18 Burst results for "Sixteen Thousand Feet"

Uncommon Grit, with a Navy Seal Photographer

This Week in Photo

06:30 min | 11 months ago

Uncommon Grit, with a Navy Seal Photographer

"Hey welcome back to another episode of this week photo on your host. Frederik van johnson. This is going to be an interesting interview as many of you know i'm a. Us air force veteran eight years. But nothing that i ever did in the air force and i was a combat photojournalist in the air force. But nothing that i ever did in the air force comes close to my guest. Today has done in the navy as a navy seal. We're going to talk about that. We're connected on many levels. He's like my brother now. You're my big brother. So we're we're gonna talk about photography. We're gonna talk about his experiences being a photographer being a navy seal photographer and getting some of the shots did some of us just dream about getting. We're also gonna talk about this thing right here uncommon grit so. This is a book that he just published. That has a bunch of the photos that he took on that journey throughout the years. We're going to talk about all that all it's coming up right now be was going on man how you doing good man. Thanks for having me appreciate it. You know it's like you know we work with the air force again. Yes exactly so. I tell you what you'd be going. Air force base is awesome and those guys we were talking about earlier. It's like all we do is we're on deployment. Also we wanted that. Damn cheese tortellini. Mr and then you go there or face and go and do donna facility and they got damn pop tarts got doughnuts breakfast sandwiches and mike. Wow we chose the wrong service. look us. life was hard for us back then. It's like god damn you guys ever get the steak exactly right. I don't understand it. Medium rare knitted always medium. I don't understand. I know like we show up. We're like hey what can we get for this really cool navy seal dive knife like wow a semi two inch plasma screen okay. Sold as greasy work work with air force the. Pj's fantastic and those their you know what they did there Just phenomenal people. So you know it was. Yeah it s great to scrape to her. She wanted to work with you on the other side with photography which is really and here. We are right. Who knew who i keep. This book is part of my permanent collection. Now so thanks again presented over amazing. So let's let's talk about first. Let's before we dive into the book piece of this. Give give give us kind of the overview of your journey from you know not knowing anything about photography publishing an amazing book like dream that you know i. It's it's really very very very unique. Journey is just the it started with Graduated seal training and ninety six class to await from there. It went to silting to Did a bunch of deployments was silting created. Seal team ten. So that shifted me over silty mate but there were talking about like liberia. Were afghanistan iraq. So it was like four. Five combat deployments before i got a break and when i got a break that's in the navy airforce auto the air force's rotation but the navy break is five and two so it's five years deploying two years at a advanced training command. Get your senses back together train and then get back out there For me it was ten years. But when i got out there i got sent out to military freefall school in arizona and it's joint commands. Were there with like army navy with that. You know that's where my journey began this two thousand and seven and you know actually even be out there teaching free like ours. I was already a navy seal for ten years. I had to be a basic wall. Which is your static. Line basic military freefall called basic static. Line jump master military freefall jump master and then when i got out there ended up being a military freefall instructor military. Freefall instructor examiner And so An accelerated freefall Accelerated freefall coach excessive rainfall instructor essen. Tna select basic all the calls for air and then a everything. Now you're jumping out of a c. One thirty at sixteen thousand feet with With new operators never jump before and you tap on the show them the jump out and my job was just hang with them and just with the mix. You don't screw up getting getting back straight whatever they need to do and make sure they poll and and go from there and then i I started doing video because video. And what you're gonna learn at military freefall because you can't see what you're doing because you're you're free some students are all over the place you know and so do the video but one morning It was really really early. I don't know what. I think we're trying to beat some weather pattern. That was coming in and we were like literally. The ramp is open on like like probably five. Am just as the sun is like creeping up and the whole desert was just like beautiful reds yellows oranges and i was like man. I should Somebody should take a picture of this is really cool and then i'm like oh i guess i should figure that out you know are and so. That's soy started. Just google unlike the went to dr google photography you know and then that started my journey and the number you know it just you learn and then i go to barnes and noble. As a matter of fact. I went to barnes and noble at my old seal team to dive log from my last a combat dives that i did and i went all the way to the back. Full of the paged. I put my semi kids over to the kids section. You know when. I sat there like digital photography. Open up books going. Wow this is this is going to be interesting. And then i take notes and put the book back. You know. i'm that guy. Sorry i'm the guy. I would well at that time. He knows i'm in the military. I had three kids. You know with that. You're obviously for me that my life is unhappily married so to me it was. I was broke and i can feel the book. Twenty five bucks. I'm like well. I gotta take my kids to you know to the movies so i'm like i'd so it's anyway long story short right down. That's what i did.

Air Force Navy Frederik Van Johnson Us Air Force Army Navy Liberia Mike Afghanistan Iraq Arizona Google Barnes
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

06:44 min | 1 year ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on KGO 810

