37 Burst results for "Six Years"

Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

06:37 min | 17 hrs ago

Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

"The. Fbi and new york. Police departments are facing new calls to finally open their records related to the assassination of malcolm x. Shocked at fifty six years ago at the audubon ballroom and harlem february twenty first nineteen sixty five. This comes after the release of a deathbed confession of a former undercover new york police officer who admitted to being part of a broad new york police and fbi conspiracy targeting malcolm in the confession the former officer. Raymond would who died last year admitted he entrapped to members of malcolm security team and another crime. A plot to blow up the statue of liberty just days before the assassination. On saturday ray woods cousin. Reggie would read the letter at a news conference at the shabazz center in harlem assignment to draw the two men into a felonious federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first nineteen sixty five in his letter. Raymond would also revealed. He was inside the audubon ballroom. At the time of malcolm's assassination at least one other undercover new york police officer. Gene roberts was also inside after infiltrating the security team of the organization of afro american unity. The group malcolm founded after leaving the nation of islam. Both officers would and roberts were part of the bureau of special services and investigations or bossie. A secret of political intelligence unit of the nypd nicknamed the red squat welcomes assassination. Police arrested three members of the nation of islam. His murder but questions about the guilt of the men have lingered for decades in his letter. Raymond would openly says one of the men. Thomas johnson was innocent and was arrested to quote. Protect my cover and the secrets of the fbi and the nypd unquote ray woods letter. Echoes claims and recent books by manning marable and less pain that some of malcolm's actual assassins were never charged in a moment. We'll be joined by raymond. Woods cousin reggie would released his deathbed confession. But i i want to turn to the words of malcolm x. Himself speaking after his home in queens was firebomb just a week before his assassination february fourteenth. Nine thousand nine hundred sixty five by house was bombed. It was bound by the muslim movement. On the orders of aligned to mohammed. Now they hit come around so they had planned to do it from the front. End the back so that i couldn't get out. They had they. They covered the complete the door then they had come to the back but instead of getting directly in back of the house in this way they stood at a forty five degree angle and talk with the windows so it it glance and onto the ground and the fire hit the window woke up my second oldest baby and then the fire burn on the outside of the house but it had had that one going through that window it would have fallen on a six year old girl a four year old girl and a two year old girl. And i'm gonna tell you if it had done it. Taken my wrangling going to anybody insight. I would not wait. Goes in the senate because this the police know the criminal operation of the black muslim movement because they have thoroughly infiltrated because they have thoroughly infiltrated it. Those are the words of malcolm x. Right before his assassination right after his home was firebombed in february of nineteen sixty five just days later he was shot seconds after he took the stage at the ballroom. We're joined now by reggie. Would the cousin of raymond would author of the new book. The ray which story confessions of a black nypd cop in the assassination of malcolm x. Still with us. Civil rights attorney. Ben crump who attended that news conference with Reggie wooden at the audubon ballroom now. The shabazz center where malcolm x was assassinated fifty six years ago. Reggie thank you so much for joining us. Use read parts of the letter this weekend. Talk about your cousin. Ray would and what you understand happened the conspiracy. He alleges that he was a part of by the fbi. And the new york police department to assassinate malcolm x. Morning thank you for having me ray was was a complicated man I think be based on his past experiences he he lived with a lot of fear and caution on a daily basis which instilled in me over the past ten years but are ray was a person that lived as a lived. He lived as a as a very quiet and reserved person because of what he experienced he witnessed some horrible things firsthand and also realized that he was a part of it after the fact and so therefore ray was told by his handlers. That not to repeat anything that he had seen or heard or he would Join malcolm therefore for forty six years. Ray separated himself from the family and In fear that he will put us in danger out rey lived alone many years and he Finally in his final years when he realized that he was his cancer was a reoccurring. He wanted to reconnect with family. Because he didn't want to die alone. So i volunteered to move them to florida so that my wife and i take care of them and get them back and forth cancer treatments things of that nature and therefore he trusted me enough to reveal this information and asked me not to say anything until he passed away but at the same time knox allow them to take it to his grave.

Malcolm Ray Woods FBI Audubon Ballroom Raymond New York New York Police Department Shabazz Center Gene Roberts Organization Of Afro American Bureau Of Special Services And Bossie Malcolm X Manning Marable Woods Cousin Reggie Reggie Thomas Johnson Harlem
Fresh update on "six years" discussed on Sean Hannity

Sean Hannity

00:23 sec | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "six years" discussed on Sean Hannity

"A. For continuing orthopedic care and recovery. That's rather Orlando 1 29 92 Brooklyn is 18 in a row 27 for Kyrie, Irving. We hol hold each other accountable, and we just want to have that consistency. Have fun doing so a lot of smiles. With the effort that we put on out there the six year staying a half game ahead of the Nets. After downing the Mavericks 1 11 97 the Bucks over the pelicans 1 29 1 25 38 For Yana Santana Coop Oh College Ball number one Gonzaga Handled Satya Clara 89 75 for their 50th straight home Victory number three Michigan blew out number nine Iowa 79 57. Michigan State over and over four Ohio State 71 67. The Al Attar's with five of the third to defeat the Bruins. Seven to a hat trick for Sam Gagne, The Redwing Scott by the Predators five to that Sports Frank Charity, NBC News Radio. My heart radio.

Sam Gagne Yana Santana 18 Mavericks Ohio State Kyrie Frank Charity Nbc News Radio Michigan State Six Year Irving 27 Michigan Satya Clara Bruins Bucks Seven Five 75 Gonzaga
Former real estate CEO Michael Lyon back in Sacramento County Jail on drug charges

The KFBK Morning News

00:34 sec | 1 d ago

Former real estate CEO Michael Lyon back in Sacramento County Jail on drug charges

"Estate mogul in Sacramento remains in prison after his appeal was denied Cape because Johnny De Agostini has that story. A Sacramento court is denying Mike Lyons appeal of his conviction for secretly filming prostitutes in his home. The real estate mogul claimed he was convicted unfairly in the case, saying prostitutes do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy. The appeal was denied yesterday by the third District Court of Appeal in Sacramento. Lyons is currently serving a six year, four month sentence in state prison given in 2018, Johnny D. Augustine e News 93.1 KFBK You County

Johnny De Agostini Sacramento Mike Lyons District Court Of Appeal Lyons Johnny D. Augustine
Fresh update on "six years" discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

00:39 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "six years" discussed on The Odd Couple with Chris Broussard & Rob Parker

"Matombo call malone and tim duncan they all want it once so do we. Let's just keep it real because it is subjective and lebron made a point that you know the criteria changes and shifts. It's just there is no criteria. The league doesn't give you a list of things to look for so every voter has his own criteria. But i would rather that rob then stale analytics statistical measure and whoever had the highest automatic bounds assist. What right 'cause i just matter analytics told us rob. This is true a week ago. Analytics told us that the lakers were better. Defensively with anthony davis and dennis schroder on the bench. that's true. It said they were better. Nobody nobody will believe that right because his ridiculous look at them. Now how good do they look defensively. I remember a few years ago. When they say kawai or san antonio was better defensively without kawhi. That's what the analytic said. Come on and as when he was really in his defensive prime. So look the. I test subjectivity. All the human elements that voters want to take into account that matters. And that's much better than some computer. Just spitting out. Who's the mvp. Every year so lebron guy four. That's great. He's behind kareem highs with six then jordan bill russell with five and lebron's next before so i'm with you. Though as davis should have just been honest. nobody would have killed him. Kill the brown for wanting to one to win. mvp add eighteen. At thirty six years old. I would be an accomplishment. Absolutely absolutely. I eight hundred seventy seven ninety nine or fox. Eight seven seven nine hundred sixty three sixty nine..

Anthony Davis Dennis Tim Duncan Lebron Five Matombo Jordan Bill Russell SIX Kawhi ROB San Antonio Kawai Davis A Week Ago Eighteen ONE Thirty Six Years Old Four Few Years Ago Eight Hundred Seventy Seven Ni
Food bank demand surges among military families amid pandemic

KCBS Radio Overnight News

02:06 min | 1 d ago

Food bank demand surges among military families amid pandemic

"Military families have had trouble putting food on the table, and many are forced to turn to food banks. CBS News correspondent Mark Strassmann says This is one of the many economic effects of the pandemic. We are military and we're struggling way met this army family on the front line of a food crisis. All right, my love. What would you like today? Just everything. There's a Ray Alvarez, her three year old Elijah and six year old Mary Soul. This'd the first time that I've consistently had to go to bed being over and over again. Her husband's an E three private at joint base, Lewis McChord or J B L M. Tacoma. Washington is expensive for a family of four living on $2300 a month. Half hour away. Thurston counties Food Bank serves 1500 Military families like the Alvarez is high. A 22% spike since the pandemic began, you welcome necesita days. That hurts. May Lieutenant Colonel J. P. Smith, a chaplain at J B. L. M. Identified the downturn here. You take a a spouse who's normally working, unable to find work because of the covert pandemic. If they lose that second income, that's a that's a blow on anybody. Says right Alvarez used to work until the military transfer them here A year ago, their financial cushion collapsed, the family's income plunged more than half I really need to find a job. The Department of Defense estimates the jobless rate for military spouses is 22%. Other estimates run as high as 35% in San Diego families using the food bag of the armed Services Y M C. A surged 400% during the pandemic. We're couldn't even go a full week without having to go get help. I'm a food pantry. Our family is worth it were worth getting the help that we need families helping Defend America in a bruising battle against hunger. Mark Strassmann

Mark Strassmann Ray Alvarez Mary Soul Lewis Mcchord M. Tacoma Thurston Counties Food Bank Lieutenant Colonel J. P. Smith Cbs News J B. L. M. Alvarez Elijah Army Washington Department Of Defense San Diego America
Michael Madigan’s Successor In Illinois House Resigns Just Three Days After Madigan Arranged His Appointment

Chicago Tonight

00:44 sec | 2 d ago

Michael Madigan’s Successor In Illinois House Resigns Just Three Days After Madigan Arranged His Appointment

"It took just a few days for former illinois house speaker. Michael madigan's handpicked successor as representative of the twenty second district to resign on sunday madigan and democratic party leaders elevated twenty six year old ward employee edward garrick kodak to fill madigan's house seat but today madigan and thirteenth ward alderman. Marty quinn issued a statement saying quote after learning of alleged questionable conduct by mr kodak. It was suggested that he resigned. State representative for the twenty second district. We are committed to a zero tolerance policy in the workplace with madigan support code at one over ten other people seeking the job. The former speaker intends to have another meeting tomorrow to select. His replacement

Madigan Edward Garrick Michael Madigan Thirteenth Ward Alderman Marty Quinn Mr Kodak Democratic Party Illinois Kodak
Woman, 11-Year-Old Child Found Dead In Pond Outside New York City

Steve Scott

00:24 sec | 2 d ago

Woman, 11-Year-Old Child Found Dead In Pond Outside New York City

"Bodies of a woman and child mother and son were found in a North jersey pond. Last night. Police were called Grace Lord Park in Boonton after someone heard a six year old boy near the water, shouting for his mother. Officers followed footprints in the snow and found the bodies of the 35 year old woman and 11 year old boy in the pond. The six year old wasn't hurt. We do not yet know how the woman and boy ended up in the water.

