21 Burst results for "Six Thousand Kilometer"

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on Extinction of Dinosaurs on the earth

Extinction of Dinosaurs on the earth

02:05 min | 8 months ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on Extinction of Dinosaurs on the earth

"It takes fifty eight days fifteen hours thirty minutes and thirty four seconds one rotation it revolves around the sun. Ninety eight days with a speed of one lack seventy-six thousand kilometers per hour. Venus for tation it takes two hundred and forty three hours. Forty minutes and two hundred and twenty five days for a revolution earth for a rotating twenty three hours fifty six minutes and four thousand ninety one seconds one day and three hundred sixty five days five hours forty eight minutes and forty five point. Five one seconds one year for a revolution mas for rotation it takes twenty four hours thirty seven minutes and twenty two point six three three seconds and six hundred eighty seven days for a revolution.

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on Scuba Shack Radio

Scuba Shack Radio

06:44 min | 9 months ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on Scuba Shack Radio

"This is wet notes here on scuba shock radio for monday. September twenty seventh two thousand and twenty one first up. I want to congratulate tech clark and a dive locker. Podcast on celebrating the second anniversary for those who don't know about this. Podcast tech. Started this to help die professionals with various topics and techniques. But it's not just for dive professionals. I remember listening to the first episode. Way back in two thousand nineteen just before dima that year i've come to look forward to each weekly episode tech plans to keep the show going and has teed up a lot of great new content for the year year ahead. So i'd encourage you to check out the dive locker podcast. There's a lot of great information and perspective on things that hopefully will give you something to think about. Scuba shack is a proud patron of the dive locker. By the way tech also hosts a podcast titled the league of extraordinary divers. Where you can listen to some of the giants of our industry. Great job tech. Keep it coming now. I don't know what it is. But i seem to be a sucker for a message in a bottle story. So here's another one this time. The story involves a bottle that was washed up on the shores of the big island of hawaii. The bottle started his journey thirty seven years ago from japan and it was put in the water by school children. As part of an experiment in monitoring ocean currents the number of bottles were cast into the ocean in nineteen eighty-four from choshi highschool hawaii's about six thousand kilometers or four thousand three hundred miles from the launch point now. The bottle was found by abbie graham while her family was visiting a beach near hilo. It is estimated that about seven hundred and fifty of these bottles were tossed into the ocean between nineteen eighty four and nineteen eighty five. The last time one was found was in two thousand and two on kake. Jima island overall. The bottles have been found in seventeen. Different locations including okinawa the philippines china and even the west coast of the united states. I just get fascinated by these stories and often wonder just how many messages in bottles are out there in the ocean now. Last week we got an email from the clearly clearly came in resorts and it wasn't good. News clearly came in resorts include cobalt coast on grand cayman. Little came beach resort and cayman. Brac beach resort. The news informed us that the cayman borders will remain closed until two thousand twenty two. Now that's tough at a recent press conference to premier indicated that phase. Three of the original plan will start sometime. In february given the rise in cove in nineteen cases the resorts are now planning on opening on february. Fifth two thousand twenty two. Now this has been a really tough situation. If you remember way back in april i reported that the plan was to open in late april or early may two thousand and twenty one. It's been a long and difficult road for a lot of places. Surely the caymans are feeling abroad. We hope it gets resolved before october. Twenty twenty two trip yet. That on certain there's been a great deal of communication coming from tom. Ingram the president and ceo of dima the dive equipment marketing association regarding the two thousand twenty one show in las vegas. Tom unequivocal be states. That the show has absolutely no plans. Of cancelling now they did indicate that accordance with the local health mandates. Everyone will be required to wear a mask on the exhibit floor. There are several large past exhibitors. Who are forgoing the show this year causing some to question whether it should even take place. I know we've been getting a lot of surveys from our vendors as to whether we plan to go or not right now matt and i will be there. Tom indicated that it would be extremely difficult to cancel at this late date. Given the contracts that are in place and that if it were cancelled it would seriously impact demon's ability to put on these shows in the future. So we're looking forward to a successful show this year out in las vegas and finally today. I wanna talk about a piece of underwater camera gear that you might just want to consider. There was an article from sport diver magazine by john widow titled great camera accessories for underwater photography. It was a scuba lab review of the products that the staff took diving at alexander springs in central florida. First on the list was a sea life. Sport diver smartphone housing. Now that's pretty cool. I can remember my first. Underwater camera was sealife. Reef master with a whopping three mega pixels now. This housing will fit a number of iphones and android smartphones. The housing is bluetooth enabled and his rate it to one hundred and thirty feet. The sea life sport diver smartphone. Housing comes with a vacuum seal and duly alarms when you purchase the housing. You'll get a free app that will give you access to most of your phones. Usual camera functions also included is a red filter. And if that's not enough to housing allows you to put in those sealife life color changing moisture. Munchers he i remember those now. The housing isn't cheap. It retails for two hundred ninety nine dollars and ninety five cents. Us but if you wanna travel light and still get some great underwater shots of your adventures check out the c. Life sport diver smartphone housing at sea. Life fash cameras dot com. Well that's it for this edition of wet notes here on scuba shack radio.

choshi abbie graham Jima island cobalt coast Brac beach resort hawaii dima dive equipment marketing assoc youtube hilo clark giants okinawa grand cayman beach resort cayman west coast japan
Wet Notes - 9-27-21

Scuba Shack Radio

06:45 min | 9 months ago

Wet Notes - 9-27-21

"This is wet notes here on scuba shock radio for monday. September twenty seventh two thousand and twenty one first up. I want to congratulate tech clark and a dive locker. Podcast on celebrating the second anniversary for those who don't know about this. Podcast tech. Started this to help die professionals with various topics and techniques. But it's not just for dive professionals. I remember listening to the first episode. Way back in two thousand nineteen just before dima that year i've come to look forward to each weekly episode tech plans to keep the show going and has teed up a lot of great new content for the year year ahead. So i'd encourage you to check out the dive locker podcast. There's a lot of great information and perspective on things that hopefully will give you something to think about. Scuba shack is a proud patron of the dive locker. By the way tech also hosts a podcast titled the league of extraordinary divers. Where you can listen to some of the giants of our industry. Great job tech. Keep it coming now. I don't know what it is. But i seem to be a sucker for a message in a bottle story. So here's another one this time. The story involves a bottle that was washed up on the shores of the big island of hawaii. The bottle started his journey thirty seven years ago from japan and it was put in the water by school children. As part of an experiment in monitoring ocean currents the number of bottles were cast into the ocean in nineteen eighty-four from choshi highschool hawaii's about six thousand kilometers or four thousand three hundred miles from the launch point now. The bottle was found by abbie graham while her family was visiting a beach near hilo. It is estimated that about seven hundred and fifty of these bottles were tossed into the ocean between nineteen eighty four and nineteen eighty five. The last time one was found was in two thousand and two on kake. Jima island overall. The bottles have been found in seventeen. Different locations including okinawa the philippines china and even the west coast of the united states. I just get fascinated by these stories and often wonder just how many messages in bottles are out there in the ocean now. Last week we got an email from the clearly clearly came in resorts and it wasn't good. News clearly came in resorts include cobalt coast on grand cayman. Little came beach resort and cayman. Brac beach resort. The news informed us that the cayman borders will remain closed until two thousand twenty two. Now that's tough at a recent press conference to premier indicated that phase. Three of the original plan will start sometime. In february given the rise in cove in nineteen cases the resorts are now planning on opening on february. Fifth two thousand twenty two. Now this has been a really tough situation. If you remember way back in april i reported that the plan was to open in late april or early may two thousand and twenty one. It's been a long and difficult road for a lot of places. Surely the caymans are feeling abroad. We hope it gets resolved before october. Twenty twenty two trip yet. That on certain there's been a great deal of communication coming from tom. Ingram the president and ceo of dima the dive equipment marketing association regarding the two thousand twenty one show in las vegas. Tom unequivocal be states. That the show has absolutely no plans. Of cancelling now they did indicate that accordance with the local health mandates. Everyone will be required to wear a mask on the exhibit floor. There are several large past exhibitors. Who are forgoing the show this year causing some to question whether it should even take place. I know we've been getting a lot of surveys from our vendors as to whether we plan to go or not right now matt and i will be there. Tom indicated that it would be extremely difficult to cancel at this late date. Given the contracts that are in place and that if it were cancelled it would seriously impact demon's ability to put on these shows in the future. So we're looking forward to a successful show this year out in las vegas and finally today. I wanna talk about a piece of underwater camera gear that you might just want to consider. There was an article from sport diver magazine by john widow titled great camera accessories for underwater photography. It was a scuba lab review of the products that the staff took diving at alexander springs in central florida. First on the list was a sea life. Sport diver smartphone housing. Now that's pretty cool. I can remember my first. Underwater camera was sealife. Reef master with a whopping three mega pixels now. This housing will fit a number of iphones and android smartphones. The housing is bluetooth enabled and his rate it to one hundred and thirty feet. The sea life sport diver smartphone. Housing comes with a vacuum seal and duly alarms when you purchase the housing. You'll get a free app that will give you access to most of your phones. Usual camera functions also included is a red filter. And if that's not enough to housing allows you to put in those sealife life color changing moisture. Munchers he i remember those now. The housing isn't cheap. It retails for two hundred ninety nine dollars and ninety five cents. Us but if you wanna travel light and still get some great underwater shots of your adventures check out the c. Life sport diver smartphone housing at sea. Life fash cameras dot com. Well that's it for this edition of wet notes here on scuba shack radio.