"The U. two aircraft that a number of other highly classified pieces of hardware that the CIA used during the Cold War now the the big issue here is the submarine as you said John is three miles over sixteen thousand feet the the wreckage in up to that point the deepest anyone has ever recovered a submarine was two hundred and forty five feet the two of you SO Squillace in nineteen thirty nine so here instead of two forty five feet you have to go down over sixteen thousand feet and at the same time you know you're going to be out in the mid north Pacific and as soon as you said the ship out there the Soviets will be there watching so we built the Glomar explorer under the cover of being a Howard Hughes project and the irony here is in nineteen sixty eight through seventy four when you said Howard Hughes every journalist in this in the rules in the city in the country turned around because Howard Hughes was a great news story so here you have a top secret code word program and what do you use for a cover the most press attractive person in the country this is really cool Norman I mean well let's talk about it because it really at this point the book becomes a thriller we put together something called the executive committee X. com Richard Helms head of CI a dentist a day David was a David Packard yes David Packard was at CIA Henry Kissinger who is now national security adviser leads what would become the committee of forty I think its name forty because they approve forty secret missions this is one of the note was same forty much before they approve when they started approving the missions I see they just eventually approve forty missions sell forty some running pretty some all right and doctor Lee DU bridge at the presidential science adviser this is is about as secret as it gets if you talk about this we have to shoot you and they used to in the Cold War they didn't mess around meanwhile there's something that happens there is only explicable because it it's history of the Soviet embassy in Moscow and were in Washington is given a note we don't know who wrote it telling the Soviets that the U. S. knows whether a Soviet submarine is in the Pacific and they're going for where did that no come from north well no one knows wasn't that specific it just said the Americans are going to sell try to salvage one of one of your submarines by saying one of your submarines events it was obviously written by an American some people believe it was the spy John Walker a navy communications specialist and that makes a lot of sense except it couldn't have been because by that time Walker had Russian contacts and he would have given it directly to one of his contacts because Walker did everything for money anonymous note this and did not earn John Walker money how Walker and several of his colleagues are still with is there in Florence Mel Colorado for the rest of your life a couple of others and do we believe that the man or woman who did that is still unknown and still it trees a traitor the Russians assure me they don't know who said this so I would guess the person is still as still out there all right the Russians get this note do we know the Russians have the note we don't all right but the Russians get the note the immediately to a brain and who was ambassador in Washington at the time immediately sends on to Moscow naval headquarters gets the note there shocked the first think about the K. one twenty nine they don't know where she is but they know she was somewhere in the north Pacific with the deaths are between twelve and twenty five thirty thousand feet so they know salvage there is impossible so they start looking at other sufferings we could have been locked that were lost the the the CIA now with a black budget starts a project using Howard Hughes is cover remember now Richard Nixon as president Howard Hughes and Richard Nixon have a long and chequered history there are people in Washington who want to spill everything about Richard Nixon's relationship with Howard Hughes dating back to the fifties and the nineteen forties you've seen movies about Howard Hughes this is the most spectacular van I think in all of Howard Hughes is history to build a ship under watching Soviet eyes that is going to recover K. one twenty nine and they have to do it in public the way they're going to do it is to convince the public that Howard Hughes is interested in mining at the bottom of the ocean and they and and Norman they start schools across America to mine at the bottom of the ocean well the several companies including Lockheed which was a key player in project historian but the lucky people who were working on mining projects don't know about the classified so they put more money into C. for mining a number of other kinds of companies to universities start classes in ocean engineering to take advantage of this new field and this matter fact we start the book with students walking in the class right after it's revealed in length early seventy five nineteen seventy five but it's all a hoax and imagine these kids and their professors of to spend a couple of years studying ocean engineering C. for mining and related subjects and suddenly the LA times publishes a story that says it's all fake the bill now there's no see for mining effort the building of the Hughes Glomar explorer on the east coast and the building of the enormous barge that holds the sled that will actually recover it imagine this we've got a ship with this huge empty center of it they had to build a ship that could hold together with that at an empty middle right the moon K. right now and she'll be shipped without a keel centerpiece and in that they're going to have this recovery mechanism that looks like a crab they call the Clementine eventually and that's going to be in case in a barge to conceal it because it's got to be loaded in the in the in the front of the public off of California Catalina island with all kinds of spies and all kinds of news been around it Norman it's just amazing these are these men dream this up and pulled it off I am it's a credit to them that they had such a fantastic thing a credit to the Nixon administration that with all its political problems fighting the Vietnam War fighting the Soviets they went ahead and and play James Bond well as you say it was just amazing.

CIA sixteen thousand feet twenty five thirty thousand fe two forty five feet forty five feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

06:47 min | 1 year ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"And he had a key role in developing the U. two aircraft in a number of other highly classified pieces of hardware that the CIA used during the Cold War now the the big issue here is the submarine as you said John is three miles over sixteen thousand feet the the wreckage in up to that point the deepest anyone has ever recovered a submarine was two hundred and forty five feet the two of you SO Squillace in nineteen thirty nine so here instead of two forty five feet you have to go down over sixteen thousand feet and at the same time you know you're going to be out in the mid north Pacific and as soon as you said the ship out there the Soviets will be there watching so we built the Glomar explorer under the cover of being a Howard Hughes project and the irony here is in nineteen sixty eight through seventy four when you said Howard Hughes every journalist in this in the rooms in the city in the country turned around because Howard Hughes was a great news story so here you have a top secret code word program and what do you use for a cover the most pressing the track this person in the country this is really cool Norman I mean well let's talk about it because it really at this point the book becomes a thriller we put together something called the executive committee X. com Richard Helms head of CI a dentist a day David was a David Packard yes David Packard was at CIA Henry Kissinger who's now national security adviser leads what would become the committee of forty I think its name forty because they approve forty secret missions this is one of the note was same forty much for before they approve when they started approving the missions I see they just eventually approve forty missions sell forty some running RD psalm all right and doctor Lee DU bridge of the presidential science adviser this is is about as secret as it gets if you talk about this we have to shoot you and they used to in the Cold War they didn't mess around meanwhile there's something that happens there is only explicable because it it's history of the Soviet embassy in Moscow and were in Washington is given a note we don't know who wrote it telling the Soviets that the U. S. knows whether a Soviet submarine is in the Pacific and they're going for where did that no come from north well no one knows wasn't that specific it just said the Americans are going to sell try to salvage one of one of your submarines by saying one of your submarines events it was obviously written by an American some people believe it was the spy John Walker a navy communications specialist and that makes a lot of sense except it couldn't have been because by that time Walker had Russian contacts and he would have given it directly to one of his contacts because Walker did everything for money not not in the snow to this and did not earn John Walker money how Walker and several of his colleagues are still with is there in Florence metal Colorado for the rest of your life a couple of others and do we believe that the man or woman who did that is still unknown and still the trees a traitor the Russians assure me they don't know who said it so I would guess the person is still as still out there all right the Russians get this note do we know the Russians have the no we don't all right but the Russians get the note the immediately the brain and who was ambassador in Washington at the time immediately sends on to Moscow naval headquarters gets a note there shocked the first think about the K. one twenty nine they don't know where she is but they know she was somewhere in the north Pacific with the deaths of between twelve and twenty five thirty thousand feet so they know salvage there is impossible so they start looking at other sufferings we could have been locked that were lost the the the CIA now with a black budget starts a project using Howard Hughes is cover remember now Richard Nixon as president Howard Hughes and Richard Nixon have a long and chequered history there are people in Washington who want to spill everything about Richard Nixon's relationship with Howard Hughes dating back to the fifties and the nineteen forties you've seen movies about Howard Hughes this is the most spectacular event I think it all of Howard Hughes is history to build a ship under watching Soviet eyes that is going to recover K. one twenty nine and they have to do it in public the way they're going to do it is to convince the public that Howard Hughes is interested in mining at the bottom of the ocean and they and and Norman they start schools across America to mine at the bottom of the ocean well the several companies including Lockheed which was a key player in project historian but the lucky people who were working on mining projects don't know about the classified so they put more money into C. for mining a number of other kinds of companies to university start classes in ocean engine airing to take advantage of this new field and this matter fact we start the book with students walking in the class right after it's revealed in length early seventy five nineteen seventy five but it's all a hoax and imagine these kids and their professors used to spend a couple of years studying ocean engineering C. for mining and related subjects and suddenly the delay times publishes a story that says it's all fake the bill now there is no see for mining effort the building of the Hughes Glomar explorer on the east coast and the building of the enormous barge that holds the sled that will actually recover it imagine this we've got a ship with this huge empty center of it they had to build a ship that could hold together with that at an empty middle right the moon K. right now the ship without a keel centerpiece and in that they're going to have this recovery mechanism that looks like a crowd they call the Clementine eventually and that's going to be in case in a barge to conceal it because it's got to be loaded in the in the in the front of the public off of California Catalina island with all kinds of spies and all kinds of news been around it Norman it's just amazing these are these men dream this up and pulled it off hi I'm it's a credit to them that they had such a fantastic thing a credit to the Nixon administration that with all its political problems fighting the Vietnam War fighting the Soviets they went ahead and and play James Bond well as you say it was just amazing.