Grace Lord Park North Jersey Boonton
Rapper Bobby Shmurda Released From Prison After Six Years

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 3 d ago

Rapper Bobby Shmurda Released From Prison After Six Years

"In prison Once news time for 49 rapper Bobby sh murder has been released on parole after spending more than four years in jail for a drug gang conviction. 26 year Old Smyrna of Brooklyn, whose birth name is Akil Pollard was best known for hot boy that's a gritty song with rhymes about gunplay. Murder, was arrested in late 2014 after he left a recording studio near Radio City Music Hall Just days after he performed on Jimmy Kimmel Live. He and 15 Others were charged with several

Bobby Sh Akil Pollard Brooklyn Radio City Music Hall Jimmy Kimmel
Managing care During COVID

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

04:37 min | 3 d ago

Managing care During COVID

"What's an average day like for you. Caretaking on a typical day to feel like you have things under control while. I'm going to answer the second question i do. I have things under control. Never never ever ever. It's like. I'm on this constant roller coaster of ups and downs Just one. I think i've got it under control. The rug gets pulled out from underneath me. So what is an average day like my kids are early birds and for the record i hard roll my eyes that anyone who says their kids are early birds and then proceeds to tell me that they're little angels wake up at seven. Am shut up. try waking up every single day at five. Am for six years to just energetic screaming. Demanding kids. I don't know why i was blessed with early birds but here it's not as if the universe looks at us. Ms like a handful. Move onto somebody else quite often the terrible things. Just keep happening. They just keep piling up and for so many of us were not just caregiving in a traditional sense. Were caring for the people in our lives. In different ways. We are blurring the lines of our relationships between being caregiver and being a mother being a daughter being a sister being a wife being husband. I don't know. I said all all female roles except that i mean we got a lot of women's voices in here. I am a caregiver to my son. Boden he is eight years old and has acute lymphoblastic leukemia. I think one of the interesting things about being a caregiver to your own son or child is it's hard to distinguish what is just being a mom from what is being a caretaker. I ended up spending a lot of thought cycles and kind of emotional energy taking of him in a way. That is different than the way i take care of my other children. I then have to work through and process. The guilt of that discrepancy knowing both that biden has kind of different story or a different journey than the other kids that i have. But also that i'm all of their moms and so how do you kind of identified the difference between where caregiving stops and where mothering takes back up. When i was reading through your questions when you said caregiver like Or what is a normal day of caregiving. Look like. I kind of laughed. Because i thought man i think from the moment i opened my eyes to the moment i closed them giving Once pediatric cancer is kind of rock. Your world. I'm not sure there's really a space outside of it. I'm thinking about things. Like why is he not hungry for breakfast. Why is he craving meat. Why does he not wear a jacket. Is it because of a side effect of chemotherapy. Why is he sitting on the outside. When i pick them up from school wise. He's sitting on the outside of the soccer game Is it because his legs hurt is it because of the neuropathy whenever he has trouble with his homework is at a side effect from the chemotherapy. Is it affecting his cognitive function. Is it just him. Being eight I think when your role as a caregiver is so interwoven with your role as another relation like for me. His mother is just hard to kind of tease out. What part is caregiving. And what part is just living with a person with cancer so the average day for me really changed a lot during the various stages of my mom's illness she had end stage breast cancer and in the beginning when the cancer i came back it caused a lot of fluid to build up around her lung and then her lungs to collapse so at that point. We really didn't know that it was her cancer that was back and we were dealing with a medical emergency so my mom had to undergo invasive tests and surgery and there were just days with a lot of uncertainty about the diagnosis and the prognosis. And i was travelling back and forth from durham to charlotte while also taking care of my own family Here in durham and and working fulltime

Lymphoblastic Leukemia Pediatric Cancer Boden Biden Cancer Soccer Breast Cancer Durham Charlotte
Interview With Kimberley Cook

Your Life Program

05:44 min | 4 d ago

Interview With Kimberley Cook

"I have a very special guest who's had Very traumatic life. She was raised with forty years of emotional abuse from a narcissistic mother but through her heart. Perseverance and determination. She's found her way back to a fulfilling life today. Joining me on. My show is a very special self love coach. Kimberly cook who has used the skills of resilience emotional intelligence in self awareness to create a twenty four seven support system and step by step process to help survivors become thrive hours. Kimberly join us on the show. Today you're welcome. It's great to be here. You're here all the way from australia. From adelaide yes yes. I am so welcome. Welcome welcome I wanted to ask you if you wouldn't mind for the audience telling us about yourself and your story in how you became the self love coach in how you have the self love project. How did that all begin. I'm will growing up I didn't realize. I had a narcissistic mother because it didn't know what the word was you know growing up a was just emotionally demented by her Throughout my life. Until i was thirty six she sort of set me up to file in law. If i didn't i didn't have boundaries You know she didn't teach them to me. She made me live by them. But not allowed me to have my own voice and and stuff like that and You know a be thirty six years old and i. I just couldn't take it anymore. She had completely try to control. My life You basically fell in love with my husband tried to do my children and Just took them and just cut off contact with my hometown. Family which then led to me for many many years after that to Leaving out a self abuse. Because i didn't know what was wrong with me. What i deviated to learn a lot about nazism. And and then i just went through the process of Of healing myself at the tolerant knowing what to do and Dimona ten forty nine was not living on this anymore and i it would break my heart to see people suffer through united just being bullied or getting into a relationship that they could get out of. That was unhappy and many many people live with you know without so flow because we were talking back. Then you know you've got to do things for others and put others before you can so clogged was really thing. It was locked tough and often Not i believe that anymore and so flood is very confusing to people. That aren't really what it is. They should be doing To release their trauma and emotional baggage. Because it's very heavy. Yes very very heavy. So let's let's back up just a moment for the audience who might not really understand but because your years of figuring it out you now know what is a north narcissist pathological narcissist. What are some the traits that if someone is in a relationship that's abusive or heart and they don't know what Had noticed the signs explain. What narcissist is well. You know it someone huge encroaches your boundaries or. Do things for them that you don't want to do and they have no consideration. And but it's a continual thing it's Something that although law though tell you a blatant lachey face and then although tell you something and you don't hang on a minute and then you feed that back to them and the dow you know they'll be lucky. That's not what i said. Or that's not what i did or and so then you just become long magor mart laar crazy. Did i just make that open. You know and then when this happens all the time you know you really end up questioning very own self. you're your you're your mentality and There's a different level of narcissism having as a parrot because they're the people that bring you into the world you know other is someone who gave birth to you so you would think i'd be the one to protect julian Not you an and teach you to be strong and You know my mom didn't do any of that and make bad choices and then not pick narcissistic men. So i want gain on. I couldn't have a voice and was A choice alcoholics And things like that and so the stock who just sort of went on and you know when when when someone is emotionally abusing you and putting down and Barking orders it. You and stuff like that. What happens is you. You didn't turn laws and so you instantly emotionally abusing yourself

Kimberly Cook Dimona Kimberly Adelaide Australia Julian
Bell wins on Daytona road course for first Cup win

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:36 sec | 5 d ago

Bell wins on Daytona road course for first Cup win

"For the second straight week to start the season nascar cup series solid first time winner sunday's race at the daytona road course will be one that christopher bill remembers for a while christova bells courses first career win and it comes on the day course sound courtesy of fox sports. The twenty six year old bell earned his first career. Victory passing joey logano as the white flag. We've four the final lap and holding off the twenty two car for the victory. Bell follows michael mcnall who picked up his first career cup series victory in the daytona five hundred the week prior next up is the dixie vodka. Four hundred at homestead speedway Twenty

Christopher Bill Joey Logano Michael Mcnall FOX Bell
Chicago Man Arrested After Woman, Two Young Girls Stabbed In Bronzeville Apartment

WGN Programming

00:34 sec | 5 d ago

Chicago Man Arrested After Woman, Two Young Girls Stabbed In Bronzeville Apartment

"Were injured his stabbing stemming from a domestic dispute. In Chicago's Grant Boulevard neighborhood last night, police say officers responded to a home in the 4400 block of South Wabash right about 11 P.m., a man apparently becoming physically violent in the home. He attacked a woman and two young girls with a knife. The woman and a 14 year old and six year old girl reportedly suffered cuts. They were hospitalized. The man was arrested on the scene. The incident remains under investigation. The recent winter storms

