able to stay in their homes. And if you look at data, state-by-state to see how states are impacted by this. You Look at Louisiana, for instance, fifty percent of ten say that they can no longer afford their rent. A fifty one percent who say that they can't afford their rent in Florida fifty eight percent, in Tennessee fifty nine percent in West Virginia and again Benjamin love for you to jump in the frustration. Here is the utter lack of leadership, not just in in the federal government with the trump administration, but also with Congress right what we're seeing here is just it's. It's shocking, but it's not surprising race. It's almost like the natural combination of how are leadership has been leading the direction. They've been going. They are really pushing the people as far as they possibly can I. Think you are Frankin Clippers stain on. Twitter, said that they're trying to find the very least that they could possibly do without causing a riot, but you know when these numbers start hitting the fan right when people actually are put out of their homes with nowhere to go, and then if they if they're lucky enough to get in a homeless shelter night, we do not have the capacity to house. All of these people in the homeless shelters across this country, but even in that scenario they would then be exposing their families to covid nineteen. This is not something that's but the fact that they're playing chicken and taking it. All the way to the wire is is disgusting. Absolutely, so you have the moratorium on fictions on one hand, and then you also have the issue of the unemployment benefits which are set to expire on the last day of July, and so of course, when you hear the rhetoric coming from the Senate Gop, and also from the White, house, there's this live that keeps getting repeated over and over again about how well these unemployment benefits are just too high, and as a result are refusing to go back to work. In fact, one of the Republican senators. Who was her pet? This nonsense was Ted Cruz over the weekend. Let's take a listen to what he had to say. And then I wanNA. Compare what he said to democratic. Leadership Listen. In terms of the unemployment benefits do you object to providing any kind or any amount of federal boosts unemployment at this point, because not everyone is choosing to be out of work. The policy that Nancy Pelosi Democrats are pushing adds an additional six hundred dollars a week of federal money to unemployment. We have unemployment system system. Down, to seventy percent. Problem is for sixty eight percent of people receiving it right now. They are being paid more on unemployment than they made in their job and I'll tell you. I've spoken to small business owners all over the state of Texas. We're trying to reopen and they're calling. Their waiters and waitresses are other busboys, and they won't come back, and of course they won't come back is the federal government is paying in some instances twice as much money to stay home, but APP may, and to a lesser amount. At look at what we ought to focus on instead of just shoveling trillions out the door, we ought to be passing a recovery bill. What's a recovery bill or coverage? Bill would be lifting the taxes and the regulations that are hammering small businesses so that people can go back to work. A recovery bill would suspend the tax which would give a pay raise to everyone in America. WHO's working? That actually gets people back to work.

Congress Federal Government Bill Berry Urban Institute Twitter Ted Cruz Louisiana Nancy Pelosi Covid Cnbc Frankin Clippers Senate Gop Florida America Texas West Virginia Benjamin
Pandemic bike boom paves way for greener streets

Climate Cast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Pandemic bike boom paves way for greener streets

"The cove in nineteen pandemic has changed so much so fast one change for the better a dramatic drop in air pollution. From Europe to Minnesota cities have closed some streets to cars to accommodate the biking and walking surge. There's even a bike shortage as more people pick up cycling. Could cleaner air and emissions free transportation be a lasting benefit born from pandemic. Carlton Read Has Been Writing About Transportation for thirty years. His recent book is bike boom, the unexpected resurgence of cycling Hey Carlton Welcome to Climate Cast Hi de Paul tell us about the current Cova, nineteen bike boom, but lockdowns around the world people started buying bicycles and bike shops. Who some of them are closing and furloughing staff with thinking? Maybe we should actually open here and around the world it's just been selling out of bicycles, and I, see you know some streets that have closed right that used to have traffic zipping by, and maybe they had streetside or roadside cafes now if it's a walk, street or a bike street, that's a more pleasant experience. Isn't it to be outdoors? Yes so if you get the sidewalks buzzing with people that making cities that's making those individual cafe businesses at money at caused. They're cities money. It actually costs the money, so the real estate costs of of allowing 'cause to park by the side of the road is a men's, and it's pretty much absorbed by cities and cities. Now realizing we no longer have to absorb those costs I see this recent. European. Survey Finds Sixty eight percent want permanent transportation changes. Changes to reduce air pollution, our cities working on that that basically putting plans in place that they couldn't have done beforehand, so they assumed that people were opposed to these kind of measures, and the not finding that no people actually quite like the clean air, people can see you know from one side of the city from the other people can hear Birdsong and I think that's just opened many people's eyes both naturally and figuratively into. We can do things different. You wrote about and mentioned that seventies bike boom in the US. It didn't stick. Why didn't it stick? And what can we learn from that today? Cities promised to build lots and lots of one hundred thousand miles of bike ways. They didn't get built and because they didn't get builds people who were attracted to cycling inhumane have stuck around after fil fashion. A, lot of them fell away Carlton climate cast focuses on climate, change, climate, science, and solutions, and we know that transportation is now the biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions globally. How could cleaner air and new habits were seeing during a pandemic result in greater action on climate change very typical Ansett would be well. Just make all 'cause. Electric and then you solve your climate problem overnight. That's that's a transportation problem solved. And of course we know that's not the case. Because most electric cars, the great majority electric cars fueled remotely so there are there are power plant somewhere else having the emissions, so we have got to move at the end of the day. Two forms of transport that don't actually have any emissions, either locally or remotely, and of course that is walking a lot more cycling, just modes of transport, but actually have a health, clean egg, and many other benefits than just. This accidental of of saving the world, transportation, writer and bike rider Carlton read thanks so much for being on climate cast today poll. Thank you for having me.