CIA sixteen thousand feet twenty five thirty thousand fe two forty five feet forty five feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Mystery in Milton solved now but not completely here's what happened in the back you Asian slide tumbled from an airliner into the yard of when in one's home the slide took out a couple of branches of his beloved Japanese maple it turns out the uninflated slide fell from a delta airlines Jack out of Paris which was landing at Logan around noon time Sunday luckily no one was injured but neighbors say it could have killed someone another case of someone putting a laser at a jet landing at Logan this happened thanksgiving eve a southwest pilot reported a green laser shining on the side of the Boeing seven thirty seven upon descent the jet was at an altitude of sixteen thousand feet at the time but it marks the fortieth time this year that someone has trained a laser gun at an airplane in Massachusetts well apparently age matters when making travel choices but the result of a recent survey might surprise you when it comes to travel younger generations want advice and not just the virtual kind Travelport's new global digital research shows fifty percent of generation Y. twenty five percent of generation Z. turned to travel advisors for recommendations that's compared to only eight percent of baby boomers as far as social media influence on travel the survey shows generation Z. favors Instagram generation Y. turns to Instagram and Facebook generation X. and baby boomers prefer Facebook Wendy Gillette CBS news I and is being compared to performing open heart surgery in space a space walk under way today over the international space station here's Peter K. space station commander look apartment Tana when Nash astronaut drew Morgan working to upgraded expensive experiment that wasn't designed to be fixed in space the alpha magnetic spectrometer help scientists see into.

Milton delta airlines Paris Boeing Massachusetts Travelport Instagram commander Nash Facebook Wendy Gillette Peter K. drew Morgan sixteen thousand feet twenty five percent eight percent fifty percent
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on KCRW

"This is such a strange place because you're sort of standing in the middle of a high plateau there's some rolling ridges of around the side and and dotting all over the landscape for these radio telescopes hunting is the word because these radio dishes are all packed together any two of them can be as much as ten miles apart Finnair makes it hard for humans to work at sixteen thousand feet so almost main control room is at a lower altitude Amir nine thousand five hundred feet above sea level the day I visited Ignacio Toledo was the astronomer on duty in the control room what we do is to operate the telescope the alma observatory operating the telescope means deciding what the dishes are pointing at and monitoring atmospheric conditions especially the amount of water vapor alma can see radiation coming from things like dust and gas but water vapor acts like a cloud blocking the signal the lower the value the better the summations and right now is pretty good alma is very popular with astronomers to later says more want to use it then the facility can accommodate in totality we're requesting around sixteen thousand hours how we can only give four thousand so they do a selection based on the scientific merits of the project on the day I visited the telescope was pointing out an object an astronomer named David principi wanted to study to later told me principi would receive an email letting him know his turn had come up so when I got back to my desk AT and T. R. H. Q. I checked in with principi I was sitting on a beach in Nantucket and I got the email and I was surprised because myself and have very little reception he was at the beach because his observing time happened to fall on the fourth of July principi uses almost to study star formation the earliest stages of a stars life in those early stages the star is surrounded by a thick ring of dust something that alma is particularly good at singing and this ring is ultimately where planets are forming you can actually see the planet but you can see a gap in the ring where the planet's gravity has cleared away the material like almost all of ana's users principi didn't travel to the observatory when his measurements were being made at some point he'll receive a large data file containing his results that he can study in a computer in his office alma astronomer Ignacio Toledo says this remote capability take some of the magic out of observing with the telescope is less romantic yes but at least for me anything for most of the people here they work in this feeling that what we're doing is there something awesome learning how the universe is put together does have an awesome component to it Palca NPR news.