South Wabash Chicago
Science FAIL! Why it's good to do

Science Friction

05:25 min | 6 d ago

Science FAIL! Why it's good to do

"We've all made mistakes right. But sometimes i can make us fundamentally confront who we are and who we want to bay beck in twenty four eighteen neuroscientist. Dr been to has had a damn good reason to be excited. It was it was such a shalit's basically there was years of work at prestigious scientific journal current biology had just accepted a paper by humidity supervisors based on his phd project but not without rigorous peer review. I of course reviews as good and tough questions and lots of extra analyses. I did when finally the email arrived and said yes. The paper is accepted. it was just. It was a very happy moment. A piper in a high impact journal. That's a big deal for. Young scientist then investigates how we perceive the world visually. So as your brain stitches together sane in front of you what you see is rematch spatially. Onto a part of your cortex at wrinkly atalaya of brian. So if you think of the cortex is old crumbled up that if you would flatten it out like a sheet could see on this flat surface neighboring points on the critical surf representing neighboring points in the visual field in the scene in front of us then put people in an mariah scanner to see what happened to the map when he distracted them using different visual cues. He came up with a k. For design for study and think we scan a total of twenty seven people which was at the time by far the largest study using this type of method and the method was kind of knew. He said there was a lot to figure out. It was computational so there were some analyses that literally took weeks every weekend machine would run through that stuff when it crashed it would send me an email which is a dangerous thing to do because when you get an e mail on sunday saying oh your coaches crashed in your very tempted to go back to the office and start to fix it. That lots of careful data crunching and analysis lighter and he'd found something significant and surprising this aspect of the brain of the visual brain which part of the scene a given neuronal population of marin response to seem to be more malleable than we thought and it was surprising that it seemed to change with attention. Just through your attending a given power to seen more than an condition. There's a lot to this week but the shorter the long of it is. This was a robust finding worthy of journal. So fast four now to six years later it's june twenty twenty and bins running his lab and tame remotely in the middle of a pandemic lockdown in germany. He's home is three. Kids is a lot going on right and he gets an email. I received that email. And i have to say at i. If i'm honest i i. Wasn't that worried that something was wrong. Really wrong only been didn't understand what yet and he would have to make a career defining choice about what to do next today on science fiction. Something we can all relate to filing and why it's good to do especially in science but also wants wrapped up in a whole lot of stigma and shame again especially in science you know great successes are trumpeted and things. That are not successes. You don't want people to know about however failure is so normal to the day to day working of science we need to move towards a culture where we are actively embracing failure. We all know that air is human and assigned as you know we have to ask why and behalf to ask how and way we fe often leads to the next question we are asking and so does this theory much part of scientific process. It's very great suits of inspiration in many ways the into no signs. That's not the way it looks and sounds in science when a journal pulls or retracts a paper the stuff of nightmares for scientists. But he's angst about scientific integrity scandals scaring scientists away from talking more openly about making mistakes back to that email bend has received at the uselessly. Big university in giessen. It was from susanna stole. Who is doing pay at university college. London under the supervision of professor sam schwarzkopf. Now sam had been a post doc in the lab been had done his pitch in and susanna was building on original. Study when i first read and paper thought. The design. They've chosen was really beautiful and was impressed. Ben included a very extensive stepney mandatory material conducting analyses infect around thirty pages of supplementary data for just a two page paper. Susannah was impressed with half farah was but then she went to do her on experiments and she noticed something odd she was getting. The same results has been even with different experimental conditions. And that shouldn't be high s-. I really had no clue

Prestigious Scientific Journal High Impact Journal Shalit Beck DR Big University Giessen Germany Susanna Sam Schwarzkopf University College SAM London BEN Susannah Farah
From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

Unreserved

04:32 min | 6 d ago

From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

"You may have seen my guest today on the small screen and big screens or on the stage. Michael is is a man of many talents. He's a classically trained ballet dancer. Choreographer director playwright and renowned actor over his three decade. Long career michael has appeared in some of the most beloved first nation films like dance me outside and smoke signals. He has taken on challenging roles. Playing indigenous leaders like sitting bull wandering spirit to come see and crazy horse more recently. He's taken the small screen by storm appearing on hit tv shows like fear the walking dead true detective and the soon to be released nbc. Comedy rutherford falls. Michael is net. Oh and a member of the musket lake cremation in sketch. Juan and he joins me now from los angeles. Welcome to the show. Michael falen thank you so much for the invitation. Oh it's so great to have you here so you're in los angeles right now But i wanna go back a bit. Can you tell me about where you grew up. I'm from treaty. Six territory in saskatchewan My mom and dad are from reserves in the middle of saskatchewan. My dad's from moscow. And my mom is from sweet grass and my sister and my family. We lived in a couple of places where in the capelle valley. Of course lebron and then we moved to saskatoon and saskatoon was where i spent my boyhood until i was plucked plucked from the prairies at the age of ten years old to attend canada's national ballet school in toronto and my family and i we moved from treaty six territory to To dish with one spoon territory. So i could pursue dance as as a career potential career and so i wanna talk about your dancing a bit but first i want to know what was it. Like growing up on the prairies. What do you remember What do you remember about growing up on the prairies. So many beautiful things. Obviously that's home. That's that's that's my home. That's where i know about my family. My a my early years. I remember the sunlight of remember the sky. I remember my cousins and all my relatives. And i remember playing just riding my bike with my banana seat all over town. They need to make banana seats again. They're very comfortable. they do they do in los angeles. There's a whole like bike culture. We're fleeing be tricked out bike's banana seats. So you're known primarily as an actor now but as you mentioned you know you got into the entertainment industry in a different way. You started as a dancer as a ballet dancer. So how does a kid growing up in saskatoon and up in the ballet well by accident entirely by axes we were living in saskatoon and my mom was a teacher at the school for the deaf. A very famous School for deaf children in saskatoon and my sister. And i were doing you know little kid things. I was playing hockey of course and my sister was taking dance lessons so mumbai. I we used to week for my sister in the car and i was you know five six years old so i was like a super board super easily so it was like she died. She'd done and i would go up and check on her. I remember the classes at the university of scotch one and it was kind of like this wile experiences little kid i walk in. I'd look for her and then she be dancing with these little girls. In one day. I decided to really kinda pay attention to what they were doing. And i and then. I blurted got ceesay. Teacher overheard me. She said well. Do you think it's easy. Why don't you come on back next week. So i said A will and i told my mom all week. I'm going to dance next week. And she of course you know. I apparently said lots of crazy things as as a boy but as the days got closer. She was like okay he. He's repeating it. He's he's he's he's insistent about this. Why do you think you're going to death sex because the teacher invited me so with my mom and my mom used me. I'm so so sorry. Michael thinks that you've invited him. Smith usually oh yeah yeah yeah come on in. And that's how. It started precocious boy pushing his way into a dance class that he hadn't signed up for.

Saskatoon Rutherford Falls Michael Falen Capelle Valley Los Angeles Saskatchewan Michael National Ballet School NBC Juan School For Deaf Children Lebron Moscow University Of Scotch Toronto Canada Mumbai Hockey Smith
Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

Techmeme Ride Home

05:12 min | 6 d ago

Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

"What is the gaming industry and by that. I mostly mean developers. What what does the industry think about developing and just the market is it clearly a sliver compared to other things. But do they think like. It's maybe on the cusp of being something. That is interesting. Yeah so. I don't. I don't have numbers obviously but like so to get into my background and just in case your listeners. Don't really know me. I wrote for game informer magazine for eight years as there for a long time until i was we had like right when right when the oculus rift came out like we had an issue like vr issue. Right and we. I remember getting test kits into the office and playing early games and stuff like that and at that time we kind of went in with the mindset of like okay. Well this is like a new. This dobie xbox. They'll be nintendo and they'll be oculus that's kind of how we felt about it like it would just be this other competitive corner of video gaming and now all this time later which is a. We're going to maybe like four or five. Six years later feel like it has found its spot and like you said like beat sabre. Which is the fantastic i played. I almost literally played every day. I love beat sabre Has sold gangbusters There's like i think facebook released a blog that said something like thought they had five other. Vr titles at it sold a million copies which was cool. And so where we're at now is it's interesting because it's not what i thought it would be. Where would be like just as competitive as like the switch. You know what i mean. It would just be another platform that you know hardcore gamers like me would have in their home but it's increasingly kind of become this like weird separate thing that even non gamers are kind of getting into like i've i'm like i've heard of people have met people who aren't really big video gamers but they do have a headset. And they like vr because it does have kind of like what you were talking about earlier. It has practical applications beyond video games. You know you can kind of around the world and see things. I use it to work out like. That's my main exercise purpose lately as i tried to play oculus like at least once a day for thirty minutes played exercise games and beat because they're very movement centered so it's it's closer to like the mobile market. I feel like we're there's a lot of disparate things floating around that are trying to find their niche as opposed to like someone like me. Who's like i have an xbox series s x. I have a playstation five and i got my oculus rift like that's not super common. It's almost treated as like you know gamers like it but it's not like it's not it's more than a video game machine you know. It's like ninety percent of video game machine but like that ten percent is really lifting it up and people are finding that way. Well so this is gets into my sort of disappointment with what i what is out there. Obviously this would have been one of the times where. Vr should have had its breakthrough moment like a lot of things including video conferencing of had The pandemic times now. There are apps on their from companies. That are clearly the eight even says. It's like we'll use this to remote work with your teams and you can all meet in a space and you know whiteboard together and you know. Even you know sketch things and and in a three d. environment especially frano architects and things like that. I can see that but none of it's very good that i've sampled like i would think there'd be more of that. There's also there's also a handful of things that are like we'll watch a movie with your friends and you go into a virtual Sort of movie theater and by the way. All of the like netflix and and prime video they all have apps that essentially you can watch anything you want on a virtual big screen which is very nice for lying down in bed and stuff. But i'm wondering if like they missed a trick like there is nothing that was like a breakthrough during pandemic times for just being virtually with other people. Yeah right when the pandemic started. I remember i think it was fun. Mation was selling tickets to go. Watch a cure with an audience in oculus and i love cura is like one of my favorite movies and i like we are but even i was like i look at that mike. I want to do that like yeah. The resolution on the headset just isn't there like it's basically like shoving a like a switch. Well let me take them. It's better than a switch screen. It's like it's a higher resolution switch green but like it. Just can't look as good as your desktop for work or your four k tv in your living room. It's just it's like you have to accept that limitation in order to participate like i saw this Which i had never seen until today. Maybe because you are emailing me about vr. Google is like oh let's send this guy. vr ads but it was like it was like. Yeah what will like. Let's let's have a workspace. You can have as many monitors as you want and you can have a virtual keyboard. Obviously it'll be but there'll be a virtual keyboard and it's like that's a really interesting idea. But i'm not gonna take that resolution downgrade in visuals. I'm not going to be able to see that. Virtual computer monitor. As well as i can't if i'm just looking at my standard computer monitor and it's not worth that dive and

Nintendo Facebook Netflix Cura Mike Google
Kim Kardashian and Kanye West are getting divorced

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:19 sec | 6 d ago

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West are getting divorced

"Of the most well known celebrity unions is ending kim kardashian filing for divorce from kanye west reportedly an amicable split. They've been married for more than six years and have four children. It was the first marriage for west. The third for kardashian her family's show keeping up with the kardashians is ending. Its fourteen year run this year.

