35 Burst results for "Sixteen Years"

Gwyneth Paltrow celebrates turning 48 by posing in her 'birthday suit'

Mojo In The Morning

00:42 sec | 1 d ago

Gwyneth Paltrow celebrates turning 48 by posing in her 'birthday suit'

"Gwyneth paltrow celebrated turning forty eight by being naked. The actress posted an instagram photo yesterday in the nude one, hundred percent naked posing beneath his beautiful tree she wrote in the caption in nothing but my birthday suit today. Thank you so much for all of the birthday wishes and thank you to goop insanely amazing brand new body butter for making me think I can still get my kit off. Her sixteen year old daughter Apple reacted in the comments ratings simply mom in all capital letters which due to my dad when he does something that embarrasses me gwen responded with some laughing emojis which apple replied you are killing it though

Gwyneth Paltrow Apple Gwen
Millie Bobby Brown on her role as a young detective in 'Enola Holmes'

The Big Ticket with Marc Malkin

03:23 min | 6 d ago

Millie Bobby Brown on her role as a young detective in 'Enola Holmes'

"People know Millie Bobby Brown for her work eleven on stranger things. But now the sixteen year old may have launched a new movie franchise round stars as Shrunk, homes little sister in a nola homes. The film is based on a series of books by Nancy Springer Nola homes also marks Brown's producing debut variety film critic Peter Praised Brown's performance in his recent review of the movie comparing her to a young cure nightly in pride and prejudice I talked to Brown via zoom from our home in Atlanta. How are you? Up and very good. Just quarantining hoping my dogs do not bark. Don't here too. So you're good. How are you doing in quarantine? How have you been keeping saying? I mean just staying healthy in Finding creative outlets a been learning new things. Talk, art senior on Tiktok. Exactly. I just been doing. I've just been trying out new things unlike because there's nothing else to do and it's a great time to just. Focus on your style focus on things. Are Important to you. So for me on definitely focusing more on own news and things like that. Yeah it's really fun. So a known homes such a fun movie so much fun. Br you familiar with the books were you familiar with the series at all? Yes. No I read. So I read the book a few years that with my own page, she read it before I did and then told me to read it and So I was familiar with the I definitely was I knew the story I'm what I, what I also knew that I wanted to play. So I kind of like. How do we get this to happen my dad? WHO's incredibly pus Vera Vera and he wanted to make this time to lives, which is a thing and he. You know he found studio for found legendary we then found a ride to respond our director and it was it was amazing. It was it happened relatively Fox for you know a Hollywood, don't like that. What do you like about a Nola? What I like Batman alleged incredibly braves She has the will to be vulnerable hush humorous funny She kind of a ends gender gnome she's not a great address. She's UNAPOLOGETICALLY herself and I. Love I. Love that about Ho what did you learn about yourself playing her? Island in alone is a good time to find just. You know I was I. Think. In edges right now is it's it's a challenging time because you get your afraid that. To be alone, you're afraid to be lonely it's not nice to be lonely but. Still whilst illness I realized that actually the facts that she is alone, it helped to find herself and so you don't need those of people around you to keep you happy. You can make yourself happy and that's what I land will thumbing this film Definitely Quarantine has helped me focus more on that. I've definitely.

Peter Praised Brown Nancy Springer Nola Nola Batman Vera Vera Atlanta HO Tiktok Braves Director FOX Hollywood
Queen Afua Discusses Coronavirus, Grief, & 21 Day Detox

On One with Angela Rye

05:53 min | Last week

Queen Afua Discusses Coronavirus, Grief, & 21 Day Detox

"Welcome everyone. This is another edition of on one with Angela Rye as a masterclass with the Queen Herself Queen. Food. Thank you so much for being with me and invited me to your lovely space in Q.. So Much I. Just Love You love your work. So honored to be with you today. Thank you. I'm honored to be with you and just for making this time given all this going on corona virus forest fires. Everything else and here I am sitting with you seven days into mind. Your details. So let's talk a little bit about your journey. How you kind of came into this space I have my heel I sell books, and here am my sacred woman book here. You aren't expert on all things holistic wellness and healing. Can you talk to me a little bit about how you started your own journey? Well, my journey is what keeps me inspired to help others when I was sixteen years of age. I had chronic asthma. And ECZEMA from head to toe at rightous had bedridden PMS. Headaches I was as fell. Sick and tired of being sick and tired know what to do you know how to change it. And the doctor told my mother. Lived in a glass house, he's alert to every. That's all he had me and I had my biweekly objections to just manage. So I know by the time out of East in my twenties walking with the respirator. You know that's helped boggling my lungs were. And there was no way to get out of less I, shifted a whole nother new life. Well, I was invited to healing mistreat that changed my entire everything where was it? It was upstate New York, right? The first time I've ever been on retreat I was a mediator, a junk food eater everything's toxic I was eating right out of ignorance and so when I go in this retreat. The bus open the cartilage. The grass, the trees there should be a friends, but it will my image toxin. So then the ASS kicked in and getting off the bus and I started exe- scratching and weasing and left my medication home and I wouldn't so the cafeteria to put down my bags and I ask the first spiritual question ever. Was Am I. Going to do I'm out here with strangers and I was in a panic but I got my first message from my invoice. Grapefruits Lemons and oranges. Okay that's formula later on I found out and I had. T and that day that's all I had water. In, the midst of the asthma me quietly in this state I heard this loud voices wonderful man who's talking about herbs and the healing the nation. A master heartless at that time about fifty years. and. He talked about healing testimonies in miracles happen for people who did the herbs and took a natural lifestyle. Well I. Sat down that Nice still wheezing scratching I didn't hear anyone I didn't remember the giving presentation anything I was caught up. But that night, there was a fireplace, the fires going. It's come into my lungs not knowing a fellow sitting up because as Mac down you love to collapse. Everybody else was in their big I. was front of the Fireplace on the Sofa like now. That next morning I had my first detox I didn't d tops. Bathroom for about an hour music is drained out of my nose. Some came out of my eyes some came from my chest on my throat out of my mouth. And then all of a sudden the asthma stopped. and. The red. White of my eyes it's. Stopped where and then the itching stopped, it was A. Tornado that hit me and then it was a calm day. After that happened I said, wait a minute what's going on there must be some relationship. To what I'm eating and if I'm going to get well, I'm going to be sick. And I realized that I had the power at that moment to change my life. Dazzling never came back. I'm in my sixties. came. Back. And I picked up a book Dick Gregory cooking with Mother Nature. He became my mentor to his book. Took on his family nine children they didn't know me but I knew them. Went home. With membrane the next day the next two days now of a sudden. People were talking about algae to herb. War. Using Medicine Meditation Yoga often that I live now and teach others it was all new to me. When I went home, I went cold Turkey I didn't go through transition I didn't go from one level. I just went all that's called the detailer not begin. And soul debt was the shift, and then shortly after I got home twenty, one day detox. And Twenty one day. For the last two years. And then became certified opened up a censored life continued and the asthma the allergies left the Eczema left the PM less was a shock that live took two months no more pain and I was in the President I. saw my mind shifted to my thinking. I was very introverted. I didn't talk a lot but I was an artist. I was dancing a dance off to sing and that's what I'm wanting to do. But this he'll got caught quote me and I got caught up in. Yeah and that's what I do now.

Asthma Dick Gregory Eczema Angela Rye Headaches New York Rightous Allergies MAC President Trump The Detailer
A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

WSJ Tech News Briefing

06:11 min | 2 weeks ago

A Closer Look at Sundar Pichai: From Middle Class Indian Upbringing to Google's Head Honcho

"Google and its parent company alphabet on the precipice of several major challenges regulators are expected to file antitrust lawsuits as early as this month and other example some faith company isn't as innovative as it used to be. A CEO of alphabet sooner Pechanga will play a key role in how the company navigates the headwinds, and while Pichai, is not nearly as in the spotlight as the other tech leaders. He's already had a long history Google, and by taking a look back, we can try and get some clues about how he might move the company forward a reporter Copeland joins us with an inside look rob. Thanks for joining me. Thank you. So, at the tech hearing before the House antitrust subcommittee earlier, this year Pichai himself as an immigrant sort of the picture of the American dream. And wonder if you could start by telling us more about the Chinese upbringing shore so Definitely outlier in many ways in Silicon Valley perhaps the most famous way that he stands out is that he was born in. India. So he grew up middle-class for India but not necessarily add western standards. He famously talks about growing up and getting in his first. Rotary phone. He is in such an older guy that the technology was just a lot less developed there. So he speaks frequently about the connection that he feels to technology and the knowledge that new technology can really change someone's life. So pettah eventually came to the US for Grad School. How do you find his Google? He worked relatively ordinary corp jobs until he joined Google right after its IPO google was not the Google that it is today it really was just a search engine. Quickly impresses people for his ability to one build consensus, which is true to this day, but also get the job done his first major job at Google. toolbar product. So before there was chrome there actually was an add on on your browser to search google. So his job was to convince companies like Dell when they sold you a laptop to have an automatic google search bar on there. So he's moved through the ranks since then becoming CEO of Google and then last year taking over as alphabet. CEO How did he make his way up the ladder? What's so remarkable is he's been at Google for sixteen years and we even though we're the Wall Street Journal have never done a full profile of him. So a big part of my task for the last few months was really unpacking who he is and how he got to this position and what really emerges is that Google was a place and still is a place with big personalities people who scream at each other people who say we should bet the farm on this or that and what sooner sort of did. was stay in the background, but he was also very careful that whatever he did it worked starting with toolbar but that extends to chrome the browser which he co lead and is now by far the most used web browser one of the big reveals of this reporting for me was that he's a very strategic person. It's not an accident that he stayed in the background for instance, someone who used to report to him. Told me early on in a meeting with with Larry? Page. who was CEO of Google before soon Dr Sooner made sure that they never disagreed in front of Larry. He really didn't want anyone to see any cracks and this also emerges in a lot of the people I spoke to some of whom sooner himself suggested that I speak to. But then when I got on the phone with them, they didn't seem to know him personally well. So he he keeps it very close to the vest. So it sounds like he's pretty deft at navigating the company politics now that he's in the top spot. What's he known for as a leader? So to a man to a woman ever and I spoke to said that sooner has a tendency in the middle of meetings to stand up and begin pacing in the middle of your presentation. He won't say anything necessarily sign that he likes or doesn't like it. It's just signed that he's thinking. So you can imagine people have spent weeks preparing for the CEO and he leaps up in the middle just starts pacing it can be quite disarming frankly this comes back to the criticism. Of Soon Dr to standing up in the middle of meeting and pacing as you think is not necessarily your traditional hey drive the car forward leadership. There's a big knock at Google today it's that and this comes from investors analysts even some executives of the company it's that the company is pretty much operating on autopilot. It makes almost all of its money from online advertising and you don't really have to do much besides sit there and the money comes in adding an extra add to youtube isn't exactly a high level. Decision. So the criticism is that sooner hasn't necessarily made the big move to position Google for the next decade on the other hand. When you have such a head start that Google has just not messing up is a billion dollar proposition. And what about as a coworker? What's he known for that? The best thing that's has going for him is that people genuinely like him in fact, one of his deputies Caesar. Gupta told me he loved sooner Pichai. He said the reason I stayed at Google this long as because of Dr He's someone that I trust. He moved to Jakarta because soon are asked him to. People. Say in this world where everyone is obsessed with Silicon Valley with what is happening in Menlo Park and Palo Alto and San Francisco that soon Dr a truly global outlook that he cares for instance, about Google pay in India where there are many multiples number of people using payment products in there are in the US. But tacitus surly had as much investment and one of the really fun things that is in the story is he's very much a creature of habit. You can imagine your CEO of of Alphabet you're traveling the world whenever he's in Korea he goes to the same burrito place an orders, the same Veggie Burrito. And in this world of he's hard-driving CEOS who appear in TMZ or go through high profile divorces. Everyone says that sooner Chai's legitimately just a kind nice guy.