Ignacio Toledo David principi Nantucket Finnair Amir alma observatory T. R. H. ana nine thousand five hundred fee sixteen thousand hours sixteen thousand feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Sea level this is such a strange place because you're sort of standing in the middle of a high plateau there's some rolling ridges of around the side and and dotting all over the landscape for these radio telescopes hunting is the word because these radio dishes are all packed together any two of them can be as much as ten miles apart Finnair makes it hard for humans to work at sixteen thousand feet so almost main control room is at a lower altitude a mere nine thousand five hundred feet above sea level the day I visited Ignacio Toledo was the astronomer on duty in the control room what we do is to operate the telescope they alma observatory operating the telescope means deciding what the dishes are pointing at and monitoring atmospheric conditions especially the amount of water vapor alma can see radiation coming from things like dust and gas but water vapor acts like a cloud blocking the signal the lower the value the better dissertations and right now is pretty good alma is very popular with astronomers to later says more want to use it then the facility can accommodate in totality we're requesting around sixteen thousand hours how we can only give four thousand so they do a selection based on the scientific merits of the project on the day I visited the telescope was pointing at an object an astronomer named David principi wanted to study to later told me principi would receive an email letting him know his turn had come up so when I got back to my desk at NPR H. Q. I checked in with principi I was sitting on a beach in Nantucket and I got the email and I was surprised because my cell phone had very little reception he was at the beach because his observing time happened to fall on the fourth of July principi uses almost to study star formation the earliest stages of a stars life in those early stages the star is surrounded by a thick ring of dust something that alma is particularly good at singing and this ring is ultimately where planets are forming you can actually see the planet but you can see a gap in the ring where the planet's gravity has cleared away the material like almost all of ana's users principi didn't travel to the observatory when his measurements were being made at some point he'll receive a large data file containing his results that he can study in a computer in his office alma astronomer Ignacio Toledo says this remote capability take some of the magic out of observing with the telescope is less romantic yes but at least for me anything for most of the people here they work in this feeling that what we're doing is saying something awesome learning how the universe is put together does have.

Ignacio Toledo David principi Nantucket Finnair alma observatory NPR ana nine thousand five hundred fee sixteen thousand hours sixteen thousand feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It when it's convenient and the doctor there was an applause line it resonates with some people yeah it was never talk about point about the issue of deportations I'm just really surprised vice president didn't sign with the folks were deported under president Obama with those that had broken a law while they were in our country but you'll listen these folks all got to get their little breakout moment I think may help you the short term it will not help in the long term trying to win the democratic primary by using grackle Bhama is a way to you know score points I just don't think it works what does the conversation about Barack Obama tell you about the direction of where the Democratic Party has moved in the last several years well it's a good question and I think what we'll see through the primaries is you know what we're that direction of that party is going I believe our party is moving you know in in the right direction on the big issues will right is very general I mean as someone who has been in the positions you've been in I'm sure you can give me a more pointed answer I mean what what is it that we're seeing when people critique this legacy well the critique of the legacy on specific issues obamacare and I'm deportation so it's very specific on tuitions I think most people are happy with obamacare it needed to be fixed tweet but you know nearly thirty million more content health insurance today but it does sound like there are some Democrats were on satisfied with the compromises that needed to be made to get there is that what's being hashed out before us now I think so but it is it is a scene is releasing obamacare if it brought in a lot of new people into the system but a lot of issues have to be dealt with and I think there's frustration with folks out there today with health care going forward do you think that there could be any consequence to taking on these kinds of shots at the Obama administration I do and I think probably Donald Trump loves the idea the Democrats are attacking president Obama's policies I can guarantee a prison Trumbull uses there is a danger we need to be a US art Carney going against in trying to defeat an incumbent president now I think we're gonna be trump but it's never going to be easy and we should not be giving ammunition to Donald Trump to come back inspired us that's Terry McAuliffe he was governor of Virginia and chair of the DNC his new book is called beyond Charlottesville taking a stand against white nationalism thank you for speaking with us thank you very much the Atacama desert in Chile is one of the driest places in the world and dry is good for radio telescopes because it lets them see the heavens more clearly NPR science correspondent Joe Palca reports on a on a ray of some five dozen radio telescopes that provide a unique view of the universe the telescopes look like large steerable satellite dishes they're in a part of the desert that's sixteen thousand feet above sea level.

sixteen thousand feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Org this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and Audie Cornish there was one Democrat not on the stage of this week's presidential debates his name came up over and over again that would be former president Barack Obama and arrival time resident Barack aka one of the first few years of the Obama administration several democratic candidates re litigated policies of the Obama administration healthcare deportation numbers and trade agreements all were under scrutiny vice president Joe Biden has made claiming the Obama mantle a centerpiece of his campaign fought back I hope the next debate we can talk about how we fixed or is is the fix the things that trump is broken it's not how Barack Obama made all these mistakes he did he did joining us now to talk more about what this means for the party we're joined by Terry McAuliffe he was the governor of Virginia and lead the Democratic National Committee welcome to the program thank you for having me on today so we heard the vice president they're sounding fairly defensive but if planes going to claim to be there to the Obama legacy should we have to answer to these criticisms he should but I think it's a big mistake for the Democrats to be going after Joe Biden using president Obama's policies president Obama has a ninety five percent approval rating in the Democratic Party and I just think it's a faulty strategy for these folks to be going after president Obama's policies he was a great president Democrats a dorm but Dan Aronson was on Charlie Charlie every vice president who runs for president has to deal with the legacy right I mean that's right part of the package sure it is part of the package in it I think it really is an advantage for Joe Biden that every time people here really it president Obama being attacked I think it goes to the vice president saying to his benefit I think the Democrats ought to be spending their time on trump and also putting out a positive message where they stand on the issues here's how senator Cory Booker feels about this service present you can't have it both ways you invoke president Obama more than anybody in this campaign you can't do it when it's convenient and the doctor there was an applause line it resonates with other people yeah it was never talk about point about the issue of deportations I'm just really surprised vice president says that the folks were deported under president Obama with those that had broken a law while they were in our country but you'll listen these folks all got to get their little breakout moment I think may help you the short term it will not help in the long term trying to win the democratic primary by using grackle Bhama is a way to you know score points I just don't think it works what does the conversation about Barack Obama tell you about the direction of where the Democratic Party has moved in the last several years well it's a good question and I think what we'll see through the primaries is you know what we're that direction of that party is going I believe our party is moving you know in in the right direction on the big issues will right is very general I mean as someone who has been in the positions you've been in I'm sure you can give me a more pointed answer I mean what what is it that we're seeing when people critique this legacy further critique of the legacy on specific issues obamacare and I'm deportation so it's very specific on tuitions I think most people are happy with obamacare it needed to be fixed tweet but you know nearly thirty million more Americans have health insurance today but it does sound like there are some Democrats were on satisfied with the compromises that needed to be made to get there is that what's being hashed out before us now I think so but it is an existing user lacing obamacare if it brought in a lot of new people into the system but a lot of issues have to be dealt with and I think there's frustration with folks out there today with health care going forward do you think that there could be any consequence to taking on these kinds of shots at the Obama administration I do and I think probably Donald Trump loves the idea the Democrats are attacking president Obama's policies I can guarantee a prison trample you sis there is a danger we need to be a US art Carney going against in trying to defeat an incumbent president now I think we're gonna be trump but it's never going to be easy and we should not be giving ammunition to Donald Trump to come back inspired us that's Terry McAuliffe he was governor of Virginia and chair of the DNC his new book is called beyond Charlottesville taking a stand against white nationalism thank you for speaking with us thank you very much pushing the Atacama desert in Chile is one of the driest places in the world and dry is good for radio telescopes because it lets them see the heavens more clearly NPR science correspondent Joe Palca reports on a on a ray of some five dozen radio telescopes that provide a unique view of the universe telescopes look like large steerable satellite dishes they're in a part of the desert that's sixteen thousand feet above sea.