Kim Kardashian Kanye West Kardashian
Writing About Illness Without Platitudes

The Book Review

05:03 min | Last week

Writing About Illness Without Platitudes

"Silica. Juha joins us now from rural new jersey. Her first book is called between two kingdoms. A memoir of a life interrupted salako. Thanks for being here. Thanks so much for having me camera. So this book came out originally. I believe from a blog that you did for the new york times. Called life interrupted key. Start with how that blogger came about and what it was about through. I received a diagnosis of leukemia. Was twenty two and in those early weeks of being in the hospital and going q. I had all kinds of grand ambitions about whatever's going to do with the strange time on bedrest. I had packed a suitcase. Full of books including were and peace was on my bedside table but you know as the treatment can and and the side effects started to set an i had so little energy i never read a single one of those books and a kind of despair began to sink in as i realized that my life had bifurcated the resist before a diagnosis. This after and i really struggled to figure out what i could possibly do from the confines of a hospital room and so i returned to something. I've always leaned on in difficult times. Just keeping a journal. And i wrote every day. I had made this commitment to myself. An didn't matter how good the quality of the writing was or how long it was sometimes over a couple of sentences. Sometimes just a word occasional rain the f. word but i think i was trying to make sense of the circumstances i'd found myself an and over the course of keeping that journal turned a kind of reporters notebook. I'd had aspirations of becoming a foreign correspondent the for my diagnosis and blah. I couldn't travel or interview. Anyone really leave my hospital room bubble. I began to report from the frontlines of my hospital bed on a very different kind of conflict zone and that journal and became the source material for the life. Intrepid calm and i was interested not just in kind of excavating the experience of us but thinking through the way in which age impacts how we experienced major relation tractions for you at the time. Of course it was the before diagnosis. And the after diagnosis. Obviously from this vantage you've been healthy for about six years. It feels more like a between period. Thus perhaps the title of your book between two kingdoms. This idea of interruption was hopeful one. I had this belief that i needed to endure the treatments than once i was well i get to return to my life into the person that i'd been that that didn't happen. I very quickly realized. After nearly four years and treatment that i couldn't return to the person. I'd ben bc before cancer and that in fact the hard work of killing did not end with the cure. It was really where healing began. And i found myself in this strange of in between place. The title of my memoir between two kingdoms is a reference to the berlin susan song tag. Who wrote about how we all have dual citizenship and the kingdom of the sick and then Bell but even though i wasn't sick on paper anymore i felt as far as i possibly could her from being the healthy happy twenty seven year old woman that i had hoped to end the other side of this. And so you know. The book is an examination of this year's of and the impact that it had not just on me but on my family my entire community but really it's about aftermaths and why we do when our life is ended and we have to learn how to love again. Describe a little bit what you mean by the difference between moving on and moving forward so when i finished treatment i has a solution that i needed to move on from illness and i very quickly realized that moving on is the kind of meth and as much as i tried to do. Just it wasn't possible. And so i really needed to learn how to move forward with my illness and its imprint on my life on my body on my mind and to carry thought wreckage with me as i try to find my way forward.

Juha Joins Salako Leukemia The New York Times New Jersey Susan Song Berlin Cancer Bell
Newsletters vs Email Sequences: Which One Is Best for Your Business?

The $100 MBA Show

04:10 min | Last week

Newsletters vs Email Sequences: Which One Is Best for Your Business?

"Newsletters versus email sequences. That what we're gonna to talk about today which one is best for your business for your audience for the people on your email list. I list the find them. A newsletter is a email you send on a regular basis to your customers to anybody on your email list that could be a customer. Non customer potential customer leads and the main differences that you're actually triggering this email. You're writing it in advance and maybe scheduling it to go at a certain time or certain day every week or every two weeks every month so in whatever will use to send emails those mailchimp verkada active campaign. You're writing up this newsletter. Maybe a week or two in advance scheduling it to go out to the recipients so they can read. What's new in your company. What's happening early blog post. You need latest video or podcast episode. It's some sort of value. You wanna give your customer. An email sequence is different because it's not one email that goes out to everybody at a particular time or the same time so the newsletter. You're sending every monday for example to everybody on your list but with an email sequence as soon as somebody joins your list they get an automation sequence of email so they might get one email as soon as they join your email us. Welcome them then day. Later they'll get an email with your latest blog posts and these are pre written emails that get sent automatically in a certain sequence that you create in advance and these sequences can go on for as long as you like for as many emails as you want. Some people call this a chateau newsletter. I heard this from brennan done. Who writes a lot of courses creates a lot of courses would comes to email marketing. We had brennan on as a guest teacher back on episode sixty five around six years ago. You hit subscribing. Find it in our archives if you'd like it's called the newsletter because from the recipient's end from your potential customers and it's just an email newsletter is both from your end. It's all prescheduled all automated. So which one is better while. I'm here to tell you that they both have value. And it's all depends on what you're trying to achieve and i have my own thoughts on this. I think that traditional newsletters have their place. They advantage of newsletters. It's fresh content fresh information that you just wrote recently a week or two ago max so you might be covering recent topics current events. You might be curious articles that have come up in your feeder that you've seen that are recent or relevant with a newsletter shatter newsletter Things can get old really quickly because if you wrote the sequence six months ago those emails are not as timely as they are now in terms of the content of the actual information. You're sharing so what i recommend. Is you do send a newsletter. But i think the timeliness of what's going on what's the latest and greatest actually pertains or is actually more important for your actual customers. Setting regular newsletter customers actually makes more sense because you want to retain them you want to keep them happy and you want to give them value also an update on what's going on with your products or services your company and that information needs to be timely but they were trying to nurture an audience to become a customer like the emails you send to potential customers on malysz that necessarily doesn't need to be a newsletter it can be what's called the shadow newsletter or an email sequence. And will you focus on is things that are not really a time bound so when it comes to these email sequences include content. That is timeless. Like your most popular blockposts. Another email could be your backstory. High started the company. And why you do what you do. Another e mail in the sequence could be how some of your customers are getting the most out of your products and services that you sell some success stories things that will get them over the line from being a non customer to accustom because really. That's your goal with that email list of people that are not customers yet

Brennan
Interview With Bradley Kam

Bitcoin Radio

04:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Interview With Bradley Kam

"We have a returning gas brian. Cameo from unstoppable domains and brad. Thanks for joining great. Thanks for Awesome awesome. so we've had you on before for those that maybe missed it. You can go to the reimagine twenty twenty youtube channel Up reimagined twenty two brought cameron and it will populate they're interesting story good stuff there You know for free that. Take a peek out. That i'm having back again. So hopefully we can shed some new light and get some updates in and see what's going on but bradey know what i noticed from. The last discussion is With quite get your journey like into blockchain I've done countless interviews now over the last four months and it'd be It's interesting you know. Love to hear your side and you found out in the rational and how you got into blockchain shore. So i i heard about it from the wired article in two thousand and eleven the rise and fall bitcoin which a lot of people probably heard him read and i remember thinking. Oh this is cool. And that i remember tossing the magazine aside and then nothing about it again. For a couple of years i moved out to san francisco in end of two thousand twelve december. Two thousand twelve to work on marketing tech startup. Six years working on that. But when i moved to san francisco. I moved into this hacker. House called twenty mission Right in the center of the mission district is crazy place a day. After i got there they were shooting horror. Fill there Just to give you kind of an idea of like what the building looks like They didn't need to change the scenery. It was ready to go for the film So there was like a clown getting murdered or something like that right outside my right outside. My door They eventually built it up a little bit. Got a little bit nicer but it was basically. I started by a early bitcoin supporter and essentially everybody. There was some sort of Some sort of a bitcoin enthusiast. The second bitcoin exchange was launched in the basement of the building Trade ill second. Bitcoin exchange in the us. bunch of early meet ups were in the building. The talk was giving talks in or courtyard before theorem. Live was basically everybody that i met when i moved to. San francisco was crypto person. Maybe three weeks. After i got there read the white paper You know maybe rented another couple of times just that first week thought it was one of the most amazing things i've ever heard was a little skeptical about whether or not this could actually work implementation. Wise i'm not ankle so i of needed to trust might eleborate friends. Essentially that this was like real from a tech perspective. They convinced me that it was and reading about it and think about it. Ever since i was more seven years ago. So how is living about pat. I don t twenty mission. It's not there anymore. I don't think right though. There is a lot of phases so a lot of a lot of those early folks in a lotta. Those early crypto folks are have since moved on But it was it was. It was pretty wild in the back in the day. I mean they were doing doing five hundred person. Y- parties with multiple. Dj's going until six am and stuff like that A lot of meet ups. It was amazing. I met so many. Jimmy's metallic was so he's to my. Cto is what was in a hacker house. I don't think he was. I think he might have been twenty mission as well but there was another one. A nearby and metallic was pitching a theory at that time Which kind of blew. Everybody's mind when he was trying to sell tokens and obviously my cto. Now wish he would have awesome. Yeah yes i didn't actually. I didn't get to talk to patel. Bear but it i did a. I was taking this class collection. You in south bay. And i think twenty fifteen and batali gave a talk Talking about a theory. And what. I heard it. It sounded like the most convoluted confusing thing ever. Everybody was like why. What's gas wise there. Gas is that different than ease. The token like it was just so confusing hours. Like is this really. Is this really going to work. It just seems so So bazaars i i didn't i didn't immediately get it. I don't think i'm probably took me another year. After the thing was was live when i started seeing some apps and then finally once i could see apps i was like okay now i get it now. This is a decentralized platform for apps

San Francisco Brad Cameron Brian Youtube PAT Jimmy United States Batali Patel South Bay
Jim's Recovery Story