Carlton Europe Minnesota United States Cova Ansett Birdsong Paul Writer
Americans are Uncomfortable With Going Back to Church

Thank God I'm Atheist

06:20 min | 1 year ago

Americans are Uncomfortable With Going Back to Church

"Survey. Oh. Good survey from taken by the American Enterprise, institute, has shown that sixty four percent of American churchgoers. Were somewhat uncomfortable or very uncomfortable with attending in person worship. Sixty four percent sixty four percent, in fact, what they found was basically only one group is Gung Ho on going back to Church and that's why evangelical 's. Right no surprise there if you know the news. Yeah if you add up there somewhat comfortable, and they're very comfortable's. It's. Sixty one percent of them are all about. Thirty. Four percent of them are very comfortable with going back to. Yeah because they because not only do they get to engage in the worship that is so important to them, but also they get to pony lives. Show us. What idiots we are. Yeah, Yeah so apparently. Even those who reported that their congregations offer actually offered. Worship last week, Fifty, six percent of respondents said they chose not to go. Yeah, and you know. I mean obviously like one of the hotspots repeatedly everywhere this Cova. Is seems like Church's just keep popping up like that was one of the first stories coming out of South Korea right was there was a church like a crazy colty church, but nonetheless. I think that's. Probably. But that was one of the hot spots, and that that was one of the big spreaders of Covid, nineteen and obviously we're seeing that in the United States. We're we're. We're just seeing it right like this is operatives These are the kinds of places that people who care about their health and their communities health. Should, be staying away from and a lot of Christians actually do agree with that depending on their denomination if you look at Black Protestants. And add their numbers up. Sixty eight percent are. Either somewhat uncomfortable or very uncomfortable. Well. Yeah, because it's because this thing is killing them in disproportionate numbers so. I can see why. Hispanic Catholics seventy three percent are are on the uncomfortable side. Really Yeah, yeah, that's that's. That's a number that means something. Yeah, and you're white mainline Protestants. It's sixty at three percent well. Yeah, I mean I'm you know talking to my mom hi mom, if you're listening. The other day, and she was saying that you know she. Attends, a free often attend an Anglican a Canadian Anglican Church She goes there mostly for the for the. For the free coffee I think anyway And music, doesn't she really liked the? It's the Camaraderie and the people. She loves the people there and I don't blame her for that tall any who? She said that they're not going to be going until like late in the fall at the earliest. Really. Yeah fantastic. That's not even an option, so I I mean they're. They're doing it right up there i. don't know about what what the Anglicans are doing down here, but. Well Lake. PISCOPO, here, so yeah. Definitely not Anglican. We broke off from that country. Diane exactly. Anyway. Yeah I just think it's kind of interesting. To contemplate re where people's this raises an interesting thing right like it does ask people where their priorities are right and this is something that is really supposedly really important to them going church right right and their belief in God and one of the things that they're God requires them to be active participants in their religious community. I would assume that's why they go right right and because why, like honestly, I mean God bless your mother and everything I guess friends. Get you there right like I can. But. Those people I think are trying to earn points in heaven. Right sure. And, so anyway, where was my? My point was my point. That's that's the new memoir. That's the title of your memoir now. I. Don't lose it that often. So my point is that. You know when you look at. Where these where people are putting their priorities, right? They're having to do this balancing act between their health. And God right and they're and they're and him parole needs for most people they're proving. They're proving that they are actually rational actors. They're choosing their health their choosing the tangible. They're choosing what is right in front of them over what? I mean the Evangelical. Christians there, the Rangers in this in this game right there. The good ones because they're not letting some dumb disease getting the way. They're God demand of them, and they're going in there doing yeah, and if they died they, they go to heaven and God's. Right and I heard that I've heard that quote. In meet. Why haven't I in articles I've Read I've seen that quote where people are just like like. Yeah, you know like if I get. It gets God's will. God's will be done. You know and it's like. Oh. Yeah, it's pretty. It's pretty

Church Rangers Gung Ho Canadian Anglican Church American Enterprise Cova United States South Korea Diane
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"That finds sixty eight percent of Americans who are expecting a tax refund say it's important to their financial well being what about common payments for those who the good news among those who are and that's usually about thirty percent of the population good paying with cash or cash equivalents something like a Jack a bank transfer a debit card that's good because it suggests they have the money on hand I know nobody wants to the Iraqi that the end of the year but at least they've got the money for it only twelve percent of putting it on a credit card nine percent are going with an IRS payment plan if you don't have the money now I think the payment plans the better option interest rates are typically lower through the I. R. aspen they would be with your credit card company thanks Ted Ted Ross been industry analyst at creditcards dot com thirty minutes now after the hour on this morning America's first news what I your favorite things feel made for you your education should too university of Maryland global campus formerly university of Maryland University.