Scuba Equipment Ocean Ocean Health Scuba Scuba Diving Choshi Abbie Graham Jima Island Cobalt Coast Brac Beach Resort Hawaii Dima Dive Equipment Marketing Assoc Hilo Clark Giants Okinawa Grand Cayman Beach Resort Cayman West Coast Japan Philippines
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"Because we're talking about where space stuff goes after it dies after ray now it's safe to say that were already for a getaway and if you're going to go on vacation somewhere then make it a place you'll feel at home like myrtle beach south carolina or as the people call it around there the beach. Welcome to sixty miles made for you. The beach myrtle beach plan your trip at visitmyrtlebeach dot com Since the launch of sputnik in nineteen fifty seven humans have been sending all sorts of things into space stuff like the serious eight and new satellite just launched by stitchers parent company or cargo space craft bringing supplies to space station's not to mention the most prising stuff like golden records or read tesla's an estimated thirty five thousand bits of Incentives right up to objects at the size of double decker buses up to of course international space station which is said to be the size of american football fields or five bedroom house. That's dr alice. Gorman associate professor at flinders university in south australia and one of the world's leading space archaeologists she studies all sorts of ways. Humans have engaged with space including these tens of thousands of objects rocketing around in earth orbit. And that's just stuff four inches and bigger there's believed to be millions of objects anything smaller than that. They distributed from lois little bit which is about two hundred kilometers above the surface of the us up to maybe about one thousand two thousand kilometers then. You have raged. That's just cold middle or medium business and then you get into. The high as obits. Miss includes Stationary orbit which is where bust of telecommunications satellites used to think of these orbits kind of like three lanes of a running track with satellites and spacecraft as the runners zipping around and around in their respective lanes. But note that for this analogy to work the track would be really really big and runners relatively teeny if we go out there and look at these might only say one object within your field. You so that impression. We have a stuff's closely packed together. Just together that's actually luck. Absolute worst case scenario. Which we're not at yet. There's growing concern about what will happen over. The next few decades as there are a lot of plans to launch way more stuff into orbit. And here's the thing. The vast vast majority of objects orbiting the planet is considered space junk. Something that doesn't currently have a purpose and doesn't have a purpose in the foreseeable future. Millions of tiny space debris like dust flex of paint from rocket a rogue toothbrush. A glove lost by astronaut. On a spacewalk there even some entire antique rocket bodies and defunct retro satellites from as early as the late fifties two experimental satellites koto deca poll one and decca paul to sometimes called porcupine one and two because they have seven foot antennas so they look like sections and then not working anymore that technically space jam. I cost quite loves him. Wind satellites like dudek apple one and two and many many other spacecraft from decades ago designed to go up the weren't really designed to come down and while it's cool they're up there all of these obsolete zipping around earth orbit can also be cause for concern they might lead to space collisions festival that can cause extensive spice crops. Stop working second of all every collision create small bits of debris whether those dust grains or large chunks. This is why they some coal space junk. Zombie satellites Like the after the electronic brains of the welcome satellites. the company controls. The dislike Today luckily there are few different ways to care for the bodies of dead space craft a lot of what lives in low earth orbit especially smaller. Satellites are guided down through kind of sudden cremation deliberately dragged into the atmosphere. Where the almost immediately burn up those in geostationary on that outer lane of the track fees a much quieter colder and to their lives. They're sent into the graveyard orbit over thirty six thousand kilometers up over twenty two thousand miles above the earth's surface. The has been convention that when a pesco gets to the end of its live enough you'll be left in it to push it higher into the graveyard obits or it'll be out of the way the satellite.

beach myrtle beach dr alice flinders university myrtle beach Gorman tesla south carolina south australia ray decca paul lois football us apple
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on The Science Show

"The side show on aren. Great big loud noises and it's worse at see. This is what lisa gershwin had to say about it last week. Make no mistake. The biggest problem for dolphins is noise. Salmon farming has turned quiet bays into unrelentingly noisy industrial sites where big ships and heavy machinery are at all hours. It is creating a serious mental health crisis for human locals so imagine the effect on dolphins use echo location or sound frequencies in all aspects of their life from finding food to social cohesion and on top of that deafening thrown. The salmon industry sets off up to about forty thousand underwater cracker bombs a year to deter seals these explosives shatter bones rupture eardrums and her nate brain tissue. So imagine what they do to the echo. Location of dolphins in victoria the threats. This dolphin faces are largely environmental disease climate pollution but in tasmania what should be its refuge. It faces completely manageable. Human threats ships news twenty four seven machinery noise twenty four seven and forty thousand underwater seal bombs a year. Lisa given in hobart christine albert is the director of the center for marine science and technology at curtin university in perth and she trained as a physicist. So why now go marine by accident. Totally back accident. I literally overheard two. Professors cussing on underwater noise and whether it interferes with the communication amongst beluga whales enough. Oh my goodness this is crazy and just stopped and said hey you know. I'm a physicist. I can do this project. So that's got into to acoustical oceanography. Tell me that story about your going out into the ocean sailing. Say with students and you lower the microphone or whatever. It is into the water. What happens so when you take students out for the first time into the ocean and you go off shore so far that you just don't see any land anymore and then you stop the vessel and you look around and you see nothing but water and then we put a hydrofoil which is essentially an underwater microphone bluetooth proof microphone into the water and we put our headphones on and we listen and you hear ships ships all over the place and then you get these big highs and students looking all around. Where is the we can't see it. And then we await twenty minutes and then you can see the ship on the horizon. And that's the first experience. I was students kid with how well sound propagates underwater. So in you might hear sounds over a few hundred meters and the water. You're here sounds of tens or hundreds of kilometers water so dense so sound propagates so well. Underwater uae is density important density affects the way. That sounds propagates. So the more densely pack your molecules are of the medium in which you want to propagate the zone the fast and the bitter. The sound propagates. But i had no idea. He traveled fifty one hundred kilometers. Yes so we can hear ships over tens to hundreds of kilometers we can he has is make surveys over those distances so some people have recorded the sound of seismic surveying over thousands of kilometers in australia. In fact with a hydrophone of cape lewin just off the southern part of western australia. We can listen to. I spray cup from antarctica so that six thousand kilometers away and we can listen to individual is events. How do you know so. They actually have intellect distant. How can you tell we can tell direction. So if you have more than one hydrophone in the water you can do what we could been forming and you can actually figure out where the sound came from. But how have you developed the sound sensitive devices to work even better these days so underwater acoustic recorders have been around for hundred years. But these days you can. Just take your iphone. Put it in a ziplock bag and dangling over the side of boat and if you do that let's say here in the one river you will be amazed. You'll hear dolphins whistling. You will hear fishes singing so male fitch by come together on the spawning grounds. And they call us in order to attract the females. So if you do this you will suddenly find yourself in a completely different world acoustically underwater and presumably they need to hear each other accurately and what you found that the sounds. We propagate interfere with this exactly so depending on your species. They need to communicate over different ranges. So fishers will only communicate over a few hundred meters kilometers possibly but solitary wales. They actually need to communicate a very long distances in order to find their mates so then any noise that we put into the ocean for example from shipping or from naval testing or from shore resource development potentially interferes with sound usage by these animals. Malkin you do about that. We can make things quieter we can perhaps candu exploration activities so they happen in a season of this abundance so the great whale. It's great so we have them in australia. During the winter months and then in the summer they go down to the southern ocean to enact so depending on what you're about to do in the ocean caps can y'all it so that it happens when the animal's not here when you suggest that what the people who've got chips and other things say are they willing to do it or not is so we find that in general sort of industry quite happy. I mean nobody wants to show these animals away so we certainly find people come to us for advice wind. Should we do this. And what can we do to make our operations quieter. The shipping industry for example the the different companies come together in the i am also of the international maritime organisation. They are interested in making vessels quieter. They're different international working groups looking at how to make vessels quieter. So don't going in the right direction and if you make lots of noise you're using lots of energy and if you come back you save exactly exactly so any energy that we put into the ocean in the form of noise is a loss of energy. Yeah you might as well use that for propulsion except some people like a lot of noise. Now between you and me as we're alone will. I am standing in the street and their traffic lights. Lots of traffic about to take off and two guys on two motorbikes. That is so loud. You can almost feel the building shake and they seem to love that terrible noise. Why what makes mainly men actually going for that sort of thing. You know very good question. But we see that in the ocean to people living their boat engines and people revving the engines of their jetskis. They actually are papers on. How annoying sound is so from people who live near the coast. So they complain about this revving noise of boats motorboats and jetskis and i'm sure many animals underwater this equally annoying near neon yao samat power making big noise and you don't care. People in effective people get annoyed is even better isn't it. Maybe i don't know can't relate to that one a where is your work going next the different aspects to it so we're working actually on research to understand the effects that different types of noise has on animals so it can interfere with communication. Actually loud events can temporarily deafened animals or we're doing research in that area. We ought so trying to just understand the general soundscape. So mapping noise underwater. We also work on natural noise so the ocean is naturally very noisy. It's not just our ships which makes the ocean noisy. And that's because the ocean is the doc place so animals. Actually you put a lot of noise into the ocean and then the natural environment just wind blowing over the ocean surface. So you see whitecaps right. These little gas bubbles which the wind introduces into the top layer of the ocean. Every bubble creates noise because it vibrate. So there's a lot of natural noise in the ocean as i said earlier like ice cracking from antarctica. So we're trying to understand the balance. What's the noise budget. In a how much noise we put in the ocean but also put it into context. Did you have any idea when you're doing physics that it would lead to this. No no no no no no opportunities arising you stepped identifying grab them professor christine who tried to germany and in canada and now resides in perth at curtin university..

