4 Burst results for "Six Two Decades"

"six two decades" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"six two decades" Discussed on Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

"Less than half the population of Africa can can rely on just flicking on a switch light or heat or cooking and that also limits technological advances in banking education and healthcare a recent International Energy Agency report says skipping over the fossil fuel heavy grids the most of the rest of the world relies on and turning straight to solar and micro grids or even wind power has real potential for accelerating development particularly in Central African countries. Michael at the University of Pittsburgh Researches Energy Policy Policy and he says that renewable I approach can work with some caveats. I've seen myself attempts to almost helicopter. Drops solar panels in rural areas. And without any kind of local button. This doesn't work very well. Because one challenge for instance is that many people would like like ideally to have access to the great and feel that the smaller systems do not quite provide kind of services. They were hoping for. I think think what really needs to happen is a lot of bottom up involvement from these local communities to tell other people what their needs exactly are so that these can be met met the best and most effective way as possible in your experience. What is an effective installation on maybe a household or village or town level? Just exactly what would that look like. So these needs very quite a bit across very different settings and I think that's precisely why renewable off great technologies are potentially so powerful is we can really use them tailor them to match what people really can use them for. That's the big difference to the grids because the grid rid is one size fits all type of approach right every house here in the US. For instance once you're connected you have about the same type of services that you can use. They're in somebody's countries. It's going to be very helpful to be able to adapt the kind of technology to their financial means and as a result you can really make the best use use of that without having to go through the high costs imposed by extending the grid so obviously some countries like China that makes solar panels see a potential new mark here but other other global economic gains that we could see by the transition to a different type of electrical infrastructure. This has really serious consequences says on how these families these villages how much they can really produce think about any kind of business if you have a small grocery and you WanNa Fridge Ginny power you need artificial lighting to be able to operate after nightfall so I think what is really going to be. The more and more transformative effect of these technologies can come from allowing places that would otherwise be fairly unproductive from an economic standpoint to suddenly really be able to use their potential and they become much more productive. That way Michael. At Clinton University of Pittsburgh the report says the continent of Africa could by twenty forty meet the energy demands of of an economy. That's grown to four times larger than today's but used just fifty percent more energy and now some related links. The report is worth reading. It says Africa is going to become increasingly influential in shaping global energy trends over the next six two decades. And that's because it's undergoing the largest process of urbanization the world's ever seen the number of people. Living in Africa's cities will grow by six hundred with million. That's more than the increase we've seen in China so the energy demand will grow. Brookings also has incredible visuals and a report on Energy Africa which which are worth clicking through to. For example one graph highlights the cost burden of powering a refrigerator for a year as a percentage of GDP per capita in the US like France UK and other developed countries. It's basically zero in Liberia it's forty-nine percent and really it's all those central African African countries at the expensive end of that chart and we just talked about micro grids on marketplace tech earlier this month.

Africa Michael International Energy Agency US China University of Pittsburgh Brookings Liberia Clinton University of Pittsbur France UK
The promise of  renewables in remote Central Africa