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

08:17 min | 2 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Hey, dave. Hey doing that other not deserve. What's up? Hey, so I'm a real estate guy got my license shortly after you did that was twenty two when I got my real estate license and have been in the business about fourteen years, heavy on the investment side. I'm at portfolio rental portfolio. That's about three point five million dollar net worth about a sixty percent equity position at it. And I did a calculation relatively new fan. And I appreciate all the stuff you're putting out there. And so I did a calculation to figure out what it would actually take. If I used all of the cash flow two point right at the debt, how long it would take to actually pay all of it off with came out about ten years and three months, but I guess my question is value in doing that versus value on continuing to use the cash flow to grow the portfolio, which today is basically what I've been doing. Okay. So you've got a top line asset base of three and a half million not net worth correct? Kotal value is three point five five equity is one point one three two. So you got fourteen fifteen properties right about there. Yeah. Okay. Cool. Good for you. Well done. Very well done. And you're you're seventy percent equity position. Meaning you only have thirty percent of in debt, so less than a million dollars in debt. No reversed sixty eight percent leverage. Oh, okay. So you don't have a ton of cash flow. It's about monthly after all expenses mortgages, you know, kept backs. Everything's around seventy seven hundred a month. That's not much. Okay. That's what I thought. I thought it was tight. I mean hundred months a lot of money, but not on three and a half million. It's not. So that's that's. Okay here. Here's the thing. You said your new all this. Here's what I went through. We had about four million dollars worth of real estate and owed about three on it. So we're in about seventy five percent ratio. Some of that percentage of that probably probably Mia that was on ninety notes because we were doing flips. Okay. This is back in the eighties way back. Okay. I was in my twenties I had grown that from nothing and just a few years. And so I'd leveraged into every bit of it, obviously. But I did goodbyes like you've done which gave me strong equity positions. And so, you know, I was at about the same LTV you're sitting at roughly and a little higher, but I but I had a high risk position. Because of the night, I notes and the flips which is actually what took me out. That's what broke me 'cause they banks called the notes on the ninety day notes Bank got sold and they freaked the new Bank freaked out when they looked over and saw kid in his twenties at a million dollars. And so the new guy freaked out, and that started a tumble that I couldn't recover from. And so what I learned from that process was a lot. Things of course. But as a real estate guy one real estate got another real estate guy. I learned that let me stop a second. Okay. In also got a finance degree and in the process of getting the finance degree. We were taught in other investments to to not measure risk investments with lower high risk investments with low risk investments. Apples to apples, meaning an example would be an aggressive growth stock mutual fund, which is much more volatile than a growth and income mutual fund. Okay. You wouldn't compare it? Making a twenty percent rate of return with a growth and income making ten percent rate of return apples to apples and say, oh, we're going to discount. We're not gonna consider risk. We're just gonna go with the twenty percent higher return. Because when you consider risk you equalize out those two. Funds the lower risk in the high risk. You have to mathematically put the risk it. And in that world, there's a way to mathematically insert risk. It's called a beta. And it's a statistical measure of risk the volatility of the hills and valleys if you chart it and all of that. Okay. So all of that to say is there's actually a math formula that you can use when comparing investments of that type because the beta is stated by the mutual fund company to volatility index and. Long story short you can adjust for risk. So you can compare a high risk investment with a low risk investment. Apples to apples does that make sense. Sure. Okay. Now having said that then when I went broken real estate business. I suddenly realized that in the real estate business which I grew up in. We are not taught risk. At all. We're just taught it's all leverage. And it's all good all the time. But common sense tells you the more leverage you have the higher leverage you are. Meaning if you had a ninety percent leverage position seventy sixty eight percent leverage position. You would be at a higher risk. Agreed. Right. But we don't adjust for that. Correct. And if you had a a one hundred percent paid for real estate portfolio, your risk would have dissipated like light years from where you are today. Agreed. Sure hip, and yet we're not taught to mathematically adjust for that all were taught to do is go. Let's take the cash flow by more real estate going that some more we do not adjust for the risk of leverage in the world that you and I were in. Okay. We're not taught that nobody does. And so we that leads us to a faulty perception that risk isn't there? And so we just go buy stuff on that. You would always take. I mean, what kind of fool wouldn't have dead on real estate? And we just go buy real estate. And that's what I did for years, and what I believe for years because I was not taught academically and no one in academics that I've ever found. I've never found any one who actually applies risk formula to the leverage issue in real estate. But it's there, we know. It's there from commonsense all of that babbling to say, I came to the conclusion, and I've actually run some pretty sophisticated math models outta Veld myself because I'm a math nerd that shows that paid for real estate will prosper, you a smaller portfolio paid for real estate will prosper you more than a large portfolio of leveraged real estate over the span of twenty years. Okay. And so I leverage guys nothing down guys all those guys that have gone broke. I knew a bunch of those guys back in the day. I don't know any of made it ten years. They all crashed within ten years. Like like super high leverage or not that guy. Okay. But you know, the nothing down crowd. You know what I'm talking about? Right. I mean in all fairness and disclosure. I started it with, you know, seventeen grand probably we've just rolled up the equity out excellent. The money wisely. But you know, it's all going right back into the same. Exactly. And and you know, if you look at seventy seven hundred flow, I want you got it's not that. Great, right. You don't have that much movement for the amount of money, you are controlling and manipulating every day. Also a side business. Think how you got there. I'm not going to be mad about it. I'm just glad you're there. Congratulations. You've done. Great. If I'm you. I'm going to dial down that risk for my long term stability. I would rather own less real estate that is working towards getting paid for. So I might cherry pick the portfolio keep the ones I really wanna hold twenty years, and some of these others that I'm not that thrilled about I might flip the equity out of those towards debt reduction. I'm not guilty. Other way, matter of fact, I know I would all of my real estate's painful and pay cash for all of it. And I got a punch. Hey, man. Thanks for the discussion. This is the Dave.