Big Book Podcast

06:02 min | Last month

Jim's Recovery Story

"I was born in a little town in virginia in an average religious home. My father a negro was a country physician. I remember in my early youth. My mother dress me just as she did. My two sisters. And i wore curls. Until i was six years of age at that time i started school. And that's how i got rid of the curls. I found that. Even then i had fears and inhibitions we live just a few doors from the first baptist church and when they had funerals i remember very often asking my mother whether the person was good or bad and whether they were going to heaven or hell i was about six then. My mother had been recently converted and actually had become a religious fanatic. That was her main neurotic manifestation. She was very possessive with us. Children another thing. That mother drilled me was a very puritanical point of view as to sex relations and as to motherhood and womanhood. I'm sure my ideas as to what life should be like. We're quite different from that. Of the average person with whom i associated later on in life that took its toll. I realized that now about this time an incident took place in grade school that i have never forgotten because it made me realize that i was actually a physical coward during recess. We were playing basketball. And i had accidentally trip to fellow just little larger than i was. He took the basketball and smashed me in the face with it. That was enough provocation to fight. But i didn't fight and i realized after recess. Why didn't it was fear that hurt and disturbed me a great deal. Mother was of the old school and figure that anyone. I associated with should be of the proper type of course in my day. Times had changed. She just hadn't changed with them. I don't know whether it was right or wrong but at least i know that people weren't thinking the same. We weren't even permitted to play cards in our home. But father would give us just a little tidy with whiskey and sugar and warm water now and then. We had no whiskey in the house. Other than my father's private stock. I've never seen him drunk in my life although he'd take a shot in the morning and usually one in the evening and so did i but for the most part. He kept his whiskey in his office. The only time. I have ever seen my mother take anything. Alcoholic was around christmas time when she would drink some eggnog or light wine. I remember my first year in high school. That mother suggested that. I do not join the cadet unit. She got a medical certificate. So that i should not have to join it. I don't know whether she was a pacifist. Or whether she just thought that in the event of another war it would have some bearing on my joining up about then too. I realized that my point of view on the opposite sex wasn't entirely like that of most to the boys. I knew for that reason. I believe i married at a much younger age than i would have had not been for my home training. My wife and i have been married for some thirty years. Now was the first girl that i ever took out. I had quite a heartache about her then because she wasn't the type of girl that my mother wanted me to marry in the first place she had been married before. I was her second husband. My mother resented it so that the first christmas after our marriage which was in may of nineteen twenty-three. She didn't even invite us to dinner. After our first child came my parents both became allies. But in later days after i became an alcoholic they both turned against me. My father had come out of the south and had suffered a great deal down there. He wanted to give me the very best and he thought that nothing but being a doctor would suffice on the other hand. I believe that. I've always been medically inclined though i have never been able to see medicine quite as the average person sees it. I do surgery because that's something that you can see. It's more tangible. But i can remember and postgraduate days and during internship that very often i'd go to the patient's bed and start a process of elimination and then very often i'd wind up guessing. That wasn't the way it was with my father. I think with him. It possibly was a gift. Intuitive diagnosis father through the years had built up a very good mail order business. Because at that time there wasn't too much money in medicine. I don't think. I suffered too much as far as the racial situation was concerned because i was born into it and knew nothing other than that. A man wasn't actually mistreated. Though if he was he could only resent it. He could do nothing about it on the other hand. I got quite a different picture. Farther south economic conditions had a great deal to do with it. Because i've often heard my father say that his mother would take one of the old time flour sacks and cut a hole through the bottom and two corners of it and they're you'd have a gown of course when father finally came to virginia to work his way through school. He resented the southern cracker as he often called them so much that he didn't even go back to his mother's funeral. He said he never wanted to set foot in the deep south again and he didn't i went to elementary and high school in washington. Dc and then to howard university. My internship was in washington. I never had too much trouble in school. i was able to get my workout. All my troubles arose. When i was thrown socially among groups of people as far as school was concerned i made fair grades throughout. This was around. Nineteen thirty five and it was about this time that i actually started drinking during the years. Nineteen thirty to nineteen thirty five due to the depression and its aftermath. Business went from bad to worse. I had my own medical practice in washington at that time but the practice slackened and the mail order business started to fall off

Basketball Virginia Washington Howard University Depression
"six years" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

The Oklahoma Observercast

02:09 min | 4 months ago

"six years" Discussed on The Oklahoma Observercast

"<Music> walk <Music> in the door <Music> <Music> and <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> we <Speech_Male> want to thank Democratic <Speech_Male> Senate nominee <Speech_Male> Abby Broyles <Speech_Male> for joining us <Speech_Male> for this week's Observer <Speech_Male> cast <Speech_Male> on our next episode. <Speech_Male> We <Speech_Male> will be joined by one <Speech_Male> of the state's sharpest <Speech_Male> political Minds <Speech_Male> former <Speech_Male> house Democratic leader <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Scott Inman <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> for a lively <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> discussion and Analysis <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of the general <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> election results. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> Also, <Speech_Music_Male> if you're interested in <Speech_Music_Male> sponsoring Observer <Speech_Music_Male> cast, please give <Speech_Music_Male> me Arnold Hamilton <Speech_Male> a call at 405-478-8700 <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or drop me an email <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at a Hamilton <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> it okay Observer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Org <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you also <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> can support Observer <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cash with a tax <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> deductible donation <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> wage. The Oklahoma Observer <Speech_Music_Male> democracy <Speech_Music_Male> Foundation whose <Speech_Music_Male> mission is <Speech_Music_Male> to help create a better <Speech_Music_Male> more informed <Speech_Music_Male> Oklahoma to <Speech_Music_Male> keep us on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the air visit. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Okay Observer. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Org and click <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the Donate button <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> on the upper right <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> side of the home page. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> You <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> can stretch your donation <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> even more <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> thanks to the covid-19 <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cares act <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and stimulus package <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that lets <Speech_Male> non itemizers <Speech_Male> take up <Speech_Male> to a $300,000 <Speech_Male> above <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the line charitable <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> income tax <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> deduction for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cash donations <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> made in 2020. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> So <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for folks who take the <Speech_Music_Male> standard deduction if <Speech_Music_Male> you give $300 <Speech_Music_Male> to charity <Speech_Music_Male> this year, you <Speech_Music_Male> took the $300 <Speech_Music_Male> tax break in <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> addition to the standard <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> deduction. We <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> also <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> urge you to subscribe to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Oklahoma Observer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> now in our 52nd <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> year of comforting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The Afflicted and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> afflict the comfortable we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> have lunch special digital <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> subscription <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> rate for Observer cast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> listeners only <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a dollar 99 <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> a month for the first <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> year. That's <Speech_Music_Male> 50% off <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the usual rate for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> monthly digital subscribers. <Speech_Music_Male> Just <Speech_Music_Male> use the coupon <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> off. Observer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> cast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> when checking out <Speech_Music_Male> to get the discount <SpeakerChange> rate. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Finally, <Speech_Music_Female> we want to thank Norman's <Speech_Music_Female> Jared deck <Speech_Music_Female> for the music you're listening <Speech_Music_Female> to today. <Speech_Music_Female> You can download his albums <Speech_Music_Female> at iTunes <Speech_Music_Female> and learn more including <Speech_Music_Female> dates for Jared's upcoming <Speech_Music_Female> online performances <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> at Jared <Speech_Music_Male> deck music.com. <Speech_Music_Male>

"six years" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

03:05 min | 8 months ago

"six years" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Launch an orbital that will study the Martian atmosphere. What makes his mission remarkable, is it? It's coming from a space agency. This is just six years old. The you a new any other Arab nation has ever launched a planetary mission before. I've come to the Mohammed. Bin Rashid Space Center in Dubai to hear more about this audacious mission. First up I spoke to Sarah, L. Mary, deputy project. Manager and science lead the mission. When I first heard about this mission, my impression was. That sounds crazy. You wouldn't be the only one we get that a lot because one where new country that has entered into the space race and it was something that was a day. She's but for us. It's in the city, so the UAE is going to mass. Where did the IDEA I? Come from the idea of going tomorrow started ministerial retreat towards the end of two thousand and thirteen, where the government's re looks at the General Strategy Direction that the government's going down and. And sets his priorities and objectives, and it was in their retreat, the his highness ship, but I should on the tomb was the Prime Minister Buea, and also the ruler of Dubai discussed the idea of going to Mars as a means by which we can challenge the development of science and technology skills across the board, and elevate that and be a country. A nation was able to design and develop complex systems, and it was from there that the team at the. Space Center was tasked with looking at. How do we get tomorrow? How to design develop a mission there? How are you going to develop the capabilities around that and most importantly? How are you going to get there? Before the second of December twenty twenty, one, whereas the second of December Twenty One is the fiftieth anniversary of the creation of the as a nation. And how ambitious was this plan? How much experience had the already in? In going to space, so you eight has been a user of space systems since the eighties, and we transitioned designing and developing spacecrafts in two thousand, six, so late, two, thousand, thirteen, beginning, two, thousand, fourteen, what sort of amid point journey for us in developing Earth observation satellites, and it was about point that we took experience that we had from Earth observation built with knowledge partners and move towards developing this the hope probe. And so what will probe do at Mas to the hope pro for the very first sign, we'll give us a full understanding of the weather of Martin's that occurs in the lower obser- Morris, and we'll be studying most of the major constituents within the lower atmosphere to better understand what happens. Who Water Vapor there happens to the dust storms and more importantly, what we also want to look is atmospheric loss, and the loss of hydrogen oxygen from the top of the Martian atmosphere, and this allows us to have a more holistic understanding of the planet, and how it's awesome, atmosphere and also. Also, the dynamics of the atmosphere as a whole now. Why is that different? Why is it noble than other missions? Because we all know about what what makes up the atmosphere, Mars we know about temperatures, but prior to this missions have looked at it not throughout an entire day, so looked at it during two timeslots of the day. Either two am to be and for us we'll.

