23 Burst results for "Sixteen Shots"

Williamson, Ingram power Pelicans past Clippers 135-115

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 6 months ago

Williamson, Ingram power Pelicans past Clippers 135-115

"The pelicans let it start to finish in a one thirty five to one fifteen route over the clippers New Orleans shot a blistering sixty five percent from the field the highest mark in the NBA this season I believe that up to thirty three points in the fourth quarter Zion Williamson made thirteen of sixteen shots and scored twenty seven points I think the more the ball around very well tonight created a lot of open shots for everybody and well let's aficionados since Brandon Ingram added twenty three points Kawhi Leonard scored twenty three to lead the clippers who have now lost four of their last five games I am mark Myers

Zion Williamson Pelicans Clippers New Orleans NBA Brandon Ingram Kawhi Leonard Mark Myers
James scores 26 as Lakers roll over Rockets 117-100

AP News Radio

00:31 sec | 9 months ago

James scores 26 as Lakers roll over Rockets 117-100

"The bride James scored twenty six points in a little more than three quarters of the Lakers one seventeen one hundred route of the rockets if any Davis added nineteen points and ten rebounds and three quarters helping Los Angeles clobbered Houston for the second time in three days the Lakers led by twenty or more for most of the game on a night James harden made just five of sixteen shots and the rockets were out rebounded fifty five forty two Christian would had eighteen points and eight rebounds for the rockets harden had sixteen points seven rebounds and six assists in a game where none of Houston's starters played in the fourth quarter I'm the ferry

Lakers James Harden James Davis Rockets Houston Los Angeles Harden
Giannis has triple-double, Bucks rout Knicks 123-102

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

Giannis has triple-double, Bucks rout Knicks 123-102

"The Milwaukee Bucks jumped out fast and be the next one twenty three to one to Milwaukee open the night hitting on their first six three pointers well the Knicks missed twelve of their first sixteen shots brook Lopez keyed the box first half and finished with fourteen points and seven blocks Jana centered a couple twenty two points eleven rebounds ten assists in twenty six minutes Chris Milton a game high twenty three points he was pleased with the complete effort that's really what places where sars repair no matter who are opponents for forty minutes will pay patient great defense and relatives the books hit eighteen three pointers and improved to twenty six and for the Knicks fell to seven and twenty three might make you so New York

Milwaukee Bucks Milwaukee Knicks Jana New York Brook Lopez Chris Milton Twenty Six Minutes Forty Minutes Milton
"sixteen shots" Discussed on Racing Post

Racing Post

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on Racing Post

"Was one that got into the primarily low season louise's go zoom marine him. I mean i still would have him all all day. Long i in that back four. I mean you don't get to be so played level. We as if he's useless in the bonnie ronnie did a great piece in the guardian about our they've got divy louis wrong offing the signing of the summer for us new and much improved damages chelsea so at the back. I've got my concerns about josie. I'm also going to have a on john lester to win and both teams score <hes> lester way really enjoy playing in the space that that chelsea lebron them and they didn't enjoy against wolves because moved moves don't do that and severity had nothing to work in. I think they'll get more space. Just there'll be a nervousness around chelsea. Things don't start well. Liens you give the hosts more johnston jonathan amount do yeah maybe slightly unpopular opinion bug with chelsea way nothing less to a quite wasteful in with wolves. Only one of those sixteen shots i had was on target. We'll get <hes> yeah. I think the defeat the fa- chelsea was a very harsh reflection of the game as mark said they hit the woodwork with abraham and an m._s._n. As well obviously that doj a penalty if that is easy to say in hindsight that goes in complete different game mason mount ross barkley could quite seasons from midfield and jets that young players. I see lots move the ball forward and i think it could be a little bit of a switch around in later in the season zuma maybe dropping out and they'll look maybe to partner ruediger christians in the back which it'd be good moderate christians great and a half so you look at the chelsea bridge this right and we've got monday night match which is always good news and it's a cracker eight p._m. Mulinuu wolves versus assise manchester united highly paddock pile on this one <hes> wolves twenty three to ten the draw eleven to five monday night sixty five..