Google CEO Pichai India Silicon Valley United States Larry Tacitus Jakarta Dell Wall Street Journal Copeland Reporter Caesar Grad School Korea Pettah
20 new sexual assault counts filed against adult film actor

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | Last month

20 new sexual assault counts filed against adult film actor

"I think this phone stores facing more serious new charges two months after being charged with the rape of three women in the sexual assault of another Ron Jeremy has been stocked with nearly two dozen more allegations authorities in Los Angeles have filed twenty new counts of rape or sexual assault against him the charges involve twelve women and a teenage girl the new accounts spent sixteen years from two thousand four to January of this year Jeremy has been held in jail on six point six million dollars bail since June he has pleaded not guilty to the new charges as he had to leave earlier allegations I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Rape Assault Ron Jeremy Los Angeles Oscar Wells Gabriel
Why Does Your Business Exist? with Jimmy Mellado

The EntreLeadership Podcast

05:00 min | Last month

Why Does Your Business Exist? with Jimmy Mellado

"In business and leadership everybody's talking about purpose vision mission goals you know all that stuff sounds fancy, right? We know enough to know we need this stuff but what the heck is it especially purpose. This idea of purpose can feel kind of philosophical or mystical. I'm GonNa tell you though it's not guys. It's the reason you exist and if you don't have one you're screwed. From the Ramsey network, this is the entree leadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves their teams and the Prophets I'm your host Daniel Tardy today. My guest is Jimmy Mulatto. Jimmy's been a part of a successful startup. He's an Olympic athlete and today he's the CEO of Compassion International. He leads a team of over three thousand employees and over thirty five countries. Talk about a guy who understands why you have to have direction a goal passion fire a purpose. And for Jimmy. Figuring out his purpose started at a really young age. There were some real strong themes early early in life than I immediately think back of Nicaragua. says. A little boy was born outside the United States grew up in six different countries. I'm one generation away from poverty. My mom knows what it's like to keep a dirt floor clean daughter migrant farmers on the Mexico US border, Mexican culture but my dad and her married and they were adventurer. So they move forty one times in sixty two years of marriage. And I was in six countries before celebrating my first birthday grew up and seven. So fascinating and I love the my childhood. But in in nineteen seventy, two, I was living in Nicaragua and third grade and I watched the Berlin Olympics and something happened and I said I WANNA be a part of the Olympic movement and that started you know sixteen years of training and working and dedicating myself to getting just developing the skill, the craft, and all these different events was a generalist I wasn't a specialist I just loved all the events and the decathlon fit me. Purpose that you had loved to be a part of the Olympics that drove me for sixteen years until seeing that that vision realized and that's just one area and purpose can emerge in different areas of life. You have an epiphany have calling you have a transformative moment or something traumatic happens, and then all sudden this energy inside of you wells up you wanNA make a difference. You want to make an impact somewhere. That's the birth. Of purpose it could be purpose for life. Yeah. But everybody's looking for purpose, but it could be purpose for. An organization every organizations dying to have real purpose defined it. You know a lot of times purpose. I know in my story a lot a lot of businesses we work with it starts out as as something closer to survival or just pay the bills. You know you're not really thinking about this big impact. You'RE GONNA make on the universe it's almost like, yeah, that's for smart people. I just got to get this thing off the ground. Is it always that way or the big organizations that really make a difference do they know from the beginning like this is why they're gonNA EXIST Well I mean I don't know for certain but from my experience, it's always been that way for me. When you're starting something, it's fragile. It's not defined. It's just got energy and you don't know where that energy is actually going to go my first year leading a startup organization the Willow Creek Association, which is a training leadership training organization that was started in thousand ninety two when I was a part of that as a six employees, we lost a quarter million dollars at first. Year and our very existence was threatened. So our immediate like right here purpose was survive another year survive another day survive another payroll. That's the real visceral reality of startups and and they're all consuming. But that more closer in purpose it really does always have to be in the context of a longer longer-term purpose and I will say this it's not always clear. It's not always clear what that longer term purposes when you're a startup situation, you've got some that created there was the sense. That hey, we want to help churches thrive. So the Willow Creek Association got created but then how does that look? What's the priority? What's the focus? What's the strategy? How are we gonNA do that and how are we going to do that in a sustainable way? So all those questions get answered it takes time to answer them and in the meantime you gotta survive. Yes. It seems like you're saying it's not an exercise you do at a retreat it's more a process that you. Refine. As you're figuring out what you're about and you're experimenting with the marketplace Senate, it's evolving to some degree. Absolutely no doubt about it. Net actual real life experience is speaking into how that purpose will get crystallized and become clear over time and it will if you keep pursuing it,

Jimmy Mulatto Willow Creek Association United States Olympics Daniel Tardy Nicaragua Ramsey Network Jimmy Compassion International Mexico Senate Nicaragua. Berlin
‘Resident Evil’ Live-Action Series Ordered at Netflix

Gaming Ride Home

01:47 min | Last month

‘Resident Evil’ Live-Action Series Ordered at Netflix

"A resident evil show, it's coming to net. Flix. NETFLIX's has another video game show to add to its weirdly growing video game TV show roster with the announcement that a resident evil show is in the works, the twitter account and on Netflix which shares all of Netflix's official announcements shared a picture of a script titled Resident Evil Episode One. Oh one welcome to new raccoon city. The accompanying tweet reads when the West kids moved to new raccoon city the secrets they uncover might just be the end of everything resident evil A. New Live action series based on Cap comes legendary survival horror franchise is coming to Netflix something about the phrasing of the whisker kids just makes it feel like it's going to be a kid show. I don't think it is, but it just feels like it's going to be like an animated spinoff or something following the whisker kids. Bradley Russell did some additional reporting on the show for games radar and wrote as per Netflix's the resident evil series will on two timelines and the. First Time Line fourteen year old sisters, jade and billy whisker are moved to raccoon city a manufactured corporate town forced on them right as adolescence is in full swing but the more time they spend there, the more they come to realize that the town is more than it seems and their father may be concealing dark secrets secrets that could destroy the world. The second time line has a serious time jump sixteen years into the future and with a whole lot more zombies on. The scene, there are less than fifteen million people on. Earth. Reads the synopsis of the Second Time Line and more than six billion monsters, people and animals infected with the virus. Jade thirty struggles to survive in this new world while the secrets from her past about her sister, her father and herself continue to haunt her

Netflix Billy Whisker Bradley Russell Jade Twitter CAP Official
HE HAD TO BE SHOWN

Big Book Podcast

04:38 min | Last month

HE HAD TO BE SHOWN

"Who is convinced against his will is of the same opinion still. But not this man. I was the oldest of three children and my father was an alcoholic. One of the earliest memories that I have is of a bottle sitting on his desk with skull and crossbones and marked poison. At that time as I remember he had promised never to take another drink. Of course he did I can also remember that he was a salesman and a very good one. When he was uptown, we were living in the little town of Moscow. I went up to try to get some money from him to buy groceries. He wouldn't give me any money for the groceries, but he did take me across the street and buy me a bag of candy which I later took back traded for a loaf of bread. I was not more than six at that time. My father died in nineteen. Oh One when I was eight years old and I was in the second or third grade school. I immediately quit school and went to work and from that time until I was high school age, there was never a return to school. I always built up in my own mind. The great things that I was going to do, and in fact, I accomplished about fifty percent of them and then lost interest. That continued through my entire life. When I was sixteen years old my mother remarried and I was given the opportunity of going back to school. I went into the high school grades but having missed all the intermediate grades I didn't get along too well. So I developed the habit of going back to school just long enough for the football season and then quitting. There was always a tremendous drive and ambition to become a great guy because I think I recognized inwardly that I didn't have any special talents. At a comparatively early age I can remember being jealous of my brother. He did things much better than I did because he applied himself and learned how to do them and I never applied myself. Whether I could have done as well as he I don't know. I was married at the age of nineteen to a grand girl and had good business prospects. I had bought a piece of ground in Cuyahoga falls and cut it into lots and had a profit of approximately forty thousand dollars and that was a lot of money in those days. With that profit I built a number of houses, but then I neglected them. I wouldn't put sufficient time on them. Consequently, my labor bills ran up I. Lost Money and then just fool the way a large part of that profit. When I was eighteen at the end of high school, the High School team had a banquet at a well known roadhouse outside of Akron. We boys drove out in somebody's car and went to the bar on the way to the dining room and I in an effort to impress the other boys that I was city bread having lived in Scranton and Cleveland asked them. If they didn't want to drink, they looked at one another quarterly and finally one of them allowed he'd have a beer and they all followed him each of them saying he'd have a beer too. I ordered Martini extra dry. I didn't even know what a Martini looked like but I had heard a man down the bar order one. That was my first drink. I kept watching the man down the bar to see what he did with a contraption like that and he just smelled up his drink and set it down again. So I did the same. He took a couple of puffs of the cigarette and I took a couple of puffs on my cigarette. He tossed off half of his Martini I tossed off half a mind and nearly blew the top of my head off it. Irritated. My nostrils I choked I didn't like it. There was nothing about that drink that I liked but I watched him any tossed off the rest of his. So I tossed off the rest of mine he ate his olive and I ate mine I didn't even like the olive it was repulsive to me from every standpoint I drank nine Martinis in less than an hour. Twenty. Two years later Dr Bob told me that what I had done was like switch and setting up a demand for more alcohol in my system. I didn't know that then I had no more reason to drink those. Martinez than a Jack Rabbit. At that particular time the boys put me on a shudder and took me out to the shed and I lay in the car while they enjoyed their banquet. That was the first time. I. Ever Drank hard liquor. Blackout. Drinking. At once.