Mia Bank ten years million dollars twenty percent twenty years seventy sixty eight percent four million dollars seventy five percent five million dollar one hundred percent sixty eight percent seventy percent fourteen years hundred months
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on RJ Bell's Dream Preview

RJ Bell's Dream Preview

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on RJ Bell's Dream Preview

"Combined. Guys. I'll tell you sixty eight percent, I could be doing this. I'm thirty five years old. I could do this another thirty years, and I might not have another season where I hit sixty eight percent. And I would say the chances of that are probably less than fifty percent out of thirty. Reasons to have another year like I just add an football. So those are outliers keep keep in mind the whole goal here is fifty five percent. What is fifty five percent that allows you to bet and mitt and do a li- make a living out of this. You can not necessarily retire. If you don't have enough bankroll, but you can be one of those what three percent of all sports bettors that actually makes money in this. That's the goal. That's legitimate. Fifty five percent is good. It's not bad people. So again, and that's your weekly reminder in that on the hose that continue to think, you know, slightly above fifty percent, just isn't cutting it. Part of me wishes. We didn't have I mean, I love having what the success we had during football bud man, if we could have been maybe just a little slightly below. It might have kept bars. Yeah. The bar was said a little too high. And I'll for those of you that are new, you know, AJ's getting beat up here, and I feel for them because I was in his shoes a couple years ago. I was a new guy on the block Fezzan RJ. Everyone knows who they are. Yeah. I I went like I had a to in ten or on on best bets in college football. So it happens. And it's just one game. There's a randomness to it especially with a small sample size. Just because you go tended to doesn't make you the best handicapper in the world. If you go to intendant doesn't make you the worst foul along all season. And you know, when you have hundreds and hundreds of games as far as the sample size. Then you can add it up and come up with an opinion. But just judging us on a couple of best bets whether they win or lose. It's don't be overreacting that. So th that's my little PSA. Sorry. I went off script. They're a little bit any thoughts on that AJ. I'm sorry. No, I'm right there with you. It's frustrating for me. I don't like to lose either. And like I said I had to go deliver a big fat envelope. This morning myself. So when I lose trust me, if you're if you're losing on my picks, I'm losing to and had done feel good. And and I don't like, I I'm I am new to having you know, people on my picks like in such a public manner. And but I can think back in my host my co host here in Houston was telling me this every year. There's a run, you know, at some point where you're bad. And he reminded me do every year, you you finish in, you know, in in the mid to high fifties in college basketball, what are you worried about? But it is it, you know, when it's happening in a very public manner. It does sort of it does sort of throw you off a little bit messes with you a little. Yeah. Yeah. But I'll say this guys that the month that matters the most we are in that month. So if you win this month, I tell you this and this'll be the day, I die. I'd rather have a winning month of March than I winning month of February when it comes to college basketball because there's a lot more is co- coming with each passing week onto the sport of college. Who's particularly starting next week when conference tournament start so moving along here again, I was recapping it. So I went a little off script double like Mississippi State Tuesday night. Plus at least I didn't go off script for about an hour on like normal train podcasts turned into a four hour podcasts. Oh my goodness Tuesday night. And this is an AJ special here he requested this when he's got a strong opinion on Xavier at Butler will call Butler a home favourite right around four points. You like this one? What say you AJ?.

AJ football basketball mitt Houston Mississippi Butler Xavier sixty eight percent fifty five percent fifty percent Fifty five percent thirty five years three percent thirty years four hour
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Down low. He works on calcium pushed off, but what are they gonna say a block on Cal Scher and for Calcio? That's his fourth foul oil Meru we got away with one there. He clearly tried to create space with that left arm. Yeah. It's going to send me to the line for a one and one opportunity, and if you're Minnesota gotta stay aggressive on the officer. But more importantly got to get it done D on the defensive end. That's how Minnesota was able to get back into this thing in the second half and go on their run. They were getting stops in limiting Rutgers to one shot each possession. Four twenty eight to play on me at the line of sixty eight percent, free shoot a Rutgers five of nine this free. Throw is good. He has thirteen it's a four point gain. Fifty seven fifty three. Eugene Omer ROY out of Rex Dylan -tario Canada. Next gone is good all net fourteen for him. And it's a three point Minnesota lead. The gophers with the ball coffee against Mathis jobs over half court pass to the near side as we look at mcbrayer. That's the right side of the offensive in mcbrayer against McConnell, working left. Four coffey. Amir directing some traffic has a dribble and uses it. It's a screen from Otaru Johnson. It's another screen from Otaru instead rejects pivot symbol, bounces off his ankle and goes to Otaru seven to shoot Murphy, right-wing mcbrayer with four to shoot depre- with three to shoot works. His way in shot up off front rim. No good. Rebound McConnell for Rutgers rifling ahead to Mathis against toffee goes in lost his footing and a foul called on. Amir Coffey his second and to the line will be the Rutgers scarlet knights, but first a time out on the floor. To the line will be Mathis a sixty percent free throw shooter, and he has a chance to make it a one point lead..