chelsea chelsea bridge john lester ross barkley louise bonnie ronnie zuma josie manchester fa partner louis abraham mark
"sixteen shots" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:19 min | 2 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Sixteen shots and a cover up became a familiar mantra. After a judge ordered the release of a police dash Cam video that video show police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting seventeen year old McDonald sixteen times protesters accused mayor Rahm Emanuel and police have concealing the video and called for the mayor's resignation in an emotional speech. Emanuel apologized and talked about what he said was a problem at the heart of policing a code of silence. It is his tendency to ignore. It is a tendency to deny is a tendency in some cases, you cover up the bad actions of a colleague or colleagues the video caught the alleged bad actions. It contradicted. The police claimed that MacDonald tried to attack officers with a knife. William Callaway is an activist who fought for release of the video the code of silence exists. We're doing our best to try to destroy that in Chicago police. And activists hope this case will help do that Joseph Walsh, David Marsh and Thomas Gaffney stand accused of conspiracy obstruction of Justice and official misconduct. They all denied lying and engaging in a cover up to protect then fellow officer Van Dyke. A jury found him guilty of second degree murder and aggravated battery. He's scheduled to be sentenced tomorrow. Well, I think people have the misconception that there is just one code of silence code phones covers everything Sonya could make if vich is a criminal Justice, professor at Michigan State University. For two decades. She studied police agencies around the world and says there is a culture of silence among them. All there's often a club ish. I've got your back mentality because of the dangers of policing. The professor says her surveys show patrol officers are more likely to keep silent about low level misconduct. Like cursing at a suspect. They are more likely to come forward. She says when there's more serious misconduct like the use of deadly force. But there are thousands of police agencies and each is different. For instance. There are what could Nick eve cabbage caused high integrity police department and induced agencies something as serious as using deadly force will not be tolerated not be covered by the code. They might have explicit rules about lying and enforce them by firing are suspending officers who ignore them. They may also reward officers who report misconduct, then there are the others low integrity departments. She calls them where almost any form of misconduct would be tolerated. The head of the police union in Chicago, Kevin Graham. Zim buying it. He says the whole idea of police. Secrecy is overblown. I am not going to be so naive is to say that every officer is a Saint in his perfect. What I am saying. Is that to have a code of silence to try and say that that people are covering up for other people? It's ridiculous. There have been plenty of cases throughout the decades across the country, though that raised concerns about the culture of police silence. It really came to the public's attention in the nineteen seventies. When whistle blower Frank serpico outed corruption in the New York City police department now video is being used to expose possible corruption and abuse like in this trial related to the liquidation McDonald shooting? President court judge Dominica Stevenson will issue today's verdict. She'll take into account the testimony of Chicago police officer Dora Fontaine, she's a key witness who says a detective altered her statement about the liquidity McDonald shooting on the witness stand. She talked about why she was transferred from St. to desk duty other officers were calling me a rat a snitch a traitor, if I was at a call in needed assistance. Some officers felt strong enough to say that I didn't deserve to be helped contains appearance. They'll may bolster the notion by some that there is no entrenched. Police code of silence. Peter moskos, a former Baltimore police officer is a professor at John Jay college of criminal Justice time and time again, see cops testifying against other cops even so Moscow's calls this particular conspiracy case against the three officers, rare the silver lining is I do think it Representative change in police culture in Chicago in particular. Change. He says where a cover up might have been even standard in the past, but is not anymore. Carol corley NPR news, Chicago..

officer Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel Van Dyke professor Jason Van Dyke McDonald John Jay college of criminal J Peter moskos William Callaway Kevin Graham Dora Fontaine Frank serpico MacDonald second degree murder Nick eve Carol corley vich NPR
Florida woman tosses piece of concrete at police officer

Steve Dahl

01:19 min | 3 years ago

Florida woman tosses piece of concrete at police officer

"Brandon. It is a snowball now, it's three dollars and she found. It happened in Monmouth beach, New Jersey, in many cases, finders keepers. Not in this case. Really? Well, it took a long time to be a keeper page page. What he was twelve years old and twenty four when she had a friend. Magazine you read? According to the information desk warning. Page. Woody was how describes how would leave through a playboy. Mr. In twenty four she and a friend found three dollars in turned it into a police officer in Monmouth beach, New Jersey, the money was never claimed and ended up in an evidence bag until just recently money turned up in an audit. And what he says he was returned to her. She says half the money a dollar fifty. Of course goes to her friend. All right. This is some small scale. Waste of police. Police department. How do they drug? What are we going to do with this three dollars? Off by three dollars. And a and a kilo of cocaine how did a drunk, man? Thank his roommate who helped him to bed after he fell into a Christmas tree. He sexton. Nope. He vomited on no. I don't know head massage. Thank my shooting at the roommate and the roommate's son. All right. I wanna make sure they stayed you guys. Stay in bed. Now. Randall we Dickinson was charged with several crimes you heard it Randall we'd Dickinson was charged with several crimes. Weed weed weed weed Dickinson for knowingly trying to cause the death of his roommate and the roommates relative in a an incident earlier this month when the trailer I'm guessing they don't specify sounds trailer. When the roommate and his son went outside to smoke a cigarette they say that they heard what sounded like a gun going off. And that's when the pair said they saw Dickinson firing at them getting off sixteen shots before the roommate and a son could pin Dickinson police arrive they put him in bed with him. And he fell into the Christmas tree. Yeah. Totally drunk. They put him in bed. And then when they went out for a smoke. He came out with a gun. All right, wasn't ready to go to bed. No cranky people can kids can get when they don't want to go to bed for some time, especially Christmas time facing a whole bunch of charges, including two accounts of attempted murder. Uh-huh. And knocking over a Christmas tree. Gentlemen. Yes. It's time for.

Dickinson Monmouth Beach New Jersey Brandon. Randall Cocaine Woody Officer Sexton Three Dollars Twelve Years
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"Does this make things better worse, or does this not really move the needle that much before we gotta go. Are you talking about the stop and frisk. Though the conviction of officer Van Dyke. Sorry. I believe that it will I the city of ACOG, oh, to move forward at a much faster pace with better training and more transparency because now they know that what they never thought would happen and being exposed being caught and being tried could happen again. I think they need to start better training for the officers. I do agree with both judge Cordell and major Franklin that the community needs to be involved at needs to be less military based and more community friendly just to add to that as far as officers being dropped into neighborhoods or not familiar with. I am the white Irish female blonde hair blue eyes. And that was dropped into the Chicago housing projects, which was all African American. And if you are an officer that takes the oath to protect everybody equally seriously, you can adapt and officers must be able to adapt to every single commune. Unity and be fair across the board. I was able to do it in one of the most dangerous neighborhoods in the nation. So officers need to remember. It doesn't have to be white. People in white neighborhoods are black and bummer. We all work together. Chicago police officer, Shannon Spalding, Neil Franklin, executive director of law enforcement against prohibition WBZ's, Patrick Smith and retired judge Doris Cordell everyone..