australia lisa gershwin canada iphone germany tens two guys Lisa last week christine twenty minutes six thousand kilometers christine albert tasmania antarctica fifty one hundred kilometers hundreds of kilometers wales two hundred years
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

07:41 min | 1 year ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Russia mean just finally then as we look ahead to these elections due in september. And i think it's fair to say that few if any russian mike is taking bets on the result but nonetheless other people in charge concerned about what these elections might portend not necessarily defeat at the polls but yeah outbursts of public anger at the way things are going the very concerned. Yes i mean. This is why they're trying to get their retaliation now. Well well ahead of the elections. They're afraid that could be mass boycotting the elections they will be stuffing the ballot boxes. They've done that all along. But even so if you get more people again on on social media trying to clamp down on social media because they know that people will be sharing things saying well no. We didn't go vote because there's no one vote for that. They are very worried about what even if they stop people from standing as candidates who they never be opposed to them the the the people and particularly the younger generation has still got method. And saying we don't like what's going on stephen. Dl thanks as always for joining us. That was the russia analyst. Stephen deal you're listening to the briefing. Here is monica's us rebelo. With the days of the headlines thanks. Andrew israeli opposition parties have agreed to form a new government. That would end. Benjamin netanyahu's twelve year stint as prime minister on their rotation arrangement right-wing politician naphtali bennett would serve as prime minister before handing over to the centrist yard lopate. Taiwan has called on china to embark upon real political reform rather than avoid facing up to nineteen eighty nine tiananmen square. Crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators. In beijing. tomorrow marks. Thirty two years since chinese troops open fire to win. Student-led led unrest in and around a square tokyo. Two thousand twenty president. Seiko hashimoto. says she is one hundred percent certain the olympics will go ahead but warned. The games must be prepared to proceed without spectators. In the event of coronavirus outbreak. There are fifty days until the delay. Tokyo games begin on the twenty third of july and portugal has announced the completion of a new undersea cable that stretches to north eastern brazil the six thousand kilometer transatlantic cable will reduce latency. Which is time it takes data to get to its destination by around fifty percent in can find out more at monaco. Dot com forward slash. Minute does today's headlines back to you. Andrew thank you. You are listening to the briefing on monocle. Twenty four with me andrew mullet now there is much that remains to be understood about the sent to the us presidency of donald trump and which may require understanding all over again. Should he seek to get his old job back in two thousand and twenty four but one of the more baffling questions of this particular. Saga is the one of the barely bridled. Enthusiasm for trump professed by america's lodge noisy and powerful block of conservative christian evangelicals. Who did not seem a natural constituency for a candidate who was among many other apparent to terrence godless. Philanderer compulsive liar and chronic. Materialist joining me now. Is sarah posner. An investigative journalist and expert on the intersection of religion and politics. Her new book is called unholy. Why white evangelicals worship at the altar of donald trump. Sarah of festival. I think we should. We should probably try to establish a baseline here. Which is did the van. Jellicoe is do you think. Regard trump with any more or less enthusiasm enthusiasm than they would have regarded any of the republican candidate. They absolutely dead White evangelicals in the united states are predominantly republican there reliably seventy five to eighty percent of them vote republican and that was true with trump where about eighty percent of them voted for him but they did so far more enthusiastically than they would have or they did For george w bush john mccain or mitt. romney. I mean. I know the question. The answer to this question has literally filled a book. A either one. You've written boot. Why there are so many obvious reasons why you would think serious churchgoing family values conservative would be absolutely repelled by donald trump. Well as it turns out what they liked about. Donald trump is. He spoke to their social and cultural grievances in a way that really appealed to them his anti-democratic small schmaltzy impulses. Were exactly what they were looking for. He came along at a moment when they thought that their political and social issues abortion. Lgbtq rights separation of church and state. They're opposed to that were they. Were fearing that. That was slipping away from them. The demographics were against them that public opinion was against them and here came. Donald trump. He spoke to all of their grievances that political correctness and social justice was overwhelming our society and seizing control of our politics and he was willing to do anything to fight back and that really appealed to them and while he his racial grievances and his nativist grievances also appealed to them. It was these things are not separate from one another. I mean it's understandable. I guess up to a point you can see how people with those concerns would swallow a lot of their other objections and just think well. He's a guy who will get things done that we want to see. Get don we don't necessarily have to lock him. And i think most of us have probably cast a vote along those lines at some point in our lives but it it strikes me from having observed the last few years and also from reading your book that it did go beyond that a lot of these people were fully aboard board members of the donald trump cult of personality. They seem to like and him. Yes absolutely i. I think a lot of people mistakenly believe that weight evanger locals were holding their nose to vote for donald trump that they viewed it as a transactional relationship or vote of expedients to get their issues on the agenda but that is not true. They viewed trump as almost a messianic figure They compared him to king cyrus in the bible they compared him to. They said that god often chooses an unlikely figure to lead a nation at a critical juncture in its history so donald trump may not be a christian like us but he's chosen by god to restore a christian america that has been lost to secularism but buddies. All quite mad isn't it. It absolutely is. But i think that you if you look at it at face value. It seems mad. But if you dig beneath the surface and realize that their agenda has been an anti-democratic project from the start on the religious right got motivated in the nineteen seventies nod about abortion but about school desegregation They've been avid fox. News watchers since the advent of fox. News they swallow all of the fox. News Anti immigrant rhetoric. So the idea that they're only concerned about Family values or abortion or lgbtq rights is mistaken..

donald trump Benjamin netanyahu Seiko hashimoto Donald trump naphtali bennett september Stephen Sarah trump fifty days twelve year one hundred percent Andrew six thousand kilometer today sarah posner eighty percent andrew mullet bible north eastern brazil
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on eBikeNews - der Podcast

eBikeNews - der Podcast

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on eBikeNews - der Podcast

"No modest ibert incontinent vixen remedy. We'll put him on. Unsticking apu voided and konta mumbai. Mananger faunas got an winter. Clap moncada as asian super mobility concept lubis Question of friday's e-bikes yound feel familiar. Have can another kenan Who on house dealer on out. Deka management fan Now i have a fun cruiser. i'm gonna owned by its sanity. sophie them off Ambition dimmed to done Cindy come thousand miles. Lanta finished foul mouth atolls and against the on abbad tests taught in hamburg Against started out in about midwest via Yeah it's not super dish. I'd yeah few other who under visits the fda ya closer site muffin biz. Open end apps. would not kill on punishment wounding in an hangar at Relatively blame those mitsu name. Yeah It's as tuition in market. None cruise on by this isn't early on in habitat. Sisley hits shaun's i'd seen yon must monte clannish cat man as extreme hyper desisting on certain Hazardous kite does Wouldn't damage from pawtucket vinod. Cincinnati jewish also fuzzy Taga would it's covered on own-goal going on uncovered some Sick isn't email Now team cruiser as skipjack tatsushi county so feeler rashida running a mocked owned Via haven't met him hadn't album valentine's pot and hang out owned in humble al kayano of six thousand kilometer diversity. Ignorance told bush talk on shined as Medieval ultimas air to feeding or kabc I'm podcast Team on hang out. China stemmed is fine glisten punked e bikes anki owner Some electoral out zone. An-and who's Run dictum name. Niche does e-bikes poss- mum shop guns off. We are that's who he by. Lashing zach humana golf sets on from stratton Von happy fun. Tesla in viduka. Zine the voted as tesla latian get site globus funding. You bike Stack unionism as with these a concept e bikes that you shown told us fat Understand for motored. Daddy stan Focused you understood. Some browse does concept Much past absolute Says it savaged ago. Glauber shell by Calvin chiding the potent Enough to me by zest not ashdod Owned as obama my kinda Sheena invited by vice will fund it at aden Tinashe baas.