Cal Scher Amir Coffey Minnesota Mathis Rutgers Otaru Johnson McConnell Otaru Rex Dylan Calcio Eugene Omer ROY gophers officer Canada Murphy sixty eight percent sixty percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Ad Rams loss recorded a forty four point nine and a sixty eight share in meter markets. Now, let's put this into some perspective. Please fifty percent of America was watching. I'm sorry. Forty five percent of America's watching sixty eight percent of the people that were watching TV had the Super Bowl on. So the ratings are gigantic. But that was the lowest in a decade in the second lowest of the decade was. Last year. It's the patriots. You know, what it is? It is patriots. People are tired of seeing the same team over and over and over again, that's interesting to me. But part of it is also that the ratings curve on everything going to is going to slowly I mean, they've been like I helium balloon floating up for years and years. I think the helium s- finally starting to wear off in the balloon is falling like the rest of television television. It's just because everybody can stream everything impinge watch everything. I mean. Yeah, that's just how it is. With the with the patriots constantly being there. It puts this predictable feel on the season. You no matter if you're in the AFC, it doesn't matter. The patriots are going to go, right? That's you have something. Incredible. You we have Patrick Mahomes guy. How much would have Powell homes Super Bowl that was the real? That's what everyone really wants. That's called the screw defense Super Bowl. Oh, yeah. That's the man. Exactly. That's the EA sports. Just let it fly ball fifty two to fifty four. I coming up next. We will we're doing a couple of things at once today. We are lamenting the loss of the Super Bowl. Plus, we will get you the latest on the MacIntosh involving Anthony Davis the New Orleans pelicans in the Los Angeles Lakers. The NBA trade deadline is Thursday. But I want to remind you supercops Lakers fifth row. Friday's going on this.

patriots Los Angeles Lakers America NBA AFC Anthony Davis Patrick Mahomes New Orleans sixty eight percent Forty five percent fifty percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on KTRH

"On the tens speaking sports. Alex bregman had elbow surgery. Not quite sure why he wanted to share all that with everybody. But he did. So if you want to check it out for yourself, we have Alex bregman, elbow surgery, KTAR, H dot com. Houston's morning news. Also have another story about our friends in Canada, Canadian air traffic controllers sending pizza across the border. Why assume ordering from across the border pizza in the US for some of our air. Traffic controllers are doing extra duty and doing it without pay at least temporarily without pay. Also, we have another story that I want to share with you. The good news and the bad news. I think this woman is rapidly becoming a poster child for the ignorance that exists when it comes to politics. The majority of American millennials identify themselves. Now is socialist. That's the bad news. The good news is sixty eight percent of them have no idea. What socialism is they can't define it. Sixty eight percents. And what are those? I would consider to be Alexandria Cossio Cortes who was making a comparison miracle. She was on with Anderson Cooper talking about socialism, and he Astor when you know, whether or not you didn't fly with the Soviet Union and Cuban Venezuelan Cambodia in Poland and North Korea and China as far as socialist goes. And she said, no, of course, not the brand. I like is what they have in the United Kingdom and Norway Finland and Sweden. Well, the Brits and the Nordics public policies may include things like government providing health care, but they do not resemble socialism in most any other form, and she doesn't seem to recognize that seven forty now..

Alex bregman Alexandria Cossio Cortes Anderson Cooper Nordics Soviet Union US Houston Canada Cambodia United Kingdom North Korea Sweden China Norway Finland Poland sixty eight percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:52 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"So there's been a lot of talk about threats to to american democracy this summer but it turns out americans have very different ideas about what those threats might be a new survey suggests that for some the big threats include the increasing political power of the very rich to control government and foreign governments interfering with elections but others are more concerned about media bias than russian election meddling the new survey comes from the atlantic and the public religion research institute and suggests that americans are now more than more divided than ever so joining me to discuss this from washington is robert jones he's the ceo of the public religion research institute who administered the survey robert jones good to have you thanks for joining us hi thanks anthony also with us from washington atlantic reporter imigran whose article about the survey results is out today immigration good to have you thank you for joining us thanks for having me so let me start with you robert what's the biggest takeaway from this poll that you'd like to highlight well i do think the divisions in the country that are not just political they're also racial is one of the things that just stands out in particular when we're looking at really threats to our democracy in threats to our voting system in particular and you know the bridge finding from the conversations you've been having is a question about outside interference by foreign governments now overall it looks like there's only forty five percent of the country that says this is a major problem with our election system but if you look under the hood a little bit that forty five percent goes in two very different ways politically so only twenty two percent of republicans but sixty eight percent of democrats say this is a major problem so on this topic and i should be cleared this survey was in the field prior to the the press conference yesterday so this is where the dial was set prior to this conversation but that's a nearly fifty percentage point gap between republicans and democrats on their perceptions of how big a problem mm outside interference by foreign governments in our electoral system is and that carries over to a number of other things you mentioned media bias and influence a wealthy individuals and here again the two political parties are really mirror images of one one another on the influence of wealthy individuals and corporations eight and ten democrats but only four in ten republicans say that's a major problem but when you get to media bias against certain candidates it completely flips only about four in ten democrats but about eight and ten republicans and eight and ten white evangelical protestants by the way also say that media buys is a major problems we have this just real divide in in the country so essentially groups of people will be looking at the exact same set of facts but come to very very different conclusions yeah that's right i think that is one of the real challenges here you know you think about i mean democracies are kind of fragile things and they depend on at least a baseline of consensus on some basic facts and and really the arguments are only productive when they are really working from at least a baseline set of understandings and i think one of the real worries in threats here is that on many many of these very important issues americans whether they're democrats or republicans or whether they're white or african american are seeing two very different realities so evergreen let me come to you and tell me about your article which is out this morning if i have that correct how did your reporting supplement this survey's findings give us a sense so what we see in this survey are two very different stories about the state of american democracy in general sense of pessimism perhaps from both republicans and democrats conservative liberal but more broadly just a different sense of what's ailing us as.