officer Doris Cordell ACOG Neil Franklin Chicago Van Dyke Shannon Spalding executive director Patrick Smith
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:38 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"The one, eight dot org. I cannot believe the police officer lied the way he did on the stand. It appears to me that they made up a story before they knew the tape, evidence existed and stuck with that story. Even though the video clearly shows what happened. I wonder what the perspective from the video the police destroyed would have shown are the officers who destroyed that evidence going to be tried for that crime. Patrick, what's Aaron referring to here? Well, there is this shooting happened by Burger King and that Burger King had surveillance footage that that would have captured likely. It seems like where the camera was would have captured the shooting. However, a big chunk of that of that footage was was sort of mysteriously missing from the the footage and the Burger King manager told reporters that that police came in and seized it, and he, you know, sort of suspected, they destroyed it. I will say that that the prosecutors here said that there. There was no evidence that there was any damage to the to the surveillance footage that this was a coincidence before we wind down judge Cordell. I'd love you to react to something that the president said yesterday. He was speaking before the international association for the chiefs of police conference in Chicago, and he said the following, listen, I've told them to work with local authorities to try to change the terrible deal. The city of Chicago entered. Into were they c. l. u. which ties law enforcement's hands. And to strongly consider stop and frisk it works and it was meant for problems like Chicago. It was meant for stop and frisk President Trump speaking yesterday in my apologies. He was speaking in Orlando, referring to Chicago, judge Cordell just to this keeps coming up often. We don't have much time to spend on it, but could you just clarify for us what what the law says about stop and frisk? Sure that the Trump administration, first of all hostile to any kind of oversight from the federal government over any law enforcement. So just put that out there. So stop and frisk was deemed to be unconstitutional in New York. And basically it gives officers the right to do just what it says to stop. People do detain people and then to I them for, you know, for reasons that don't rise up to what the legal standard is. And the notion was luck if we can just stop and frisk people enough, then you know, people are just not going to be inclined to commit any kind of crime because we're watching them and it had the quite the opposite effect because it involved racial profiling, stop and frisk basically is code for stop every black person, especially blackmail that you see because they're likely up to no good. And in this way, we can really clamp down on everything and that really creates the essence of an occupier in communities of color so that the Trump administration's hostile to any kind of restrictions on law enforcement and the in the president himself has no clue about about the things that he's talking. The end Jeff Sessions. Our attorney general is basically said, I don't like this kind of federal oversight, and if they could, they would have undone the consent decree that came about in Chicago in working to try to bring. Some reform there, Shannon before we go. I know we're low on time, but I wonder what role you think this will have in how officers in Chicago engage with Chicagoans.

Chicago Cordell President Trump Burger King president officer Jeff Sessions New York Shannon Patrick attorney c. l. u. Orlando Aaron
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"Jamie asked, shouldn't there be a national group or board who could provide oversight over individual police departments? They could be an objective trusted advisory board whose judgments both sides would trust and accept and to whom and aggrieved local citizens group could appeal Paolo tweeted police forces with their training, transform them from people's defenders into a communities foes with this stance, the police force is not your friend, even if you are a regular law abiding citizen. So maybe trainings part of it. And Hector emailed the UK and other European Union countries have unarmed on-duty police officers, and we should have more unarmed cops to Patrick Smith. I'm not sure if anyone is advocating that any officers in Chicago disarm themselves, but I wonder what people are suggesting. I mean, is there a conversation about lasting change after the look Lon McDonald case, or are there still other loose ends with this that need to be tied up first before we talk about form? Well, there are. The the video of McDonald's shooting prompted the department of Justice to come in and investigate the Chicago police department which has been done in other cities. And actually our state government and the city of Chicago are are in the very final moments of sort of hammering out a consent decree to make big changes over the next decade to the Chicago police department. The police union here is very opposed to that effort. They think that this reform is not going to help. It's gonna make us less safe. Many activists thinks this is a really good, you know, a really big step. And then of course, there are some who are who are skeptical. This is going to be the change that we really need. And I will say one thing that has been talked about a lot here that some of the comments you've gotten have alluded to is, is the idea of having officers in neighborhoods that they really know. Something that I've heard from a lot of people is that there are white officers Chicago's a very. Aggregated city that there are white officers who really didn't have much interaction with people of color before they joined the force, and then they are sort of dropped first thing for, you know, as soon as they're out of the academy into some of the toughest neighborhoods in the city where they are encountering and working with people of color, and they don't, they don't know what they don't know what they're doing essentially, and they're overmatched and and sort of cultural differences and blind spots are making the problem worse here. That's something that that some people say would would would help out in the city to have more represent representation have police officers policing in neighborhoods where they themselves live. I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one a.. Patrick one more quick question for you. I know we're low on time, but Aaron wrote on our website,.