Salesman High School Martini Cuyahoga Falls Jack Rabbit Football Dr Bob Scranton Akron Moscow Martinez Cleveland
The Last US Civil War Pension

Everything Everywhere Daily

04:50 min | Last month

The Last US Civil War Pension

"Triplet was born in Nineteen thirty in Wilkes County North Carolina Sixty five years after the end of the civil war. How she ended up receiving civil war pension is one of those stories that you wouldn't believe if it wasn't true. But when you do the math, it actually does workout. Her father was most triplet was a veteran of the civil war. He had the distinction of having fought for both the confederacy and the Union. He was a member of the fifty third North Carolina infantry who fought in the battle of Gettysburg. On the way to Gettysburg most fell ill and was hospitalized the illness probably saved his life because most of his unit was either killed or wounded during the battle. After he recovered, he deserted the confederates and joined up with the third north, Carolina mounted infantry which fought for the union. The unit was known as Kirks raiders after commander Colonel, George Washington. Kirk. After the war Mos- returned to North Carolina got married and started a family his wife Mary passed away in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety. As with many older civil war veterans, they would often take younger second wives especially during the Great Depression as their pension was considered a source of stable income. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four at the age of seventy eight MOS married his second wife Alita who was twenty nine years old Mohsen Alita had five children. One of them Irene was born in one, thousand, nine, thirty when Mos- was eighty-three. Irene was just eight years old when her father died at the age of ninety two after returning home from a civil war veterans reunion. Irene had a cognitive disability which made her eligible to continue to receive her father civil war pension after his death as a quote, helpless child of a veteran. She received her father's pension of seventy three dollars and thirteen cents every month from her father's death in one thousand, nine, thirty, eight to her death in. Twenty twenty. The amount was never for inflation. The entire time it's estimated she received approximately seventeen thousand dollars over the course of her life. In addition to having received the last civil war pension, she was also the last child of a civil war veteran. The second to last child of a civil war veteran also had an interesting story in two thousand. Eighteen Fred Upton passed away at the age of ninety seven. His father was William H Upton. Who is a civil war veteran and the former governor of the state of Wisconsin who was elected in eighteen ninety four. Because of the occurrence of young women marrying much older men with pensions, the passing of the last civil war widow wasn't that long ago either in two thousand and eight motty Hopkins died at the age of ninety three in thousand, nineteen, thirty, four at the age of nineteen she married eighty six year old William Cantrell who served as a sixteen year old soldier in the confederate army. Blast Union widow was Gertrude Janeway who passed away in two thousand three. The last surviving documented veteran of the civil war was Albert Wilson who died at the age of one, hundred, six in one thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six he was a fourteen year old drummer boy in the first Minnesota. Heavy. Artillery Regiment. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, six there was an episode of the TV Game Show I've got a secret with a ninety five year old man named Samuel Seymour. The panelists had to guess what the guest secret was. Samuel Seymour. Was the last surviving witness to Abraham Lincoln's assassination. He was a five year old boy was taken affords theater and said in the balcony across the theater from the present it. there. Is a clip of the appearance on Youtube and I highly recommend viewing it if you're interested in such things. The. Last surviving person who was born as a slave in the United States was Peter Mills who died in Nineteen seventy-two he was born into slavery in eighteen sixty one and live to be one hundred, ten, one person was both born into bondage and live to see the moon landing. The last surviving veteran of the Revolutionary War was John Gray who died in eighteen sixty, eight at the age of one, hundred four he's one of the only people who live to see both the revolution and the civil war oddly enough he was born on George Washington's estate Mount Vernon and his father died in the revolutionary. War. The, last surviving veteran of Napoleon's army was a Polish man Vincent Markowitz who died at one hundred and eight in nineteen three and the last veteran of the war of eighteen twelve was Hiram Cronk who passed away in one thousand, nine, five at the age of one, hundred and five. In Two thousand eleven at the age of one hundred and ten American Frank. Buck was the last surviving veteran of World War One in the world to pass away. Demographers estimate that the last veteran of World War Two will pass away sometime around the year twenty, forty four. It will probably be someone who fought at a very young age and lives to be at least one, hundred and ten. It's amazing how the lives of some people can span such incredible lengths of time and how we can have lives that overlap them. We think of the civil war is being a long time ago. Yet we're only two or three generations removed from people who lived through all of these events.

Ladies' First

Your Brain on Facts

05:35 min | Last month

Ladies' First

"Valentina Tereshkova was twenty two years old when she made her first parachute jump with a local aviation club in nineteen, fifty nine and she loved it. unbeknownst to her this exhilarating pastime was giving her skills that would bring her to the attention of the Soviet government. The Soviets needed someone who could handle themselves jumping from twenty thousand feet. The mandatory ejection altitude from the re entry of a rocket capsule. One of the many facets of the space race to the Soviets wanted to win was to have the first woman in space in February nineteen, sixty, two Tereshkova and four other women, three parachutists and one pilot began the intensive training to become cosmonauts. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. We're headed toward another presidential election and it seems like both a minute ago and an attorney ago that we had a female candidate for president would most people don't know is that the first female candidate? Rian before she was even allowed to vote. Victoria Claflin later, Victoria Woodhall was one of ten children born to illiterate mother and a petty criminal father. Would Hell attended school sporadically for a few years. At Age Fifteen, she married a doctor who soon revealed himself to be an alcoholic philanderer. To make matters worse the sixteen year old woodhall gave birth to a mentally handicapped son who would need extra care in eighteen fifty four. Three of would hold siblings had died as children. And she claims she had clairvoyant powers to communicate with them. Always looking for a new scam, to run. Her father put her on the road with her sister Tennessee as a faith healing and fortune telling act selling elixirs that promised to cure everything from asthma to cancer. They didn't. In fact, Tennessee was indicted for manslaughter after one of her patients died. By some good fortune that I don't know the sisters found themselves with a wealthy patron in the form of railroad magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt. He and Tennessee were rumored to be lovers. Stock Tips that she picked up during their relationship came in pretty handy during an eighteen, sixty, nine gold panic during which the sisters supposedly netted seven hundred thousand dollars. With. Vanderbilt's bankrolling Victoria and Tennessee then opened their own highly publicized firm named Woodhall Claflin and company becoming the first female stockbrokers on wall. Street. However they were never granted a seat on the New York Stock Exchange. It would take another near century before Muriel Siebert did in nineteen, sixty seven. In the same year that she became a stockbroker would attended her first suffragette rally and immediately became a passionate devotee of the 'cause. She befriended or beguiled a congressman to get her an invitation to testify before the House Judiciary Committee. She argued that women did already have the right to vote under the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments those granted persons born or naturalized in the United, states citizenship and prohibited voter discrimination. But the house declined to enact any legislation on the matter. Even still the appearance made her a celebrity among suffragettes. In. April. Of Eighteen seventy, just two months after opening her brokerage firm woodhull announced her candidacy for president of the United States on a platform of women's suffrage regulation of monopolies nationalization of railroads, an eight hour workday direct taxation. Abolition of the death penalty and welfare for the poor what whole helped organize the equal rights party. which nominated her at its May eighteen, seventy two. Famed abolitionist Frederick Douglass was selected as her running mate and told about eventually he never acknowledged it officially, and in fact, he campaigned for the incumbent Republican Ulysses s grant. What else name appeared on ballots in a couple of states. Knows for certain votes she received because apparently they weren't counted. All of this was essentially moot. Though considering that would hold did not reach the constitutionally required age of thirty five until six months after the inauguration. It would be nineteen, sixty four before a woman was actively considered for a nomination of a major party. When Margaret Smith qualified for the ballot of six state primaries even coming in second in Illinois. The only female candidate other than Clinton was faith spotted Eagle a native American activist who received a vote from Robert. Sexual. Junior. WHO's referred to as a faithless elector for not voting has pledged section also voted for why known Luke for vice. President. Luke is executive director of honor, the Earth a native environmental organization, which plays an active role in the Dakota access pipeline protests.

Valentina Tereshkova Tennessee Cornelius Vanderbilt President Trump Victoria Woodhall Muriel Siebert Victoria Claflin Woodhall Claflin United States Luke Soviet Government Frederick Douglass Rian Margaret Smith House Judiciary Committee Asthma United Clinton Congressman
Britney Spears' Ex-Husband Wants Her Back