Rashid Space Center Dubai UAE Prime Minister Sarah obser- Morris Buea Martin L. Mary
"six years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

"Would sigh or get up and leave in the middle of someone testifying about something traumatic and she says it was worse for her transgender clients when one transgender woman struggled to explain an incident in her past. Talia says Judge Munoz asked if her memory had been impaired by hormone therapy and Trans Women. Judge Munoz insisted on using the wrong pronouns calling them Sir and addressing them by their former names the judge would say you know if peewee Herman were in my courtroom. I wouldn't call him peewee. I would call him Paul After. She started seeing more of these cases in two thousand eleven judge. Kunio says. She asked her bosses for guidance about which pronouns to us but never heard anything. She says she even asked one of her clerks to research. What the law said about it and didn't find anything and she says there was a practical reason why she referred to transgender women using male pronouns. Like he him that she had to keep the written record consistent. It's not a social issue. I'm not in. They're trying to change the world. I'm just in. They're trying to deal with the law. One of the big complaints against her was that she didn't understand the basics. The gender identity is totally separate from sexual orientation. Immigration officials are trained about this but judges. Don't get that training you know. I'm not an expert on Trans and the history of cases were based on just Gay Asylum cases so when Trans evolved as a more common type of case we didn't have any training or background materials. Talia another lawyers. I talked with say Judge Moon wanted help. She could have read their evidence and listen to experts who explained that discrimination against transgender women is different from discrimination against gay and Lesbian People. I will say there there. Certainly is more awareness. Generally in society now than there was ten years ago And yet they're still alive. I think between mockery. It felt like an attack for years. I sent hundreds of Trans Women before. Judge Mona's a judge with one of the highest denial rates in the country. A judge who records show regularly CAST DOUBT ON PEOPLE'S GENDER identity after years of filing complaints and seeing no discipline no change. A few lawyers decided to fight back. They picked a case that was scheduled for Judge Moon. Llosa's Court and set it up for an appeal. They wanted to force higher courts to say she was wrong. I think are the same. I J in all three cases MS arguing before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in two thousand fifteen lawyers described the case of Kerry Avendano Hernandez a transgender woman who had been raped by police in Mexico. Judge Munoz denied her claim ordering her to return to.

Judge Munoz Trans Women Judge Moon Judge Mona Kunio peewee Herman Talia Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Kerry Avendano Hernandez Paul After Llosa Mexico
"six years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

"Happened since the immigration judge approved this girl's request for voluntary departure. She talked with their family for the first time. Though now Malia explained to me what that first and only recent video call with with the girl was like and the whole where all new Iran. Ah told me that the girl said hi umbrella and she said Hello my child and that she was crying and she spent seven years crying for her. And the girl said. Oh I will allow but I've already asked from deportation and and I'm going to go and told her come over here. Come with us you can go doing on. Lula's give almost build. Donya Malia learned in this conversation that the girl hasn't learned how to read she's been in the United States for more than six years and she still doesn't know how to read. She also shared that. Most of her days are good but that she's still self harming sometimes and Dona Amalia also said that. She pushed back when the girl said that she wanted to go back to. Dudas the gave us yama visit a busy a long way I saw. What is she going to go do over there to to lose herself to raise children? She's GonNa get passed around from man to man that's what she's headed to do more with dancing. Neither he or she gets is unbeatable. Just gets me. She was lost to us. We didn't have hope we didn't have anything and today we do because we know that the kids are alive. They might be well. They might not be well but they're alive. So has this interaction with her family. Chains the girls desire to leave the country. It's unclear if the girl has formally asked legally asked to change her petition to the courts. The case manager has also been in touch with the family. So there's finally this connection between the government and the family members in the US who are still willing to sponsor her but after some initial contact the family says the case manager is mostly ignoring their calls. Obviously they're worried about losing contact again assuming she does go back to Honduras. Does her family there no win? She might becoming well. I have been able to talk with birth mom. She hasn't been in contact with her daughters since she left on. Liudas eight years ago. She heard from her for the first time a couple of weeks ago. Walk the person. I'm told me that the girl said she didn't want to go back to unload us after all that she wanted to stay with her and with her grandmother. Donio Malia. They're the ones who raise turn. She told me and since they decided to try and give this girl future. I don't WanNa see it twisted around. That's what she told me. She'd said that the growth should be with her family and her family is Danica.

Donya Malia Lula United States Dona Amalia Iran Honduras Danica
"six years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

"Mentioned the first time that she was sent to. Shiloh sources have told me she then went to a shelter in New York and then she was sent back to Shiloh. Then a few months ago she was sent to a shelter back in Oregon and and at some point in all of this. The girls started to believe that her family abandoned her that they didn't want her that they didn't care for her when during that whole time they were thinking about her and they wanted her back. Doesn't the girl have a representative or a lawyer? That would stop this from happening. Who who's at fault here since we still don't know why. The government cut off contact. It's hard to say exactly. Who's at fault? We do know that the girl has had a number of people representing her over time. I don't yet know the total number of attorneys that she's had but that's one of the challenges that comes with prolonged attention. The inability to how steady legal representation attorneys came and went and the girl stayed. The girl also has an advocate. That advocate is different than the attorney that represents her she supports what's best for the girl. The attorney represents what the girl wants. Then what the girl wants. And what's best for her aren't necessarily the same thing. So that brings us back to the hearing that you flew out to Portland to watch where you heard that the girl was going to ask to be deported right. So this is this really important hearing and I heard so much about the girl but I never seen her much less talk to her check. Check check okay. So I'm back in my hotel room so this is what you recorded after you witness the girl's court proceeding. I recognize the girl right away as soon as she walked and she came in wearing I think like black pants but she had this really pretty cream. Colored top with flared sleeves on the arms. And then Kinda like black lace work going down the middle and then just black piping Over some parts of of the blouse she had her hair totally pulled back in a ponytail and she had a whole bunch of like pink. Baratz on With I don't know if it was like hearts or bears or something. Was there anything else that you noticed about the girl? She seemed nervous. She was constantly fidgeting and looking around they called the kids into the courtroom and since these hearings are open to the public I just went in after them and inside. There was a big department of Justice seal on the wall behind the judge. And there was wood paneling on the walls and there were about a dozen kids listening in the courtroom. Okay so the judge called AAC ACE and the attorney for the respondents said that she wanted this other case to be heard. I and it turns out to be the girl the girl whose case I'd been following so the girl steps to the front she. She takes her seat. She puts her headphones on so that she can understand the interpreter. He reads her name and he asks her. If that's her and she says yes see so. This girl has been here from the age of ten. And she's seventeen now and she still needs an interpreter. Clearly she can say some words in English But she is most comfortable communicating in Spanish. The thing that I'm caught up on here is that she's been in the US for years but she hasn't had consistent access to real education. She's not allowed to access social media accounts. I mean what are they doing to her like? She doesn't even have a cell phone which she can contact anybody. Yeah I mean that's what we're trying figure out. I know that the shelter that she's at now Morrison Like many other shelters. It's sort of a revolving educational program because these shelters again. They're not designed to hold kids for more than a few months. Maybe a year certainly not six years and so I've wondered like how many times has she learned the. Abc's how many times has she learned to bliss to his four and it's impossible to know there have been so many layers and there hasn't been a layer where I'm like. Oh this makes sense right they. They've they've kept her. They've kept her from her family. Remember she came here seeking asylum like her. Her uncle was brutally murdering. That's no joke. I've seen the death certificate. I've talked to enough people to know what happened. What what that was like in her family is trying to bring her hair so that she has a life and look at the life she's had yeah What.

attorney Shiloh Oregon representative department of Justice New York US Abc Portland Morrison
"six years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

"We come back out to track down what happened to her during that time and what comes next. This is revealed from the Center for investigative reporting. Impe are ex. The real real the leading reseller for authenticated luxury consignment consign men's and women's luxury fashion fine jewelry watches are in home. The real real makes it easy. With our free white glove service instore drop off or from home shipping think sustainably consign with the real real today and earn up to eighty five percent commission plus like credit authentic sustainable luxury only at the real real dot com. It's done for Al's podcast picks and if you like investigative storytelling and I'm assuming you do because you're listening to right now check out motive from wbz Chicago. They've just released a new season about a group of young women seeking justice in Spain. Story Starts With College Students Steph. While studying abroad and the questions that surround the man she was with the night she died and goes on to look at allegations of sexual assault while I was there. Silence for almost a decade. And what happens next you can listen to motive from. Wbz Chicago with ever you get your podcast center for.

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

"Why they were never released their family. And that's unclear how there's one theory that because the girl is in blood related to the O.`Neil Malian aunt government officials didn't WANNA turn her over but her brother is blood related and so that theory sort of flies out the window it could be that the government sought. The family wasn't fit for reason. The family says they don't know that they didn't hear any explanation from the government and I haven't been able to get an answer either. Did the family have any documentation of this absolutely? They had a lot of documentation that they tried their best to prove to the government that they were indeed the family of these two children and that they were fit and that they wanted the children back. So there's no doubt that the government identified this family as the sponsoring family. The girl was in touch with the family. Through the beginning of two thousand fifteen but then the phone calls stopped. The family didn't hear from them or anything about them for five years and there are an Iro. That's Lohan again telling me they buried her. The government buried her and that line has really stuck with me. She saying that the government buried this child. They'd silenced her underground. The family says they kept calling the phone numbers that they had furred case manager. And the caseworker. That they had previously been in touch with but nothing. No one answered weeks went by and those turned into months and at some point. The phone number that they had was disconnected. I recently tried calling two phone numbers that I found on documents associated with the case worker at the time one was out of order and the other belong to a new user so this family is no longer hearing from the kids. They can't get anyone from the government to respond. So what was it like for this family for this family Al? This wasn't family separation for them. These children were disappeared not themselves am. He's John Maria your get. His own went duck woman. That Ron your meal goater tourists who we and then I want them to be. We didn't know where they were. That's the thing I was dying from. Tears it asks are they dead. How are they my God? How MUSCLES SUFFERING NAKED. Hungary and the family was so petrified of the government itself not just of government officials but also of contractors associated with the whole shelter system so attorneys and advocates in case workers and case managers for Looney Amalia. She called on the one authorities. She's always placed her faith in God in your mother's your mother. You were to sort of us but I called on my God. I called on Him Jehovah. You are powerful. You are wonderful father. Relieve me from this. Please bring down an angel from the sky. Their ideas debby sower. Mother is on television. That all of the children that were taken from their families have to be returned. They said that mother is blizzard. Embiid compares World Jesus. It's it's truly terrible in the end. There's really no equal comparison. It's as if they were dead as if they were dead. We knew nothing nothing and it was clear over several days talking with her in person that she thinks about the kids all of the time. It's not like there. Were certain things that reminded her of the kids. It was constant none of the family out in North Carolina or Dudas had heard anything about the girl or the boy until I started poking around. I'm talking to reveals out auto about a case of a seventeen year old girl from Honduras who's been held in. Us custody for six years when.