Chicago police department Chicago Lon McDonald Patrick Smith advisory board Jamie Joshua Johnson Paolo European Union department of Justice Hector UK Aaron
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:25 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"And and and so what I'm saying is that maybe it's time now to say, let's pull back from this whole image. We have of police being occupiers and look at a different model entirely. I'm not opposed to criminal to criminal Justice reform. But look, what happened? We we get body cameras and what what happens? Well, we have officers some who don't turn the congress on, or we have places like Chicago where it takes more than a year and a court order tickets. Footage out on, for example, on Liquan shooting so that the whole lack of transparency policing, for example, has very little sunshine is very little sunshine in policing. We don't get to know who these officers are. Their track records their history, their disciplined history. It's very, very difficult to get that information in those states. The comment that one of our listeners left for us Reggie who lives in Maryland left this in our inbox. I talked to please both black and white, and they seem to have this militaristic approach to the community. I have had experiences where you know police just simply, you know, would rather have conflict with with community rather than actually serve it. I really think that they should, you know, take away the guns for the first couple of months, put police to buy chain inside the community without guns make him standing community to force them to have a dialogue with community. I think it'd be a lot better with serving the community. Reggie thanks for calling in and sharing your thoughts with us, Neil Franklin. I'd love you to respond to that, but if I could, I, if we could contract what Reggie said with another set of comments that we've gotten from some of our listeners, like what Schuyler wrote, Schuyler rights police, put their lives on the line everyday, protecting our society. Ninety percent nine. Zero percent of the cases put forward by activists, says examples of police brutality involved people not complying. Why is the outrage not centered around these individuals behavior that got them shot? If a cop breaks the law, I'll convict them. But if there is any doubt, I'm siding with the police one hundred percent of the time Neil. What would you say to folks who say that police work is inherently difficult, inherently dangerous, potentially deadly. And then we, as a public also have a role to play in easing the tension that officers feel about just being able to make it home at night. So I believe it was ready that left a message? Yes, you know. That was such a brilliant comment because forcing the dialogue seat when you develop a relationship with those people, you are serving the citizens you are serving and you get their support. Your job doesn't isn't as dangerous as it is today. It, you know, going back to what the judge Cordell said. How used to be having relationships walking up and down the street, talking with citizens talking with the neighbors. When something happens, they support you when you have those relationships. But when you have this occupying force, will you know none of the people are very few of the people are the ones that you do know there's conflict on under on the other end of that relationship. That's a problem. This goes to community control policing that I mentioned before. Where the community sets the philosophy where the community sets the budget for those in uniform where the community decides who the the leader is going to be, whether you call them a chief or Commissioner, oh, whatever with a community decides what's important where the community decides, you know what we can handle these issues at ground level. We just want you to pay attention to people hurting other people, and this is how we want you to do that. But policing is very political, its political through the unions. It's political through the mayors and the governors, and we'll never get to that place until the community decides Nick together and say, we want control over our police departments, and this is how we want to do it. Having that oversight at the beginning means that you don't need police review boards at the end when something goes horribly wrong, is speaking of which we got some ideas from some of you about what could be done with regards to policing and review boards. Were part of it including on a larger scale..

Reggie Neil Franklin Schuyler Maryland Liquan congress Chicago Nick Cordell Commissioner one hundred percent Ninety percent Zero percent
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:14 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"Back now to our conversation with Neil Franklin, Shannon Spalding, Patrick Smith and judge Doris Cordell. Let's get to some more of your comments before we start kind of looking forward at where the effort to improve policing in America might be going, hey, sailor tweeted. The reasonable officer standard is a very easy standard to apply. It's not that hard. We do need to eliminate the criminal Justice college major and higher police with degrees in psychology or sociology, too many cops have no business carrying a badge and a gun. However, Galvin had these questions. Galvin writes, the question is, what is reasonable? Does disobeying police officer, shouting orders, constitute the right to use deadly force? Does a drug dealer running away from the police deserve to be shot while they may be criminals? Are the actions from the police equivalent to the criminals actions judge Cordell, maybe you should respond to Galvin. How do we suss. Out in a finer sense. What reasonableness is. Wastefulness is in the eye of the beholder. It really has no one definition and what jurors are required to do is put themselves in the shoes of the officer and what was the officer staying experiencing? And oftentimes incidents happen in just a matter of a few seconds. So it's there really is not one definition of it, but, but I do want us to get to something you said Joshua about, you know, looking ahead, I believe it's time to re imagine policing in America policing in America today is, is quasi militaristic and police departments officers are seen as an occupying force, especially in communities of color and in low income communities. That's not how policing started in this country. Policing started with individuals who lived in a community who knew everyone, and they were people who were not seeing as an occupying force. There were people there to basically provide a service and help the individuals in the community, and it has dramatically changed. We have police departments armed to the teeth with tanks and all kinds of of equipment that are commonly used in the military. And I think it's time to to change this whole thing. We need to start thinking outside the box. Why do we need police officers to basically patrol and and take care of traffic issues? Why can't that come from within the community? Why can't individuals community members somehow deputized to to deal with with those kinds of things that the minor kinds of things that are happening in the community. I'm not disagreeing with you just by way of context. There are some places where a lower level of sworn law enforce off or Forsman officer does deal with things like parking enforcement and traffic enforcement, things that are less likely to require deadly force. Sure. But but but my point is that that our our whole attitude and this is even within police departments, they see themselves as this, you know, kind of a militaristic force and they, they do have a command structure..

officer Galvin Doris Cordell America Neil Franklin criminal Justice college Forsman Shannon Spalding Patrick Smith Joshua
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"How do you see this before we have to break. Yeah, I just comment on what judge Cordell said about unions, the unions in their power. And the other thing she said was about police oversight, and we need community oversight of police department and move away from police policing the police just went that's a whole nother story as relates to the mentality and thought process of these officers. I mean, officer Spalding hit it right on the head. You know what she was talking about is absolutely correct, but I want to say something about the officers who would come to her and speak to her and all those officers out there who don't want this type of policing who don't want the corruption who don't want the officers like vandyck, who have these many, many complaints if they were to come together, their numbers are so much greater if they were to come together and form a movement to remove these officers out of the rank. So they can be the police officers entered apartments that they want to be for their citizens. We wouldn't have this, but if they're not capable of doing that, we need community oversight of these police department. So I just wanna push push back on that just a little bit because talking about the few bad apples, you know, the ones who don't come forward like Spaulding did are they not also problematic and allowing this to occur more in a moment, stay close, whether it's athlete, protests of a Muslim travel ban gun violence school reform or just the music that's giving you life right now, race is this subtext to so much of the American story and on coats which we make that subtext text. You can listen to us on NPR one or wherever you get your podcasts..