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:09 min | 1 year ago

The promise of renewables in remote Central Africa

"Than half the population of Africa can can rely on just flicking on a switch light or heat or cooking and that also limits technological advances in banking education and healthcare a recent International Energy Agency report says skipping over the fossil fuel heavy grids the most of the rest of the world relies on and turning straight to solar and micro grids or even wind power has real potential for accelerating development particularly in Central African countries. Michael at the University of Pittsburgh Researches Energy Policy Policy and he says that renewable I approach can work with some caveats. I've seen myself attempts to almost helicopter. Drops solar panels in rural areas. And without any kind of local button. This doesn't work very well. Because one challenge for instance is that many people would like like ideally to have access to the great and feel that the smaller systems do not quite provide kind of services. They were hoping for. I think think what really needs to happen is a lot of bottom up involvement from these local communities to tell other people what their needs exactly are so that these can be met met the best and most effective way as possible in your experience. What is an effective installation on maybe a household or village or town level? Just exactly what would that look like. So these needs very quite a bit across very different settings and I think that's precisely why renewable off great technologies are potentially so powerful is we can really use them tailor them to match what people really can use them for. That's the big difference to the grids because the grid rid is one size fits all type of approach right every house here in the US. For instance once you're connected you have about the same type of services that you can use. They're in somebody's countries. It's going to be very helpful to be able to adapt the kind of technology to their financial means and as a result you can really make the best use use of that without having to go through the high costs imposed by extending the grid so obviously some countries like China that makes solar panels see a potential new mark here but other other global economic gains that we could see by the transition to a different type of electrical infrastructure. This has really serious consequences says on how these families these villages how much they can really produce think about any kind of business if you have a small grocery and you WanNa Fridge Ginny power you need artificial lighting to be able to operate after nightfall so I think what is really going to be. The more and more transformative effect of these technologies can come from allowing places that would otherwise be fairly unproductive from an economic standpoint to suddenly really be able to use their potential and they become much more productive. That way Michael. At Clinton University of Pittsburgh the report says the continent of Africa could by twenty forty meet the energy demands of of an economy. That's grown to four times larger than today's but used just fifty percent more energy and now some related links. The report is worth reading. It says Africa is going to become increasingly influential in shaping global energy trends over the next six two decades. And that's because it's undergoing the largest process of urbanization the world's ever seen the number of people. Living in Africa's cities will grow by six hundred with million. That's more than the increase we've seen in China so the energy demand will grow. Brookings also has incredible visuals and a report on Energy Africa which which are worth clicking through to. For example one graph highlights the cost burden of powering a refrigerator for a year as a percentage of GDP per capita in the US like France UK and other developed countries. It's basically zero in Liberia it's forty-nine percent and really it's all those central African African countries at the expensive end of that chart and we just talked about micro grids on marketplace tech earlier this month

Africa Michael International Energy Agency United States China University Of Pittsburgh Brookings Liberia Clinton University Of Pittsbur France Uk Forty-Nine Percent Six Two Decades Fifty Percent
"six two decades" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