forty five percent sixty eight percent twenty two percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"The bible among white democrats that number rises to sixty eight percent holy mol in this creates a big issue for them because a mum black and hispanic democrats the that it's totally flipped the majority of them believe in a biblical god and so you're seeing much greater similarities on questions of religious belief with republicans black and hispanic democrats and republicans publicans and you're seeing certain cracks in the democrat electoral coalition i think a lot of that is due to this base issue of god you see the amy barrett floating nomination has really drawn this point home i don't know if you saw today in the daily beast there was a big expose on leonard leo who is the head of the federal society they've put all those great originalist judge and it was called the secrets of leonard leo fi michael j j michaelson and do you know what the secret is he's a catholic oh my your joke that's the secret and it really do dead serious and by the way i don't know which is more hilarious in this article the outright errors like just factual errors about christianity and catholicism worthy the insinuation that basic elements of philosophy the allergy or crazy and bizarre but this is how i mean you've got to remember that the press is a wing of the democrat party by this is like in the one thousand nine sixties they did this to kennedy you know this anticatholicism this is what you're getting he writes leonard's faith is paramount to him carter said when he traveled staff members had to find him a church near where he was staying so he could go to mass every del my to mass this is terrible just a mass every day every imagine that next next you'll find out.

leonard leo j michaelson democrat party carter amy barrett kennedy sixty eight percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

"Number five so in courage guests to leave reviews on your google my business listing so if i'm little note from bright local sixty eight percent of people left review after local business ask them to imagine that asking you shower seve's people people do what you ask them to do unless my ten year olds eight percent of them yeah yeah anytime you can influence someone by but you should take that opportunity it's the same the one of the reasons face because become so popular is it does a really good job of giving people clear instructions someone to do like people given the opportunity they're gonna do it so yeah definitely it doesn't doesn't hurt and it doesn't have to necessarily be with your mouth hole it can be in your in your emails in any kind of for them yeah so definitely encourage people to ask what what's the worst is going to happen then not gonna leave her review while they probably wouldn't have done anyway there's no there's not a person on this planet that is intending the lever of you and they like all can you believe your data to them they just the lever of now absolately knocking to leave her view if someone does leave a review leave a response you know usually prompt response neo kind of shows that you place value in what your guests thinking if it's a good review of a thank you helps or yeah it's a negative review respond that you're you're fixing your work and what are you doing what you're doing to fix it show that you cash that you're aware issue job at u treating the root cool is not the symptom in you know be hospitable i think that's the thing google reviews if you look over the last twelve months have accelerated a ton like if you look at the volume it used to pale in comparison to tripadvisor tripadvisor was you know many many times the number of us that the google is getting but we've clients now where they're getting more of us on google than they aren't providing now so don't don't look at this anymore as a secondary marketplace for reviews this is right up there with tripadvisor and you should treat it as such and that you know we're not sure we do that goes on with google completely but we pretty certain that the velocity of reviews a minimum if not the quality reviews has some kind of impact on visibility on such engines right whether that's just on the local sadhil ganic as well there's a lot of debate about that but the mole reviews you get on google it's it's gonna benefit your business either way so you definitely want to not take a onesizefitsall approach push everyone that you're asking reviews ful tripadvisor i would say that google if it's not already as important as revise i think is going to be in the next year or two so you should definitely pay it the attention it deserves number six so adding high quality photos and video to your listing can only be benefit to you and your business so giving potential guests and inside look at your.

google sixty eight percent eight percent twelve months ten year
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Pull Up with CJ McCollum