Cordell Spaulding Spalding NPR officer vandyck
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"They never really gave their condolences and everybody that tried to come to us on behalf of Jason Van Dyke. They came to us asking us, could we forgive Jason Van Dyke? And I want the world to know that you can't just go around for giving people who number one didn't think they done anything wrong and who never to never ask for forgiveness. Jason Van Dyke has never asked this family for forgiveness period at all. Patrick. I wonder what the conversation has been like in Chicago after the verdict. What the response has been. I have to say, personally, I was surprised to hear Reverend hunter, put some distance between forgiveness and Jason Van Dyke, especially based on what Christian theology says about forgiveness, but I also understand like he lost a loved one. How are Chicagoans talking about this, particularly in terms of being able to move forward or even forgive? Well, I think I haven't heard from a lot. People who who are willing are interested in forgiving officer, Van Dyke. I, I mean, I think it depends on who you're talking to. There are many in Chicago who don't believe that officer Van Dyke needs to be forgiven. Who think that he was putting a tough situation and did what he was forced to do even after the verdict, they believe that and there are many others who are who are glad about this verdict and and believe that this is Justice being done. I agree with you about, you know, the Christian beliefs in forgiveness. However, as as revenue hunters said right there, you know officer Van Dyke has maintained that he did nothing wrong. Obviously, there are legal reasons for that the why he would maintain that, but but it is hard to forgive someone who is not admitting admitting fault or asking for forgiveness. But no, I, I have heard the Chicagoans that I've talked to who believe that officer Van Dyke you know, was guilty. They are. They are gratified by this verdict, and they believe that him spending a long time in prison. I would be Justice, Aaron rights. When you read how the Chicago. Police union responded to this conviction. I'd say that there's not much hope for real reform. They believe the conviction was wrong. Evidently, it's okay for the police to murder someone in the course of doing their job. Richard wrote an our inbox. My nephew is a police officer who told me that they have a saying better to be tried by twelve, then be carried by six presumably meeting that it's better to deal with the criminal Justice system than to be shot on the job, Neil Franklin. I have to pause and just a minute, but could you speak to this idea of the mentality of officers in this this cone of silence. I mean, there are officers who want crushed rooted out. There's also the police union which has to speak in the larger sense of protect every single officer who is a dues paying member..

Jason Van Dyke officer Chicago Reverend hunter Neil Franklin Patrick murder Aaron Richard
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:24 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"We answer millions of calls every every every year and they have used this case to really kick around the Chicago police department which has been unfortunate because I'm going to tell you this and. Men and women of the Chicago police department are some of the finest police officers in this country. They take seriously what they do, and they try and provide the best protection. They can for the people in the city of Chicago, and they do it putting their own lives in peril every single day and night to Kevin Graham, the president of Chicago's fraternal order of police. Shannon, I'd love to get your thoughts on what Kevin Graham said. I mean, it doesn't minimize this low Kwon McDonald case at least for me. But I do kind of see what he's getting at in terms of getting a bad rap. I mean, if you wanna see a positive for trail of Chicago police, you got to watch NBC and prime time. I mean it just you'd. You don't hear much of it. Do you think that Mr Graham has a point. Absolutely. He has a point. I do want to say most of the Chicago police officers, men and women go to work every single day to serve with honor and integrity, and when they do so they are willing to lay their lives down for you. That is the job they signed up for it is like being in the military, you know, you're going into harm's way. What I found out though is you expect the dangerous to be from the outside world not from within your own department. It is a shame that officers who who are in good standing and serve with integrity. Now have a tarnished bad that they wear because of the few corrupt. Every profession has some bad apples in this includes law enforcement across the nation. However, citizens must remember that not every. Officer is corrupt and officers must remember not every individual of color is a criminal. There has to be a mutual respect both ways. And I think with the Jason Van Dyke trial, it is over the verdict is in, we cannot go back and change the mistakes of the past, but we absolutely must learn from them and go forward in a positive direction regardless of what side of silicon McDonnell Jason, Van Dyke case Iran, I think we can all it Ray that Takata needs to move forward in a better direction and we need to do it together, the police and the citizens, or we won't be able to make different. I should note by the way we did reach out to the administration of Chicago's current mayor. Rahm Emanuel for comment regarding officer Spalding case. It did not respond. WBZ has reported that the mayor and his administration have. Denied that there was any retaliatory treatment for officer Spalding actions. But the mayor's office did not respond to us. That invitation is still open. Let me get to a few more of your comments. Jim emailed the public should take some comfort from the fact that there were many more officers present. One Liquan McDonnell was killed and they acted with proper restraint. Only Jason Van Dyke act and on raw emotion that said, the institutions that police unions, the police command structures, the arbitration processes and the city administration certainly need reform and more transparency. I'm Joshua Johnson. You're listening to one a.. Patrick, let me bring you back in here is a clip from the Reverend Martin hunter. He was the great uncle. He is the great long uncle of the late Liquan McDonald. This is what Reverend hunter had to say. After the verdict against officer, Van Dyke was read. I can't rejoice in a way you know to say Yippee. Okay, because this man is going to jail. When I looked over and I saw his wife, my mind had to go to his his daughters, his wife who didn't pull the trigger, his daughters who didn't pull the trigger his father. He didn't pull the trigger. I could see the pain and those people, and it was touching my heart to see that pain. But it was also touched bothering me that they couldn't see the pain that was within us. They never..