Daily Pop

08:25 min | Last month

Britney Spears' Ex-Husband Wants Her Back

"Events daily pop. Hey remember when Britney Spears married Jason Alexander for just fifty five hours. Well, he wants her back now. Yes. They're right. Jason was spotted at a free privy protests at the courthouse yesterday he told us weekly. He still has love for Britney and he'd quote definitely the open rekindling their romance quote if they would give us an honest chance. Is he serious right now old what is furious? Is this heat in? Los. Angeles put that photo backup with the orange shirts. I can see that under boop sweat real quick. You know how hot it is in this Place look at. That alone. Look better though. Her he looks good. But I just like what is this guy I mean he clearly has nothing going on like the fact that he's GonNa show up even just give us weekly any sort of exclusively come on. This was how many years ago twelve thirty claims that two thousand four was when this fifty five, our wedding are. happened. They were childhood friends they got married very briefly. Now they've been I think in touch a little bit throughout the years I doubt recently my goodness. So the things he had to say about Sam you guys San has to be so livid right now. Right. So he said I got to see this code and he said I don't know him. He looks like he's in good shape but I'm in good shape. So Bravo to him she's got some type of feelings for him I. Guess I'm like Oh, my Gosh San if he ever sees you, he's going to punch you in the face. He's never gonNA. See Him this guy ever not a factor in her life, and this is the problem. What happens is even though he went there with good intentions quote unquote this just makes everything that Brittany's fighting for a spectacle and it makes it joke and if he really loved her and really wanted to be a part of her life and really wanted to help her, he would have stayed away from that camera and not became this headline. One hundred percent, and also for him to be like if they gave us an honest chance, she doesn't want you like I. Don't know who they. Does not she has no interest in rekindling your relationship I. Promise you that I don't know where he gets off thinking. Oh, if they just would just believe in our love like she's not petitioning for you bro at all, she's not looking for you in any day. Ever Gosh tell it like it is mortgage. Ed I love the. If a man sit outside like that for me I would feel some type of way about it in the. Sweat It's always flattering, right? It's always flattering to see. Talk about how he wants you back I. Mean it's Nice to hear whether you care or not of. The protest was held at the courthouse because there was a hearing about getting Brittany's data removed as conservative as we told, you yesterday according to court documents I'm really wants her care manager Jody Montgomery to step in permanently. So Jason has thoughts on that to telling US weekly Britney doesn't want to be under the conservative ship and he wants her to get what she rightly deserves. So how does he? Oh, how does he know he has not been in contact with her is will be. Governed from ghost talking to this man talent him where Britney saying he has no idea and Britney has said exactly what she wants and this for him. This was kind of a bold move because this hearing wasn't about changing anything this hearing was about let's check in. Let's see what's happening. The real hearing will come once they file papers and once she puts in court writings that she wants this change. This guy's making it worse for her get off her bag they offer not it's just. Weird. Do you think the intention because he wants Brittany back or he wants his own fame or he just was truly going there out of love for Brittany, and truly feels that she feels trapped and was trying to be a voice for her? What do you think I can't believe this I can't believe this is our Abe. Block. Are you kidding he therapy for fifteen minutes and it's going to be four because this is the last time we're talking about this. This is insane person. We have not heard one word about this person in sixteen years six I'm too hot over this. Crazy. You'll get the fifty. He'll get the fifty because what will happen is Cara Delevingne will see him on the news noticing that he's getting airtime. So then she'll date him to make Ashley Benson Jealous, and then he'll get twenty minutes. Oh my God. We're bringing car delving into this way. Okay. Well, let's move onto a couple that we've also talked about a couple of times before. New Year. So Tomorrow Laurie Lachlan and her husband Massimo are scheduled to be sitting for their roles in the college admissions gets scandal at the same time. The government's recently filed sentencing memo raises questions about what their daughter Olivia Jade may have known. So here's the new stuff. You guys. So Libya is never mentioned by name in the document, but they're quote. Younger. Daughter is referred to specifically prosecutors say in one incident Laurie Mossy Ma and they're quote younger daughter discussed how to avoid the possibility that a high school counselor would disrupt their scheme. So the family has not spoken out, but a source close to the family says their daughters had nothing to do with this. So if what the prosecutors are saying is true. That Olivia Jay did know about this do you feel she should be punished as well as her parents? Here She did no I just hello even if she knew or did not know she is a child and was a minor at this point in her life. That age you do as your parents tell you to do you follow suit you. You'd even realize the difference between right and wrong I could barely drive through MC. At that point by myself, give me a break. There's no reason that this young girl should be punished for anything like I understand her parents made a mistake we've been talking about it when I was reading the research is warning I was like for over a year literally been talking about this now for over a year and it's dwindled down to two or three months and five months number one. The she was seventeen. Leave her out of it. It's not relevant for her to be involved with the fact that their names are mentioned I get it. They need to be to kind of paint a full picture you do what your parents, how you to do. This is how we're getting into college. Sweetie you go. Okay. Mom just let me know where I need to be et Cetera not true Morgan you do what your parents tell you to do but let's say let's say you've got some awful parents right? Like I'm not saying these people are saying you got some awful parents and they say honey were broke I want you to go steal some milk and some candy bars and some cereal, and you know what? Go ahead and grab that xbox to they won't even suspect you. You're a teenager just go do it. Okay. If they get caught that could go to Juvie or get some sort of legal. Question. So Matt Your question. Your mother. Makes you sign your name on legal documents that puts you as a as the lender on alone and your mother then defaults on it ten years later should be. Held Liable Harris of thousand dollar loan that your mother made you sign for when you're seventeen or would you fight it? Well that's different because you would never have hypothetical situation that happened in. Dollar Loan. Drill, trust. It happens on sweet bitter. I just saw show where it happened. So where do you bring up that example? I agree with Morgan when you're seventeen years old if my mother would have told me sign the papers for this D to my kidney I wouldn't have asked two questions about it because my mother told me. But my problem is. This is the problem my judicial system we're sitting here worried about what a seventeen year old may or may not have known meanwhile Brianna Taylor's killers walking around free and the people who accosted Eliza McLean have not been nothing has been done to them. We know exactly what happened. We've seen the camera footage we've gone through everything. Why are we focusing on this and not focusing on what we do know?

Britney Spears Brittany Jason Alexander Morgan LOS Angeles Cara Delevingne Brianna Taylor Ashley Benson Bravo SAM Olivia Jade Olivia Jay Laurie Mossy United States Matt Your Laurie Lachlan Libya Jody Montgomery
Diversity in Photography

This Week in Photo

05:51 min | Last month

Diversity in Photography

"Welcome back to another episode I'm your host Frederik van Johnson. Today I'm talking with my friend Karen Sacks. We're GONNA be talking about her new accidents, not even that new, but it's a it's a service that you may not have heard about its. Services a good name for Karen can explain what what the loop is all about, but it is a, it's something. Like this carrying you can tell me if I'm wrong, it is something that is serving a niche that is severely under served right now, and she's at the right place at the right time with the right product cares acts welcome to the show how's it going and it's going great. Thank you so much for having me and great description of of what we're building at the loop. WAS THAT AMORPHOUS? You it was. It was why don't I? Can. Go a little bit deeper and. What we like to say is that we're building a platform that is connecting the world's best diverse photographers, commercial professional photographers with brands around the world to make great work we want to help brands get content. Simply we WANNA simplify that process and we want to help photographers especially underrepresented diverse photographers get work. So we're bringing those two together our platform, the loop. Wonderful. That sounds like you you practice for. Maybe once or twice. Saying that a lot lately. To, the elevator with with. Man. Musk at your kitchen, you know. Right, exactly that's my elevator patch. Has Perfect Elevator pitch. Okay. So let's let's rewind I wanNA dive into the loop and kind of understand you know at a at a DNA level what it is you built and are building. But let's let's understand who cares. Sachs's I swear what's your? What's your pedigree that brought you from A to B. Sarah? No problem. So I have been in the industry for close. To twenty years, it sounds a little crazy to say that twenty years But that's how long it's been. I started my career at National Geographic I actually backing up a little bit started taking photography classes in high school like many photographers they always put in there about me section on their website that somebody gave them a camera when they're fifteen or sixteen years old. Similar similar for me I started taking classes. Photography classes in high school fell in love with it decided I wanted to major in photography. I went to the University of Michigan where I studied photography. I have a BFA photography I also have. A degree in American culture. So I did it be in American culture I felt like I needed both of those to take me where I wanted to go in my career yet I didn't know where I wanted to go in my career. I had this idea that I wanted to be at national geographic like many photographers many young aspiring photographers who wanted to go to national. Geographic I had my heart set on it. I. Didn't know what that would look like for me. I didn't know how I would get there. I didn't know what I would do there but I. Knew I. needed a career in photography and I wanted to start there and that's what I did when I graduated from the University of Michigan in August the following summer at the end of the summer I, moved to Washington DC and I started a job at National Geographic Kids magazine as a photo assistant and worked my way up to a photo editor. I. Was there for four years. It was an unbelievable experience I would ride in the elevator speaking of elevators I would ride in elevators with photographers whose work had been studying in school and I would be so nervous. I often wouldn't know what to say to them. That it was they were my heroes, my superstars they were who I wanted to be around into study their work and to know their images and I loved taking my film to get dropped off at the at the film lab at National Geographic. How cool that there was a film lab there and yes, we are still shooting film in those days. And I would be you know right next to Steve McCurry are Jodi COBB and that to me was the coolest thing. So I was there for four years and over that time I, realized that my place was not behind the camera was not being a photographer it was working with photographers. So I started to get a glimpse of really what I wanted to be doing and with each move I made in long career I got closer and closer to what it is that I wanted to be doing. So after I left geographic, I moved up to New York and I started freelancing for the Wall Street Journal. Started meeting a lot of photographers being in studios with them kind of understanding how they operated, how they worked, how they got jobs, and from there where did I go Martha Stewart Martha Stewart living in I was a director photographer on the merchandise side at Martha unbelievable experience I felt like I was working with the best of the best actually where I met my husband and I worked on all of her different product lines overseeing the photography for the product lines working with Martha on a couple of. Shoots, which was an incredible experience and I also after I left there. I went to a place called Archive. I skipped one I was at Corbis for a little bit Corbis, which is now part of getty images in the stock photography world. So I was getting glimpses of different aspects of the photo industry starting with editorial moving into commercial with Martha's products moving into stock photography. At Trunk Archive, I worked with high end photographers, Boutique photo, agency So so I kept kind of building I. Think these are all building blocks. And then more recently, I was at shutter sock for five years. So that's when I really understood what it meant to build products and to work for a company in the photo space. And then that has led me to the loop,

Martha Stewart Martha Stewart University Of Michigan Karen Sacks Frederik Van Johnson National Geographic Corbis National Geographic Kids Trunk Archive Sachs Steve Mccurry Sarah New York Wall Street Journal Washington Editor Jodi Cobb Director
Lily Cole on Why the Fashion System Needs Reform Now

The Business of Fashion Podcast

04:23 min | Last month

Lily Cole on Why the Fashion System Needs Reform Now

"Hello this Zimran Ahmed founder, and CEO of business to fashion and welcome to live. On this episode I am thrilled to have with me a face that I. I got to know when I first started sneaking into fashion shows here in London about a decade ago. lily. Cole was an up and coming model and those days and she's gone on to have. A career in the fashion industry. But in in addition has become an activist of sorts has studied. At some very very well known universities and has recently published a book which is called who cares wins reasons for optimism in our changing world and so I'm delighted to have lily here with us today. Welcome Lily. Thanks for having me links to see. To, see you to Of course we're GONNA talk about your book, but you have such an interesting backstory that brought you into the fashion industry. So I thought we could actually start there and then get to how you decided that writing a book was kind of something that you wanted to do and how it connects back to some of your experiences and fashion. But so to begin with, you want to just tell us I'm sure it's you know everyone has their origin story and I'm sure. You're you're tired of telling it but. How how did you first get into this weird and wonderful industry? Irish a group in London. and. I was fourteen years old. Just, doing my thing hanging out with my friends in central. London I one evening and a scout from stool agency CRA Benjamin. Hart. Came over to me, he was very looking model himself this very handsome oatman was approaching. And then he talked about the agency had did I want to muddle and gave me business cards and within a year I was kind of flying around the doing I mean even that year I, started walking the next things really took off. The moment when you? Feel like you really realize that you're going to become quite a big deal. In fashion, Industry Missouri Specific Opportunity that you you come. Yeah. It's probably a few. Sixteen A. Nose Service Fifteen. New York and opened anesthesia legis show a campaign with Steven, Meisel and at the time I'd never heard of him. You know I didn't know anything about fashion. So I didn't I didn't know what the meaning of of that was. But when I was in New York for the show kind of sense, the buzz around. Him and his work that I'd worked within. A sense of it and and then I was remember another moment when I was in back in London. And was. was on a motorbike going between shows, which were as you probably know, tons of shows I was trying to fit like five a day sometimes, and so is getting annoyed between shows like it makes them and I had this moment on the back of his motorbike probably fifteen sixteen years old going through central London and seeing my face on the side of these red buses. What? It was quite made it feel real in a very surreal way how I went from Bash into writing a book, which is obviously a big jump by the book writing about fashion and how the experiences I had in bashing took journey along winding journey that I'm still on in which the book is a product. So after a few years working the fashion industry, I started to become more and more wet of some of the challenges with different supply chains I was made aware of the few the companies I was working with they were having are damaging impacts on the people or the environment within which is working. With a charity, Cool Developmental, Justice Foundation who still work with WHO drew my attention to cotton and how cotton farming can be really destructive but I feel very. Conflicted I guess because I thought quite responsible. So what I was appetizing into watching. And I decided instead of focusing on the negative which you know of course, we can I wanted to focus on the positive and the fact that there are different ways that supply chains can be set up and managed

London Meisel New York Hart Lily Zimran Ahmed Cole Justice Foundation Founder CEO Steven
Should I Let My Little Brother Move In With Us?