NPR ari Shapiro Audie Cornish sixteen thousand feet ninety five percent
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"Specifically is going into an high Alta. The put lineage Ohio out to the port, you know, we go to flare, you don't have quite the you don't have quite the thirty. Do you normally do down to see level like, especially with our airplane? That was so USA flying out, east go to flare, the airplane. And, you know, the, the, the talk what he density, the fact of the elevator is not there, as, as when normally used to so thinking about fact of a an earlier flair. And also thinking about the fact of the, of the fact of on the breaking on the aircraft, and how much more energy need to stop the craft at that higher altitude. Because because it wouldn't you know, it will be much longer landing role in and break temps will tend to be higher as you and I have been briefed about too many memos Jeff go into someplace like Denver, Albuquerque, we're El Paso, El Paso. Yeah. The just a point of fact, the they're six runways at Denver International five or twelve thousand feet long. One of them sixteen thousand feet long. So I want the sixteen thousand foot long. Here's a question. I'm trying to wrap my brain around this. And I'm not sure I quite know if this is a factor not so we're talking about. We need more. More distance more runway to take off at the higher altitude. But we also said that our ground speed has to be a lot faster to get the appropriate indicated airspeed because that's what the airplane really cares about is indicated airspeed. So does that mean that the actual timing if you hit the, the stop watch it is going to be significantly different, even though you're distances lot longer because your ground speeds higher. You know what I mean? I'm thinking. She willing to flex the engines. So if we apply to flex temperature we could reduce the power of the engines on an efficacy level, and cheat the same take on from because we using much less trust than we would be at out to eventually course you common chief to balance failed performance because the failed out to becomes too high and you just have to use a much higher power setting. So, yeah, if you working bounce failed, otherwise, you balancing the power so that you always achieve you'll take speed at the same point on the runway then that come what, but eventually, I mean, on the three forty three hundred which wasn't ova pilot then. We used to basically full power out of Joe buck, because we hunt to and, you know, we just hope for the best. Stay together. One of the things that Dana, and I are company has been doing for, for the last few years is what we call flex flap settings is what they call it flex settings. Like slam dunk. Something like that, where they instead of using just a standard takeoff, flap setting all takeoffs. They'll adjust that. And if they can get away with the performance of using reduce thrust, and the it's a nice long runway. They'll instead of using flats eleven will use flaps five, and that always means that we're going to be on the runway for a law and longer. I mean, sometimes it's like if you like looking down at your watch to see if you know how much time is a lap since he started to take off roll, because you've been forever on the runway. But you're you're at a much higher speed. Of course, by the time you finally lift off. And we all love those flaps five takeoffs. Don't we Dana? Yeah. It's no. Kind of uncomfortable. Yeah. The airplane is the, the airplane is rattling. It's rolling Darian. It's just not a very comfortable ride in any imagine the people in the back are going. Are we ever going to lift off here? Yeah. We'll when When we're. I mean, almost never is off of, you know, the, the north side Jeff, it's always tends to be in Atlanta. Two seven nine two seven right. Nine landmine left and, you know, he you looking at the, the runway veil will science going by a down on on, on such a what are we at ten thousand feet on that roadway now is longer than that. They extended out. Remember his twelve at the almost twelve. Well, it depends on if it's Lima Chali not. Yeah. Yeah. Which, I don't I don't remember this Pacific number. I think that's just under eleven thousand so you looking at that. And, you know, you look any before thousand.

El Paso Dana USA Jeff Ohio Lima Chali Denver International Joe buck Denver Albuquerque Atlanta sixteen thousand feet sixteen thousand foot twelve thousand feet ten thousand feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