Chicago Officer Chicago police department Kevin Graham Van Dyke Reverend hunter Rahm Emanuel Kwon McDonald Liquan McDonnell Shannon NBC Joshua Johnson president silicon McDonnell Jim Liquan McDonald Patrick Ray Takata
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"You didn't talk about it. It didn't exist. They try to label me as crazy for believing that this was actually going on within the department. So it made me very unpopular and led to a lot of police retaliation. A wonder, why is from your perspective? I mean, I can't imagine. I've never been a law enforcement officer. I have law enforcement in my family, but I've never taken an oath so I can't. I'm speaking as an outsider, but I would think if I knew that there were reporters who worked for my station who were lying. In stories and they got caught. I would be grateful to see them go because I'd drags all of us down. Why do you think it's not a similar mentality in law enforcement. Honestly, own lot of police officers, dead approach may and they still talk to me and you are correct? Honest police officers, absolutely do not want to work alongside with corrupt officers. However, the code of silence is so strong within the Chicago police department, and I feel that does go across departments nationwide that officers actually fear what will happen to them if they break this code of silence. And what was interesting to discover during this journey of. Breaking the code of silence is that there's this common misconception that it's blue officers, blue shirt, common street officers going against other officers when actually I learned that the retaliation came from the top down bosses were actually instructing the officers who are working with me not to back me up or they would be the next Shannon Spalding. So out of fear of becoming me out of fear of retaliation themselves were putting their lives in danger, losing their job, what could happen to them? They complied because they it, it's easier. It's easier than blowing through everything that I had to go through. And even though officers didn't want to, they felt they had to. I had officers come up to me and say, you know, I believe in what you're doing, but I can't be seeing talking to you because. Albee not. We'll let me let me play a clip from the president of Chicago's fraternal order of police, Kevin, Graham, this is what he had to say after the conviction of officer, Jason Van Dyke. This clip comes from WBZ's podcast on the Lachlon McDonald case called sixteen shots here is Kevin Graham, I do. I do believe William some of the politicians. I think that over the last several years, they have used this case one face and I want to remind everybody..

officer Shannon Spalding Chicago police department Kevin Graham Jason Van Dyke WBZ Lachlon McDonald Albee Chicago William president
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:57 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"And as a result, you find very few judgment. First of all, you know in in similarly, ensuing police departments, jurors have to get hold the standard and prosecutors before they decide to to charge an officer have to look at the standard and say, what would an officer reasonable officer in that situation have done? So it is the supreme court that has set this rule for all law enforcement agencies in the country. And there are over eighteen thousand separate police departments throughout the United States. They all have different rules, but they are all under the umbrella of whatever the supreme court said that is the rule that is out there. Now, by the way, referring to the case, it's Graham versus CONNER. It's a case from a nineteen eighty nine. And some of you actually commented with regards to what's going on in officers. Minds like Peter Peter emailed. It seems like today with the mentality of police officers that their life is paramount beyond all else, including their safety. I feel like whenever they are threatened with any sort of possible harm, they used deadly force and it is somehow justified. This is a career in which they signed up for similar to the military where they know they're going to be put in harm's way to protect and serve the are paid for this. Let's add one more voice to our conversation before we get to some more of your comments joining us. Now on the line, Shannon Spalding, a Chicago police officer who was also a whistle blower within the department. Who worked undercover with the FBI. Shannon, welcome to the program. Thank you Joshua. No, I understand you had been working as an FBI informant within the department and as a result of what happened that caused some of your fellow officers not to be to fund with you, what what happened that caused such a stirred? It'd have to do with with corruption inside the Chicago police department? Absolutely. Dash LA. I was working as an undercover narcotics officer with the FBI, and I had discovered that some of my fellow officers were actually involved and running the narcotic trade with in the Chicago area. And therefore I began an operation dubbed operation brass tacks against some of my fellow officers who I use the term officer loosely, because if you are on the other side of the law, you are really not an officer, but they did have badges. And ultimately that led these officers. One of them being Abaas to go to federal prison, and that made me very unpopular among the ranks and files within just a cog. Oh, police department. Because before I came forward with operation brass tacks, the code of silence was unheard of..

officer FBI Shannon Spalding Chicago Peter Peter United States LA Joshua Graham CONNER
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"We have the training we went through the academy, what right? Do you civilians have to even say what we're doing is wrong or. Right. And the result of that is that you have police basically policing themselves in any kind of institution? Polices itself means that they're, they're not being held. Accountable by those lives they're impacting and any systems that police themselves are ripe for corruption. And that's what's what tends to happen in law enforcement when you have police departments, however, that are very more open minded more receptive, more receptive to having oversight. And that became the case in San Jose. We're discussing the verdict in the Liquan McDonald tastes. That was a teenager who was shot dead in Chicago by officer, Jason Van Dyke. Let me get to a few of your comments before we keep going. Nick is in Wilmington, North Carolina, Nick rights. I'm in North Carolina, and the GOP state supermajority pushed a Bill through last year to not release anybody Cam footage to the public, except for family members involved to view if I could make one law to increase mistrust with the public. This would be the one b Sean wrote on our Facebook page. Maybe the real issue here is that the criminal Justice system in general and law enforcement in particular, are being deployed to manage the. Effects of social and economic problems that they are ill equipped to resolve. And Seth wrote on our Facebook page as a white person who works in an office that staffs mostly black people, hearing stories of police shootings scares me that one day I might lose a beloved co worker just because of their skin color. When I found out they found this man guilty. I was elated, it's time for bad cops to stop being protected. Killers, judge Cornell. It seems rare that officers are convicted after shooting someone under questionable circumstances. What's the legal reason behind that? Well, there is a decision from the United States Supreme court. That really is the key to all of this. And that is the decision that the court made many years ago in the Graham case that basically said that when you are determining whether or not an officer is engaged in the use of excessive force, you must basically take b in the seat that that. Steps are the seat of the officer. So it's a very subjective standard. What would a reasonable officer have done in that situation? So it is not an objective look is what is the officer feeling? What is the officer seeing? What does the officer experiencing? So that's what the jurors are required to do..

officer Facebook United States Supreme court North Carolina Jason Van Dyke Liquan McDonald Nick San Jose Wilmington Sean Seth GOP Cornell Chicago Bill Graham one day
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