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"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on TechStuff

"Weight. Weight material is incredibly helpful. You need to be strong enough to withstand the rigors of launching stuff into space, and you also have to remember. This space is always always always trying to kill you, but you also want the material to be really lightweight, because that reduces the amount of energy. You need to get the darn stuff off earth in the first place, carbon nanotubes have. have been suggested as a possible material for a tether for a space elevator. The space elevator concept is kind of trippy. Essentially, you've got to wait or technically a counterweight like a space station, and it's out in space, and it's tethered to the earth that is anchored somewhere along the equator of the earth and this counterweight. The space station would be way out beyond geostationary orbit. That is way the heck out there. Geostationary orbit is around thirty six thousand kilometers. May the International Space. Station is just at four hundred eight kilometers, so we're really talking deep out there, but the idea is that the centrifugal force on the tether would be equalled by the gravitational pull on the tether, and you would end up with a taut cable that could go up to the stars, or at least out into far orbit, and an elevator would be able to climb that cable, delivering payloads out into space without ever having to load it onto a rocket and blast the stuff up there now there are a lot of engineering challenges. Challenges in the way of ever realizing this technology here on earth among them, finding material strong enough to withstand the crazy amount of force. It would be under some folks that carbon nanotubes be the answer to that. That's just one tiny example pun intended of a possible application for nanotechnology but one. That's really still far off in the future. If it's you know at all a possibility, but in the meantime countless scientists are learning more about what happens on the very small scale, which is great, because it extends our knowledge about how the universe works, and it also gives us the opportunity to leverage that knowledge in fields like chemistry listen. All Science and robotics nanotechnology plays an important role just not one in which we have very teeny tiny robots building stuff atom by we have done some molecular manipulation on that scale, but it's been far more meticulous and human controlled than the SCIFI scenario now. All of this is to say that a lot of the technologies that are marketed as nano-tech are at best misleading. I've seen robots that have been called Nanno. Robots and they're pretty small, but they're not even crossing the micron threshold. Let alone the Nanno scale so I. think that's not really terribly. Terribly accurate, there have been some interesting sensors and switches and things that are on the Nano scale that you could argue fit into Nanna robotics, although it doesn't necessarily match what we classically think of as a robot, but it's still closer at least than these small, but not you know microscopic robots that I see marketed as Nano bots all the time. I'm sure I'm going to do a lot more episodes about nanotechnology. Including specific implementations I mean I didn't even get into bucky balls in this episode. So you know I got to come back to it. In the meantime, if you have suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff whether it's a specific technology company, a person intact. Maybe just a trend. Let me know reach out to me on twitter or facebook, the handle for both of those texts stuff, H. S.. W. And I'll talk to you again. Really soon. Textile is an iheartradio production.

International Space Nanno Nanna robotics twitter facebook
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on TechStuff

"Weight. Weight material is incredibly helpful. You need to be strong enough to withstand the rigors of launching stuff into space, and you also have to remember. This space is always always always trying to kill you, but you also want the material to be really lightweight, because that reduces the amount of energy. You need to get the darn stuff off earth in the first place, carbon nanotubes have. have been suggested as a possible material for a tether for a space elevator. The space elevator concept is kind of trippy. Essentially, you've got to wait or technically a counterweight like a space station, and it's out in space, and it's tethered to the earth that is anchored somewhere along the equator of the earth and this counterweight. The space station would be way out beyond geostationary orbit. That is way the heck out there. Geostationary orbit is around thirty six thousand kilometers. May the International Space. Station is just at four hundred eight kilometers, so we're really talking deep out there, but the idea is that the centrifugal force on the tether would be equalled by the gravitational pull on the tether, and you would end up with a taut cable that could go up to the stars, or at least out into far orbit, and an elevator would be able to climb that cable, delivering payloads out into space without ever having to load it onto a rocket and blast the stuff up there now there are a lot of engineering challenges. Challenges in the way of ever realizing this technology here on earth among them, finding material strong enough to withstand the crazy amount of force. It would be under some folks that carbon nanotubes be the answer to that. That's just one tiny example pun intended of a possible application for nanotechnology but one. That's really still far off in the future. If it's you know at all a possibility, but in the meantime countless scientists are learning more about what happens on the very small scale, which is great, because it extends our knowledge about how the universe works, and it also gives us the opportunity to leverage that knowledge in fields like chemistry listen. All Science and robotics nanotechnology plays an important role just not one in which we have very teeny tiny robots building stuff atom by we have done some molecular manipulation on that scale, but it's been far more meticulous and human controlled than the SCIFI scenario now. All of this is to say that a lot of the technologies that are marketed as nano-tech are at best misleading. I've seen robots that have been called Nanno. Robots and they're pretty small, but they're not even crossing the micron threshold. Let alone the Nanno scale so I. think that's not really terribly. Terribly accurate, there have been some interesting sensors and switches and things that are on the Nano scale that you could argue fit into Nanna robotics, although it doesn't necessarily match what we classically think of as a robot, but it's still closer at least than these small, but not you know microscopic robots that I see marketed as Nano bots all the time. I'm sure I'm going to do a lot more episodes about nanotechnology. Including specific implementations I mean I didn't even get into bucky balls in this episode. So you know I got to come back to it. In the meantime, if you have suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff whether it's a specific technology company, a person intact. Maybe just a trend. Let me know reach out to me on twitter or facebook, the handle for both of those texts stuff, H. S.. W. And I'll talk to you again. Really soon. Textile is an iheartradio production.

International Space Nanno Nanna robotics twitter facebook
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:45 min | 2 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on TechStuff

"Weight. Weight material is incredibly helpful. You need to be strong enough to withstand the rigors of launching stuff into space, and you also have to remember. This space is always always always trying to kill you, but you also want the material to be really lightweight, because that reduces the amount of energy. You need to get the darn stuff off earth in the first place, carbon nanotubes have. have been suggested as a possible material for a tether for a space elevator. The space elevator concept is kind of trippy. Essentially, you've got to wait or technically a counterweight like a space station, and it's out in space, and it's tethered to the earth that is anchored somewhere along the equator of the earth and this counterweight. The space station would be way out beyond geostationary orbit. That is way the heck out there. Geostationary orbit is around thirty six thousand kilometers. May the International Space. Station is just at four hundred eight kilometers, so we're really talking deep out there, but the idea is that the centrifugal force on the tether would be equalled by the gravitational pull on the tether, and you would end up with a taut cable that could go up to the stars, or at least out into far orbit, and an elevator would be able to climb that cable, delivering payloads out into space without ever having to load it onto a rocket and blast the stuff up there now there are a lot of engineering challenges. Challenges in the way of ever realizing this technology here on earth among them, finding material strong enough to withstand the crazy amount of force. It would be under some folks that carbon nanotubes be the answer to that. That's just one tiny example pun intended of a possible application for nanotechnology but one. That's really still far off in the future. If it's you know at all a possibility, but in the meantime countless scientists are learning more about what happens on the very small scale, which is great, because it extends our knowledge about how the universe works, and it also gives us the opportunity to leverage that knowledge in fields like chemistry listen. All Science and robotics nanotechnology plays an important role just not one in which we have very teeny tiny robots building stuff atom by we have done some molecular manipulation on that scale, but it's been far more meticulous and human controlled than the SCIFI scenario now. All of this is to say that a lot of the technologies that are marketed as nano-tech are at best misleading. I've seen robots that have been called Nanno. Robots and they're pretty small, but they're not even crossing the micron threshold. Let alone the Nanno scale so I. think that's not really terribly. Terribly accurate, there have been some interesting sensors and switches and things that are on the Nano scale that you could argue fit into Nanna robotics, although it doesn't necessarily match what we classically think of as a robot, but it's still closer at least than these small, but not you know microscopic robots that I see marketed as Nano bots all the time. I'm sure I'm going to do a lot more episodes about nanotechnology. Including specific implementations I mean I didn't even get into bucky balls in this episode. So you know I got to come back to it. In the meantime, if you have suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff whether it's a specific technology company, a person intact. Maybe just a trend. Let me know reach out to me on twitter or facebook, the handle for both of those texts stuff, H. S.. W. And I'll talk to you again. Really soon. Textile is an iheartradio production.

International Space Nanno Nanna robotics twitter facebook
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:37 min | 2 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Celebrations confirmation that the corona virus can be transmitted from person to person as mid stepped up screening of passengers health both here and abroad Australia is the latest country to announce it'll be checking travelers arriving from Wuhan the central Chinese city where the outbreak started in Brisbane a man who recently returned from what harm has been placed in isolation is being tested for the virus which causes pneumonia lawyers for president trump in the democratic impeachment manages to be making final preparations for his historic trial in the Senate which begins later on Tuesday Mr trump is accused of abusing his office by pressing Ukraine to investigate a political rival from Washington his Jon Sopel don't expect contrition or any please of mitigation when Donald trump's defense sets out their argument cities trial his legal team insist the president did absolutely nothing wrong but before we get twenty of that there's likely to be a lengthy wrangle over the rules under which the trial is going to be conducted Republicans wanted over as quickly as possible saying that each side should get two days to set up their arguments and then often limited questioning a vote on whether witnesses be committed which Republicans are opposing Democrats cool that's a travesty hours before his impeachment trial begins in Washington president trump will address the World Economic Forum in the Swiss ski resorts and devils from James Robbins reports Donald Trump is flying more than six thousand kilometers to be far away from Washington and his trial in the Senate but this annual meeting of the World Economic Forum now in its fiftieth year is substantially devoted to combating global warming during the president's session he will be questioned by the forums founder Klaus Schwab who says the world is facing a state of emergency apart from Donald Trump the other global figure topping the bill will be great to tune Buck the Swedish teenager and climate tech to mist who is among the president's sternest critics a panel appointed by the government in Myanmar has concluded that some of the country's soldiers may have committed war crimes against for him good Muslims but the ministry was not guilty of genocide investigators were probing the twenty seventeen operation in recalling state the displaced more than seven hundred thousand people human rights groups to slam the conclusion as a whitewash report comes days ahead of an international court of justice ruling on the issue of genocide BBC news official figures show that Mexico suffered its bloody STA in modern times in twenty nineteen with a record thirty four thousand five hundred and eighty two homicides the statistics underline the challenge faced only present and just men will Lopez Obrador who has promised to pacify Mexico with a less confrontational approach to security much of the killing is blamed on powerful criminal gangs the Constitutional Court in Thailand has ruled against dissolving one of the country's largest opposition parties after it was accused of opposing the monarchy and it being influenced by a secret international conspiracy a conviction could have seen future full with banned from Thai politics Jonathan head reports that which she is from supporters of future for the party had courses as the judges of the Constitutional Court read out the verdict some cold for prime minister prior channel check to resign the court has a track record of dissolving dissidents political parties on seemingly trivial grounds the bizarre accusations this time that future Ford was allies to a mythical secret society known as the Illuminati in the campaign against the monarchy was judged too flimsy to warrant such punishment this time South Korea is to send a naval units to the strait of Hormuz used to help protection being in the strategic waterway the move follows a cool from the U. S. for helping guiding oil tank is made high tensions with Iran the ministry of defense rests the unit would operate independently from the US led coalition the figures from the you and say that nearly half a billion people what Leslie wants to or not to to the international labor organization also forecast that unemployment will rise by about two and a half million this year it was stagnating global economy the agency believes this has a profound and worrying implications to social cohesion it ends the inequalities due to gender age and geographical location continue to plague the job markets BBC news hello and welcome to the all sour on the BBC world service and this week it's all about jazz.