Ramsey Call of the Day

06:26 min | Last month

Should I Let My Little Brother Move In With Us?

"It's of Tuesday and this is the Ramsey call of the day part of the Ramsey networks. Lincoln Nebraska Dylan is Pie Dylan what's up? So. Excited to talk you. Know. I'm calling because I'm currently in baby step two with my husband. And we originally started at twenty, five thousand and we're down to about sixteen thousand. And my parents are going through a really bad divorce and my sixteen year old little brother would like to move in with me and my husband We're kind of at odds about it because. I want to let him move in but my husband. Wants to stay get intense and he's concerned. It will be too much of an expense if we let him move in. Are. You do you live near where he lives now? No they live about forty, five minutes away from Moscow I guess not too bad but he would stay in his same school community as a car. no she would transfer to school here in mine town. About forty five minutes from here. And what is the financial condition of your parents? Very poor they've filed bankruptcy and they are still even after the bankruptcy twenty, five, thousand and. What's your household income? Sixty five, thousand. What costs are associated with bringing him in food. food he would be would have to help him get a car because he doesn't have one and with daycare with my son Conflict with school scheduling. Bus Doesn't run front of Your House. You sorry. There's a bus not run for the school in front of Your House. No. But he he could. He could walk for a while it would just be hard one turn you really cold. How Far Away is it? About, a mile here That's not bad as nice little hike. uphill both ways and snow right You could tell his grandkids about it some day. It sounds like things are pretty miserable for him I want to help him. Me Too. So how is he miserable enough to? Take on some other forms of misery in order to get out of there like for instance, when he moves in with you, he starts he starts a job immediately and I saves up right quick and gets him a thousand dollar car. And he pays for it. He would be willing to work I I'm just concerned it would affect his grades. I'm concerned that he's living in a cesspool and he needs to get out. I'm not, concerned. About his range. He needs to work. If I'm your husband and you came to me and said, look, he'll take a job and he'll work this many hours and make much money He'll pay US fifty bucks a month for food and he'll save up to everything else and beyond a budget the way we teach him in order to save up and pay cash for his furlough thousand dollar car that we're going to help him get. We could be saving his life please let's do this for my brother. I think that's a regional thing. But if your little brother wants to move in there and sit on the couch and eat Doritos, all afternoon and suck. And play video games and sit on his butt. And then gripe because he ain't got a car that you gave him that he's entitled to because he breathes air this is different animal you following me. So I'm just I if he is as desperate to get out of that mess as it sounds like he is then he's desperate enough to do some crap. When he hits the road overture housing, it's get his life straightened out. I'm sorry for him. It's a tough road. He's at such situation. He's in his parents are both completely unplugged. Basically emotionally have abandoned him financially of abandoned him and he's sixteen years old. Let's talk. I'm. heartbreaking. But. If I'm your husband, your husband, he doesn't WanNa take a project on. He wants to bring in bring in someone that he can be a blessing to. If I'm your husband that's what I would be sitting on and so I think you can lay out some guidelines and then talk to your little brother and say these are our conditions if you will meet those, you're welcome. And of course, when you live under my roof, you live by my rules to. Come home drunk at sixteen years old. You're not doing dope it sixteen years old you're not doing you know out I just fill in the blank right? On Sunday. We're going to church or this is what we do at our house. Okay. If you live in my house, you do what we do at my house. You don't WanNa live there. It's okay. You don't like that that's live somewhere else. But when you're under my roof, this is high works. That's kind of old school. Should we did have a basic savings account for the car? Yeah. Just help him. I don't care if he puts it in a fruit jar. Just won't even I just wanted to sixty hours a week and go get him thousand dollars. Right? Quick. Okay sounds good. Just Bust I. Mean I just want him bust his butt man I want he's got a lot of emotion. He can burn off a bunch of it working. Yeah I agree I think that he's definitely willing to do what it takes anything more I just had reservations about forcing him to work so much I don't I don't have any reservations about it at all the best thing ever happened to him. He he won't die from it when you're working really really hard right before you pass out, she went to worry about work killing you won't kill you. So it's okay. You're going to be. All right. That's going to be the best thing ever happened to him. You're giving him safe emotional environment to live in someone that loves him and actually cares about his well being you're a good person. You're good sister. Well done. Just put some guidelines on it. So your husband feels like he's participating in. Process it's helpful and not enabling a bunch of crap.

Your House Lincoln Nebraska Dylan Pie Dylan United States Moscow
The Racing Family that Death Couldnt Stop

Past Gas

05:05 min | Last month

The Racing Family that Death Couldnt Stop

"Welcome back everyone to pass gas As always. I'm your host, Nolan Sykes joined by my friends. One Joe Weber. What's up? And I'm sorry, I'm trying I'm trying to bring the energy, but this is also a very somber script already, and so I want to be entertaining Bhai also want to. Honor respectful. Done that. Be Entertaining, but respectful. And James. Humphrey. You hear him talking now. To, two. The river. All right anyway. gas. So today's are two part our second part of our story on the Isle of Man. T T we're talking about the Dunlop family, are you guys ready to get into it I? Am I think I just want to point out I. Think you're man is the one of the six nicknames I've ever? That's a great and I said well good. It's so it means it means you're a nice guy. It. Yet. It's a rare nickname that sounds really cool. But it also means you're Nice Kylie. Guy that the go-to guy whenever anything needs to be done. Man He's your man. Love it. Great. Start to great episode. Let's dive into it when Marjorie and Ian Forest and their twin teenage sons moved to their house on Douglas Road on the isle. Of Man. One. Of the things they look forward to was the opportunity to watch the legendary I'll of man tourist trophy races from their front yard after all, it's not every day that you can watch the best road racers in the world. Take a corner, your corner in front of your house at speeds of over one hundred, twenty miles an hour. Unfortunately, the forest family had no idea what they were in for on a practice day in two, thousand five, they heard a crash outside Yawkey Carlson, a Swedish racer had run into their gate and flipped into their garden. The Swede was severely injured. Medics rushed to the scene, but there was nothing they could do Carlson's name joined the two, hundred, fifty plus other men who had died on the t course. The horror didn't end there though officials told the forest family that was to logistically challenging to delay the practice and move Carlson's body instead who Carlson was zipped into a body bag on the Front Garden for ninety minutes as the road marshals waited for practice to end, all the garrisons could do was closed their curtains and forbid their sons from looking outside. We'll I got. Doubts pretty awful. there's no way around it. Motorcycle racing is dangerous. Even riding a motorcycle daily traffic puts you at risk of dying in a crash twenty, nine times higher than that. If you were in a car at the same time, motorcycle riders and racers understand that danger. In fact, it's part of what draws them to the sport. Unfortunately, there's no real way around risking your life unlike cars where technology has greatly improved safety and driver protection motorcycle crashes, you're basically experiencing the equivalent of a no seatbelt through the windshield accident every single time. And as dangerous as motorcycle racing is the Isle of. Man. T he stands out as a full degree of magnitude more dangerous than the rest. First of all public road courses like the Isle of Man were writers have to contend with what they call the furniture. That's sick. They're talking about telephone poles, ditches, garden walls. These are much more dangerous than closed circuit courses or dirt bike riding and racing. While those races do see fatal accidents there hasn't been a deadly crash in a speedway race since twenty sixteen and in the twenty years before that, there is an average of less than one year similarly motocross raced at much lower speeds also sees lower fatalities unlike public road races. These courses are designed with plenty of room to minimize danger to the writers. So if Motorcycle Race Games skydiving public road courses are like base. Base jumping in a wing suit taken an already dangerous activity and bringing it as close to the edge as possible. However, even among public road races, the Isle of Man is easily the most dangerous in the twenty seven years. The T T was part of the World Grand Prix, championship thirty, six racers died on the isle. Of Man. Obviously. More than one year. In comparison at Imatra, there were two fatalities in sixteen years at Hockenheim, three deaths in twenty six years. The second deadliest race after the man was a circuit day SPA francorchamps which. Baby Franker Jam Cams, which saw ten deaths in thirty five years making the Isle of Man and average four times deadlier than even the second most deadly race.

Yawkey Carlson Nolan Sykes Bhai Joe Weber James Grand Prix Humphrey Front Garden Imatra Marjorie Ian Forest
Cindy & Mona Lisa Smith

Casefile True Crime

05:02 min | Last month

Cindy & Mona Lisa Smith

"Cousins just center rose and Melissa Smith had been inseparable since childhood the two goals but just one year apart in age and grew up close to one another in the small town of book located in Central Northern New South Wales. Just Cinta who was the younger of the two was better known by her nickname of Cindy. Shea was born on October twenty, three, nineteen, seventy two and was the youngest of seven children with four brothers and two sisters. Cindy lived with her mother Yona don't Smith and her siblings in a house on the east side of town. She was often looked after her brother Loyd who was seven years her senior. Mona Lisa's family resided on an aboriginal reserve. Now, the L. Said Woods village, which was like I did about two and a half kilometers west of Burke. Known by locals as the reserve the yellow said Woods village consisted of twenty cottages which were run down and overcrowded. It was entirely populated by indigenous Australians from two families, the Edwards and the smiths. Siblings cousins, and other extended family members lived side by side and the close community provided a sense of safety and belonging to its residence. Nine. Lisa was born on November twenty, nine, Nineteen seventy-one to parents June Smith, and dougie shillings worth. On the nausea was born have father had walked to Burke Hospital to visit June and their newborn singing. Nat King. Cole's Song of Mine Ole saw the entire. This led the couple to name their baby goal after the famous song. They also had another daughter Fiona and four sons. Dougie held big dreams for all of these children hoping that they would have good jobs and delayed successful lives. The close knit family spent their evenings together, dancing and singing. But when Mona Lisa was just six years awed Dougy Center, a heart attack and Pasta way. Cindy and Moaner attended primary school together before enrolling at the same high. School. They were both happy go lucky popula conned and dwell locked. Cindy was the nurturing top taking on babysitting Judy's and caring for her younger cousins when needed. Minor roles. So babysat her cousins and was sporty playing regularly Internet Bolton. When Cindy was in her early teens she left high school and Moan followed suit at the end of nineteen ninety seven when she was sixteen years old. Cindy. who was now fifth Dane often travelled the short distance to the reserve to spend time with no nine her family. The two goals occasionally got up to mischief together, but they will well behaved and widely regarded as good kids. Because there wasn't a lot to do in Burke, which was a remote ap Bac town, they would spend their time hanging out with friends visiting pox and swimming and fishing at the nearby darling. River. On Saturday December five, nine, hundred, ninety, seven, Cindy. Dimona spent the day together and accompanied one of their aunties to a nearby park. By the time evening fell. The two of them had decided to go into town. Burke was a small town with a population of just three, thousand, four, hundred paypal. It was originally home to the Nimba people, but when Watt settlers arrived in the area during the mid eighteen hundreds as traditional landholders would dispossessed. Lock old indigenous people across. Australia. The Nimba paypal battled loss of land and culture were hit hod by European disease and experienced conflict with colonists. By the late nineteen, th century, their population had dwindled. While some continued to live a traditional lifestyle in the region surrounding book others found employment on nearby. CADDO stations.