04:16 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"Lightning many Hof inch thick began to lash at his glider than a blinding boat smashed into the company. With the sound of a pistol shunt the boat flash between the rudder pedals and fill the Cup with a stench of ozone an although the electric city continue to thrash, the little aircraft. It was client again. Just the whistle of the slipstream in the distance, he could have the booms of thunder. And again, the lightning sneaked into the company this time it felt like his control column had been plugged into Kaos. I'll get an he's ache to the shocks ran through him again. And again, he couldn't let go of the stick. He just had to endure the pain and there was no kidding himself anymore. He was truly scanned the loss bolt to go through him made him yell out loud. But he continued to climb. He spiraled into less violent conditions and the lightning eased away. Now, he found a new concern he began to feel a little light headed and knew that he was starting to suffer from high punk SIA, a lack of oxygen and it was getting worse. There was nothing. He could do. Little sky lot had no sin. So he continued up puts changing his course he straightened out. But the compass wasn't indicating promptly in the controls felt stiff he was icing up. He could feel the ice, foaming and soon need both hands on the stick just to move it. He took a chance and he heave the stick from scientists side and the allied leapt up points as the ice fell away, he could fly again. But the ice was also building on the news and the leading edges of his wings. His trim type was as far as it could go to counter the weight. And he began to worry that his pito tube was icing up is he trying to work out, what might be wrong with his instruments? He realized he wasn't sure whether he's outta me to read six sixteen thousand feet not the little window on the side of the. Space kind of trying to breeze some fresh, but he was giggling like child and squinting at the instruments try to read them properly, and he realized that he was passing seventeen thousand feet, and then eighteen thousand feet and still doing up. He tried to remember his plan and how high he needed to get to be awarded his time. And see, but he wasn't sure anymore. So he decided to continue to nineteen thousand feet and then head out of the cloud, he knew he was getting high sick is. I ll, it's felt as heavy assembled in his head lulled around and seem difficult to lift up. The mole was still very strong, and as he squinted at the Al to meet he realized it read twenty thousand feet and you it was time to go he felt limp in his straps unclear to fainting. So he put his finger. Through the little side win to deflate. Some cold air onto his face east out his breaks and the hissing Astrum client, as he slowed he began to descend but another updraft Colt him. And he's confused state. He thought I might as well off again. Just to make show pumping the brake spanky, and he shot up with an, the sky lock spiraled around Piggott, sank limply back into his seat. He had no recollection of the next few minutes as he's faithful little glide flew him into the record books. He was now an unconscious passenger along for the ride the trace on his barrack Ralph was the only thing to record his story, as it quietly,.

Ralph Piggott six sixteen thousand feet seventeen thousand feet eighteen thousand feet nineteen thousand feet twenty thousand feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Tulsa, our courthouse and city hall are practically filled with clan members elected to office, with clan support and on January fifth, nineteen twenty two five city leaders, including two oil industry executives are prominent banker in a state legislator would incorporate the Tulsa benevolent society officially establishing the KKK as a legal organization in the state of Oklahoma in August nineteen twenty two almost two thousand hooded Klansmen would parade through downtown eagerly watched by fifteen thousand Tulsen's by nineteen twenty three two years after the riot. The Tulsa Claburn would both three thousand members the largest chapter in the southwest one of the largest in the nation. In Greenwood the fall of nineteen twenty one war on fourteen hundred children, returned to school at Booker T Washington high, the Red Cross having moved to another building. So school could start. But even though residents had won the right to rebuild. They had still not been compensated for the destruction of their homes and businesses they sued the city by the hundreds for damages, but didn't win a single case. But once again, Morris willows found a way to help Greenwood's people funding the construction of more than six hundred homes five churches, twenty four two story brick buildings and two gas stations. A theater and a brand new hospital. The Red Cross furnished almost four hundred thousand feet of lumber sixteen thousand feet of screen wire and two thousand pounds of nails. Willows, also hired fifteen carpenters.

Tulsa Red Cross Greenwood Oklahoma Booker T Washington Klansmen Morris nineteen twenty three two year four hundred thousand feet sixteen thousand feet two thousand pounds
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"And they are now plying that same, you know, constant innovation strategy to the vision jet, which is pretty amazing when you figure the vision jet for started shipping, I think it was just about exactly two years ago. I think it was December two years ago and they've shipped about ninety of them in that time. And yet they are now going in. Into the, you know, the the new enhanced model the g two and what they're doing essentially is that anybody who had a g one on order while you're gonna get a g to some of the new features that they've added here such as the auto throttle. Those are going to go into different packages of options at so if you've got a deposit, you know, at a certain price for the old g one while you may get the base model G tube. But then you can upgrade it with some of the other little goodies that have come out. So I think that's a really great strategy for protecting the investment of people may put the deposit down seven eight years ago. But now they can probably choose to pay a little extra and get some of the latest greatest features. So all I can tell you is is my new favorite plane, and I could tell you my my twenty twenty nineteen goal is to get to as much time in that jet this year as I can't some anybody who's interested in talking about the vision jet or flying the jet. Give me call. Because this is this is the one thing I'm focusing on at twenty nineteen vision yet, it's it is so much fun. It is an awesome airplane. What can you tell us about auto throttle win? Does that come into play? You know, I find that a lot more handy. Kind of in the the descent the approach to landing because often you're ending up doing a number of stair steps as you descend, you know, descended level off, it sixteen thousand feet descend level off it, you know, four thousand feet, and so on and uncertain instrument approaches, you can also get a number of those stair steps, and you end up having to make a lot of changes a lot of them very small minor changes to the throttle to maintain that particular airspeed, especially as you're making altitude changes. And so I think it's going to really simplify the operation allow you to spend more of your your thought process on other things rather than, you know, looking at the thrust levels in the air speed, and you know, making tiny. Any you know, changes to the throttle often? So yeah, it's going to be a real workload saver. All. Right. Yeah. I like I like companies that have a continuous improvement sort of focus to their to their product. The it makes a big difference from the standpoint of the consumer. Yeah, I can't wait to see what you know, they end up doing in the future. Couple of these changes. They made I kind of could've guessed because when I did my typewriting and September. Hey, there was extra little button on the throttle that g wasn't used yet. But it would be perfect for an auto throttle. Some of these things we kinda guest coming along the fact that it was originally limited to below twenty nine thousand feet suggested that, hey, when they get some certification done for RV SM than it will be able to go up to hire out, the toots, some of the things we've been able to guess, I think it's going to be fun looking forward, you know, to to where they go. I would imagine there's a lot they can still do to enhance the single engine vision jet, by the way, the product manager combine something that I hadn't really known. He said the reason they call it the vision Jetta simply because visibility is so excellent through the the front windshield. And that's because the avionics are really consolidated into pretty small package. Not like a typical jet where you've got, you know, banks and banks of switches all over the place as so that really allow them to increase the size of the the windshield. And for sure the, you know, the the view out front is just unparalleled. It's really great. Very cool. All right, one final item. This is from the Seattle times the air force finally takes ownership of its first Boeing tanker with serious misgivings. Oops, oops. Yeah..