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Was arrested for firearms possession America is six on the right on the ninety three W. I. peace and the chicks love a good message in a bottle story yeah they're fine art really aren't makes you want to do it I know so listen to this a Massachusetts college kid I just got a response to a message in a bottle that he threw into the ocean when he was ten home my gosh so he's now nineteen and he is a Suffolk university sophomore he put the letter into a glass wine bottle at Long Beach in rock port in August of twenty ten and it was this you know this cute little letter that you write when you're ten years old yeah however reading this please write back and I like apple he my favorite color is this blah blah nine years four thousand miles later someone with the initial first initial G. last name to boys discovered that letter and wrote back I found your message in your bottle on October tenth twenty nineteen on a beach in France between conte and mini zone according to your date August twenty one two thousand nine it will have taken nine years to cover the six thousand kilometers that separates us you have grown a lot during that time ten to nineteen oh my god and then tweeted about.

America Long Beach apple France Massachusetts Suffolk university nine years six thousand kilometers ninety three W ten years
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

08:50 min | 3 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"F. treaty has expired we are now officially out of the I. enough treaty I'm you're gonna hear this portrayed tomorrow morning a very dire terms but without any contacts and so I thought with it keeping some of the walking us out of it and some of the short strokes in the dates and all that I thought I would give you a quick overview of why this is happening and what led to it and it's important right up front for me to remind you that NATO including the secretary general Oldenburg of NATO supports the American decision because the other the twenty seven countries of NATO have agreed I mean for me that the twenty eight other countries of NATO have agreed that the Russians have broken the treaty all the United States did was go through the formal procedure I'm announcing in six months were leaving the treaty the Russians broke it in two thousand seventeen thirty complete denial of this and they're they're taking advantage of making hay the th of the fact that we went through the formal process of announcing we're leaving and they're saying look we get that the Americans are engaging in nuclear rest escalation well the deal is the Russians broke the treaty because the I. N. F. treaty says that the treaty prohibits both parties from possessing producing or flight testing lunch ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges of five hundred to fifty five hundred kilometers that's important that's what's considered intermediate range so we have to take you back to the late seventies for the context of this what led to the I. N. F. tree in and this is at this point academic but both sides agree the US and Russia both agree the inspectors agreed the diplomats agree the generals agree the I. N. F. treaty was the gold standard of treaties it was mutually beneficial it was it was followed and accompanied by a inspection regime that was completely doors open and transparent leaving absolutely no question that both sides had complied and then it was enforced for a thirty two years since nineteen eighty seven so what happened well why did we first get to the I. after he well we went to take you back to the many would say the beginning of the high tide of the Cold War I can nineteen seventy seven Jimmy Carter is president at West Germany is the site of a handful of U. S. and German controlled Pershing missiles on the other side of the border in the Warsaw Pact move but more specifically on Soviet territory the Russians had a new generation of intermediate range ballistic missile called an SS twenty it was on a mobile launcher it can be deployed very quickly it was far more accurate than the missiles of the Russians had up to that point the S. S. four nexus five which each only had one warhead the new SS twenty had three multiple independently targeted reentry vehicles are murmurs in a mobile system and this was a significant escalation because the Soviets got to base this weapon on their own soil this weapon's range was just below the maximum range from the recently signed salt to strategic arms limitation treaty of the mid seventies sea salt treaty said that anything with a fifty five hundred to six thousand kilometer range or greater is a part of the salt two treaty that makes it nice CBM the Russians make sure the SS twenty was not bound by the salt two treaty so the internet is a new class weapon that they had already developed they'd already it but on the blueprints for a couple years they knew that once they agreed on the range limits for the I. C. B. M. tree the sultry they would make the SS twenty just underneath that so now the Russians have deployed a very capable very accurate mobile oil missile Klay deployed quickly launched with three MIRV warheads launched missile and they deployed at on Soviet soil it deployed in western Soviet Union so what does that mean I'm a very rapidly through European political capitals the concern came down that if the Soviets intentionally targeted western Europe with nukes but not the United States it very well may be may be that the US would not enter the war so in other words there's no more deterrent the reason the Soviet Union on the United States never traded ICBMs was because we both had ICBMs and we both targeted each other we knew we knew both sides knew if we see you mass lunch we're gonna launch a retaliatory strike we have US submarines to follow up both sides said that to each other and it worked the sultry in the salt two treaty they worked as well but now the Russians have deployed a nuclear missile that has the range to hit all of western Europe and so from Paris to Bonn Germany to London to Rome European leaders were saying what if the Russians have us a box what if the Russians to launch a first strike but just against western Europe will the Americans retaliate well the reality is with so many American troops on the ground of western Europe of course we would have retaliated however the Europeans didn't exactly by that one of the things European said was well what if the Russians blackmail the Americans what if the with the president after Carter doesn't doesn't have the backbone to stand up to that one of the Americans get out a NATO and we're just left with Russia versus western Europe and they have these nuclear weapons second cover us in the Americans would retaliate and if they don't retaliate there's no deterrent now you see what the problem is the Europeans felt the political leadership felt unless the Americans are able to match that Soviet system but put it in western Europe the Russians are going to think they can launch a first strike against western Europe and there won't be any retaliation from the Americans and so that brought the pressure on Jimmy Carter and then Ronald Reagan to deploy a corresponding system to western Europe because they were the Russians were not about to negotiate anything about the SS twenty and why would they we didn't have any leverage we were gonna threatened to nuke them if they if they didn't destroyer dismantle the SS twenty system and after all the system was on their soil it wasn't in East Germany wasn't in Poland it wasn't anywhere in the Warsaw Pact it was in the Soviet Union it was on Russian soil and so the European started to crap and so the United States responded and how we responded is how we got to the I. N. F. treaty and if you recall all the protests in the eighties from old ladies in England the people are lying down from trains in Germany and Holland they were missing a crucial piece piece of information which is that a deterrent was needed and it was called for by their political leadership this was not Ronald Reagan forcing anything on them so that and more the D. backer of the I. N. F. and how exactly is it that the Russians basically broke the tree Michael survey live the KFI twenty four hour news from at least twenty people were confirmed killed at mass shooting at a Walmart in el Paso Texas number twenty six people have been hurt police have arrested a twenty one year old man for the attack officials say the crime is being investigated as capital murder and possible hate crime more than one hundred fifty acres of rush to burn next to the five freeway template high when the Angeles National Forest near to stick the fire first reported around twelve forty five earlier today this afternoon by someone that said with a black kia Sorrento with burning on the right shoulder the fire now sixty percent contained employees have resumed at John Wayne airport after a power outage caused a full shutdown of the airport for several hours socal Edison lanes of fire at a power substation for the outage it continues for about twelve thousand customers in Irvine in Newport beach could last quite awhile but check out the forecast in your driving the seven ten Hey what's up it's running from the Kane.

fifty five hundred kilometers one hundred fifty acres six thousand kilometer thirty two years twenty four hour twenty one year sixty percent six months
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Now in the weeks that the world has been mocking and celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the U. S. mint moon mission immortalized in the words of Neil Armstrong the first man on the moon to date India has been attempting to make its own leap for mankind in its second lunar mission seven six five four three two one zero one of the the the the news comes a week all straight holes in the shed to blast off due to a technical snag the chairman of the Indian space research organization the I. S. R. O. Kyla it suffered the food Savannah said the charm dry and John Chandrayaan launch had gone better than expected today is not convey what send send in the color of the in India I am extremely happy to announce that he is in the water please wait successfully injected send that to him that defined out of it inside dobby is six thousand kilometer more than one thirty in the net it's better the space she said his agency had bounced back with flying colors off to the aborted first attended your hopes the one hundred and fifty million dollar mission will be the first to land on the moon's South Pole the spacecraft is into the earth's orbit where it will stay for twenty three days before it begins a series of maneuvers that will take it into lunar orbit I love a burglar is a science writer and was the launch this morning India just launch the jump around to circulate into the earth orbit the jump down to settle lake is a very special satellite it is a three in one mission it has an orbiter it has a lan burglary come and it has a role what would you bought on the moon's surface yeah it does for the first time but in the eyes attempting a soft landing on land the body outside so you do the mission which has many important things attached to it India is attempting something which has never done before I'm sort of going to give them for because yeah I was heading towards the sound of the moon very close to the soul when no other country has gone before so it should be a good sites why is it important to India the this is a mission that they should undertake obviously the the outcome of it in terms of the science will be valuable to everybody but why is it important to India it's very important because somebody on one where the mission ridge yonder you will call each and this is a follow up of back I'm AT follow exactly the reasons because the jump right on one mission change the understanding of the lunar history when it discovered water molecules on the moon's surface so this particular mission is a caddy forward because India is searching for water on the moon and this isn't making history in all the ways to do it since the first into planetree expedition is being led by two women that is correct in the women have done well in space sciences they have had to bone missions which they have led but first time any interplanetary mission for India the program director is doctor and bunny thought and the mission director is little got it done jul very able and dedicated scientists from the Indian space research organisation impressive in lots of different ways but I I wonder to what extent there has been talk about this being something that India shouldn't be doing it's still a country that has an enormous amount of policy there still is a huge amounts of inequality and I wonder whether they're all people who are all doing that this amounts of money just under a hundred and fifty million dollars should not be spent on IT space program those are mostly fringe elements mostly outside India who have been asking such questions in India the Indian spacing in she is the daughter yeah because they've been able to deliver what they have almost every dollar spent on the Indian space agency they have given back one and a half dollars to the country it just by India allows its case against that was the science ryssa Indian signs rice Palava about glass condemning me to be a fringe element a quite clearly that just under mind you that if you'd like to tell us what you think about what you hear on our program at B. B. C. news out is the programs to handle that residue is mine if.