Pull Up with CJ McCollum

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Pull Up with CJ McCollum

"Been there since since the beginning of time and i seen this stat on synergy it said over the last ten over the ten games since the start of the western conference finals kevin during has shot an e percentage of fifty percent on isolation sixty eight percent and pick and roll and seventy four percent on spot oh so that kinda shows you know the three the three phases of the game is salaciously pick and roll spot up he's able to dominate in every facet whether that'd be mid range with it i'd be three pointers with it i begin to the basket or the free throw line he literally did everything kinda showed everyone kind of what he said it's easy to be good on a bad team around bad players it's hard to be great on a great team full of great players and some people argue that that's not true but i think you know there's there's positives and negatives to that statement because he's right everybody can't be great on a great team it's it's obvious and some players you know are empowered by teammates around them so they looked better in their roles some role player look better obviously develop mcgee's guy who looks unbelievable broke the warriors franchise record for field goal percentage in a postseason ended and finals so you kind of see how you're able to elevate other players but he's one of the reasons why the players are great he's able to elevate steffi's able to elevate klay he's able to elevate role players iggy and make some of those guys a little bit better and they also empower him and allow him to get more one on one situations allow him to get more catch and shoot opportunities and i think it's kind of allow for his game become full circle and although i wasn't happy with the move that he made he had a right to make it he was a free agent he had to do what's best for his brennan his family and.

mcgee steffi klay seventy four percent sixty eight percent fifty percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"I hate my job welcome to about sixty eight percent of americans so why do you hate your job well mainly if because this half my only son's life okay what do you want to do do you have any idea what you would like to be doing if i could snap my fingers and give you the job yes i like to teach school and coach the ball okay what do you do right now i have a your truck driver okay do you have do you have your degree because being a teacher will require a degree that's the problem i have two degrees but made a one of marin education what are the two degrees a athlete training sports medicine degree and i have a criminal justice degree interesting why teacher why teacher why do you want to be a teacher fun has some special education needs and i've interacted with those kids and positive our special education director said that she thought i'd make it special education teacher and well i'd love to pursue the pat the main thing is i won't be home that's the issue so stop right there at phone that's one of the issue i get it i think it's the issue your truck driver and you're missing half of your son's life that's the show this is apple now that you've got you know i was going to quit when he was thirty and we said okay i'll.

director apple two degrees sixty eight percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Dunc'd On Basketball Podcast

"And a you just that's just not the mindset of guys to take that kind of a deal even if i think a lot of them probably should one other note i wanna make with with actually to other notes on winslow shooting one is despite the improvement in his mechanics and everything from 3 his freethrow percentage has not gone up he was set sixty eight percent his rookie year 62 and then this year he's at sixty three so not a huge upgrade there and do you want to guess what he's shooting on deep twos this year he shoot doesn't take money from so it is a definitely a small sample size issue but the numbers striking all it's got to be like under 25 percent because of an even at the rim shooting over fifty percent so he's got to be something so bad to get him touted up forty one percent unto oh it's half of that 25 percent it's twelve man here and not in that and not exactly what outta 8 it might be something like that because he only ten percent of his shot attempts have been from deep doo but so you kinda sit there and you're okay guy shooting 44 percent from 3 he's not taken that many attempts but he's shooting twelve percent from long too maybe there is a little adjustment that's going to happen you we'll get to the indiana pacers momentarily but first this from our friends at blue apron with the playoffs coming up a especially if these double headers in the evenings doing the twitter nba show don't have a ton of time but blue apron is still something worth it making time for they now offer twelve new recipes each week it and what i like to do is get the fourperson recipes make a ton of food and then i've got leftovers it as well it's great for me in the evenings when are watching is i'll make it during the day for lunch and then can have some more at dinner some of the things that they're got this week quick bucatini with broccoli in pechory cheese and italian style shrimp and sweet pepper blue apron is a.

indiana pacers winslow twitter nba 25 percent sixty eight percent forty one percent twelve percent fifty percent ten percent 44 percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Sixty eight percent of the what he had said yes does the world need more goose gossage is fifty nine percent of the audience said yes vic lane johnson didn't tedy bruschi he defied fun different way did you say ninety eight percent there's a record hi i was closed the ninety seven percent of the earth now you have is this blamed johnson hinted hebrews do you have a different definition for what is what is appearing to be charitable while not actually contributing to charity the best of both worlds a deadbug greg go the endorsed ido either coating it lowers the by saying that the best of both worlds the is is appearing to be charitable instead of actually being charitable quilt sixty eight percent of the audience also endorses it man the greg have the look out see it see music fact there 94 percent of the the said yes and then we have a was today's big a a lot of votes already of course you guys we'll wait for that question all day yes is the audiences and weird our audience is weird because uh they will arrive places quickly mike what are we doing with the skills competition we decided that we're going to do something on the internet with the skills competition where we're going to do a show around the basketball skills competence will have an announcement on that shortly and i'm sorry my apologies off the poll question up hell the sun's dillon metre there is no real answer for that know i'm so one would it be those saturday this saturday if we were doing it if we're doing it when we have our announcement shortly hey what do we want greg cody to be a part of it he does not want to be a part of the medical first one what so well one up when is try to get i.