12:36 min | 1 year ago

"six two decades" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rowe price T. Rowe price invest with confidence the story of helium is largely a story of the U. S. government it has a massive stockpile of helium and one of the people in charge of that stockpile is Sam in what are your thoughts on balloons party balloons yeah like helium use for graduations and party I personally love party balloons I think it's not a party without balloons right so I'm I'm a I'm a big fan of party balloons and Sam loves helium I like helium I'm I'm it's it's my element element he's speaking with your I've spent my whole life working with it I'm quite the helium geek Sam says astronomers first identified helium in the sun in eighteen sixty eight and as far as anybody knew there was almost none of it on earth just the sun but then in nineteen oh five it was found on accident in dexter Kansas mix up in the natural gas there a couple of scientists discovered it when this is all my gosh this is he this is the same stuff with on the sun this is the first time that anyone has found helium in any significant amount anywhere on earth so scientists bottle it up to start testing it and they learned that helium is really late like so light you can lift things like if you fill the balloon with helium it will lift and float off but at that point people already knew that hydrogen this other gas could lift things people were using hydrogen to lift blames this was before airplanes are really it being so plans are really big deal like people are flying around in giant blimps but hydrogen blames were dangerous they were catching on fire because hydrogen is very very flammable helium is not helium will not catch on fire the military found that application very very interesting the US military thinks a lifting gas that doesn't burn would transform warfare in the air as to the government was like Hey dexter Kansas we'd like to invite your helium yeah yeah that was actually top secret work it was considered highly top secret how we getting that that helium gas the military sauce so much potential in this helium that they decide to keep it to themselves and in fact two of the German government approach of the United States and requesting helium and because it was a defense minerals a strategic mineral they said no we wouldn't give them our helium we would not give them our healing and how we got it was considered very very very hush hush too so how did Germany know that we had helium them apparently somebody else were you getting that from well he's got it government researchers are using all these code words for helium like he is lost send more pups from the same litter that meant send more helium by the nineteen twenties the government is sending helium to the army and the navy in these big metal cylinders to fill up the first ever Super safe helium blimps they could attach bombs to these plans by on enemies from the air but there's a problem the helium kept leaking out of the cylinders like slowly over time helium is an escape artist if there's a whole helium will find it sneaky little element it absolutely there's a leak it'll it'll get out helium is one of the smallest lightest things in the universe it's so light and floaty that it's one of the only things that can escape earth's gravitational pull it will just float up and out into the universe where helium is abundant so if you try to trap the queue him in a cylinder it will find a way out so we were just like use it real quick because it it disappears erred floats off into outer space yeah but eventually this problem helium leaks out of everything turned out to be really useful for the space program it's the height of the space race and we want to make sure that uncle Pete's space suit and his rocket don't have any leaks any leak in a rocket engine and they could explode that sounds bad the solution test the suits with helium if you'll be M. doesn't leak out their super sealed and it's not just testing for leaks you need helium to launch a rocket like to push in astronaut into space so the US starts to realize we need helium more than ever it's a matter of national security and this kicked off a series of government decisions and counter decisions and counter counter decisions that led to today's helium shortage okay we know helium is a natural gas but a lot of it was just floating away so in nineteen sixty five Congress passes a law to set up a national helium stockpile the stockpile where Sam works today at the bureau of land management Congress says to the Sam of nineteen sixty go to the US treasury and borrow the money you need to buy a ton of helium pay whatever you have to so it's really a win win it's it's to the to the natural gas producers helium is kind of a waste product so of course natural gas companies start capturing their helium and selling tons of it to the government and now America has to figure out how to store the sneaky gas that escapes from any container you put it in and then someone goes okay hear me out what if we put the helium back in the container it came from like underground they find a huge chunk of underground rock near Amarillo Texas it has these holes in it that helium likes to float into it used to have a bunch of helium and in nineteen sixty the US government starts injecting helium back into that rock and they injected thirty two billion cubic feet of helium that's an awful lot of helium that they put into the ground for future use like how far down into the earth are we talking here is three thousand three thousand two hundred feet down in the ground where the where the dinosaur bones there's somewhere in there right yep this is the only stockpile of helium anywhere in the world other countries have tried to trap helium and failed so this stockpile totally top secret it was like Cold War Cold War type stuff to protect the field from prying eyes the government was hiding the helium in a field near Amarillo Texas imaginable a wide open Texas prairie they're slightly rolling hills it's predominantly flat first you just see a big open plain you slide back this metal cover and look down and there's a ladder that takes you down it is like walking around the field like so yes just to feel just an empty field and then there's like a little door in you know in that door and you know look there's a well solar there so it is one of the most important elements in the entire universe is just down here there you go by nineteen seventy three there was so much helium under that rock that the government stopped injecting more they thought they had enough for like a hundred years they were wrong by nineteen ninety six two decades later the helium world had totally changed yes Sam was still selling government helium to the military and NASA and the weather people and science researchers but now there's this whole big private helium industry to like private companies selling helium to private companies to run MRI machines blow up party balloons whatever so Congress is like why the US government in the helium business why are we maintaining this stockpile this was a national security issue it is no longer and it cannot be justified as a jobs program either it needs to be put to rest on your time bouncer might have expired they introduced a bill to sell off all the government helium shutting down an inefficient facility which is outlived its need and can't compete with the private sector Congress votes to get out of the helium business they tell them sell off all the helium you've got not just to the government to anyone who wants it sell it as fast as you can it has nothing to do with the market nothing to do with how much people are willing to pay for it what could go wrong I I I I would say that we were doing it just for our own expenses and what Sam and his colleagues didn't realize was that they were flooding the market with cheap helium so cheap that it wasn't worth it for private companies to try and find new helium anymore they're low prices were killing the private helium industry and by two thousand thirteen Congress was like wait our plan to turn them over to private industry didn't work there is no real private industry we messed it up so they gave them new orders Congress with said the you need to raise those prices Congress told teams them at the helium stockpile to increase the price of helium to encourage private industry to go looking for new sources so now if people wanted to buy this rare precious gas they were going to have to fight for it Sam and his colleague start auctioning helium off to the highest bidder and the price of helium went up it raised up fairly quickly it raised up to in the in the sixty to seventy dollar range and that during this time period I think we're in the eighty eighty dollars a range and and then the here after the auctions it's it's up it's up to a hundred and nineteen cents Congress told teams them to start auctioning off the helium the price has gone up from around sixty five dollars per thousand cubic feet to one hundred and nineteen dollars helium is more expensive than ever and people are paying to get it but the demand for helium is so high right now that Sam and the people at the helium stockpile literally cannot pull it out of the ground fast enough we are delivering what we can as fast as we can and sometimes it's not as much as they actually need well there's more in the ground but we can't give it more than what we can deliver it so they're rationing Celia everyone gets just some of what they are we need which is why some birthday parties have droopy balloons and why helium has become too expensive for some scientists to do their research it's becoming scarce enough that someone assigns community say the government should ban it helium balloons save it for more important uses but soon it won't be up to the government at all anymore the government has to get out of the helium business entirely by twenty twenty one once and for all that's what the last helium law requires and they're not just selling off the last of the helium trapped in the rock at the highest price they can they're like selling the field with the hidden door selling the building to all the nuts and bolts and pipes in yep yep roc computers desks all that stuff September thirtieth of twenty twenty one I gonna take like a little bitty helium with via no I probably better not do that just a little bit no I better not do that okay now that Sam and the government are getting out people like Nixon iter the guy who's great uncle Pete walked on the moon are getting in in two thousand thirteen the year Congress that helium has to get more expensive Nick started a company that year he called it north American helium means we drill holes in the ground looking for new sources of helium in North America and I invited myself along.