04:51 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"Let me come to you. The matter of kind of the code of silence that many civilians perceive in law enforcement is definitely front and center. Here as was mentioned by Patrick offers Van Dyke had a number of complaints against him. How often do you see it taking a little bit of a step back from Chicago more broadly? How often do you see that officers with controversial records with complaints about excessive use of force, find themselves protected by their colleagues, particularly protected from accountability for their actions. It's quite often. This is part of the culture that needs to be changed nationwide. You know, police officers, especially today, fill that they're out there by themselves and that most of the public has sided against them, which is not true by the way. So they form a very tightly close knit circle of protection among themselves, and it usually takes quite a bit for officers to come together to to from notes part move someone out. I'm sorry, Neil. Would you just elaborate on that idea in terms of being in it by themselves? What do you mean by that? So if you, you know, video has exposed the ugly underside of policing today. What I mean by that if you go on YouTube today, you can see number of cases involving excessive force. The lack of transparency, how police officers negatively interact with citizens they curse at them. They disrespect them, they use excessive force whether it involves, you know, deadly force or other means they overreact. And now with the, you know, with everyone, literally has a video camera in the palm of their hands. We have body cams. We have in-car camps in this. These videos are surfacing one after another, and we're really beginning to see what citizens have been complaining about for decades in this country guarding the abuse of certain police officers working in their communities. And this is calls citizens to begin to push back. Back at alarming numbers to the protests that we're seeing across the country. And now police are circling the wagons. And you know they're, they're, they're forming the circle of protection there behind each other. And they realized that when they're out there working in the streets and somebody's neighborhoods are dangerous, quite dangerous. They realize that you know their backup could be the the officer that they protect it yesterday from some sort of complaint judge siding with them. So there a number of reasons why you know the police have formed this very close knit culture of protection among themselves, which prevents officers like Van Dyke of Patrick, talked about the number of complaints, unsustained complaints that this guy's head and that is because apparently the evidence has not been there. You know to to sustain these complaints and what evidence I'm talking about statements from police officers who may be on his squad or may have. Witnessed something because when it comes down to it, when police are investigating their own, they're going to believe the statements inversions of their police officers before they will believe that of a citizen. And that's why video is so important. Well, I'm also curious, judge Cordell in terms of how far up the chain, these efforts to protect officers who use excessive force go. I mean, you had a big job dealing with San Jose police department, which you know San Jose is the largest city in the San Francisco Bay area. It's a city of about a million people significantly larger than San Francisco self. Talk about some of what you saw in that big city in terms of the impediments to getting at the root of bad policing when it shows up hell it. It's important. First of all to understand that when you talk about the police, it's not a monolithic group. There's generally the rank and file and that refers to the union, and then you have the leadership that command staff and really what, what controls, what happens with the police department is really the rank and file. Police unions are very, very powerful in this country. And while the power of other unions in other professions has declined over the last even to two decades, the power of police unions has grown so that that I've found to be not just in San Jose but everywhere to be the biggest obstacle to getting police departments to be more transparent and to be able to hold police officers accountable police departments, historically are resistant to any kind of oversight at all in the attitude. Pretty much his look..

officer Van Dyke San Jose Patrick San Francisco YouTube San Francisco Bay Chicago judge Cordell Neil two decades
"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

1A

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on 1A

"He's covered the Liquan McDonald case since the beginning, and he is also heard in WBZ's podcast on the case called sixteen shots. Patrick welcome to one a. thanks for having me also with this judge Latorre Cordell she is retired from California superior court system and is the former independent police auditor in San Jose, California, judge Cordell. Welcome. Good to be here also with us from WIP our public radio in Baltimore, Neil Franklin is a retired major from the Maryland state police department. Currently, he's the executive director of leap law enforcement against prohibition. It's a nonprofit focused on improving relations between police and the public Neil heavy with us. Thank you, Joshua Patrick Smith. Let me start with you. Give us a quick overview of hula Kwan McDonald an officer. Van Dyke were particularly officer van. Daikin, what his record was like within the police department before all of this happened? Well, the McDonald was a seventeen year old. He had he had a difficult life before before this shooting he. He was in the foster care here in Chicago foster care system. He was sort of in and out of juvenile jail. But his friends described him as a fun, loving guy who was who was always sort of cracking jokes. And you know, even though he was in the foster care system, he was mostly placed with family. He grew up with his grandmother officer Van Dyke. He joined the Chicago police department in two thousand one. We got a chance to interview him before the trial started with our partners at the Tribune. And and you know, he said, he believed he was a good officer. He joined the force because he wanted to help people. However, in his years on the force, he racked up, you know, more than twenty citizen complaints against him. Most of those were not found to be true by the Scottish police department. However, they don't. They don't. They side with the officer and most of the cases, and we heard from expo. Hurts who said that sheer number of citizen complaints should have been a red flag to the department. Patrick what exactly happened on the night that la- Kwan McDonald was was killed well, so there was a call in that someone was in a in a truck yard trying to steal radios. Couple officers, not officer, Van Dyke responded to the scene and pretty soon after they called for help. They called for a tasers specifically. They said that McDonnell was walking away from them with a knife in his hand that sort of slow speed foot chase where the quantum was just sort of walking and the officers were following behind him at a slow speed went on for about ten minutes. When officer Van Dyke and his partner got on the scene, they were on the scene for for less than thirty seconds when obser- Van Dyke got out of his car and within six seconds, he started shooting. He unloaded his gun into the quantum McDonald and he hit him all all. Sixteen times Curtis tweeted, it absolutely must be pointed out that Chicago sat on the video for a year and only. Released it after a court order. Van Dyke was only arrested after Chicago was forced to release the video Patrick. Why did it take so long for this video of the incident come out? Well, that really depends who you ask. You know the official. What what city officials say is that the policy from, you know, since forever has been that when there are investigations going on, you don't release evidence. And this video was evidence in they say, an investigation both by the city to see if any police rules were broken and also by the state's attorney's office to see if they were going to file criminal charges. I think there are many, many people in Chicago who don't quite buy that. Who believed that this video was kept under wraps because it looks really bad. You know, the city paid liquid McDonald's family five million dollars without a lawsuit ever being filed, which is not. You know, that's not the only time that's that's happened, but it is. It is rare. And part of the agreement was that the video would not be released at least. Well, these investigations, we're going on Neil Franklin..