johnson greg greg cody tedy bruschi ninety eight percent ninety seven percent Sixty eight percent sixty eight percent fifty nine percent 94 percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Sixty eight percent of the what he had said yes does the world need more goose gossage is fifty nine percent of the audience said yes vic lane johnson didn't tedy bruschi he defied fun different way did you say ninety eight percent there's a record hi i was closed the ninety seven percent of the earth now you have is this blamed johnson hinted hebrews do you have a different definition for what is what is appearing to be charitable while not actually contributing to charity the best of both worlds a deadbug greg go the endorsed ido either coating it lowers the by saying that the best of both worlds the is is appearing to be charitable instead of actually being charitable quilt sixty eight percent of the audience also endorses it man the greg have the look out see it see music fact there 94 percent of the the said yes and then we have a was today's big a a lot of votes already of course you guys we'll wait for that question all day yes is the audiences and weird our audience is weird because uh they will arrive places quickly mike what are we doing with the skills competition we decided that we're going to do something on the internet with the skills competition where we're going to do a show around the basketball skills competence will have an announcement on that shortly and i'm sorry my apologies off the poll question up hell the sun's dillon metre there is no real answer for that know i'm so one would it be those saturday this saturday if we were doing it if we're doing it when we have our announcement shortly hey what do we want greg cody to be a part of it he does not want to be a part of the medical first one what so well one up when is try to get i.

johnson greg greg cody tedy bruschi ninety eight percent ninety seven percent Sixty eight percent sixty eight percent fifty nine percent 94 percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

The West Wing Weekly

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on The West Wing Weekly

"I ever ever need dear stru and this brings us to the other great refrain in the episode sixty eight percent of respondents think rehana too much and foreign aid 59 percent he managed to keep saying it he's harping on it we don't find out why until he finally explains it to you what his problem is with the statistic but throughout the episode you seem to be just in your shot when he's just when he's saying at one point in fact will even says were you talk in the majors right there's a really interesting argument that comes later in the episode from danny that kind of again sometimes then he will have these moments where he'll visit key hands cj the playbook that would work does he should be doing this instead of this we cut farm assistance and colombia every single crop we develop was replaced with cocaine we cut aid for primary education in northwest pakistan and egypt the kids went to madrassas why were you making a case the republican senators are bad on drugs and bad on national security why are democrats always so bum fossil the thing that's interesting and compelling but also kind of cynical about dini's argument is that the only way this is going to work is if you steer away from the idea of foreign aid is something that is good you know that there is a moral than thirty yet drain ethics from the conversation and make it about partisan politics right and i wondered if that is true if that is in fact what it.

colombia cocaine pakistan dini danny egypt sixty eight percent 59 percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Lists republicans take the harshest view they say sixty eight percent have a less favourable view of the media compared to fifty four percent the democrats four out of ten republicans say that reports painting politicians in a negative light should always be deemed as fake news that's alarming there is commercial element to this too there is money because actually in this present climate cnn's audiences for example there are audiences are up the advertising revenue is up they are trying to market ties the unpopularity of donald trump among certain quarters does that leave their widening their readership are they reaching pockets of republican supported midwest america no they're not borabora liberals think the constitution is under threat we must subscribe and so you have people living ever more in an echo chamber of fewer and fewer americans a hearing anything other than what they already believe john so pull reporting and as some more news on the explosive book far and fury written by michael wolff about donald trump's white house i promise this isn't fake the book is going to be made into a television series five and fury depicts a chaotic administration and president trump has condemned it as being full of made up stories written by totalling zone and as it from us for now but vow will have an updated version of the global news podcast for you later and as we record this one the world's media currently leaping upon a very lovely story from the papal visits to south america but francis has conducted a wedding on board his plane marrying two flight attendants i have tweeted a picture of the happy couple and the next podcast will have some more on that story because nothing booms a wizened journalistic old hot like a good wedding if you want to comment on this podcast all the topics covered in it deeply sent an email the address is global podcast bbc don't cuddled uk or tweet me using the hashtag lebanese needs polled i'm jackie leonard until next time byebye.

cnn advertising revenue donald trump midwest michael wolff president south america francis jackie leonard john sixty eight percent fifty four percent
"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"sixty eight percent" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Lists republicans take the harshest view they say sixty eight percent have a less favourable view of the media compared to fifty four percent the democrats four out of ten republicans say that reports painting politicians in a negative light should always be deemed as fake news that's alarming there is commercial element to this too there is money because actually in this present climate cnn's audiences for example there are audiences are up the advertising revenue is up they are trying to market ties the unpopularity of donald trump among certain quarters does that leave their widening their readership are they reaching pockets of republican supported midwest america no they're not borabora liberals think the constitution is under threat we must subscribe and so you have people living ever more in an echo chamber of fewer and fewer americans a hearing anything other than what they already believe john so pull reporting and as some more news on the explosive book far and fury written by michael wolff about donald trump's white house i promise this isn't fake the book is going to be made into a television series five and fury depicts a chaotic administration and president trump has condemned it as being full of made up stories written by totalling zone and as it from us for now but vow will have an updated version of the global news podcast for you later and as we record this one the world's media currently leaping upon a very lovely story from the papal visits to south america but francis has conducted a wedding on board his plane marrying two flight attendants i have tweeted a picture of the happy couple and the next podcast will have some more on that story because nothing booms a wizened journalistic old hot like a good wedding if you want to comment on this podcast all the topics covered in it deeply sent an email the address is global podcast bbc don't cuddled uk or tweet me using the hashtag lebanese needs polled i'm jackie leonard until next time byebye.

cnn advertising revenue donald trump midwest michael wolff president south america francis jackie leonard john sixty eight percent fifty four percent