six thousand kilometer fifty million dollars fifty million dollar twenty three days
Adrian Steckel, CEO And Richard Branson discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

Bloomberg Surveillance

01:11 min | 3 years ago

Adrian Steckel, CEO And Richard Branson discussed on Bloomberg Surveillance

"Of the companies you just heard about Adrian Steckel is the CEO of one lab a satellite company that is raised nearly three and a half billion dollars to date back twice softbank Airbus Richard Branson's virgin group Adrian thank you so much for joining us so if indeed you believe that internet access is a fundamental human right given the scale in the pace at which you and other companies are operating when do you think that could be a reality internet for all thanks to satellites well we're we're launching satellites starting in December thirty satellites in thirty four per month sometimes thirty six I will have our first phase or systems are giving global coverage by the third quarter of twenty twenty one I will be getting service in some places and and twenty twenty our promises low latency a service angle will coverage and one of the things that happens right now with the with satellite is that people get really clunky service because of the high latency it's just physics right the G. O. satellites or thirty six thousand kilometers away ours are twelve hundred kilometers and you really everybody in the world deserves to have the best

Adrian Steckel CEO Richard Branson Softbank Airbus Thirty Six Thousand Kilometers Twelve Hundred Kilometers Billion Dollars
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:43 min | 3 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Frog. It's coming up to four twenty GMT five twenty in the UK headlines. Erica hito of Japan has become the ceremonial process of abdicating the throne in favor of his son bringing an end to his thirty year reign. You're listening to the newsroom from the BBC World Service. Suv domes future remains in the balances the transitional military council now running the country negotiates with representatives of the protesters who overthrew president al-bashir. It's the third time in military leader has been overthrown by a popular revolution, ensued. Dan, one man, who's followed all this is the award winning journalist module. Muhammad Sally now in his ninety s he began working as a reporter in the nineteen forties James cotton and asked him why the periods of civilian rule hadn't solved Sudan's many problems in a nutshell. They failed to set up unity in diversity because Dan is a very diverse country with a big number of thrives at number of raises, a number of religions and always petition of the intervention by the military. If you go that we have now been independent for sixty three. Fifty two years of them have been law. Nope. Allies by the literally governments and yet to listen to you the civilian periods. Have not always been that much more successful than the miniature ones. No. They were not, unfortunately, for instance, Norma literally redeem falls down unless it has become bankrupt. I at this week was the shirt, which has been the case of a shares government in the last few months. This is the case now therefore they regained that comes after the military government fares is a bunch of three with of problems. So what lessons than could the civilians take assuming we see some sort of civilian military government in the next few days or months, Dan, what lessons should the civilians take from the post points. Number one. They should get all their differences by setting up very Brody alliances. But isn't that possible though, we're ready? We're seeing again the debate between the secularists and the Islamists to name just two positions. This is a divided country. Many ways it is divided country in many ways, but it is only possible to save it if they get over that can you see the military and the deep state of National Congress party civil servants, and so on really handing over power, whether political that's economic from the beginning their target was still have bad people everywhere in the civil service and the armed service in the market this. There are now everywhere. And therefore if you'll want to get rid of the game you have to rebuild again. International powers. Do not have because they stick to a very narrow definition of democracy. They won't elections in a few months dying if you'll have election now, they will get it. When you say, they will get it. You mean, President Bush's old party National Congress? The this is what people with the money with organization before we level the ground. Elections. So is one with become four years. Vision barrier, we really need to level dugout for democratise. Modules mounted say talking to my colleague, James Koppel in Sudan. And I'm off my news desk with Danielle public buildings have been set on fire integrity kalpa the capital of Honduras during a day of protests against the government's plans to restructure public, health and education services. Local media said largely peaceful protests turned violent with Marxist activists, throwing stones and petrol bombs and police using teargas. The demonstrations came during nationwide strikes in schools and hospitals against the reforms latest research into biodegradable plastic bags is found that some remain in perfect working order after being left in the environment for three years. Several in fact could still carry a full bag of shopping. The experiment was carried out by a team from the university of Plymouth here in the UK the lead. Scientist was professor Richard Thompson, really the term should relate in definitions to commercial composting conditions. So I think what. Important here is that we don't muddle up the meanings of these terms and think of them as being something that has environmental relevance in terms of reducing the impacts of marine litter or littering any environment is as sometimes implied. So that's why we ran the tests show that these materials simply don't degrade readily in the natural environment and to thirty one year old Englishman who had played a single continuous game of Minecraft for the fast past five years has said that he's devastated to have finally been killed. Phil Watson was in the most difficult hardcore mode, which meant his character. Couldn't be brought back to life. It walked more than six thousand kilometers and jumped over seven hundred thousand times that Mr Watson said he got a bit fun of myself and eventually became startled by zombie baby. Before being eaten by a spider. He claimed the five-year game was a record. Thank you. And try to take seen university students in South Africa held large protests against plans to hike tuition fees. They wanted the government to deliver on promises of free education the issue of education. It was a big talking point a head of next month's elections, especially with young people. So has anything changed from felony has been finding out. Fifteen in two thousand sixteen a couple of the protests at the university of the box ront here in Johannesburg. It's at the forefront of the nationwide demonstrations against fees. It doesn't incredibly tense time and often ended in caches between students and the police. They were the largest student protests.

Dan UK Sudan BBC World Service Erica hito Phil Watson president al-bashir Japan National Congress party President Bush Johannesburg James cotton National Congress Muhammad Sally Norma university of Plymouth James Koppel Brody Honduras democratise
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

09:42 min | 3 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"As well as offering a change of seasons the much acre Knox's also brought with a circle superman that happened just four hours after the moment of equinox. The closest since March and the two thousand and it will be another eleven years twenty thirty before the two events will gain be less than a day apart. Well, just think of that we now closer to twenty thirty what want to the thousand a by the way, this was also the third and final superman for twenty nine chain. The term ship moon was invented back in nineteen seventy nine by an astrology not on astronomy for those unfamiliar with the difference between the two and astronomers a person to study space in the cosmos, using the scientific method to learn about the universe and astrologer is a person uses inaccurate positions. Constellations planets and other celestial bodies at different times in order to tell people about the character would have predict the future has never ever ever ever ever ever. Been any scientific evidence. Supporting any of the claims made by strategy and its success depends exclusively on the Gulf ability of people now back to the science on average the moon orbits about three hundred eighty four thousand four hundred kilometers from earth. But the moon's orbit around the earth isn't a perfect circle. It's slightly elliptical. Meaning one part of the orbit will be closer to the earth. Bet. Three hundred fifty seven thousand kilometers is parody. And the other part of the oil, but will be further away around four hundred and six thousand kilometres apogee, the differences about five percent closer or further away on average the exact distances of perishing apogee, also very other factors such as whether the lunar orbits long axes pointed towards the sun. Also, the moon's Ogle extremes a greatest between November and February when the earth, oh, but places the planet and its moon close into the sun, you say earth orbit itself is also elliptical by that two percent. And they will the sun's gravitational influence is greatest during these months, technically. These would be Jane full moons but trend to its east terms like what use the description of super moon to describe any Newell full moon with a ninety degrees of parody syncing opportunity. Nassar's now adopted this term as a means of educating the public about astronomy twenty nineteen will be an excellent year to look to the sky and enjoy the spectacular view of earth's nearest neighbor. The moon fifty years ago, we witnessed one of humankind's most, remarkable achievements. When we first step foot on the dusty surface of the moon. All for man. By ugly. As NASA continue celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo program. The year is opening with a number of opportunities to marvel at earth's original satellite, three super moons, and a total lunar eclipse in the span of three months. So what is it that makes a super moon super start with size? The moon orbits around the earth in a slightly oval shape at its furthest point away from us known as the apogee it's about two hundred fifty thousand miles or four hundred thousand kilometers from earth when it's closest to us. It's parody. The moon is about two hundred twenty thousand miles or three hundred fifty thousand kilometers away when the moon is full at or near its parody. It is considered a super moon and can appear up to fourteen percent larger and thirty percent brighter than it apogee. Those distances however are changing as the moon is slowly. Shifting away from earth how slowly approximately two inches or five centimeters annually a billion years from now the moon will take about thirty one and a half days to orbit the earth. Instead of today's twenty seven point three days. In the meantime, this year's first superman of the year occurred on January twenty first and also featured a total eclipse, the second occurred on February nineteenth and sky watchers. Another chance on March twenty first well, super moons. Total lunar eclipses are marvels to behold. A question rises fifty years after humankind's first steps on the moon. Does it hold anymore secrets for NASA? Scientists Noah petro project, scientists for the lunar reconnaissance orbiter or El aro at nestles Goddard Space Flight center says there are many unanswered questions about the moon. For example, we are still attempting to understand how the moon evolved to its current state. The moon has occupied space near earth for its entire four and a half billion year history. Keeping record of the impacts that have scarred on its surface over time. This record of anxious impacts is largely erased from the earth due to win water in plate tectonics analysis of Apollo samples shows that there was a period of intense impact cratering on the moon early in the history of the solar system and therefore on the earlier as well observations from L our show now in its ninth year of orbiting the moon or helping us piece together this history people say shoulda moons, especially big in brunt compare to regular full moons, but will a can be around fourteen percent lodge and thirty percent broader, you really wouldn't notice the difference unless someone told you and even then any size difference perceptions. You do have will be more likely GTO imagination in reality, you'd really need proper non-legal equipment to Mitch the difference. And remember the full moon always looks lodge and Bryant when it's near the horizon and a fake none as men allusion. The other important point member is. That Superman's not all that uncommon. They usually current groups of three roughly about every thirteen months in eighteen days. In other words, roughly every fourteenth full moon will be superman now one consequence of superman that should be noticeable involves ocean tides many factors influence title heights at a given location that they usually highest something that a spring tides during full moons or new moons when the earth sun and moon are all aligned so a parody moon being big plus than average should result in a slightly higher high tide.