Seattle times Boeing RV SM product manager two years twenty nine thousand feet sixteen thousand feet four thousand feet seven eight years
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

"Beautiful breakfast. And and Christmas lunch a slightly difficult problem. She fell down the stairs. First thing in the morning before she even had a drop about Kahal, pasta lips and rector one of ankles and spent the rest of the day, basically sitting down directing operations and the rest of us ran round and try to do everything according to a very strict rules. We got a little done. Hope she's feeling better soon on the mend. Oh, yes. She's already promising around like I'm beginning to wonder if it wasn't done by design. But she's yeah. She's probably around like a ballerina that also. Yes. This suspicion. Well, I'm glad you had a great Christmastime. Even though you were you were without your hard working jelly, right? Right way. My and the dog bustling around so washing-up is on recall unless dog walking a huge amount of eating and considerable of drinking. Everyone was very happy to spend about three days recovering. A know what you mean? All right. Let's see may. Yeah. We had Christmas here. All the kids are are the two that are in college were home. And let's see Natalie is going to be driving with your mom to Charlotte on Sunday. Which is I think is her. No that's the day before birthday. So on the thirty first she is they're driving over to Charlotte because my Natalie is taking a flight on I guess the first for Austria and Germany, she's spending her winter semester. Our winter session, or whatever they call it about three weeks or so three and a half weeks in Germany and Austria for schooling purposes, I guess. Obvious question. Why is she driving to shall it? Because the she goes to school in North Carolina Ilan, and that's the biggest international airport that leaves. And because she's going on kind of a a set. I tin ary be. I don't know. She didn't ask if she could just, you know, fly and save the money because it doesn't matter to her. Yeah. But yeah. But could have saved some some cash probably. But. Well, but anyway, so she's going to be often that adventure something to do with music classical music. I don't know if they have classical music and Austrian German. HR, please. Anyway. So yeah, that's it was very quiet Christmas time saying a bunch now Christmas Eve day and Christmas day four masses altogether. Okay. Four masses altogether. And. The next day was the feast of Saint Stephen and Boxing Day. So we had a great celebration here. It's always a big thing for us here at the Nielsen household the day after Christmas, and that's about it anything else. We want to Danny you, you kind of said something about your present trip or the trip. The or you're you're on before this one you had some troubles issues. What's going on? Spend remember it is three hour show. Yes. Exactly. So many keep it short and simple the first ship three day. Three day was fine. The weather's great. So is really no issue. The problem became that. The amount of time ahead in base is only about eleven hours. So I only go out about six hours of really good rest in between trips. Nice that my three day yesterday flew up to Baltimore and which turned into a fourteen hour day because we're airborne hitting back to Atlanta and climate through about sixteen thousand feet roughly and got E P E A O P message, which in lecture onic overhead enunciate appeal message as well. As a master caution light indicated the Pedo stall system was up and. So looked at that have the F O continue to fly the airplane. I took it all over the Hugh h in SATA working on that in, you know, be cycled the circuit breaker it went back in held for just a few minutes. Then after it have few minutes to think about it said, nah, this is not situation on being came back out in the weather in Atlanta was cruddy. So he ended up bud. Talking to mechanics on the ground in in the OCC. Also to dispatcher in the OCC mechanic said there's nothing else we can do Here. here. Asia's are even done. There's no the tricks. We have year pretty much done. And so I can't the dispatch. Instead, so well what's going on with whether Lanta you said, well, let me check into that. And came back in of course, said that the. Weather was forecast that have freezing levels in. I think so continue on because what actually had failed that in doing?.

Natalie OCC Charlotte Saint Stephen Austria North Carolina Ilan Asia Nielsen Baltimore Atlanta Danny Germany three day sixteen thousand feet fourteen hour eleven hours
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on The School of Greatness with Lewis Howes

"Safety of our loved ones and make sure we don't get our hearts broken and protect our bodies and you know make sure there's no toxic chemicals in our house and we're so busy shoring up our lives that we stop having joyful live play to save is what you're saying and what i talk about in the fear care is how we can we can actually shift those beliefs it's a cultural choice these are cultural beliefs and when i was at sixteen thousand feet in the andy is living in caros village studying the shamans there i realized they don't have those beliefs they actually had i had just finished writing the fear care so it was very validating to be there because i didn't know this about the caros culture this indigenous tribe i was staying with but the the the four what i called the the courage cultivating truth which is the opposite of the four fearful assumptions sees the world view that the caros live by and it's the opposite so instead of uncertain uncertainty is unsafe what if uncertainty is the gateway to possibility what if when you don't know what the future holds anything could happen right it's and there's a whole journey that can go on when you come into right relationship with uncertainty where you realize is that instead of playing it safe you know there's a way to allow your intuition to protect you so that you can actually safely take risks that open the gates of possibility and instead of boss being something that we can't handle that loss is natural and can lead to growth and i know for me when i went through what i called my perfect storm where i gave birth to my daughter and then within two weeks my dog died my healthy young brother wound up in full blown liver failure as a rare side effect from the nfl addicks through max that he was taking for a sinus infection and then my beloved physician father was fifty nine years old and died of a brain tumor all in two weeks and i can look back in that and say wow losses natural and can lead to growth like that was the most transformative loss of my life and i wouldn't be living the life threatening living now if i didn't have that loss and i think almost everybody that's listening can probably think of some experience of loss in their life but at the time felt absolutely devastating and then retrospect we can see how it it breaks your heart open that hurts but it also liberates the soul.