Cindy Mona Lisa Melissa Smith Burke Cousins Cinta Burke Hospital Shea L. Said Woods Dougie June Smith Loyd Australia South Wales Woods Nausea Paypal Nat King Edwards
Augustines Teenage Coauthor

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | 2 months ago

Augustines Teenage Coauthor

"In three eighty, nine Augustine Co wrote a book called it the teacher. The title comes from a Text Matthew Chapter Twenty three verse. Ten. which reads for you have one instructor or one teacher. Christ. Augusta and said, this book discusses and inquires and discovers that there is no teacher who teaches men knowledge accept God. As, written in the Gospel and he quotes Matthew Chapter Twenty, three ten of course that is very significant the title of the Book and where it came from it's also significant that this book was written in three eighty nine. It was just three years after Agustin's conversion you remember his story, he leaves Hippo there north. Africa goes up to Rome goes to Milan is literally running away from God like Jona or the Prodigal son. But God catches him. In fact, God has been directing him and directing every step of his path straight to him and in three eighty, six in. Milan. He was converted and three, eighty eight he leaves Rome, and heads back to Carthage, and then onto the gassed and hippo in North Africa, and there he will serve for the rest of his life as bishop. But this is in three, eighty nine. It is early in his Christian time. So the title is significant the date is significant but what is really significant is that Augusta had a CO author for this book and this was not just any CO author. It was a teenager sixteen year old came along to help Augusta and write this book. And was not does any sixteen year old? It was his son at data's the teacher is a dialogue, a dialogue between father and son the father. Augusta and the Sun Addio data's his son's name literally means a gift from God dot to means Gift Day Oh of course God and awe is the preposition that means from. He too was converted right at the same time Augustine was, and they were also baptized by Ambrose there in Milan and audio Dada was baptized as he was turning fifteen he went with his father back to Carthage, and then in three eighty nine, they wrote this book together in the confessions. This is what Augusta says of it. There is a book of mine called the teacher which consists of a dialogue between Avocados and myself, and now Augustine who in the confessions rights most directly to God, and so he says, you know addressing God let all the ideas expressed by the second speaker in the discussion his. Although he was only sixteen when it took place and I learned for myself that he had many other talents, even more remarkable than this, his intelligence left me spellbound and who but you who but you? Could work such wonders is so here's a guston singing. The praises of his son at your data, and as they wrote this book together well in the Book Augusta. Talks about how we use words to communicate words are symbols, their signs, they signify things. Patio donnas comes to realize that words put us on the alert they make us ready to learn. But ultimately, the words we used to learn ultimately all that is sourced in God in Christ is our teacher well, then conclusion Augustine says this to no end to love him and his to know and to love God is the blessed life which all proclaimed that they are seeking but few have the joy of really finding that is to say all want the good life but only few find it. And that was Agustin's hope for his son Avocados. Well, sad to say that a year after this book, his son at Yoda's died in Augusta who was very sorrowful from this could at least take comfort in the fact that his son died in Christ and so a Guston was confident. His son Bodice was with God.

Book Augusta Augustine Milan Augustine Co Agustin Carthage Rome Instructor Guston Africa North Africa Jona Dada Yoda Ambrose
Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 months ago

Judge sentences ex-MSU coach to jail in Nassar-related case

"The former head gymnastics coach at Michigan State University has been sentenced to jail for lying to police about what she do about abuse by university Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg is said at trial that she did not remember being told about abuse by former Olympic and Michigan State University doctor Larry Nassar she was found guilty by a jury in February of lying to police and today she's been sentenced to ninety days in jail and eighteen months of probation Nassar was sentenced in twenty eighteen to forty two hundred and seventy five years in prison for decades of serial abuse to hundreds of athletes several of Nassar's victims testified the greatest knew about the abuse two of them spoke ahead of the sentencing Larissa Boyce sekaligus held up a piece of paper in front of her when she was sixteen and older if she filed a report there could be serious consequences for her voice that she was representing her sixteen year old self was silenced and humiliated and all of the hundreds of girls that were abused after her I'm Jennifer king

Michigan State University Dr Larry Nassar Cathy Clegg Larry Nassar Jennifer King Larissa Boyce
"sixteen years" Discussed on If These Ovaries Could Talk

If These Ovaries Could Talk

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on If These Ovaries Could Talk

"And then now a man, and I was looking for blueprints on what it meant to be a man in the world. It was different being masculine woman in women in mostly women spaces, you know, but then like a bunch fem blueprint. Here's a from blueprint, right? And I loved it. And I love my creek community. I love my lesbian community. But then as a man so now got I've got a beard, and I look different now, I can't get into the lesbian spaces anymore. And which I shouldn't that make you sad vote absolute loss. Yeah. It was definitely there's a definitely a moment of grief there because I lost community that had like that sisterhood. Yeah. This these people are basically raised me up. I was the gay clubs at sixteen years. So here, I'm a man in the world, and I've kind of lost my community, which all of his pain kind of like, my my support in my crutch, you know, and that was hard. And I was like, I don't wanna hang out with straights. Because I think straights are awful. Yes. No, finish straight people. So here, I am, you know, and people look at me, and they read me straight. But I really did not. I didn't see any examples of heterosexual heterosexual masculinity. That felt good to me what I'm saying of felt limited or like, it was there's a lot of posturing it really felt fake alive. Really really fucking fake. It felt like heterosexual men were always defining their masculinity in relationship to something else. Like you define your masculinity about how much you can control. How much did you possess? You know, who you are better than this one up next update. I'm a I'm a man because you know, I drive this corvette. Or I'm a man because I'm with this chick or how all this money..

sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Florida some people we just need to write off. So I just let them have. Sixteen years old in America. TV internet school. All of the vast amount of information and contacts looking at a mother every day. And this will have that. Analysis. Written on. S sixteen you think that? Her brain isn't even finished developing yet, though. Yeah. At sixteen years old. In the current environment. All of the information available, right? Dr. What you need to drop squad to come get him. You remember that movie to drop Scott? Come and get a handkerchief negroes racket taking and make them give him a makeover. Write her off now. So that she won't become one of them all the people that are older that talk just like an act like just right off. I mean, something I mean, she. Even Dr tomorrow understand that somebody told me Dr Phil told her that they didn't want to in the white race either really interesting interview sold so basically just write her own. You know, what I mean, she looked dark as me? And if you talking this crazy, we ain't got enough time to be dealing with that much site. You know, we got some other people we can help just let up about the drop off at the Knicks rally that them guys have in Virginia. I mean, they're talking about you know, how much they hate black people in aid, you just drop off in the middle of them. And just let her walk in the middle of them. And join them see how much love she get hammers the document that's the death to Nazi needs. But let me genuine. Let me. We wish we we're making a little mistake. I think and and you can you can count on the other side, we're confusing white people with white supremacy. White supremacy is all evil. All white people are not evil. White supremacy is a mindset or construct. In practice. What about those who practice white supremacy? That's why I said, I said some okay. Yeah. That's what I'm picking we make you know in in the real world that we live in. To get out of this problem that we have. Especially us in America. Who is that this vast minority we're going to need white support. All right movement. This is Anthony Hamilton, and I love intelligent, black talk radio. That's why I listened to the movement with Dr f Keith slot on news and talk not eighty four zero four eight nine two two seven. Oh, three on news talk thirteen eighty W A. Okay. Breaking news sports weather..

Dr Phil America Scott Dr f Keith Knicks Florida Anthony Hamilton Virginia thirteen eighty W Sixteen years sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Okay. Welcome to the show today. So first off let me welcome our guest with us today. We've got Jim Palmer welcome to the show. Jim. How're you doing? Thanks for having me on. Yeah. Thank you at breakfast. This in the intro. I'm I'm excited to have you on because you're not in the pet industry. Although I'm sure plenty of people in the pet industry of USD your stuff over the years. I've I've seen your stuff over the years in kind of followed. What you do? But for those that are familiar with who you are. And you give us an intro. Like, what have you been doing? What you currently do. What's what's the story on Jim? You know, what's interesting about that is if I look back on all the big aha moments. I've had building my own businesses. Most of them came from outside. Whatever it is. I thought my industry was so I think it's good and healthy to look to see what other people are doing and see how you can apply it to your niche. So I started I'm coming up on, you know, sixteen years in the business. I started in the newsletter business. I'm best known as being the news. That are guru. Although for the last nine years, I've been the dream business coach helping other people create their dream business. And you know, the thing that I know we're going to talk about today. Tie is newsletters. And when I started my first business, I I was very much like an ordinary small business owner and. You know, I was doing newsletters for private companies and associations chambers, nonprofits and things like that about five years, and I I'd grown a nice multiple six figure business, but I was working my tail end off. And I really while the money was starting to be good. I didn't have any kind of time freedom, and I also saw myself really Maxine out. So in two thousand six I I started going to what I would call university. And I started taking all these courses, and I went really deep into internet style marketing and drek response copyrighting..

Jim Palmer business owner Maxine sixteen years five years nine years
"sixteen years" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on Unhappy Hour with Matt Bellassai