Stewart Gary NASA European Space Agency Superman Fermi Nassar Max Planck institute secretary Amway Goddard Space Flight center Gabriela Ponti Terry Mitch John Bryant Bill
The Supermoon explained

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

06:10 min | 3 years ago

The Supermoon explained

"As well as offering a change of seasons the much acre Knox's also brought with a circle superman that happened just four hours after the moment of equinox. The closest since March and the two thousand and it will be another eleven years twenty thirty before the two events will gain be less than a day apart. Well, just think of that we now closer to twenty thirty what want to the thousand a by the way, this was also the third and final superman for twenty nine chain. The term ship moon was invented back in nineteen seventy nine by an astrology not on astronomy for those unfamiliar with the difference between the two and astronomers a person to study space in the cosmos, using the scientific method to learn about the universe and astrologer is a person uses inaccurate positions. Constellations planets and other celestial bodies at different times in order to tell people about the character would have predict the future has never ever ever ever ever ever. Been any scientific evidence. Supporting any of the claims made by strategy and its success depends exclusively on the Gulf ability of people now back to the science on average the moon orbits about three hundred eighty four thousand four hundred kilometers from earth. But the moon's orbit around the earth isn't a perfect circle. It's slightly elliptical. Meaning one part of the orbit will be closer to the earth. Bet. Three hundred fifty seven thousand kilometers is parody. And the other part of the oil, but will be further away around four hundred and six thousand kilometres apogee, the differences about five percent closer or further away on average the exact distances of perishing apogee, also very other factors such as whether the lunar orbits long axes pointed towards the sun. Also, the moon's Ogle extremes a greatest between November and February when the earth, oh, but places the planet and its moon close into the sun, you say earth orbit itself is also elliptical by that two percent. And they will the sun's gravitational influence is greatest during these months, technically. These would be Jane full moons but trend to its east terms like what use the description of super moon to describe any Newell full moon with a ninety degrees of parody syncing opportunity. Nassar's now adopted this term as a means of educating the public about astronomy twenty nineteen will be an excellent year to look to the sky and enjoy the spectacular view of earth's nearest neighbor. The moon fifty years ago, we witnessed one of humankind's most, remarkable achievements. When we first step foot on the dusty surface of the moon. All for man. By ugly. As NASA continue celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo program. The year is opening with a number of opportunities to marvel at earth's original satellite, three super moons, and a total lunar eclipse in the span of three months. So what is it that makes a super moon super start with size? The moon orbits around the earth in a slightly oval shape at its furthest point away from us known as the apogee it's about two hundred fifty thousand miles or four hundred thousand kilometers from earth when it's closest to us. It's parody. The moon is about two hundred twenty thousand miles or three hundred fifty thousand kilometers away when the moon is full at or near its parody. It is considered a super moon and can appear up to fourteen percent larger and thirty percent brighter than it apogee. Those distances however are changing as the moon is slowly. Shifting away from earth how slowly approximately two inches or five centimeters annually a billion years from now the moon will take about thirty one and a half days to orbit the earth. Instead of today's twenty seven point three days. In the meantime, this year's first superman of the year occurred on January twenty first and also featured a total eclipse, the second occurred on February nineteenth and sky watchers. Another chance on March twenty first well, super moons. Total lunar eclipses are marvels to behold. A question rises fifty years after humankind's first steps on the moon. Does it hold anymore secrets for NASA? Scientists Noah petro project, scientists for the lunar reconnaissance orbiter or El aro at nestles Goddard Space Flight center says there are many unanswered questions about the moon. For example, we are still attempting to understand how the moon evolved to its current state. The moon has occupied space near earth for its entire four and a half billion year history. Keeping record of the impacts that have scarred on its surface over time. This record of anxious impacts is largely erased from the earth due to win water in plate tectonics analysis of Apollo samples shows that there was a period of intense impact cratering on the moon early in the history of the solar system and therefore on the earlier as well observations from L our show now in its ninth year of orbiting the moon or helping us piece together this history people say shoulda moons, especially big in brunt compare to regular full moons, but will a can be around fourteen percent lodge and thirty percent broader, you really wouldn't notice the difference unless someone told you and even then any size difference perceptions. You do have will be more likely GTO imagination in reality, you'd really need proper non-legal equipment to Mitch the difference. And remember the full moon always looks lodge and Bryant when it's near the horizon and a fake none as men allusion. The other important point member is. That Superman's not all that uncommon. They usually current groups of three roughly about every thirteen months in eighteen days. In other words, roughly every fourteenth full moon will be superman now one consequence of superman that should be noticeable involves ocean tides many factors influence title heights at a given location that they usually highest something that a spring tides during full moons or new moons when the earth sun and moon are all aligned so a parody moon being big plus than average should result in a slightly higher high tide.

Nasa Superman Goddard Space Flight Center Fifty Years Three Hundred Eighty Four Thou Three Hundred Fifty Seven Thou Three Hundred Fifty Thousand K Four Hundred Thousand Kilomete Six Thousand Kilometres Twenty Nine Chain Supermoon
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on The Science Show

"Spice for terrestrial applications and through very exciting time and just following on you mentioned early startups and awards. Sore for women in stem, their number of startups that have come about in a strategy in the last couple of years, and I could name you three CEO's of those keeps that related startups who are women. So we really looking for more women to be involved in spice communication satellites if you get your television via satellite, then you'll have a dish on the started Bahasa points in a particular direction and doesn't move and the reason that that's possible is because the communication satellites orbit the earth at the same rate that the tights. And so it looks to us like those satellites stationary the thirty six thousand kilometers above the surface of the earth. They actually quite a long way away compared to imaging satellites that I mentioned earlier, which are hundreds of kilometers the difference between those two heights is really quite significant you ability to communicate with them. And so on on my own experiences with GPS satellites and they leave at medium earth. But which is about twenty six thousand kilometers, and they tend to rotate about twice a day. Addis you wanna brag prize science writing last year for writing about the idiot ACA, which your wiped out a long time ago, and the fossils that you find actually in the hillsides and talk eulogists dig up and been those that normally go into space how come well. It's too, and I have to out to your archaelogist dinosaurs. Or non human stuff in this humans that eating it as well. But to that you don't normally expect to hear Oculus looking at stuff his Brayson base material, but is set of philosophies and theories and techniques, and there's no reason why it has to be applied to all stuff..

CEO ACA thirty six thousand kilometers twenty six thousand kilometers
"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"six thousand kilometer" Discussed on The Science Show

"Spice for terrestrial applications and through very exciting time and just following on you mentioned early startups and awards. Sore for women in stem, their number of startups that have come about in a strategy in the last couple of years, and I could name you three CEO's of those keeps that related startups who are women. So we really looking for more women to be involved in spice communication satellites if you get your television via satellite, then you'll have a dish on the started Bahasa points in a particular direction and doesn't move and the reason that that's possible is because the communication satellites orbit the earth at the same rate that the tights. And so it looks to us like those satellites stationary the thirty six thousand kilometers above the surface of the earth. They actually quite a long way away compared to imaging satellites that I mentioned earlier, which are hundreds of kilometers the difference between those two heights is really quite significant you ability to communicate with them. And so on on my own experiences with GPS satellites and they leave at medium earth. But which is about twenty six thousand kilometers, and they tend to rotate about twice a day. Addis you wanna brag prize science writing last year for writing about the idiot ACA, which your wiped out a long time ago, and the fossils that you find actually in the hillsides and talk eulogists dig up and been those that normally go into space how come well. It's too, and I have to out to your archaelogist dinosaurs. Or non human stuff in this humans that eating it as well. But to that you don't normally expect to hear Oculus looking at stuff his Brayson base material, but is set of philosophies and theories and techniques, and there's no reason why it has to be applied to all stuff..