John Maria Lohan Embiid North Carolina Looney Amalia Hungary Honduras Dudas Ron
"six years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

"How to run. That's funny I'm Malia every time I meet her. She wears really bright clothing with her hair tucked under a kerchief and she wears these big frilly aprons and the wrinkles on her face and her hands are deep and at ninety four years old. They give us a preview of how much life she seen from her and from other family members. I've learned the back story of how some of the family came to the. Us In twenty twelve. Bonia Molly has grandson was brutally murdered. He was shot and the vehicle that he was driving was set ablaze. Melting off whole parts of his body. His death marked one of roughly seven thousand homicides and on notice that year and we should say. Honduras is a pretty small country. Yes so seven. Thousand is a big number. Yeah it's about the size of Louisiana and as the family made arrangements for his funeral they also mapped out their escape. They'd sometimes received threats to their lives and wellbeing which they'd previously pushed aside but now those threats no longer felt hollow though now Malia and the family made their way I to the capital on Lula's then north to Mexico and then finally to the United States. They wanted to be here first so that they could set up for the others who were still on their way a few weeks later the girl her brother another aunt and a cousin arrived at the border and the girl and her brother are separated from that aunt and cousin pretty much right away. This isn't uncommon in fact it's standard practice to separate any child from an adult who isn't their birth mother or their birth father did immigration officials. Keep the kids together though at first yes. The two kids were shuffled together. I to foster care in Oregon and then sources tell me to foster care in Massachusetts. The girl had a really tough time being away from her family and it kept getting worse. The longer she was in the brother and the sister would call the Nehemiah from time to time and tell them how they were doing a anaemia Cesar Chavez solar power. Looney I'm Ali here. She was telling me the girl. Bi She'd hit herself. She cut herself with knives body. A basis not a lunar buddy was debbie era. Get people. They'll speak done just obvious if your they kept putting her in the hospital. She told me a lot of times. Not just once lots of times and so I asked her what kind of hospital. And she said who knows it or feel a little bit. She hid herself. She hit herself with something sharp. She told me Lake One of those so she was pointing at the wall and I asked her demon the wall and she said yes like the wall and from there we never knew anything else about her nothing. Nothing at all does the feeling of why she was hurting herself. They told me that she had never harder south. Before coming to the United States one family members says that the girl got the idea that if she hurt herself she'd get attention and they release her back to her family so up to this point the brother and sister were together and US policy is to release minors.

debbie era Malia United States Cesar Chavez Bonia Molly Louisiana Oregon Honduras Massachusetts Mexico Lake One Lula
"six years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

"Forward to seeing her today but we'll see how it goes. Okay let's pause on the court case for a minute and just go back. How did this girl gets to the point? Which is asking to be deported. What happened to her? This is exactly what I wanted to now. From the moment I heard about the case. I didn't have much to go on I. I only knew that the girl had been in the system for more than six years and that she mentioned the name of an aunt who was possibly living in undo us. I was finally able to find that aunt. She wasn't in on it as she was right here in the United States so this aunt helped to raise the girl along with the Alita with with the grandmother and it came to find out that she's the person that's named on government documents as the girls potential sponsor. Back in two thousand thirteen and two thousand fourteen. Which means that she's the one that the US government was supposed to give the girl back to after they separated her from her family at the border. And I should say that we're not naming many of the people in the story because their victims of trauma or or underaged or or simply worried about being deported. Some people have wanted to be named like the girl's grandmother Dona Amalia. She lives with the girls aunt in North Carolina. I went visit them. They they live in the countryside where agricultural fields dominate the landscape. She lives in a very small home with a big brood of chickens that she feeds kitchen scraps two and three little puppies. Lope around. They're still learning.

Dona Amalia United States North Carolina
"six years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"six years" Discussed on Reveal

"Of found out that the girl had family here in the US Family. She wanted to be with and that family wanted to be with her for reasons. We can't figure out the United States government cut off communication between them. The last time they were in touch was five years ago as Outta was reporting on this case she found out about an important hearing that was about to happen. It's Thursday January sixteen around eleven in the morning I'm here in Portland because I found out that the girl has an upcoming court date. It's Today Outta couldn't bring her recorder into the hearing so she taped these notes in her hotel room across the street from the immigration courtroom in downtown Portland just heavy energy in that room. I have heard from several sources that she wanted to voluntarily deported herself out. A joins me now in the studio in. Outta who is this young girl? You're talking about. Yeah so the girl whose case I've been following US her name because she is a minor and she's experienced an incredible amount of trauma. She's seventeen she's originally from dudas and she migrated to this country with her brother and he's fourteen now they were in a foster family but then they were torn apart and have had a very different experience from one another in the system. His story is a whole other case in and of itself. But today we're going to focus on the girl. She spent longer in federal immigration custody than any other kid I've ever heard about and at immigration court. She was asking to leave the country voluntarily. She's been in. Us immigration shelters for six or seven. Years I mean that's nearly half for life ahead to wrap my head around at first because her case has thrown into question for me just how much or how little the government is really doing to try and reunify. These children with their families also doing a little math here and that means that she was separated from her family during the Obama Administration. Right so we usually associate family separation with the trump administration. And we know that it happened under Obama. I just didn't know what that exactly meant until I heard about this girl. So you said you've talked with your family right. And they told me that they hadn't heard anything about her for five years and so when I told them that I was going to Portland for the case. It was the first time they'd even heard that she had a court date and they asked me to relay a message to her. And while you're in your hotel room you were getting those materials together to share with her. So I printed out a photo of a couple of people that I think that she probably will remember and I think I'm going to write that message on there. It basically tells her don't sign your deportation order more specifically you can't sign that deportation order because we're still here We miss you so much. We can't wait to see you again. The family you know very much wants to have her back so I'm looking forward to seeing her today but we'll see how.

US Portland Obama Administration Obama dudas
"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

Clockwise

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

"Would have been using the ipad for everything but i don't i still use my mac for a lot of things now i have been trying more in recent months to use the ipad for some for writing stuff i'll take it and bike down to the coffee shop near my house and i like how light it is i can carry with it and to mike is point it was the smart keyboard which really turned me around because i've tried a bunch of external bluetooth keyboards and keyboard cases and all that and i found them all kind of clunky in making the device heavier to the point that was like why don't i just take my macbook air which is not a heavy computer in the first place so a lot of times i still end up falling back to my mac for a lot of the other work that i do just because of the apps that i have there and the the sort of customization personalization that i have in my in my mac so i'm struggling to fit entirely into my workflow but i've i've make an effort to make an effort so six years later i like to think every you're capable of doing everything there's very little that i feel like i can't do if i really need to on ipad it's just that i prefer using my members of the time probably the most surprising way that i use my mobile device is that i use my iphone for live blogging and this is particularly surprising because i have pretty serious repetitive strain in trees so i had to quit doing any kind of deadline reporting especially if it involves a laptop in the late nineties so it's been like ages since i've done deadline reporting but when i got involved in local school politics here in portland i started live blogging meetings the kind were big decisions happen but like nobody is there to witness it and i her using my iphone and i realized i could type really quickly on the on screen keyboard using my thumbs which are not injured so it was really exciting for me to be able to get to do this thing that i haven't been able to do in so long and blog through facebook there's a big community that follows the blog and i'm able to take pictures of documents notes on white ports in addison right away so for me it's it's surprising because you would think or i would think at least that the iphone i never would have expected that i would use my iphone like that and it's given me the ability because it's so different organic ly to these things that i really enjoy that i that i haven't been able to do on my mac 'cause i injured myself using the mac so might unexpected use foot it is interesting six years later to see how we are just using you never really know it's actually what's going to happen with the device we can guess when they come out but it's it really takes a few years before we see that there may be ways to use it that we hadn't even thought of before to schedule for six years from today yes well until then it looks like we have reached the end of the show but before we do we've got just enough time for a bonus question but before we.

six years
"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

Clockwise

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

"And the reason i did it was because of mike is point that i've always seen that apple's products are very high quality and so that was the end result i was looking for but we'll have to wait another week whether it turned out as well as i hoped next week's topic right there for your thoughts on that let's go to our last topic which comes from shali about six years ago dan you wrote an article for macworld about using the i've had and only the ipad for work an idea that was a bit daring back then to my question is what do you find yourself using or not using your mobile devices for now that you might have never expected i'm going to have to say just i think it's just the simple fact that there's so much more that i can do on even just my iphone that before i would run to my mac to do like my man gets to take a break after five pm for most of the time because i can remember one time this has been a couple years ago or maybe three or four i can't remember it's been a while ago and i was at c s and there was a a quick story that i wanted to put together and at the time i was working for a video news company and so making a story means making video and i remember going around and capturing it was like it might as well been an apple commercial i went around was capturing the footage of different things that i wanted and i just leaned myself up against a poll so that i knew that i wasn't standing in anyone's way and i sat there with my phone turned into landscape mode and i made the entire video on my iphone in movie and was able to then take it and drop it into dropbox and then go into slack and send that link to the person who was on the ground in columbia missouri who was the one uploading our content and all of that i was able to do the full extent of my job right from my phone and so that like that's incredible and the same thing double goes for the ipad my talked before about how much i love my ten point five inch i had pro it is my hitchhikers guide to the galaxy it is a perfect size it's got all the functionality i want and because i'm a monster apparently i frigging love the keyboard that the smart keyboard case whatever the heck it's called i love that keyboard i love typing with that keyboard i love how feels i it's great and so i can do so much from the ipad that i would normally do on my mac and so my mac is mostly left for things that require two screens or require some superintendents editing audio video everything else i can do on my phone or my ipad and that's fantastic i feel free jeff what about you i'm going to echo dan what he said earlier for me unexpected thing is a lot of home kit stuff controlling lights and switches partially that is the tiein with siri being able to do it by voice what's i mean doing lights that's that's one thing surprisingly what i find more useful is just to have a few you know on off smart switches for example the printer that we own is upstairs in my office and i would say ninety percent of the time that my wife and i need to print something we are downstairs in the living room rather than you know come up turn it on wait for it to heat up go back down print the thing literally i just invoked the magic hey you know who command and say turn on the printer and it happens print the whatever it is even printing from the iphone and then you know ask it to turn the printer off it's sort of it removed a whole layer of irritation and for that like i love it i really didn't think this is gonna come back and bite me this many years later oh so yeah at the time that was kind of a big deal as an experiment because was fairly early on in the ipads life and you know if you'd asked me then part of me would have thought been six years from then i.