caros village sinus infection nfl two weeks sixteen thousand feet fifty nine years
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"I'll get a little bit into why they're not rare in a minute so the reason why we care about rare earth metals is because they they're used in things like batteries and other green technologies like turbines are also found in some types of light bulbs or commute computers led's smartphones hybrid vehicles idiom can be used to make camera lenses and superconductors as an example and cell phone screens so you may have heard in the past that there was a fear of rare earth shortage but all indications say that that was not based on reality rare earth is actually plentiful it's just hard to extract and you may have heard in the news that very large deposit of rare earth was found in deep sea mud approximately one thousand eight hundred fifty kilometers southeast of tokyo the deposit is located around the island of minimum tori in the pacific ocean researchers from japan investigated that in a two thousand four hundred ninety nine square kilometer area of seabed lice sixteen million tonnes of rare earth oxides along with that estimate they're saying that there is approximately four hundred to eight hundred years worth of rare earth resources there depending on the particular rare earth element we're talking about because the extraction process is so complicated though and expensive some people speculate that it could take up to five years to figure out how to mine the deposits i think it's way more than that i was reading very degree of estimates on that number it's probably going to be a lot longer because the deposits are sixteen thousand feet to twenty thousand feet or four thousand meters to six thousand meters under the surface of the water that's very far down i'm pretty sure that we haven't even really mind anything that's that far down at this point and there's also on top of that brief serious environmental concerns just disturbing seabed to the degree that we would be disturbing it to mind all the regulars that we want and all these elements you know it could be very hazardous and very dangerous to the ocean.

tokyo japan two thousand four hundred nine one thousand eight hundred fif sixteen million tonnes sixteen thousand feet four thousand meters twenty thousand feet eight hundred years six thousand meters five years
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"From what i understand all right but it's so say hawaiians at least yeah anyway basically out in the middle of nowhere in the northwest pacific there was a soviet sub it was a gulf to go l f to soviet submarine they called it the cabriolet for a little while but that's those were the subs with the ragtop yeah those didn't work out the the this gulf to sub was called the k one twenty nine surely it had an actual name right no i think they call them the the k whatever all right well the k one twenty nine was on a routine patrol mission he's at the soviets that they weren't glib about you know what's called this one the hannah montana exactly right so the it was just the k one twenty nine all business which actually is kind of reassuring because it was a nuclear submarine jerk it had not only a nuclear missile like a a nuclear misses you could come up to the surface and shoot onto say the united states sure it also had nuclear torpedoes yeah which i had no idea where thing oh really a nuclear torpedo it's kind of overkill them to think now not if you're underwater and you wanna shoot a nuclear bomb at somebody well okay then they really fits the bill well it turns out that some of these nucleartipped torpedoes detonated and there wasn't a full nuclear detonation obviously but like obvious but it was enough to blow a hole in the submarine and i think kick off some other detonations in some of the other nuclear torpedoes and the upshot all this was that the entire ninety eight person crew and the soviet submarine in the middle of the cold war nineteen sixty eight sunk about sixteen hundred miles or fifteen hundred miles north west of hawaii and hit the bottom at sixteen thousand feet more than three miles down yes and so kicks off the story of project as orion and the global explore yeah so what happens of course is a soviet go looking for this thing they spend a couple of months pretty massive search couldn't find it the us is kinda laughing.

hannah montana united states hawaii sixteen thousand feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Is called stalker there were a couple of them one of them is called soccer shadows of chernobyl in it feels very different herbs very similar to that but i wonder if it's actually a completely different well the character the stalker in the film is lay his whole deal is he guides people through these sites how in the film have a supernatural connotation anyway sidebar just really really enjoy the film and it made me think of some of the scenes and it's good for people to see will maybe that good but it's important for people to see the level of destruction in the level of lasting effects these sorts of technologies can have upon world especially on children who were being born right and not to mention animals ray or bore plant life and who we know that this stuff last in as much as we would like to pretend that we exist in our own islands everything is eventually connected in order to mean a disaster in one place if it's big enough as a disaster everywhere those one more thing i found that was interesting it's a bit of a bit of a crime story this is the last one i have i started looking at mass graves of ordinary skeletons who met 'extraordinary ends i found one in a state in india who tara conned out at an altitude of about sixteen thousand feet in the himalayas sworn found his many six hundred skeletons buried in a place called boop conned lake were skeleton lake they date from either the ninth century to the fifteenth century and the local community had a legend about this they said the remains include those of king giles the wall because he was disobedient during a pilgrimage and with his wife as the queen in israel entourage and his angered the hindu goddess mater ceuta game revenge she in a local deity named law to created thunderstorms in avalanches reigning gigantic stones on the kenyan as army and it turns out the legend may contain a grain of truth because the scientists say it's possible the skeletons cracked skulls were all struck by stones.

boop the queen soccer israel sixteen thousand feet
"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on The Document

The Document

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"sixteen thousand feet" Discussed on The Document

"Death march they finally reached the first base camp and dug in for the night wiped out by the days track and then they collapsed in their sleeping bags for the chilly night the following day there was another eight hours of hiking the goal this time though was the abc the advanced base camp it was located on a beautiful plateau right below the glaciers of shishir parma the green moss that covered the rocky ground was dotted with tiny purple flowers this was a a little area that had a little lake and it was a place where the climbing team sixteen years ago had built a little memorial for dave and alex and carve their names and stones which were still there and this is where we were gonna set out even at sixteen thousand feet the abc was still a ways away from where the bodies their friends rested so the cancer a couple of nights and got accustomed to the altitude and some very raw emotions and they agreed on a plan they'd hiked to a ridge near the glacier then split into two groups conrad anchors group would actually venture out onto the glacier were the danger was greatest the other would not and then they carry the bodies back down to base camp but the plan started to fall apart right from the start it was a night a restless sleep at the abc the altitude had started to take its toll especially on david bridges brother dan who is basically incapacitated jobs group wanted to give him a little extra time to recover so he could go along in the final ascent that konrad decided to stick to the original plan and left with his group in the early morning darkness it was somewhere around four a m.

dave konrad alex conrad david bridges sixteen thousand feet sixteen years eight hours