CEO ACA thirty six thousand kilometers twenty six thousand kilometers
These 1,000-year-old, blue-specked teeth could rewrite medieval history

Science Magazine Podcast

11:31 min | 3 years ago

These 1,000-year-old, blue-specked teeth could rewrite medieval history

"Where they scrape your teeth, and they take is called dental calculus or tartar off your teeth is that lesson for any. No. But luckily that is a relatively new thing and back in the day. And like medieval times, people were not having their teeth scraped every three to six months, and I say lucky because there's precious information hidden in that dental calculus may be able to learn about the oral microbiomes of the people who live in the past and also about different diseases that they might have had. And now, it's also telling us things about their occupations what they did every day or or kinds of chemicals encountered in their lives. I have Christina Warner here. She's gonna talk about some dental calculus that was contaminated with a blue mineral, so Christina. What did you find these blue particles associated with dental calculus on these remains was when we first saw them? I mean, probably the last thing I would have expected to find we were trying to look at it in house. Yeah. We expected the bacteria has after all calculus is made a plaque dental plaque. Which is made up of bacteria, and we expected to find little bits of food because when you're alive, and you have plaque on your teeth, and you're eating or your smoking or your breathing and pollen all these little things. Get stuck in your plaque overtime, the plaque calcified at mineralized in your mouth from the minerals in your saliva. In fact, it's the only part of your body that fossilising while you're still alive, and this actually happens over and over again these layers actually build up almost like tree rings or layers of an onion. So after you've calcified one layer you'll form another layer that apply can keep doing it. This woman that we looked out. We actually cross section debt, and there were so many layers. It really looked like this calculus hadn't been removed in twenty or twenty five years that had so many layers built on top of each other. But for an archaeologist this is a gold mine. It's like a time capsule that tells the story of of this woman's life. What was the first thought from the group if you know, they saw these little blue flecks in in her teeth under the microscope? We had no idea what it was. We could be some sort of contaminant is there's something in soil. That's blue. Yeah. No, no. There's not we looked into extensively actually blue minerals are very rare. They tend to be things you have to mind from deep in the earth. They don't occur in surface sediments. So we thought well, maybe maybe it's a it's a mineral of some kind, and maybe it's a paint. Because certain was so blue was Royal blue the brightest brightest blew it looked like Robin's eggs tiny little, Robin. I bet it. I was probably as right as right is a pretty common mineral, it's a pretty inexpensive mineral, and it's really widespread across Europe. And it was used by are in the middle ages. I was pretty sure it was as right? It ended up being fairly complicated to identify for a number of reasons. One is as we were looking at it the blue began to fade and disappear. Oh, yeah. This happened over and over again it took a while. I figure out what was happening, and we finally figured it out when you wanna look at calculus under a microscope. You can't just put under microscope. It's too compacted. And you have to break it up and the usual way of doing this is to apply a little bit of weak acid, and it just dissolves the mineral enough to allow the particles to come out. It turns out that many mineral pigments are actually unstable in the presence of acid and they lose their color. That's what we were seeing. So that gave you a clue that maybe it wasn't as right? We'll also breaks down from we actually tested many different reference, pigments and determine which were stable in. Which were not. So like cobalt blues is stable. But as right is not and Lashley was not there, aren't that many lose that were available to the medieval painter, they had a admitted access of the blues that they had available to most blue because of particular element. So cobalt blue is split because cobalt, Azure is blue because of copper, Vivian. I is blue because iron Rapids Lashley, actually, not one mineral. It's a bunch of minerals together. Blue component is called laterite. There's also white minerals in they're called slug apply and also pyrite the golden flex that. People often recognize one thing your paper reminded me of is that in a television show, and they say what is this mineral residue and just handed to the lab and that have hands and back and answer is never that easy. You had to go through a lot of steps to identify. What exactly was going on here on these T? So what were some of the tests that you had to subject this mineral to will the trouble with Lazarie? The blue mineral is that there's nothing unusual. About it. In terms of its elements made up of the same elements that are found in soil just configured very differently into in their mineral structure, and so we use a technique called Rahman spectroscopy which actually allows us to look more at the mineral structure itself, and that we were able to get a very good match for lodge right after we identified the blue crystals as being a match using two different methods for laterite. We thought let's test some of these white particles that ordinarily would completely ignore and they turn out to flog apply laterite and flog pie only Coker together in legislation that gave you that confidence that you what you are looking at. But it's really surprising that that's what you're looking at. It was extremely surprising. This Lashley was one of the most expensive and rarest artists materials of the middle ages. We did not expect to find it. I think it's hard for us understand how expensive it was. And how difficult it would have been to get their lap. Lashley only had one source during the middle ages, and that WAS FG. Anniston? So this pigment had to traveled from its source in Afghanistan overland along the paths of the silk road, basically at through the Islamic world. Whereas probably refined into a pigment traded up into Venice. And then distributed into Europe made in extraordinary six thousand kilometer journey to make it into the mouth of this very ordinary one about that in women. What about that last little bit of the journey? How would it end up in her mouth? I mean, there's no way this could happen completely Occidental's. She must have been exposed in a very intimate way. But help Osprey happen. Now, we spent a long time debating what the possible scenarios could be. I have my favorite. It's not the one that it is my favorite is all the the book kissing that people were doing it. The look if think has so so this is really incredible during the middle ages, but but actually later than the that was eliminated it. Yeah. Yeah. During the fourteenth century, there's this sort of fat. Bad for what they call emotive devotional osculation so says like intense kissing books, and the idea was to become very affectionate with the images. Eventually they started creating these little osculation targets at the bottoms of the pages to try to encourage priests, for example to kiss the target and not the face of Jesus because it was wiping away face that one was discarded because it was it wasn't the timing wasn't right. And let's turn to one of the what are the likely scenarios in which woman would have introduced us into her mouth. So he came up with two of the we thought were more likely that either she was trying to produce a pigment herself. And thus may have inhaled some of the dust, and that was so she would probably producing it either for herself or one of her sisters or she was an artist herself with the first scenario, although it's possible. I don't think it's likely for one reason. And that is because if you just take lapis largely Sony new grind now you'll. Will get a really dull gray pigment. It's not nice. It has too much of the flog pie and other minerals inside that dole the color. So what you have to do is you have to refine it and the technique use to refine lavishly at this time wasn't really known in Europe. It was primarily performed in in the Islamic world. But what I think is probably the most likely is that she was an artist herself, we do know from some artists manuals around the same time that one technique for producing a really fine point for for fine painting work involved. Compressing the the paintbrush between the lips the lap is largely was quite distributed through her mouth zone. It wasn't Dustin one place. It was also really disperse. So it didn't seem to have been incorporated as a paint, for example, if she had kissed it had gotten stuck an also there are some really amazing letters from right around the same time period. Maybe a little bit later. Also in Germany where there is a men's monastery. There's an or Mario. Who is the keeper of the books and he had commissioned the production of several new books from a neighboring women's community. So when you say when you say she was an artist it's more about eliminating manuscripts than it is about making paintings, correct? It was very likely for eliminating manuscripts. Because it was a lot of book production right at this time. It gives evidence that women were producing books and they were producing important books. Yeah. But unfortunately, these letters don't stay which pigments were being used we can tell by the amount of silk, and the amount of parchment that he was sending for these books to be made that they would have been quite nice books. Is there anything else from the grave site or from the ruins of the monastery where where this this remains were or anything else there that would help with that the women's community from the letter was different one. Okay. Not this community. The remains of from a site called doll. Heim doll Heim is located in western Germany and today. It's actually the site of museum about monasteries and the cemetery that we focused on was one of the very associate with one of the earliest religious communities that was founded in this area, and it was a women's community with interesting about all Heim is almost nothing survives at all. Today. You can go and visit and I recommend doing. So it's really fun. But all that's left of the women's community is the stone Dacians, none of the walls. Are there? There's no art that survives. There's not a single book that survives this poor women's community, which at its at its height supported actually, very small group of women. Only about a dozen women live there at any given time it underwent multiple fires burned to the ground multiple times. It was sacked in at least to battle. It was hit by plague and eventually it was abandoned during another war and a non was murdered and the whole community fell apart this was centuries later, and then later a group of monks moved in and they built a monastery, and that's the monastery. That actually release revives there today. And that today is really the museum people go to visit. But you can still find this kind of traces of this little women's what they call a frown closer this little women's monastery, a little women's community still bear the church foundations and the foundations of of the place where they lived, but it's very small kind of tucked away and forgotten. It's like had just been a rate how absolutely race. And so to me that was something that was so interesting is in this totally unexpected context from this very ordinary seeming woman from the cemetery we've been able to identify someone who was likely in live, quite extraordinary person. She must have been a very talented artists, and I say artists here because lapis Lashley was not used by scribes who is not used typically to write words, it was used to illuminate pictures. Wow. That is amazing. So other other remains from the

Lashley Europe Dental Plaque Christina Warner Robin Afghanistan Venice Heim Germany Lazarie Rahman Coker Sony Anniston Stone Dacians Dustin Six Thousand Kilometer Twenty Five Years