mike apple six years ninety percent five inch
"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

Clockwise

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

"And i ran into some complications mainly those being that it feels like the photo book tools in photos haven't really changed since iphoto so my question for you is do you make photo books do and if so what do you use kelly well i really only have the answer to the first part of that question which is no i don't i used to make them every holiday season and i also used to make picture books for babies in the family and that was really fun and i did use iphoto and i thought it was crate but i have found that i rarely edit my photos anymore other than cropping them and i really do projects with them because the overwhelming majority of my sharing is through social media and from my iphone so i actually had to go photos and take a look at it and you're right it looks exactly the way it has always looked when i do do prints usually use snap fish 'cause i liked the quality of their prints like i made some large canvas prints i will auction the spring but i haven't done photo books in a long time interestingly i just got a photo book in the mail this morning there's a company called canvas pop which typically makes a huge canvas prints for your wall so you send in a photo they printed onto a canvas they stretch out that canvas onto the board and you can hang it up while now they're doing books and i got to got to try out the apple little early and create a little book for myself and of course i filled it with photos of my dogs and is the best thing put up the book and the front and back cover have photos of my dogs on it and the whole thing is filled with photos and i almost wish like i would have taken the time to i don't know right up a little story about chihuahuas or something so that i could read the books because i would love to do that but yeah i've used the photo book thing jig before dan within photos and it was a little bit complicated that said whoever prince apple's books does a very good job in my humble opinion they are really high quality they come in this really nice packaging and the like the way that it's printed the paper the way that it's put together it all looks very very good so maybe it's just like they've they've put this barrier to entry it's like you have to work to get this beautiful product at the end if you can survive photos for mac then you can have this beautiful book that has all your memories in it but yeah i like making photo books every once in a while jeff what about you i think that last point is exactly the reason that i do not make a photo books which is odd because i i'm a photographer i make a lot of photos you would think and i should there's a lot of guilt here i should make a lot of photo books but it's work it it takes time you have to to sort edit and crop and it takes more than just sort of casual effort and when we can share things on facebook and twitter with pretty much nothing but casual effort that's that's the way to go in terms of prints i'm going to sound just as lazy like i'm embarrassed to admit this but whenever we need just like some quick prints like if my daughter needs to take some pictures to school there's a walgreens literally half a mile away and using their app which is okay it's not great i can upload some images have them printed in an hour or two and the quality is perfectly fine for things that are that are more precious things like larger prints all order through a company called bay photo and they do a really good job and their online tools are not terrible how about that it's a lot of yeah i don't make footer books very much this was coming up for like a family birthday and i wanted to assemble a bunch of photos from family members and put them together it's it's not just the tools clunky it's that they're actively broken in some ways like dragon dropping food we'll just stop working and you'll have to quit the app and restart it and it's like i don't think anybody at apple has has used these tools in a while 'cause they don't work very well so i struggled through it and i made it.

"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

Clockwise

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

"Salt and even more ridiculously it's voice activated so you you can ask your favorite appliance alexa or whatever to say dispense half a teaspoon of salt of course you have to pick it up and you have to put it over the spot that you need to dispense so basically it's just this ridiculous time suck that also moves the light away from other people i guess it's ridiculous in terms of something that is not silly would be the simple pleasure of activating timers using an apple watch or home pot or alexa all the time first of all i want to say that the smart trash can't thing we'll know it's really intelligent when it like spits it back out in his life why do you keep stuffing trash this is true it has become sentient how smart could have really be for me i mean i will just go with something basic that i thought would be ridiculous the idea of smart light bulbs in and of themselves seem a little ridiculous right we have light we have technology that has existed for a long time that seems to work just fine why do we need had intelligence to it but i have been won over i've many hugh lights in my house now and i've added a bunch of extra accessories like like wireless switches and i use my eco to control them and i like him a lot i have to say like i have a replaced i replacing like my overhead lights and all my rooms but i don't use those as much as mainly just the lamps but i really do love having the ability to control those by the voice or whatever i mean i've seen some ridiculous pitches in the past as i'm sure we all have i feel like i've seen a smart near pitch a couple times that like i want to believe but at the same time just the idea of embedding all that stuff in your bathroom mirror seems like a really bad idea similarly smart refrigerators i like the idea but like i don't really want my refrigerator telling me you are out of mook please get some yeah i i always a little cautious when it comes to these implementations i agree and it's kind of interesting that so many of these things mentioned have been kitchen smart devices because i think we've been seeing a lot of companies push into the kitchen recently and it seems like there's potential there but a lot of the appliances in gadgets seem like answers searching for problems the example that i have is smarty pans i don't know if you guys have seen this at the two hundred thirty dollars mark frying pan and it communicates using bluetooth with your phone at tracks the nutritional value of food you add to it so say you are gonna make recipe that involves coconut oil could voice using your voice with your phone say coconut oil and then you dump it into the pan it actually measures it calculates the nutritional value so you can add up like all the calories in fisher making so i mean that sounds kinda cool i can see that being useful and it tracks calories in it can sync with your fitness trackers some of the weirder things that does it can shear you're like you can make a recipe using the pan and then share that with friends or guide you through a recipe me all that sounds kinda cool but i mean the questions i have with all these are would you really use it so do you really wanna have to charge your frying pan how many risks do you create that are completely assembled in a in a pan just in the frying pan like all the time and is it really that hard to use measuring cups do you really need to have something that can measure your salt for you can't you just do it by yourself i think you can do yourself and i think you can sort your trash by yourself believe in you i believe thank you all for answers there let's go onto the next topic which comes from jeff so if you go to the app store on irs nowadays it almost feels like you're reading a magazine apples making this big push into publishing original editorial content making the experience more interesting than just browsing virtual store shelves.

two hundred thirty dollars
"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

Clockwise

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"six years" Discussed on Clockwise

"Of course i'm here i am thrilled to be here and to my left it is one of my former colleagues from macworld and the author of take control of high sierra charlene mcfarland's back welcome back shelly stan and the upcoming take control of mojave i wanna be present but i'm glad to hear it i can't wait to take control but i'm gonna take control of the show right now by getting into things i just got a pitch this morning before an a trash can yeah that's right we're getting trashy this machine uses quote machine learning and quote neural nets to sort between recyclables and refuse so you'd drop in some some trash and then it sends things into recycling or it's since things into the normal garbage bin however you can only drop in one thing at a time and sometimes it can't recognize what that object is and so you have to tell it and this whole thing just seems so silly so i'm curious what is a smart device that you think is a little silly or isn't worth adding smarts to or alternatively something you thought was silly but then you got this thing or saw it in action near like okay now i understand why we have to have a smart insert thing here jeff will start with you it's so silly that i can't even say it smalt s a l t it is a smart salt dispenser and part of the appeal is that it it has like a light on it and so it's like ambient artwork for your table that also dispenses.

macworld charlene mcfarland shelly stan jeff
"six years" Discussed on The Rack Radio Show

The Rack Radio Show

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"six years" Discussed on The Rack Radio Show

"The kind of person standing time face to spam sanded taken over my place so big to found twee ooh face where you can go ahead iraq fielded a hundred forty characters butcha give my diction starts climb goethe refreshment because no it's kid i'm sure i like that in the six years that we have been doing this show that we have never once considered plate taking the segment out never once this is i think the only original segment that we do still all the other ones of sort of like gone by the wayside like we used to have a question of the night every week and then we just kind of gave up on it because wwe start doing papers every other week so yeah but i like how this has stated because well the one constant the one cost at in this show even though it moves segments it is the one confident one for six years go all right wb network witness the bruiser way pete done defend the wb uk championship against kylo riley on wb nfc right now only on the wb network kyle riley responds witness a grown man resort to grabbing another grown man's is it fingers.

wwe pete kyle riley iraq six years
"six years" Discussed on The Rack Radio Show

The Rack Radio Show

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"six years" Discussed on The Rack Radio Show

"Up with a momma's questions if you have some help this summer apparently i know who helped her she's a horrible let me losing her touch outsourcing i mean where should ever outsource she's busy she has a baby cupcake she's busy i understand this but i'm just saying now outsourcing oh my nor him just just being a dick all right news dot net dot com and we're gonna get the impact news out of the way i because it's our only impact story and it makes sense to so la drake has officially resigned with impact wrestling so congratulations to him he's gonna be staying on the yeah dummy dummy yeah oh it's been a here dummy yeah off asked you have queued up like it's really scary that you had that queued up a moon worried folder in the folder when awfully all right attention now i anything else before i move on there you know i have nothing planned it's right i'm just folder simple knees he has okay to sidetrack as we do on this show especially in the news he has the mystery folder of sounds he does have an actual literal soundboard that he has so much in there i don't even think you know what you have in there anymore older folders and folders places though i don't know what i have any more hits he has at least ten years worth of wti are stuff of cb radio stuff of six years of this show wrestling clips sound effects bumpers unique name it it's it's in that folder i mean there's it's a literal treasure trove of stuff it's it's kind of awesome and it's really scary what he finds at sometimes moon before he clicks anything else maybe back to the news who's announced this week that the deal see for wbz to kane nineteen will be none other than ramos stereo young room one of the deals econtent preorder deals coming for w k nineteen ville on october if you were to deluxe version or tober ninth for the regular version cool fused of the game commercial on night was cool and the other details i can cycles nothing's been nounce so yeah but yeah it was a really cool way to debut him in the game and i really liked how they did the commercial very well done very nice also i really liked how the did the extreme rightwinger chal that's kinda cute too if you haven't seen it it's it's really kind of cute how they did it so get samborn out blame brands loose it's this week's injury round kind of random blame brench this week and he blamed printed himself the first one is only logan where it's he's the orbital bone yeah urban bone hashtag blame brent and what's really disturbing about owning larkin is apparently he was a good tell anybody that his face was broken and somebody knocked on him that his face with broken me he told people but he wasn't like they weren't telling people until told it to it was doing cyber that got story and he's on twitter who suits me and then there's there's someone else went who's to if you stooge dona larkin please please stand up and then run because he's probably gonna kick your ass and then last but not least shinsegei nakimora from a police dog bite hashtag blame brent he got bit by police dog at nerina in the leg is apparently severe enough that they are holding him from wrestling he may even miss japan tour because of this fight which would be very unfortunate for him because i.

six years ten years