"six two decades" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"six two decades" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"The podcast the best way to do that is to leave a five star of you wherever you're listening. This week. We're talking about cell phones. According to a recent u n study there are now more mobile phones on the planet. Then there are toilets. And according to another study they carry up to ten times as much back tibia as your average toilet. We'll be looking at the potential health risks of cell phones. But not that kind of health risk. There may be much more serious risks to worry about than dirty screens this week. We'll be taking a hard look at the facts about cell phones, how they work how the regulated and their possible health effects mixed week will look into conspiracy theories about what other dangers the mobile phone industry might be covering up do cell phones cause brain tumors or electromagnetic hypersensitivity syndrome, or are they actually secret mind control devices? There may be no, easy and. Sir. Since so much about the long term effects of cell phones is still unknown. But first, let's take a look at what we do know. Before we begin. We need to understand where cell phones came from some people believe that the first cell phones were reverse engineered from alien technology. That's a conspiracy theory for another day, but the real history of the mobile phone is no less extrordinary and is longer than you may think the idea of the modern smartphone existed in popular culture long before its actual invention. One example is dick Tracy's radio watch which first appeared in the newspaper comic strip in nineteen forty six two decades. After that, we saw the Star Trek communicator, which actually inspired the designers of the flip phone nowadays. Cell phones are such a common part of our daily lives. It's easy to forget. How revolutionary they really were. The earliest version of wireless telephony was developed for military trains on the German railway system in nineteen eighteen. Technically speaking, though, these were truly just two way radios the service was later refined offered to first class passengers as an amenity on commuter trains. Similar to the corded phones on commercial airlines today in the nineteen forties. We saw the introduction of hand-held radio transceivers, otherwise known as walkie talkies. The same technology was then adapted to the automobile. Actually, if you go back even earlier Swedish, inventor, LARs Magnus, Ericsson, founder of the air and cell phone manufacturing company, installed a phone in his car as early as nineteen ten, but while this phone may have been mobile. It was definitely not wireless. He had to pull the car over at a telephone pole while his wife Hilda tapped into the wires, the car radio systems developed by bell labs in the forties on the other hand was based on police radio Queant it was bulky often weighing eight. Eighty pounds or more. There was a battery under the hood and intent on the roof accorded handset under the dash and transmitters and receivers in the trunk. These were the predecessors of modern cellular technology or what some refer to as zero g as opposed to the.

alien technology LARs Magnus bell labs dick Tracy Hilda Ericsson founder nineteen forty six two decades Eighty pounds zero g