officer Van Dyke Joshua Patrick Smith Kwan McDonald Chicago Scottish police department McDonald Liquan McDonald executive director partner Latorre Cordell Baltimore California WBZ San Jose Maryland Daikin auditor
Chicago officer unjustified in killing black teen, prosecutor says

Global Revolutions

00:42 sec | 3 years ago

Chicago officer unjustified in killing black teen, prosecutor says

"O'Hare. Opening statements are underway in the murder trial of Chicago police officer Jason Van Dyke Van Dyke shot little Kwan McDonald who was holding a knife in twenty fourteen in the opening statements assistant special prosecutor, Joe McMahon said Liqun McDonald should have never been shot because nowadays single shot was necessary or justified officer vandyke fired sixteen shots that night. No other officers fired their weapons his defense attorney. Daniel Herbert is explaining. I was client never intended to kill the seventeen-year-old show. We saw. For his life. He acted

Jason Van Dyke Van Dyke Liqun Mcdonald Officer Joe Mcmahon Daniel Herbert Vandyke Prosecutor Murder Chicago Attorney O'hare. Seventeen-Year
"sixteen shots" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Even though as callers you've stunk and i threatened a ban you every week because of how unfunny you are but this one should be easy for you we're making it remedial we're just asking you to call in and name a name to represent what you believe to be the most average nba starter because we're talking about marcus morris playing out playing lebron james yesterday after saying he's probably the guy who bothers him second most in the league after qui we all mocked him about saying that lebron has one of the worst playoff games we've ever seen yeah moore's guarding him on twenty four of the possessions lebron scores five points has to assess anybody like that's a that's a doomsday scenario for the cavs like the way they're built if lebron has that game sixteen shots not scoring not distributing the ball they're gonna lose because it's a one man team but what do you do with all of that that marcus morris did that and now we're looking for the average nba started like if we go in with the moore's twins we go in one after another with the morris twins as we've had one of the best do we have a top ten we should put we're going to do that next we're into a top ten list of most thoroughly average names in the nba and again this is not meant as a slight these players are capable of the kind of game marcus morris had yesterday but when i think of morris i think of average right yes me what i do with that what i do with that is michael jordan that would never happen to donlevatar what's to stop other what it sounds like a dumb one box plus mine yep about rings plus minus i mean okay six m j three for lebron stu gods what lebrons rings in a box and then put 'em jay's rings in a box and tell me who has more.

marcus morris lebron moore cavs nba michael jordan six m
"sixteen shots" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"sixteen shots" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"You have kevin love who's your second best player gift fifteen points but it takes them sixteen shots jr smith played jr i'm jay i'll play jay i played thirty five minutes gave you five points george hill was in foul trouble if the guys that the role player that lebron are counting on if they just give you the average during the season nothing else this game the thirty point win but when you get guys playing below what they're capable of the game of the lot closer than what it needs to be no this is not a good way for them to play because when lebron gets going like this everybody is standing in the corner in amazement and that's not conducive to win long terms give because they're gonna be times that they're going to allow they're gonna make him give the bolo they can do that they can trap him bigham send three guys and he has to have enough confidence and he will to pass it to the open guy and they make the shot i don't know what happened to jeff green the do got two points in two games skill rodney hood i don't know what happened to him he because he was knocking down shots now he can't knock down shots turning the ball over the l'armee rate and he's not playing d so no i did not like i mean it was great to watch i mean it just goes to show you if he really wanted to score like a bunch of other guys that are known for assassin that kilolam paletti oh he would just rip your heart up lebron says if i really.

lebron kevin george hill jeff green thirty five minutes
Basketball star Kevin Love opens up about panic attacks

SportsCenter AllNight

02:01 min | 3 years ago

Basketball star Kevin Love opens up about panic attacks

"On that say we're going over time federal newsradio beal missing another potential game winner that said he hits 12 of his sixteen shots on tuesday finishes with thirty points wizards outlast miami they win in overtime the fifthplace wizards improving to eleven and six in their stretch now without john wall 117 one thirteen the win over the heat raptors beat the hawks 106 ninety arc's entering tuesday with a thirteen percent chance again in the top pick in the nba draft fourth best percent chance flies back a couple of weeks to mark rosen admitting that he suffered from depression he had 25 points in this one this is what he said at the time lerner a lotta people say thought about it you must sell full olckers people wonder while such a quiet guy in south florida not wanna speak out about it and not one of the people were know exactly where i was going through but you know you get to to a certain age in you know where you filet sought about helping others not but you just being selfish person about thanks hugo or through other people qantas stuff is well you know if you the shared i have put that on the forefront it make a help somebody rather if it's warren person or 100 at 1000 at his farm got sadat points where you know all the top sites the marta rosen laid last month saying if he could help one person one person did come forward tuesday kevin love published in essay in the players tribune opening up about a panic attack during a game this season and his struggles with mental health espn cavs reporter dave mcmenamin in his pc medicine that one of the first concerns the hat after the initial panic attack wasn't his mental health or a physical health that was what would happen if people found out he mentioned a relief that he felt when no wrote about it now this is something that myself and other people covering the team have heard rumblings about really for months now and is the type of deal where my own personal experience of there's.

Miami John Wall Hawks Depression South Florida Reporter NBA Mark Rosen Lerner Warren Sadat Marta Rosen Cavs Dave Mcmenamin Thirteen Percent