"They there's sixteen years difference. I didn't realize that I had until I wrote this book that I had had this pattern of dating. Older men and I didn't really understand. I thought it was like, I'm just to mature, which is not true. It's because my parents set up that that pattern, and then I, you know, followed it right. And then here's why I think it's disgusting. Having been an eighteen year old who slept with a thirty five year old because I thought like, oh, this makes me adult just unraveling all of that. All of that kind of damage and stuff to be like, oh, actually, this is why I was doing it, and this is why I don't think it's right, but if you have a relationship that's like this and it's healthy great, but let's make sure it's healthier. It's make sure everyone's on equal footing here because oftentimes it's not. I do like that. There's like a through line though that it's not just like random stories. I, it's really just like, how can I? But it's it is a lot of stories, but but couched in like, hey, here's what I went through. You probably went through something similar. I don't something adjacent and this is how it affects us in the bigger picture and why we have to address this and just seeing. I don't know just kind of outing that stuff in a way that doesn't feel like I'm just like, I'm an expert. This is why you should listen to me. It's like, no, I, you know, have had this surgery or I've been through this. This thing has happened to me, and this is why I think you should listen to me because of been through it in here on the other side and and I know a lot of stuff about, you know, STD's and breast cancer, and a lot of other scary things that people don't want to talk about. And I know about them, unfortunately, no firsthand about all those things. But yeah, you're an expert. I'm an expert on terrible. Everybody should should trust everything you say with a grain of salt, trust everything. I say. I, I want to quickly transition to basically I, I pulled a bunch of your tweets about a variety of topics, and I just want to expand on these are things that you want you characters? Yeah, I want an expansion the song, hey, baby by no doubt. You hate this song. I don't like it according to its Cording to a tweet you sent in two thousand nine. We went. Because I have I've been, I've been very heavy on Instagram the last year and a half. Your tweet was, hey, hey, baby by no doubt more than the apartheid. Joke about something like that. You know, there were real problems. I hadn't even read the full three until just now I have to pull. Okay. Well, first of all, there's there's only seven words in the whole song. Is there really? I don't know. Hey, baby, hey, baby. Hey girl, say boy, say, hey, baby. Hey, baby. Hey, hey, baby baby. That's the chorus. I mean this, here's what it is. Okay. I'm the kinda girl that hangs with the guys. First of all, fuck you. You've diluted our power. You've made us a weaker gender. This is why we can't have nice things. Yeah. Like a fly on the wall with my secret is I don't know what that means taking it all in trying to be feminine. It just is reinforcing this. We're like, I'm a, I'm a girl, but I just like hang with guys because guys are so fun. It's like, well, I guess you've been hanging out with bitches and you can't find better for. I don't know what that is. It's weird thing that girls do sometimes cold play. All these tweets are from two thousand nine. No, I love it. Let's let's let's revisit who I was. Has someone already used cold puke to describe cold play. I love it. It's perfect. That is a tweet from someone who used to love coal plan is now embarrassed about full disclosure there. I think this is related, but when you forget why you were angry about something is one of them which I think is appropriate this the coal place shouldn't. Yeah, but I haven't. Here's what's fucked up about the Trump presidency. I can't even allow myself to be angry about petty things like this is my energy is so wrapped up in like, are their children dying in detention centers..

thirty five year eighteen year sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on Caught Offside

Caught Offside

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on Caught Offside

"Think arizona pay did that well up to a point and then it's down to how you perform on the day and they've obviously exceeded expectations they've done well they've beaten things they should've beaten which they haven't really done i've the lost fifteen sixteen years so not sense obviously it's been a success think there's anyone you can look at within english possible and you know you really should have gone you made the difference dente think one of the things that we've been trying to grapple with over the course of this england run up to this point in the semifinals did they over achieve in going this far or would you say in looking at the competition they played was this about right for getting to this point this to somebody so they history remember this is an england side who did brilliantly that made it through to the semi finals that were you know an extra time away from booking a place in their first finals in the sixty six yeah you break it down you look a paper they would favorites going to every single match pump from the bows and game which of course they lost so in that sense you know they've done exactly as they should have done however you look at the pause and iceland and then over the vote count they can out the crew costa rica you know you look at that and you think well ok well they underachieve so i think england of donald set bal so low that they seems like like overachieved ment i done as as a england fan how would you rank them nine hundred nineteen ninetysix ninety as i guess on this went jiji i kind of i think it's kind of a difficult thing to do if you look at how many people in euro ninety sixteen for example gains that this team hoof i think it's pretty much most of them you know i think i think that's the issue that we have but as we've seen with regards to successful so i think if you to do a combined eleven of england cratia perfectly maybe more england players than craciun right however we know that this is more about paying than as individuals and i think in that sense it's it's difficult conversations average great compensation over three to have down the pub but i don't i don't know where it gets us at this stage but enjoyment ways as a fine like oh where would you put them like this tournament seemed to you know we're we're hearing a lot about how fans can enjoy england again and you know what i would subscribe to that view even if the opposition at times wasn't wasn't top rank but you know where would you put this compared to ninetysix compared to nine hundred no no i think it's been entertaining it's been fun because we've won and i think that's about it i don't think we've hardly created anything you know compla you look at the game against colombia i didn't think i'll speak to make say because again today super sich didn't have to make a safe and i think in that sense then entertaining us away but we giving the policies that winning we give them a cough 'cause they young giving them the cough because fail so badly in the past but let's get ahead of ourselves and believe that you know there's an entertaining side that you enjoy watching play if team was called denmark we would say you know that pragmatic that griffey they get through it but particularly sickly wanna see them play that much but because i'm an englishman that because i think no only because i'm english i think football fans engaged with this team because they know these plants from the primarily and i think that's the reason why people would get more excited about england and they would another side considering the solid football we've seen them play today then maybe it'd be pre tournament it may be too early to know this but do feel like this team you mentioned how young they are did this.

arizona fifteen sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on ESPN FC

ESPN FC

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on ESPN FC

"Think arizona pay did that well up to a point and then it's down to how you perform on the day and they've obviously exceeded expectations they've done well they've beaten things they should've beaten which they haven't really done i've the lost fifteen sixteen years so not sense obviously it's been a success think there's anyone you can look at within english possible and you know you really should have gone you made the difference dente think one of the things that we've been trying to grapple with over the course of this england run up to this point in the semifinals did they over achieve in going this far or would you say in looking at the competition they played was this about right for getting to this point this to somebody so they history remember this is an england side who did brilliantly that made it through to the semi finals that were you know an extra time away from booking a place in their first finals in the sixty six yeah you break it down you look a paper they would favorites going to every single match pump from the bows and game which of course they lost so in that sense you know they've done exactly as they should have done however you look at the pause and iceland and then over the vote count they can out the crew costa rica you know you look at that and you think well ok well they underachieve so i think england of donald set bal so low that they seems like like overachieved ment i done as as a england fan how would you rank them nine hundred nineteen ninetysix ninety as i guess on this went jiji i kind of i think it's kind of a difficult thing to do if you look at how many people in euro ninety sixteen for example gains that this team hoof i think it's pretty much most of them you know i think i think that's the issue that we have but as we've seen with regards to successful so i think if you to do a combined eleven of england cratia perfectly maybe more england players than craciun right however we know that this is more about paying than as individuals and i think in that sense it's it's difficult conversations average great compensation over three to have down the pub but i don't i don't know where it gets us at this stage but enjoyment ways as a fine like oh where would you put them like this tournament seemed to you know we're we're hearing a lot about how fans can enjoy england again and you know what i would subscribe to that view even if the opposition at times wasn't wasn't top rank but you know where would you put this compared to ninetysix compared to nine hundred no no i think it's been entertaining it's been fun because we've won and i think that's about it i don't think we've hardly created anything you know compla you look at the game against colombia i didn't think i'll speak to make say because again today super sich didn't have to make a safe and i think in that sense then entertaining us away but we giving the policies that winning we give them a cough 'cause they young giving them the cough because fail so badly in the past but let's get ahead of ourselves and believe that you know there's an entertaining side that you enjoy watching play if team was called denmark we would say you know that pragmatic that griffey they get through it but particularly sickly wanna see them play that much but because i'm an englishman that because i think no only because i'm english i think football fans engaged with this team because they know these plants from the primarily and i think that's the reason why people would get more excited about england and they would another side considering the solid football we've seen them play today then maybe it'd be pre tournament it may be too early to know this but do feel like this team you mentioned how young they are did this.

arizona fifteen sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"More then they're taking in this is the first time it's happened since nineteen eighty two social security this year for the first time since nineteen eighty two is dipping into reserves to pay benefits and by twenty thirty four will not be able to pay full benefits in fact we'll be able to pay only three fourths of benefits beginning in twenty thirty four in twenty twenty six medicare will go into its reserves what they're saying is this program is taking in less money than it is shelling out insolvent that's an predict that in just sixteen years benefits are going to be seventy five percent of what they are today so something's gotta give it's not politically popular to talk about something's gotta give because that means either a raising the retirement age be having people contribute more through taxes payroll taxes or c start cutting benefits or all of the above right right and whose responsibility is this on on some level and who will have the courage to stand in front of people and tell them the truth because the elderly are being lied to the retirees are being lied to that this money is in perpetuity and you don't have to absolutely young people today are contributing being lied to that this money could be around for you called me young young kids today you still got many years of contributing if you will to it and then should the burden fall upon those people today to contribute more to a failing system a system which you know maybe on some level won't be around for them in their retirement age you can't just say you have to pay more into it without changing something else because then you're just throwing more money at a problem with that actually fixing the problem a greed if you will about might be one of the reasons why you think we're gonna handbasket pamela says she can restore your faith in humanity and it's interesting that on this again the anniversary of d day we have this story for your faith in humanity roland martin now is just another graduating senior in a bit of a sense you know a lot has happened to him since nineteen forty yeah that's when he dropped out of school served in the us navy during world war two since then became a father a grandfather a great grand father and even has a great great grandchild on.

roland martin us seventy five percent sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on 1A

"This is one a i'm joshua johnson there's never really an irrelevant time to publish a book about guns it seems like we're always living in the aftermath of a mass shooting but very few books on guns are satirical novels written by major political figures last month former congressman steve israel published his second novel called big guns it's a satire of the gun lobby and of the influence of interest groups in politics today we're speaking with him about the book and it's alternative reality where gun industry lobbyists introduce a bill that would force every american to own a gun we'll get to that after you hear this hey i'm kelly mcevers host of npr's embedded and we've got a new episode all about how scott pruitt ended up running the epa it's a story about peru its life in the southern baptist church how he handled a major pollution case and why he sued the epa fourteen times to search for embedded on the npr one app or wherever you get your podcasts steve israel joins us in studio are welcome to one a joshua thanks for having me on how this book come about well i've been in congress for sixteen years and in those sixteen years i sat through fifty two mass killings as a member of congress a church in charleston movie theater in colorado college in virginia virginia tech and then a shooting at an elementary school in connecticut and the most frequently asked question that i received after every single one of those events was this when will congress do something and it didn't just come from liberal democrats came from conservative republicans it came from nra members people wanted to know when congress would do something and i didn't have the heart to tell them probably never and since i realized i would never write a law that would pass on the gun violence i decided to write a book that would that will explain to people why nothing happens from the inside through satirical end.

joshua johnson steve israel npr southern baptist church congress charleston movie theater connecticut congressman kelly mcevers scott pruitt colorado virginia nra sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Public to continue to support the investigation and for people with information to cliche carat please come forward and share it go andrew sometimes we just don't know but typically whenever i talked to law enforcement about a case like this somebody knows somebody brags somebody tells somebody and that's typically how the word gets out or somebody knows that goes to jail they want to shorten their time they pick up the phone they summit a prosecutor in a say i have some information that you might be interested in most of the time people talk it's very unusual for a case like this where there's one point five million reasons for someone to pick up the phone instantly become a millionaire and at the same time bring justice it looks like that hasn't happened yet right zaari down and i went back i wasn't here for this i didn't live here during the time ellen back i am i read the original reporting on it from the seattle times back in two thousand one little bit a context here not that it really influences of the story but um you know this is a crime that happened one month almost to the day after nine eleven uh be in that stood out to me because it was a john ashcroft who had actually mentioned mentioned wales in in a in a statement in d c uh but yeah that sixteen years later a crime committed a notch as somebody who's in the law enforcement community but seemed to be in a bit controversial on his stand he was a an a a guncontrol advocate which riled some people up but for the people who worked with him on both sides of the courtroom really well liked really well respected highprofile guy in law enforcement sixteen years used to have a million dollar price tag on any tiptoed lead to an arrest now as you say one one point five wdbo and and so so sometimes when it comes to a case like this you you don't know may be it can't be solved but again whoever did this at some point they have probably told somebody and they have probably share that information was someone else so i want to get this story rowe quicken ramadan so topfive this happened today students are walked out all over the.

prosecutor john ashcroft wales andrew ellen seattle times sixteen years million dollar one month
"sixteen years" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

The Rich Roll Podcast

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on The Rich Roll Podcast

"Really fake news and what's real and went our concerns on whether or not and then i learned that listeners learn and so on yeah but they're flooding egal who write books about who know nothing right will you very good at the podcast i love enjoying i always enjoy listening to it and uh it's been cool just over the last couple of weeks deceive ha who you've out on because an additional floyd landis you had in the urban on who's my friend who i had a my shows well and i was like that's another one where i was like i wouldn't i wouldn't have expected james have anthony on but his story so amazing i was so delighted that you had him on and then i i think i did a a good job with them i have to listen to your pockets they like this is your friends that i'm sure yours was actually much better the one that we had was before the olympics os before he won this latest gold um it's probably little bit longer but uh yeah check it out he in there and there's an intriguing thing it's like he didn't just like go all out as a kid was talented great coaches win a gold and they move onto the next part of his life he likes stopped in this sport for sixteen years e broke the record for the the longest time span between winning goal a goal of two different gold medals i mean he's were were overawed he won four or five but that he broke out record and set fascinating story to me how do you get that level people form backup um again in between that period of time it's not like he was swing a whole time right if you will allow the atlanta travel ban he was like he went down a dark rabbit whole for a while and you know the travel the world in all kinds of crazy stuff start smoking cigarettes like it's just the ark of like what transpired in between those olympic victories is really quite staggering because i think in addition to people forman's if someone is a doer rather than a writer that the they have a.

james anthony forman writer olympics atlanta sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Uh a little bit i said i was dropped when i wrote over with your ties and we talked a little bit about quarterbacks and and the yeah so there's guys definitely that uh uh specially guys and are in the german terry business uh definitely get together and talk to him a little bit about football but i know that you're competitive but are you competitive they where your ranking is alltime due care out and you know when you see these list of greatest playoff performers or best clutch quarterback or whatever it might be no you know because i think that uh you don't want to me when you're competitive you're competitive and things you could control and that's something really that i can't control and that's really kind of up to the people that are making those judgments and so therefore you know yet you look at them but uh it's not it's not something that you get excited about or sleep over depending on where you rank you know and sixteen years the nfl they played it did everything it possibly could be as a good players i could and then you know now that's behind me so uh you know i can leave everything else up to everybody else should we look at the bottom line in that's the number super bowl wins when it comes to whose neil the not like the pecking order of greatness with quarterbacks is that a fair litmus test you know yeah i mean i think that's a great great topic of conversation because you know you look at a guy like dan marino and it was a commend of quarterback and you know ranks one of the alltime great if never one one so you know i think he is one that kind of was a monkey wrench into that plus there's so many things that go in wanting a super bowl and it's not only the quarterback it's a coach and that's an organization at wants to women so there's so many in intangibles that it's tough to put all those on the quarterback.

football nfl super bowl neil dan marino sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on WWL

"And thank you for joining us america armando is with us in los angeles ira mondo how are you great bank they've that you might call sure not going to have the i would question i have a universal life insurance now i'm sure and and it could have universal knife insurance that when you have like it's a saving type i've had it for sixteen years me and my wife uh started it about fifteen years ago and uh be about three seventy combined a month and wanted to see if it was just better idea to go to term life now that you know i have assets in they've done well over the years now and i don't need that uh big monthly expense and they gave me a surrender netvalue about twenty eight thousand my uh surrender that to them it's only a up five five hundred thousand for both of us 250 apiece so just wanted to see what uh what was what was the best option to just get out of that or he said you've had it for how long sixteen years now and you're how old today forty five okay and and so if we took a twenty nine year old in price determine sharon's on them today for two hundred fifty on you and two hundred fifty on her we would know what the insurance portion of the three hundred seventy dollars is right right and then the difference had we put that in a decent growth mutual fund for the last sixteen years for instance in your roth ira the instead of twenty eight thousand you would probably have close to three hundred thousand while and so that's what this product is cost you and so the question is do you stay in it will lord no no one wants sixty more years of the fund now.

los angeles life insurance sharon sixteen years three hundred seventy dollars twenty nine year fifteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Point in their lives that they are making more money as they get into their forties they see the tax benefit because they start making up more money they see that they can reduce your tax burden right there therefore there is an incentive and then by the time they get to be fifty years old may they they're even more money and then realize that over the next you know if you're gonna retire at sixty six years you know you see you have sixteen years left more right now if you're fifty i think probably 17 or her bear or eighteen years uh you know earning power laughed and you're doing a lot better and you're saying while i can maxed out on this and and so the people that are actually doing it may be smaller but the average means nothing because it's those people that are getting the tax break in their fifties and in their sixties that what vote and vote it's a hired rory intrasian of active voter a a great deal more and a significant portion of those people that are involved in that planning have considered nato philosophical ideas and a conservative fiscal mindset because that's why they're doing it i'm all for you know repealing the mandate i i think we've talked about it over the years chief justice roberts uh a it was legislating from the bench when he made that decision on the individual mandate the tax versus the penalty and so i'm with you on that that's great problem is is that you're not going to get that across that's not gonna come across over on the senate side with moderates certainly not gonna come across with democrats so that's that part of it is not likely not to survive the senate version and if it doesn't survived the senate version and then they go back and forth in back and forth you lose votes well house as we're unit what a gain votes in the senate and an embassy and wall street's journal talked about the the fact and what they say they're save the money is that the people that.

rory intrasian senate chief justice sixty six years eighteen years sixteen years fifty years
"sixteen years" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on KTRH

"No kidding warrant hans what accounts sixteen years with sixteen years we keep growing there seems to be a a demand for in jerry's the supply who you want to talk to next year doctor francis in michigan francis wocka wocka oh jerry i francis i'm interested in a buick encore you have mentioned anything about it so i just want your viewpoint on it actually like it i haven't had it in a few years but really hasn't changed very much since the last time i had it i'll tell you a couple of things that are really lack of ballot fuel economy's good but more than anything buick has done an exceptional job with their interiors and interior quietness the thing i mean down to the point francis of even putting thicker glass in the doors to cut out some noise and they've done a great job with it it's nice nice vehicle they've they've always scott good incentives on them the only got low base price the base process round twenty two thousand before you start adding a bunch of options and of course that sticker price and then of course you take the incentives off of that in and it's priced really well they've actually lowered the this vehicle since the first came out and that is unusual so i think it's a good choice mmm oh i'm glad you're very positive about it i think i'll get one because and personally driving uh ondiek um if he yeah yeah which one two thousand nine the last one that they made uh the s tech no no no not at the ascpacom trying to think what fast when the night before they went out business yeah it what is it called c i can't even remember anyway it done very well for me but tom i'm thinking of getting a smaller suv and i thought maybe the buick encore would be you know perfect sets it will you'll i've felt a lotta people into him over the years and every single one of them seems to relax i've got regulate them buric in grosse pointe if you want.

jerry fuel economy buick grosse pointe hans michigan tom i sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Her daughter with sixteen years old what would it be ads say fresh new in town i learned this from working with operation underground railroad that there are you know low miles you know th through there are by sleigh there are terms that people who are buying children clearly understand and and for backpage to be censoring those and then not turning those people into police it is really quite reprehensible and frightening i want you here's what i want you to do mary would you be willing to come back later this week because i wanna talk to you about the google connection because of court mary is mary is you know as of this coup correct me if i'm wrong mary but you and i don't agree on much i would imagine but exactly you could probably got it on the air yes okay so so we don't agree on we don't agree on much however we do agree on this and what she's going through now what google appears to be doing to her they are making her look like me they're making her an treating her info sorry have another treating her like they would treat let like they would treat me so something is really rock i get it when they're treating me that way they're treating one of their own there's something really wrong and i want her to explain that but the first thing i want you to do is please today watch i am jane doe oh and bring yourself up to speed on this because there's something going through congress that needs to happen later this week i hope to have mike leon to todd you have you talked to mike lee about this at all mary and i have no i have not okay so i i'd like to get mike involved in this because i trust mike as you know a a real strict constitutionalist but he's also a deeply moral man and so will you know will not excuse will not excuse uh the the horrors done to people over for for for rights if you will big factly and and he's a first amendment specialist and i think both he and i fundamentally agreed this is about conduct online at has nothing to do with speech nothing to do a.

mary google jane doe congress mike leon mike mike lee first amendment sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

Marketing Over Coffee

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on Marketing Over Coffee

"Caterpillar we have work with sixteen years without a contract pierre bel moelders eighteen years without a kind of went through all of these cases and so they're no contract with any of them and i said guess what we don't have to sweat a negotiation every year we're just their their customers for life it just continues on which enormity and there's no expiration date show after you by the company you're welcome to go visit those companies and say hey you know we're from new york and and we have to have contracts and these people in the small town in wisconsin that don't believe in contracts that doesn't cut it for us so we have to negotiate a contract with you now i see you can do that after you own it 'cause it your way of doing business but i'll tell you something if i were the person buying the company i sure as hell wouldn't fly around and talk to them and tell them that we update i'm contracts it's funny oh you get into that the the way of doing business in the union shackling different cultures of investors so these are all this is all taking place after a letter of intent is signed so it's not that trade is not the case where there's multiple bidders looking to buy like this is the point at which have already turned out that alan yeah when there are multiple debtors looking to buy normally claim that they're able as she is the black book.

Caterpillar new york wisconsin alan eighteen years sixteen years
"sixteen years" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen years" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Yes majorities of americans all me what has been called the left and the right share a hatred of the banks and aid fear and loathing of the one percent that's right and have a fear and loathing of war and and that's why when people are home they say this whole russia gate vein has nothing to do with russia or with their lives and they're interested in jobs and rally in peace don't forget we'd been at war in afghanistan for almost sixteen years we've been at war in the middle east for longer going back to the first gulf war and the first bush presidency so the lation is wary of war the nation has been bankrupted bob war and i think people are beginning to realize that these wars that the media and others are talking about awards we can't win and just a footnote here we cannot win a war against russia and if we tried to invade russia first of all most of the european countries would not be a part of it but if we tried to invade russia that would lead to a nuclear exchange and we would not necessarily come out on the better side of that exchange and i think people are realizing this and then saying the politicians are talking one way but at the conditions of our lives are demanding things radically different from what the politicians are talking about in a general sense what kind of opposition do you think is shaping up that's the big question and i hesitate to predict anything about the forms of party organization in his fury i think.

russia afghanistan gulf war bush bob war sixteen years one percent